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Sample records for active butyrate-degrading microorganisms

  1. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    butyrate degradation.

  2. Detection of extracellular enzymatic activity in microorganisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2015-09-18

    Sep 18, 2015 ... microorganisms with all three enzymatic activities, thereby establishing these techniques as ... supplemented at 1% with vegetable oils, including olive (OLI) ..... cepacia lipase for biodiesel fuel production from soybean oil.

  3. Detection of extracellular enzymatic activity in microorganisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of extracellular enzymatic activity in microorganisms isolated from waste vegetable oil contaminated soil using plate methodologies. Eugenia G. Ortiz Lechuga, Isela Quintero Zapata, Katiushka Arévalo Niño ...

  4. Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism in a thermophilic, anaerobic, butyrate-degrading triculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, B K; Westermann, P

    1987-02-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, K(m), for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hydrogen were 76 muM, 0.4 mM, and 8.5 muM, respectively. Butyrate and hydrogen were metabolized to a concentration of less than 1 muM, whereas acetate uptake usually ceased at a concentration of 25 to 75 muM, indicating a threshold level for acetate uptake. No significant differences in K(m) values for butyrate degradation were found between chemostat- and batch-grown tricultures, although the maximum growth rate was somewhat higher in the batch cultures in which the medium was supplemented with yeast extract. Acetate utilization was found to be the rate-limiting reaction for complete degradation of butyrate to methane and carbon dioxide in continuous culture. Increasing the dilution rate resulted in a gradual accumulation of acetate. The results explain the low concentrations of butyrate and hydrogen normally found during anaerobic digestion and the observation that acetate is the first volatile fatty acid to accumulate upon a decrease in retention time or increase in organic loading of a digestor.

  5. Population dynamics of biofilm development during start-up of a butyrate-degrading fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellner, G.; Geveke, M.; Diekmann, H. (Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie); Conway de Macario, E. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research)

    1991-12-01

    Population dynamics during start-up of a fluidized-bed reactor with butyrate or butyrate plus acetate as sole substrates as well as biofilm development on the sand substratum were studied microbiologically, immunologically and by scanning electron microscopy. An adapted syntrophic consortium consisting of Syntrophospora sp., Methanothrix soehngenii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus or Methanogenium sp. achieved high-rate butyrate degradation to methane and carbon dioxide. Desulfovibrio sp., Methanocorpusculum sp., and Methanobacterium sp. were also present in lower numbers. Immunological analysis demonstrated methanogens antigenically related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, Methanosarcina mazei S6, M. thermophila TM1, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ and Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon in the biofilm. Immunological analysis also showed that the organisms isolated from the butyrate-degrading culture used as a source of inoculum were related to M. soehngenii Opfikon, Methanobacterium formicium MF and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. (orig.).

  6. Effects of heat-activated persulfate oxidation on soil microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsitonaki, Aikaterini; Smets, Barth F.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2008-01-01

    /L). The results emphasize the necessity of using multiple toxicity assays and indigenous cultures in order to realistically assess the potential effects of in situ chemical oxidation on soil microorganisms. A comparison to other studies suggests that the effects of activated persulfate on soil microorganisms...

  7. Toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Banihani, Qais; León, Glendy; Khatri, Chandra; Field, James A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2009-07-01

    Fluoride is a common contaminant in a variety of industrial wastewaters. Available information on the potential toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms implicated in biological wastewater treatment is very limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fluoride towards the main microbial populations responsible for the removal of organic constituents and nutrients in wastewater treatment processes. The results of short-term batch bioassays indicated that the toxicity of sodium fluoride varied widely depending on the microbial population. Anaerobic microorganisms involved in various metabolic steps of anaerobic digestion processes were found to be very sensitive to the presence of fluoride. The concentrations of fluoride causing 50% metabolic inhibition (IC(50)) of propionate- and butyrate-degrading microorganisms as well as mesophilic and thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogens ranged from 18 to 43 mg/L. Fluoride was also inhibitory to nitrification, albeit at relatively high levels (IC(50)=149 mg/L). Nitrifying bacteria appeared to adapt rapidly to fluoride, and a near complete recovery of their metabolic activity was observed after only 4d of exposure to high fluoride levels (up to 500 mg/L). All other microbial populations evaluated in this study, i.e., glucose fermenters, aerobic glucose-degrading heterotrophs, denitrifying bacteria, and H(2)-utilizing methanogens, tolerated fluoride at very high concentrations (>500 mg/L).

  8. Antimicrobial activity of jasmine oil against oral microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaweboon, S.; Thaweboon, B.; Kaypetch, R.

    2018-02-01

    Jasmine sambac is a species of jasmine indigenous to the tropical and warm temperature regions in particular West and Southeast Asia. Essential oil extracted from the flowers of J. sambac has been shown to have anti-oxidant activity. However, very little information regarding antimicrobial activity especially oral microorganisms exists. Objective: To investigate antimicrobial effect of essential oil extracted from flowers of J. sambac against various oral microorganisms. Materials and Methods: Oral microbial strains used in the study were Streptococcus mutans KPSK2, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 5638, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 6363, Klebsiella pneumoniae (clinical isolate), Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Candida krusei ATCC 6258, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019, Candida tropicalis (clinical isolate), Candida glabrata ATCC 90030, Candida pseudotropicalis (clinical isolate) and Candida stellatoidia (clinical isolate). The potential of microbial growth inhibition of the oil was firstly screened by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and then the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by agar dilution method. Results: Jasmine oil showed antimicrobial activities against S. mutans, L. casei, E. coli and all strains of Candida species with the zones of inhibition ranging from 9 to 26 mm and MIC values of 0.19-1.56 %v/v. Conclusion: Results from the present study are scientific evidence to demonstrate that jasmine oil could be employed as a natural antimicrobial agent against oral microorganisms.

  9. Activation of inoculum microorganism from dairy cattle feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuningtyas, Widya D.; Ridwan, Roni; Joni, I. M.; Marlina, E. T.; Harlia, Ellin

    2018-02-01

    Coal produces Coal Bed Methane (CBM) which is formed both biogenically and thermogenically. Lignite is not utilized optimally because it has low heat content and productivity time limit that decreases CBM production. In order to utilize lignite waste, adding inoculum consortium microorganism from dairy cattle waste as starter for biogas process can be a solution. This study aimed to produce inoculum consortium microorganism as biogas starter from dairy cattle feces through in vitro activation process by Theoudorou modification method. The research used complete randomized design with 3 replications. The treatments were blank (R0), 100% concentrate (R1), 70% concentrate+30% grass (R2), 70% grass+30% concentrate (R3) and 100% grass (R4). All treatments were added by buffer solution and feces with ratio of 2:1 into 100 ml serum injection bottle with anaerobic conditions. The parameters observed were gas production, pH and gas kinetics (orskov's equation) for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24 and 48 hours. The results showed that the treatment had significant effect (P <0.05) on the observed parameters. The highest total gas production was for R2 and R3 treatments with total production of 91.17 ml and 101.17 ml, pH (6.62 and 6.57), maximum gas production (94.03 and 97.62 ml), speed of gas production (0.066 and 0.084 ml/hour). There is not a significant difference for both the treatments. The source of inoculum consortium microorganisms for biogas starter selected based on the observed parameters and potential availability of proteolytic and fibrocytic microorganisms is R2 (70% concentrate +30% grass).

  10. DMPD: Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17303405 Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. Takeuchi O, Akira S. Curr ...Opin Cell Biol. 2007 Apr;19(2):185-91. Epub 2007 Feb 15. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signaling pathways activated by microorg...anisms. PubmedID 17303405 Title Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. Auth

  11. Microorganism immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  12. Active microorganisms thrive among extremely diverse communities in cloud water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Amato

    Full Text Available Clouds are key components in Earth's functioning. In addition of acting as obstacles to light radiations and chemical reactors, they are possible atmospheric oases for airborne microorganisms, providing water, nutrients and paths to the ground. Microbial activity was previously detected in clouds, but the microbial community that is active in situ remains unknown. Here, microbial communities in cloud water collected at puy de Dôme Mountain's meteorological station (1465 m altitude, France were fixed upon sampling and examined by high-throughput sequencing from DNA and RNA extracts, so as to identify active species among community members. Communities consisted of ~103-104 bacteria and archaea mL-1 and ~102-103 eukaryote cells mL-1. They appeared extremely rich, with more than 28 000 distinct species detected in bacteria and 2 600 in eukaryotes. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes largely dominated in bacteria, while eukaryotes were essentially distributed among Fungi, Stramenopiles and Alveolata. Within these complex communities, the active members of cloud microbiota were identified as Alpha- (Sphingomonadales, Rhodospirillales and Rhizobiales, Beta- (Burkholderiales and Gamma-Proteobacteria (Pseudomonadales. These groups of bacteria usually classified as epiphytic are probably the best candidates for interfering with abiotic chemical processes in clouds, and the most prone to successful aerial dispersion.

  13. Glyphosate-Degrading Microorganisms from Industrial Activated Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Balthazor, Terry M.; Hallas, Laurence E.

    1986-01-01

    A plating medium was developed to isolate N-phosphonomethylglycine (glyphosate)-degrading microorganisms, with glyphosate as the sole phosphorus source. Two industrial biosystems treating glyphosate wastes contained elevated microbial counts on the medium. One purified isolate metabolized glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid, mineralizing this accumulating intermediate during log growth. This microorganism has been identified as a Flavobacterium species.

  14. Effects of temperature on biological activity of permafrost microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyonova, L F; Novikova, M A; Subbotin, A M; Bazhin, A S

    2015-04-01

    The number and viability of microorganism specimens Bacillus spp. isolated from permafrost soil remained unchanged after incubation at temperatures of -16-37°C. Experiments on F1 CBA/Black-6 mice showed that incubation of bacteria at -5°C for 72 h promotes a decrease in their toxicity and an increase in their immunostimulating effect.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of different disinfectants against cariogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra UZER CELIK

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial effects of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHBM, and octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT on cariogenic microorganisms by using their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC. CHX, PHBM, and OCT were diluted in distilled water to the final test concentrations. Using the in-tube dilution method, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Actinomyces viscosus were cultivated on blood agar and Mueller–Hinton broth (MHB at 37°C for 48 h. They were read using a spectrophotometer to detect MIC. To determine MBC, samples in the range of the turbidity threshold after 24 h were transferred onto blood agar and evaluated for growth after 24 h. Different MICs and MBCs were observed in all disinfectants against each microorganism. The lowest MIC and MBC against S. mutans (60 mg/L were obtained from PHBM. The lowest values against L. rhamnosus (15 mg/L, 30 mg/L, A. viscosus (30 mg/L, and L. acidophilus (15 mg/L, 30 mg/L were determined by OCT. PHBM and OCT have the potential to be replaced with CHX because they were effective against cariogenic microorganisms.

  16. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activity to Investigate Physical Growth Requirements of Microorganisms

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    Michelle Furlong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Standard "cookbook" laboratory activities that are used to teach students the optimal physical growth conditions of microorganisms should be modified so that they more effectively foster student's higher order cognitive skills and attract student interest.  This paper describes a laboratory activity that engages students in an inquiry-based approach to studying the physical growth requirements of microorganisms.  In this activity, students design and implement an experiment to obtain pure cultures of specific microorganisms, with distinct growth properties, that are provided to them in a mixed culture.

  17. Isolation and characterization of aerobic microorganisms with cellulolytic activity in the gut of endogeic earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Ikeda, Kana; Yoshida, Seo

    2012-09-01

    The ability of earthworms to decompose lignocellulose involves the assistance of microorganisms in their digestive system. While many studies have revealed a diverse microbiota in the earthworm gut, including aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms, it remains unclear which of these species contribute to lignocellulose digestion. In this study, aerobic microorganisms with cellulolytic activity isolated from the gut of two endogeic earthworms, Amynthas heteropoda (Megascolecidae) and Eisenia fetida (Lumbricidae) were isolated by solid culture of gut homogenates using filter paper as a carbon source. A total of 48 strains, including four bacterial and four fungal genera, were isolated from two earthworm species. Characterization of these strains using enzyme assays showed that the most representative ones had exocellulase and xylanase activities, while some had weak laccase activity. These findings suggest that earthworms digest lignocellulose by exploiting microbial exocellulase and xylanase besides their own endocellulase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that among the cellulolytic isolates in both earthworm species Burkholderia and Chaetomium were the dominant bacterial and fungal members.

  18. Effects of nickel(II) addition on the activity of activated sludge microorganisms and activated sludge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Soon-An; Toorisaka, Eiichi; Hirata, Makoto; Hano, Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    The effects of Ni(II) in a synthetic wastewater on the activity of activated sludge microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment process were investigated. Two parallel lab-scale SBR systems were operated. One was used as a control unit, while the other received Ni(II) concentrations equal to 5 and 10 mg/l. The SBR systems were operated with FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE modes in the time ratio of 0.5:3.5:1.0:0.75:0.25 for a cycle time of 6 h. The addition of Ni(II) into SBR system caused drastically dropped in TOC removal rate (k) and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) by activated sludge microorganisms due to the inhibitory effects of Ni(II) on the bioactivity of microorganisms. The addition of 5 mg/l Ni(II) caused a slight reduction in TOC removal efficiency, whereas 10 mg/l Ni(II) addition significantly affected the SBR performance in terms of suspended solids and TOC removal efficiency. Termination of Ni(II) addition led to almost full recovery of the bioactivity in microorganisms as shown in the increase of specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and SBR treatment performance

  19. Antibacterial activity of Thai herbal extracts on acne involved microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyomkam, P; Kaewbumrung, S; Kaewnpparat, S; Panichayupakaranant, P

    2010-04-01

    Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of 18 Thai medicinal plants were investigated for their antibacterial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, Stapylococcus aureus, and S. epidermidis. Thirteen plant extracts were capable of inhibiting the growth of P. acnes and S. epidermidis, while 14 plant extracts exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. aureus. Based on the broth dilution method, the ethyl acetate extract of Alpinia galanga (L.) Wild. (Zingiberaceae) rhizome showed the strongest antibacterial effect against P. acnes, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 156.0 and 312.0 microg/mL, respectively. On the basis of bioassay-guided purification, the ethyl acetate extract was isolated to afford the antibacterial active compound, which was identified as 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (1'-ACA). 1'-ACA had a strong inhibitory effect on P. acnes with MIC and MBC values of 62.0 and 250.0 microg/mL, respectively. Thus, 1'-ACA was used as an indicative marker for standardization of A. galanga extract using high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that A. galanga extract could be an interesting agent for further studies on an alternative treatment of acne.

  20. NREL Explains the Higher Cellulolytic Activity of a Vital Microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of a new mode of action by C. thermocellum to convert biomass to biofuels is significant because the bacterium is already recognized as one of the most effective in the biosphere. Researchers found that, in addition to using common cellulase degradation mechanisms attached to cells, C. thermocellum also uses a new category of cell-free scaffolded enzymes. The new discovery will influence the strategies used to improve the cellulolytic activity of biomass degrading microbes going forward. Better understanding of this bacterium could lead to cheaper production of ethanol and drop-in fuels. Also, this discovery demonstrates that nature's biomass conversion behaviors are not fully understood and remain as opportunities for future microbial/enzyme engineering efforts.

  1. Biodegradation of imidazolium ionic liquids by activated sludge microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Maton, Cedric; Stevens, Christian V

    2015-11-01

    Biological properties of ionic liquids (ILs) have been usually tested with the help of standard biodegradation or ecotoxicity tests. So far, several articles on the identification of intermediate metabolites of microbiological decay of ILs have been published. Simultaneously, the number of novel ILs with unrecognized characteristics regarding biodegradability and effect on organisms and environment is still increasing. In this work, seven imidazolium ionic liquids of different chemical structure were studied. Three of them are 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromides, while the other four are tetra- or completely substituted imidazolium iodides. This study focused on the identification of intermediate metabolites of the aforementioned ionic liquids subjected to biodegradation in a laboratory activated sludge system. Both fully substituted ionic liquids and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide were barely biodegradable. In the case of two of them, no biotransformation products were detected. The elongation of the alkyl side chain made the IL more susceptible for microbiological decomposition. 1-Decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide was biotransformed most easily. Its primary biodegradation up to 100 % could be achieved. Nevertheless, the cleavage of the imidazolium ring has not been observed.

  2. Identification of selected microorganisms from activated sludge capable of benzothiazole and benzotriazole transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Katarzyna; Felis, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Benzothiazole (BT) and benzotriazole (BTA) are present in the environment - especially in urban and industrial areas, usually as anthropogenic micropollutants. BT and BTA have been found in the municipal and industrial wastewater, rivers, soil, groundwater, sediments and sludge. The origins of those substances' presence in the environment are various industry branches (food, chemical, metallurgical, electrical), households and surface runoff from industrial areas. Increasingly strict regulations on water quality and the fact that the discussed compounds are poorly biodegradable, make them a serious problem in the environment. Considering this, it is important to look for environmentally friendly and socially acceptable ways to remove BT and BTA. The aim of this study was to identify microorganisms capable of BT and BTA transformation or/and degradation in aquatic environment. Selected microorganisms were isolated from activated sludge. The identification of microorganisms capable of BT and BTA removal was possible using molecular biology techniques (PCR, DNA sequencing). Among isolated microorganisms of activated sludge are bacteria potentially capable of BT and BTA biotransformation and/or removal. The most common bacteria capable of BT and BTA transformation were Rhodococcus sp., Enterobacter sp., Arthrobacter sp. They can grow in a medium with BT and BTA as the only carbon source. Microorganisms previously adapted to the presence of the studied substances at a concentration of 10 mg/l, showed a greater rate of growth of colonies on media than microorganisms unconditioned to the presence of such compounds. Results of the biodegradation test suggest that BT was degraded to a greater extent than BTA, 98-100% and 11-19%, respectively.

  3. Isolation of microorganisms with chinitase, protease and keratinase activities from petroleum contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-Gonzalez, E.; Rojas-Avelizapa, L.; Cruz-Camarillo, R.; Rojas-Avelizapa, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    The most important part in one process of bio-remediation are the microorganisms with the capacities to degrade target compounds, this research is based to find microorganisms hydrocarbon-clastic with enzyme activities to degrade chicken feather (keratinolytic activity) which is also a contaminant and has been used such as sorbent of petroleum and can be composted after the oil spill cleanup is complete, the isolation was also to degrade shrimp waste (chitinolitic and proteolitic activity) which is waste material that can be used in compost or such as sorbent of petroleum too. We isolated mesofilic aerobic microorganisms from mexican soils located in Tabasco, Mexico. We achieved to isolate 105 bacteria from 10 soils, 90% was Bacillus Gram (-) which are common in soils and all were hydrocarbon-clastic, only 7 different bacteria had protease and chitinase activity and 12 bacteria had keratinase activity. So we found three fungi and one actinomycete with capacity to degrade hydrocarbons and presence of chitinase activity. The results of growth and enzyme activities in liquid culture showed that the protease activity was produced between 18 and 48 h in almost all bacteria, the chitinase activity started at 12 h but was slight , only 0.5 U/ml, and the keratinase activity was produced after 6 h of incubation and there were correlation between logarithmic phase of growth and enzymes production. With this study we showed the existence of some enzyme activities from microorganisms that live in hostile habitats. This, can be useful in bio-treatment soils by the possible use of this type of residues that can be bio-degraded at the same time that the hydrocarbons increasing the speed or the quality of cleanup in soils. (authors)

  4. Antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates (ITCs) extracted from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) root against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho-Won; Choi, Kyu-Duck; Shin, Il-Shik

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates (ITCs) extracted from horseradish root was investigated against oral microorganisms: 6 strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans; one strain of yeast, Candida albicans, and 3 strains of anaerobic bacteria, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Clostridium perfringens. The ITCs extracted from horseradish root showed antimicrobial activity against all oral microorganisms by the paper disk method. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the ITCs extracted from horseradish root ranged from 1.25 to 5.00 mg/ml against 6 strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria and one strain of yeast, and 4.17 to 16.67 mg/ml against 3 strains of anaerobic bacteria. The ITCs extracted from horseradish root showed the strongest antimicrobial activity, with a MBC of 1.25 mg/ml, against C. albicans among facultative microorganisms, and 4.17 mg/ml against F. nucleatum among anaerobic bacteria. These results suggest that the ITCs extracted from horseradish root may be a candidate for use as an antimicrobial agent against oral microorganisms.

  5. Environmental parameters altered by climate change affect the activity of soil microorganisms involved in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Itziar; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2017-10-16

    Bioremediation, based on the use of microorganisms to break down pollutants, can be very effective at reducing soil pollution. But the climate change we are now experiencing is bound to have an impact on bioremediation performance, since the activity and degrading abilities of soil microorganisms are dependent on a series of environmental parameters that are themselves being altered by climate change, such as soil temperature, moisture, amount of root exudates, etc. Many climate-induced effects on soil microorganisms occur indirectly through changes in plant growth and physiology derived from increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures, the alteration of precipitation patterns, etc., with a concomitant effect on rhizoremediation performance (i.e. the plant-assisted microbial degradation of pollutants in the rhizosphere). But these effects are extremely complex and mediated by processes such as acclimation and adaptation. Besides, soil microorganisms form complex networks of interactions with a myriad of organisms from many taxonomic groups that will also be affected by climate change, further complicating data interpretation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Peptidomic analysis reveals proteolytic activity of kefir microorganisms on bovine milk proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C.; Citerne, Florine; Tian, Tian; Silva, Vitor L. M.; Kalanetra, Karen M.; Frese, Steven A.; Robinson, Randall C.; Mills, David A.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Scope The microorganisms that make up kefir grains are well known for lactose fermentation, but the extent to which they hydrolyze and consume milk proteins remains poorly understood. Peptidomics technologies were used to examine the proteolytic activity of kefir grains on bovine milk proteins. Methods and results Gel electrophoresis revealed substantial digestion of milk proteins by kefir grains, with mass spectrometric analysis showing the release of 609 protein fragments and alteration of the abundance of >1,500 peptides that derived from 27 milk proteins. Kefir contained 25 peptides identified from the literature as having biological activity, including those with antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, opioid and anti-oxidative functions. 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified the principle taxa in the culture as Lactobacillus species. Conclusion The model kefir sample contained thousands of protein fragments released in part by kefir microorganisms and in part by native milk proteases. PMID:26616950

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Arctium lappa constituents against microorganisms commonly found in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Juliana Vianna; Bergamo, Débora Cristina Baldoqui; Pereira, José Odair; França, Suzelei de Castro; Pietro, Rosemeire Cristina Linhares Rodrigues; Silva-Sousa, Yara T Corrêa

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial activity of rough extracts from leaves of Arctium lappa and their phases. The following microorganisms, commonly found in the oral cavity, specifically in endodontic infections, were used: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The agar-diffusion method allowed detection of the hexanic phase as an inhibitor of microbial growth. Bioautographic assays identified antimicrobial substances in the extract. The results showed the existence, in the rough hexanic phase and in its fractions, of constituents that have retention factors (Rf) in three distinct zones, thereby suggesting the presence of active constituents with chemical structures of different polarities that exhibited specificity against the target microorganisms. It may be concluded that the Arctium lappa constituents exhibited a great microbial inhibition potential against the tested endodontic pathogens.

  8. Peptidomic analysis reveals proteolytic activity of kefir microorganisms on bovine milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; Citerne, Florine; Tian, Tian; Silva, Vitor L M; Kalanetra, Karen M; Frese, Steven A; Robinson, Randall C; Mills, David A; Barile, Daniela

    2016-04-15

    The microorganisms that make up kefir grains are well known for lactose fermentation, but the extent to which they hydrolyze and consume milk proteins remains poorly understood. Peptidomics technologies were used to examine the proteolytic activity of kefir grains on bovine milk proteins. Gel electrophoresis revealed substantial digestion of milk proteins by kefir grains, with mass spectrometric analysis showing the release of 609 protein fragments and alteration of the abundance of >1500 peptides that derived from 27 milk proteins. Kefir contained 25 peptides identified from the literature as having biological activity, including those with antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, opioid and anti-oxidative functions. 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified the principle taxa in the culture as Lactobacillus species. The model kefir sample contained thousands of protein fragments released in part by kefir microorganisms and in part by native milk proteases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of selected marine macroalgae against some pathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Omer Abdalla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of six marine macroalgae belonging to green algae (Chlorophyceae, brown algae (Phaeophyceae and the red algae (Rhodophyceae collected from the intertidal area of the Sudanese Red Sea coast near Port Sudan. Methods: Methanol was used for extracting the active principles of the algae and the disc diffusion method was performed to examine the activity and the minimum inhibitory concentration of the samples against four pathogenic bacteria and two fungi. Results: All tested algal extracts exhibited considerable bioactivity and inhibited the growth of all pathogenic microorganisms under investigation. The green alga Caulerpa racemosa produced the maximum inhibition zone (21 mm against Candida albicans while the red alga Laurencia papillosa showed low antimicrobial activity with the minimum inhibition zone of 10 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested algal extracts did not show any special antimicrobial influence on the selected microorganisms when they were considered as Grampositive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi but the most efficient methanolic extracts in inhibiting microbial growth were those of green macroalgae followed by the brown and the red macroalgae respectively. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that the tested marine macroalgae from Sudanese Red Sea coast may represent a potential and alternative source for secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity.

  10. Optimized dispersion of ZnO nanoparticles and antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Espitia, Paula Judith; Ferreira Soares, Nilda de Fátima; Teófilo, Reinaldo F.; Vitor, Débora M.; Reis Coimbra, Jane Sélia dos; Andrade, Nélio José de; Sousa, Frederico B. de; Sinisterra, Rubén D.; Medeiros, Eber Antonio Alves

    2013-01-01

    Single primary nanoparticles of zinc oxide (nanoZnO) tend to form particle collectives, resulting in loss of antimicrobial activity. This work studied the effects of probe sonication conditions: power, time, and the presence of a dispersing agent (Na 4 P 2 O 7 ), on the size of nanoZnO particles. NanoZnO dispersion was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) and characterized by the zeta potential (ZP) technique. NanoZnO antimicrobial activity was investigated at different concentrations (1, 5, and 10 % w/w) against four foodborne pathogens and four spoilage microorganisms. The presence of the dispersing agent had a significant effect on the size of dispersed nanoZnO. Minimum size after sonication was 238 nm. An optimal dispersion condition was achieved at 200 W for 45 min of sonication in the presence of the dispersing agent. ZP analysis indicated that the ZnO nanoparticle surface charge was altered by the addition of the dispersing agent and changes in pH. At tested concentrations and optimal dispersion, nanoZnO had no antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Listeria monocytogenes. However, it did have antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger. Based on the exhibited antimicrobial activity of optimized nanoZnO against some foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, nanoZnO is a promising antimicrobial for food preservation with potential application for incorporation in polymers intended as food-contact surfaces.

  11. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against microorganisms grown in planktonic and sessile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, V; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Nostro, A; Cellini, L; Di Giulio, M

    2015-12-01

    The failure of traditional antimicrobial treatments is becoming a worldwide problem. The use of Aloe vera is of particular interest for its role as curative agent and its efficacy in complementary therapies for a variety of illnesses. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of A. vera inner gel against a panel of microorganisms, Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. In addition to A. vera inner gel being used in the treatment of peptic ulcers, in dermatological treatments, and wound healing, it was also tested on the sessile phase of clinical Helicobacter pylori strains (including multi-drug-resistant strains) and on planktonic and sessile phase of Staphylococcus aureus/Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from venous leg ulcers.A. vera inner gel expresses its prevalent activity against Gram-negative bacteria and C. albicans in respect to Gram-positive bacteria. The results of the A. vera antibiofilm activity showed a decrease of the produced biomass in a concentration-dependent-way, in each analyzed microorganism. The data obtained show that A. vera inner gel has both an antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity suggesting its potential use for the treatment of microbial infections, in particular for H. pylori gastric infection, especially in case of multi-drug-resistance, as well as for an effective wound dressing. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. VISUALIZATION OF BIOCHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF MICROORGANISMS GENUS AEROCOCCUS SPECIES AEROCOCCUS VIRIDANS

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    Stepansky DO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aerococci are catalase-negative Gram-positive microorganisms, widespread in the environment, in the cold-blooded microbiocenoses [1, 2] and warm-blooded organisms [3]. Currently, there are seven species of the Aerococcus genus [4]. Type A. viridans got its name as a result of greening blood agar around the growing colonies. It was found that one of the products of A. viridans growth is hydrogen peroxide, has an antagonistic effect on various kinds of bacteria "in vitro" and "in vivo" [5]. It was subsequently found that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical are produced as a result of NAD-independent lactatoxidase [6,7] and piruvatoxidase functioning[8]. The oxidative ability of A. viridans is a distinctive feature and allows to visualize these properties using a specific indicator medium [9]. We have developed an indicator that enables to visualize oxidation and reduction properties of aerococci. Material & methods. Auto-symbiotic cultures of A. viridans was used for studying of oxidase - reductase activity, inoculated from human body, an industrial strain of A. viridans 167, used for the preparation of "A-bacterin", culture of Aureobasidium pullulans B5, isolated from the soil and having glucose oxidase activity [10]. Designed indicating medium were also tested in the inoculation of aerococci crops, having lactatoxidase activity of biomaterials from birds and mammals. As a basis for the indicating media (IM IM1 media was selected with following composition (g per 1 liter of water Iodide / potassium 26.0 Soluble starch 10.0 Nutrient agar 30.0 For visualization of oxidase-reductase activity of aerococci acellular components IM4 was developed based on IM3, in which distilled water after double purification was used instead of tap water and highly purified agar-agar was used instead of standard nutrient agar. Results & discussion. IM1 is used to test the oxidative properties of aerococci crops. IM manifests the appearance of a dark

  13. Use Of Amino Acid Racemization To Investigate The Metabolic Activity Of ?Dormant? Microorganisms In Siberian Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A.; McDonald, G.

    2002-12-01

    search for extraterrestrial life or its remnants is based on studying the most probable environments in which life (extant or extinct) may be found, and determining the maximum period of time over which such life could be preserved. The terrestrial permafrost, inhabited by cold adapted microbes, can be considered as an extraterrestrial analog environment. The cells and their metabolic end-products in Earth's permafrost can be used in the search for possible ecosystems and potential inhabitants on extraterrestrial cryogenic bodies. The study of microorganisms (or their remnants) that were buried for a few million years in permafrost provides us with a unique opportunity to determine the long-term viability of (micro)organisms. We have analyzed the degree of racemization of aspartic acid in permafrost samples from Northern Siberia (Brinton et al. 2002, Astrobiology 2, 77), an area from which microorganisms of apparent ages up to a few million years have previously been isolated and cultured. We find that the extent of aspartic acid racemization in permafrost cores increases very slowly up to an age of approximately 25,000 years (around 5 m depth). The apparent temperature of racemization over the age range 0-25,000 years, determined using measured aspartic acid racemization rate constants, is ?19 C. This apparent racemization temperature is significantly lower than the measured environmental temperature (?11 to ?13 C), and suggests active recycling of D-aspartic acid in Siberian permafrost up to an age of around 25,000 years. This indicates that permafrost organisms are capable of repairing some molecular damage incurred while they are in a ?dormant? state over geologic time.

  14. A Quantitative Assessment of the Morphofunctional Activity of the Population of Mast Cells Exposed to Biotechnological Strains of Microorganisms

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    Natalia Sheina

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the sensitizing properties of bacteria, micromycetes and actinomycetes, the morphofunctional activity of the population of mast cells was tested in rats exposed to biotechnological microorganisms. The result showed the high informative value of the test of peritoneal must cell degranulation. Both the result and the intensity of the response of mast cells to the exposure to the tested strains depend on the taxonomy of microorganisms, their concentration and the mode of inoculation. The test of peritoneal must cell degranulation can be recommended for assessing the biological safety of industrial microorganisms.

  15. Phenolic profile and antimicrobial activities to selected microorganisms of some wild medical plant from Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Hleba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the methanol extracts of Tussilago farfara (T. farfara, Equisetum arvense, Sambucus nigra (S. nigra and Aesculus hippocastanum. Methods: The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against Enterococcus raffinosus, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia rubidaea, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus epidermis were determined by the microbroth dilution method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, while the concentrations of main phenolic acids and flavonoids in the form of trimethylsilyl ethers were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The probit analysis was used for statistical evaluation. Results: Of the 4 plant tested, all extracts showed a significant antimicrobial activity against one or more species of examined microorganisms. The most active antimicrobial plant extract was gathered from T. farfara, followed by Aesculus hippocastanum and Equisetum arvense. The extract from S. nigra showed no antimicrobial effects. The flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, as well as several phenolic acids (p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid were identified in all extracts. The highest concentrations of bioactive compounds were detected in the extracts of T. farfara (9 587.6 µg/mg quercetin and 4 875.3 µg/mg caffeic acid as well as S. nigra (4788.8 µg/mg kaempferol. Conclusions: We can state that the methanolic plant extract of T. farfara showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as other tested microorganisms. At the same time, a good antimicrobial activity was found in the other medical plant extracts as well. No antimicrobial effect of the S. nigra extract was found with respect to the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus raffinosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  16. Optimized dispersion of ZnO nanoparticles and antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Espitia, Paula Judith; Ferreira Soares, Nilda de Fatima, E-mail: nfsoares1@gmail.com [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil); Teofilo, Reinaldo F. [Federal University of Vicosa, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Vitor, Debora M.; Reis Coimbra, Jane Selia dos; Andrade, Nelio Jose de [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil); Sousa, Frederico B. de; Sinisterra, Ruben D. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Medeiros, Eber Antonio Alves [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Single primary nanoparticles of zinc oxide (nanoZnO) tend to form particle collectives, resulting in loss of antimicrobial activity. This work studied the effects of probe sonication conditions: power, time, and the presence of a dispersing agent (Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}), on the size of nanoZnO particles. NanoZnO dispersion was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) and characterized by the zeta potential (ZP) technique. NanoZnO antimicrobial activity was investigated at different concentrations (1, 5, and 10 % w/w) against four foodborne pathogens and four spoilage microorganisms. The presence of the dispersing agent had a significant effect on the size of dispersed nanoZnO. Minimum size after sonication was 238 nm. An optimal dispersion condition was achieved at 200 W for 45 min of sonication in the presence of the dispersing agent. ZP analysis indicated that the ZnO nanoparticle surface charge was altered by the addition of the dispersing agent and changes in pH. At tested concentrations and optimal dispersion, nanoZnO had no antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Listeria monocytogenes. However, it did have antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger. Based on the exhibited antimicrobial activity of optimized nanoZnO against some foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, nanoZnO is a promising antimicrobial for food preservation with potential application for incorporation in polymers intended as food-contact surfaces.

  17. Overcoming of Soil Contamination with Pesticides in Forest Nurseries Using the Activity of Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Freiberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticides during cultivation of pine seedlings in forest nurseries resultsin the formation two phenotypes of teratomorph seedlings – conditionally normal andabnormal. Growing forest cultures from teratomorph seedlings leads to their low survivalrate. It is known that pesticides and their metabolic products can remain in soil for manyyears. It is therefore impossible to rely only on natural degradation of pesticides in soil. Apromising way of removing pesticides from soil is their microbiological decomposition.This method is preferable because there is a meliorative organic substance not far from forestnurseries – i.e. forest litter rich in microorganisms. The purpose of these experimentswas to examine the influence of forest litter applied on pesticide decomposition in soil andmorphology of pine seedlings. The rates of forest litter that were most effective in decompositionof pesticides and the activity of microbial communities in litter, depending on foreststand structure, were determined. Estimation of that action was based on the morphologyof seedlings (rate of pine seedlings with normal, conditionally normal and abnormalphenotypes, intensity of CO2 emission from soil and catalase activity, which correlates withthe number of soil microorganisms. The results of these experiments showed the mosteffective activity of forest litter at the application rate of 20 kg/m2. The number of seedlingswith normal phenotype rose from 32% up to 40%. Besides, it was noted that saprophyteswere most effective in pine forest litter, which is characterized by a more acid reaction ofsoil solution, while most others were rich in fungi. The highest number of normal phenotypeseedlings, intensity of CO2 emission and activity of soil catalase were correlated withthe microbiological activity of the applied pine forest litter.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid against microorganisms associated with poultry processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Arthur; Ingram, Kimberly D

    2006-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of solutions of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and mixtures of KOH and lauric acid against microorganisms associated with poultry processing was determined. In vitro tests were performed by enumerating viable microorganisms recovered from bacterial cultures suspended in peptone water (control) and in solutions of 0.1% KOH or mixtures of 0.1% KOH and 0.25 or 0.50% lauric acid. Additional studies were conducted to identify changes in the native microbial flora of poultry skin washed in distilled water, KOH, or KOH-lauric acid. Although results of in vitro studies indicated that significantly fewer bacteria (P < or = 0.05) were recovered from cultures suspended in KOH than from cultures suspended in peptone water, there were also significantly fewer bacteria recovered from cultures suspended in KOH-lauric acid than from cultures suspended in KOH. Results of experiments with broiler skin indicated that although rinsates of skin washed in 1.0% KOH solutions contained significantly fewer total aerobic bacteria and enterococci than did skin washed in water, significantly fewer of these microorganisms were generally recovered from rinsates of skin washed in mixtures of 1.0% KOH and 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0% lauric acid than from skin washed in KOH alone. Washing of broiler skin in solutions of 0.25 to 1.00% KOH or mixtures containing these concentrations of KOH and two parts lauric acid (wt/vol) also significantly reduced the populations of bacteria and yeasts in the native flora of broiler skin. Enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, and staphylococci in the native flora of the skin had the highest level of resistance to the bactericidal activity of KOH-lauric acid. These findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity of KOH-lauric acid is significantly greater than that of KOH alone in vitro and on poultry skin. Thus, KOH-lauric acid may be useful for reducing the level of microbial contamination associated with poultry processing.

  19. Active sulfur cycling by diverse mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms in terrestrial mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Saxena, A; Feyzullayev, A; Hubert, C R J; Kallmeyer, J; Krueger, M; Sauer, P; Schulz, H-M; Orphan, V J

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial mud volcanoes (TMVs) represent geochemically diverse habitats with varying sulfur sources and yet sulfur cycling in these environments remains largely unexplored. Here we characterized the sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and activity in four TMVs in Azerbaijan. A combination of geochemical analyses, biological rate measurements and molecular diversity surveys (targeting metabolic genes aprA and dsrA and SSU ribosomal RNA) supported the presence of active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing guilds in all four TMVs across a range of physiochemical conditions, with diversity of these guilds being unique to each TMV. The TMVs varied in potential sulfate reduction rates (SRR) by up to four orders of magnitude with highest SRR observed in sediments where in situ sulfate concentrations were highest. Maximum temperatures at which SRR were measured was 60°C in two TMVs. Corresponding with these trends in SRR, members of the potentially thermophilic, spore-forming, Desulfotomaculum were detected in these TMVs by targeted 16S rRNA analysis. Additional sulfate-reducing bacterial lineages included members of the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae detected by aprA and dsrA analyses and likely contributing to the mesophilic SRR measured. Phylotypes affiliated with sulfide-oxidizing Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria were abundant in aprA libraries from low sulfate TMVs, while the highest sulfate TMV harboured 16S rRNA phylotypes associated with sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria. Altogether, the biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate these unique terrestrial habitats support diverse active sulfur-cycling microorganisms reflecting the in situ geochemical environment. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of dispersion methods for enumeration of microorganisms from peat and activated carbon biofilters treating volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammar, Nadia; Malhautier, Luc; Degrange, Valérie; Lensi, Robert; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    To enumerate microorganisms having colonized biofilters treating volatile organic compounds, it is necessary firstly to evaluate dispersion methods. Crushing, shaking and sonication were then tested for the removal of microflora from biofilters packing materials (peat and activated carbon). Continuous or discontinuous procedures, and addition of glass beads had no effect on the number of microorganisms removed from peat particles. The duration of treatment also had no effect for shaking and crushing, but the number of microorganisms after 60 min of treatment with ultrasound was significantly higher than that obtained after 0.5 min. The comparison between these methods showed that crushing was the most efficient for the removal of microorganisms from both peat and activated carbon. The comparison between three chemical dispersion agents showed that 1% Na-pyrophosphate was less efficient, compared with 200 mM phosphate buffer or 1% Na-hexametaphosphate. To optimize the cultivation of microorganisms, three different agar media were compared. Tryptic soy agar tenfold diluted (TSA 1/10) was the most suitable medium for the culture of microflora from a peat biofilter. For the activated carbon biofilter, there was no significant difference between Luria Bertoni, TSA 1/10, and plate count agar. The optimized extraction and enumeration protocols were used to perform a quantitative characterization of microbial populations in an operating laboratory activated carbon biofilter and in two parallel peat biofilters.

  1. Research regarding biodegradable properties of food polymeric products under microorganism activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opran, Constantin; Lazar, Veronica; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Ditu, Lia Mara

    2018-02-01

    Aim of this research is the structural analysis by comparison of the biodegradable properties of two polymeric products made by non-biodegradable polymeric material (polypropylene TIPPLEN H949 A) and biodegradable polymeric material (ECOVIO IS 1335), under microorganism activity in order to give the best solution for the manufacture of food packaging biodegradable products. It presents the results of experimental determinations on comparative analysis of tensile strength for the two types of polymers. The sample weight variations after fungal biodegradation activity revealed that, after 3 months, there are no significant changes in polymeric substratum for non-biodegradable polymeric. The microscopically analysis showed that the fungal filaments did not strongly adhered on the non-biodegradable polymeric material, instead, both filamentous fungi strains adhered and covered the surface of the biodegradable sample with germinated filamentous conidia. The spectral analysis of polymer composition revealed that non-biodegradable polymer polypropylene spectra are identical for control and for samples that were exposed to fungal activity, suggesting that this type of sample was not degraded by the fungi strains. Instead, for biodegradable polymer sample, it was observed significant structural changes across multiple absorption bands, suggesting enzyme activity manifested mainly by Aspergillus niger strain. Structural analysis of interdisciplinary research results, lead, to achieving optimal injection molded technology emphasizing technological parameters, in order to obtain food packaging biodegradable products.

  2. Investigation of the activity of the microorganisms in a Reblochon-style cheese by metatranscriptomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eMonnet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial communities in cheeses are composed of varying bacteria, yeasts, and molds, which contribute to the development of their typical sensory properties. In situ studies are needed to better understand their growth and activity during cheese ripening. Our objective was to investigate the activity of the microorganisms used for manufacturing a surface-ripened cheese by means of metatranscriptomic analysis. The cheeses were produced using two lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, one ripening bacterium (Brevibacterium aurantiacum, and two yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum. RNA was extracted from the cheese rinds and, after depletion of most ribosomal RNA, sequencing was performed using a short-read sequencing technology that generated approximately 75 million reads per sample. Except for Brevibacterium aurantiacum, which failed to grow in the cheeses, a large number of CDS reads were generated for the inoculated species, making it possible to investigate their individual transcriptome over time. From day 5 to day 35, G. candidum accounted for the largest proportion of CDS reads, suggesting that this species was the most active. Only minor changes occurred in the transcriptomes of the lactic acid bacteria. For the two yeasts, we compared the expression of genes involved in the catabolism of lactose, galactose, lactate, amino acids and free fatty acids. During ripening, genes involved in ammonia assimilation and galactose catabolism were down-regulated in the two species. Genes involved in amino acid catabolism were up-regulated in G. candidum from day 14 to day 35, whereas in D. hansenii, they were up-regulated mainly at day 35, suggesting that this species catabolized the cheese amino acids later. In addition, after 35 days of ripening, there was a down-regulation of genes involved in the electron transport chain, suggesting a lower cellular activity. The

  3. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Methanolic Plant Extracts against Nosocomial Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is a complex microbial community highly resistant to antimicrobials. The formation of biofilms in biotic and abiotic surfaces is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. New alternatives for controlling infections have been proposed focusing on the therapeutic properties of medicinal plants and their antimicrobial effects. In the present study the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of 8 methanolic plant extracts were evaluated against clinical isolated microorganisms. Preliminary screening by diffusion well assay showed the antimicrobial activity of Prosopis laevigata, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Gutierrezia microcephala. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined ranging from 0.7 to >15 mg/mL. The specific biofilm formation index (SBF was evaluated before and after the addition of plant extracts (MBC × 0.75. Opuntia ficus-indica caused the major reduction on SBF in dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic activity of plant extracts was determined using brine shrimp lethality test (Artemia salina L.. Lethal Dose concentration (LD50 values of the plant extracts was calculated. LD50 values for P. laevigata and G. microcephala were 141.6 and 323.3 µg/mL, respectively, while O. ficus-indica showed a slight lethality with 939.2 µg/mL. Phytochemical analyses reveal the presence of flavonoids, tannins, and coumarines.

  4. Rapid Detection of Microorganisms Based on Active and Passive Modes of QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Farka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Label-free immunosensors are well suited for detection of microorganisms because of their fast response and reasonable sensitivity comparable to infection doses of common pathogens. Active (lever oscillator and frequency counter and passive (impedance analyzer modes of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM were used and compared for rapid detection of three strains of E. coli. Different approaches for antibody immobilization were compared, the immobilization of reduced antibody using Sulfo‑SMCC was most effective achieving the limit of detection (LOD 8 × 104 CFU·mL−1 in 10 min. For the passive mode, software evaluating impedance characteristics in real-time was developed and used. Almost the same results were achieved using both active and passive modes confirming that the sensor properties are not limited by the frequency evaluation method but mainly by affinity of the antibody. Furthermore, reference measurements were done using surface plasmon resonance. Effect of condition of cells on signal was observed showing that cells ruptured by ultrasonication provided slightly higher signal changes than intact microbes.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma against microorganisms isolated from oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Lorenzo; Bortolin, Monica; Vassena, Christian; Taschieri, Silvio; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2013-02-25

    Autologous platelet concentrates (PCs) have been extensively used in a variety of medical fields to promote soft and hard tissue regeneration. The significance behind their use lies in the abundance of growth factors in platelets α-granules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antibacterial properties of PCs against various bacteria have been recently pointed out. In this study, the antimicrobial effect of pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) was evaluated against oral cavity microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood samples were obtained from 17 patients who underwent oral surgery procedures involving the use of P-PRP. The antibacterial activity of P-PRP, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), was determined through the microdilution twofold serial method. P-PRP inhibited the growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus oralis, but not of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. P-PRP is a potentially useful substance in the fight against postoperative infections. This might represent a valuable property in adjunct to the enhancement of tissue regeneration.

  6. Reductive dehalogenation activity of indigenous microorganism in sediments of the Hackensack River, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Seo Yean; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-07-01

    Organohalogen pollutants are of concern in many river and estuarine environments, such as the New York-New Jersey Harbor estuary and its tributaries. The Hackensack River is contaminated with various metals, hydrocarbons and halogenated organics, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. In order to examine the potential for microbial reductive dechlorination by indigenous microorganisms, sediment samples were collected from five different estuarine locations along the Hackensack River. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and pentachloroaniline (PCA) were selected as model organohalogen pollutants to assess anaerobic dehalogenating potential. Dechlorinating activity of HCB and PCA was observed in sediment microcosms for all sampling sites. HCB was dechlorinated via pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and trichlorobenzene (TriCB) to dichlorobenzene (DCB). PCA was dechlorinated via tetrachloroaniline (TeCA), trichloroanilines (TriCA), and dichloroanilines (DCA) to monochloroaniline (MCA). No HBB debromination was observed over 12 months of incubation. However, with HCB as a co-substrate slow HBB debromination was observed with production of tetrabromobenzene (TeBB) and tribromobenzene (TriBB). Chloroflexi specific 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE followed by sequence analysis detected Dehalococcoides species in sediments of the freshwater location, but not in the estuarine site. Analysis targeting 12 putative reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes showed that these were enriched concomitant with HCB or PCA dechlorination in freshwater sediment microcosms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation of lindane by microorganisms. Evaluation of inhibitory effect on microbial activity using radiorespirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farghaly, M.; Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Soliman, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of U- 14 C-lindane in two type of Egyptian soil was studied under laboratory conditions. The rate of mineralization of lindane was slow. Evolution of 14 CO 2 increased with time and amounted to 3.5-5.5% of the initial concentration within 90 days. At this period both soil types contained about 88% of the applied radiocarbon; 33-37% of the initial dose being bound to the soil. The methanol 14 C-extractables showed by TLC and HPLC analysis the presence of lindane as main product together with traces of minor metabolites. In addition, the effect of different rates of application of lindane on the respiratory activity of soil microorganisms was evaluated using U- 14 C-glucose as substrate. Concentrations up to 5 mgkg -1 caused a short term suppression of 14 CO 2 evolution. A dose of 10 mgkg -1 significantly inhibited soil respiration as determined by 14 Co 2 evolution for the 11 day period of the experiment. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McInerney; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were re-grown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0

  9. The impact of anaerobic microorganisms activities in ruminant waste and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlia, Ellin; Hamdani, H.; Winantris, Kurnani, Tb. B. A.; Hidayati, Y. A.; Marlina, E. T.; Rahmah, K. N.; Arief, H.; Ridwan, R.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Ruminant (dairy cattle, beef cattle and buffalo) waste from intensive farming concentrated in highly populated areas when stacked and accumulated in certain heights and in anaerobic condition, may produce Green House Gases (GHGs) which lead to global warming. This condition is generated through fermentation by microorganism contained in livestock waste and biogenic activities on coal. The GHGs include CH4 (methane), CO2 (carbon dioxide) and N2O (nitrous oxide). The GHG emission should be early monitored to minimize greater problems. In the other hand, methane can be utilized as an environmental friendly energy after stored as biogas on digester. The aim of this research is to detect how much GHGs formed from ruminant waste and biogenic activities on coal, which can be utilized as an alternative energy. This research conducted as an explorative study utilizing dairy cattle feces, beef cattle feces, buffalo feces and three types of coal: lignite, bituminous and sub-bituminous, which is separately added into medium 98-5 made from mixture of agar medium and chemical components in powder and crystal form diluted with distilled water and rumen liquid, with six repetitions. Each sample was stored into 250 mL anaerobic digester, observed weekly for period of 4 weeks, analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC-A14). The result showed that GHGs: CH4, CO2 and N2O were found in all samples. Anticipation of GHGs formation to avoid air pollution is by utilizing livestock waste and coal in aerobic condition or in anaerobic condition through digester.

  10. Biological activities of Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary) extract as analyzed in microorganisms and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Daiane; Figueira, Leandro Wagner; de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Pacheco Soares, Cristina; Camargo, Samira Estves Afonso; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2017-01-01

    R. officinalis L. is an aromatic plant commonly used as condiment and for medicinal purposes. Biological activities of its extract were evaluated in this study, as antimicrobial effect on mono- and polymicrobial biofilms, cytotoxicity, anti-inflammatory capacity, and genotoxicity. Monomicrobial biofilms of Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and polymicrobial biofilms composed of C. albicans with each bacterium were formed in microplates during 48 h and exposed for 5 min to R. officinalis L. extract (200 mg/mL). Its cytotoxic effect was examined on murine macrophages (RAW 264.7), human gingival fibroblasts (FMM-1), human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7), and cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) after exposure to different concentrations of the extract, analyzed by MTT, neutral red (NR), and crystal violet (CV) assays. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated on RAW 264.7 non-stimulated or stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli and treated with different concentrations of the extract for 24 h. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified by ELISA. Genotoxicity was verified by the frequency of micronuclei (MN) at 1000 cells after exposure to concentrations of the extract for 24 h. Data were analyzed by T-Test or ANOVA and Tukey Test (P ≤ 0.05). Thus, significant reductions in colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were observed in all biofilms. Regarding the cells, it was observed that concentrations ≤ 50 mg/mL provided cell viability of above 50%. Production of proinflammatory cytokines in the treated groups was similar or lower compared to the control group. The MN frequency in the groups exposed to extract was similar or less than the untreated group. It was shown that R. officinalis L. extract was effective on mono- and polymicrobial biofilms; it also provided cell viability of above 50% (at

  11. Thermal effects on metabolic activities of thermophilic microorganisms from the thermal discharge point of Tuticorin thermal power plant area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukkannan, N.; Murugesan, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic activities of thermophilic microorganisms isolated from the thermal water discharge point at Tuticorin thermal power station were studied by growing the microorganisms in sterile medium and at various temperature regimes of 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65degC. The optimum temperature for the growth of the bacterium isolated from the thermal power plant station was 45 degC and beyond 65 degC the growth was gradually decreased. The bacteria isolated from open sea water were mesophiles with their growth optimum at 35 degC and microbes inhabiting the thermal discharge area were thermopiles as they were tolerant even at 55 degC. The amylase production, carbohydrate metabolism and lactose fermentation activities were optimum at 45 degC. At 25 degC and beyond 65 degC biochemical activities of the organisms were inhibited to a greater extent. (author)

  12. Chemical Composition of Mentha spicata L. subsp. tomentosa and M. pulegium L., and their Antimicrobial Activity on Strong Pathogen Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre SEVİNDİK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mentha L., recognized as a medical and aromatic plant, is a general name affiliated to mint species and belongs to Labiatae family. Some species are used as fresh vegetables in the Turkish kitchen and they can also be used in salads. In addition, some species have been used as a spice in food. In this study, chemical composition and antimicrobial activity towards some pathogenics (gram + and gram - microorganisms of the essential oils Mentha spicata L. subsp. tomentosa (Briq. Harley, Mentha pulegium L. grown under West Anatolian ecological conditions were investigated. Extractions were carried out with Clevenger apparatus and essential oil composition was determined by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. Microorganisms used for the antimicrobial studies were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterecoccus faecium DSM 13590, Escherichia coli Q157:H7 and Bacillus cereus CCM99.  As a result, M. pulegium and M. spicata subsp. tomentosa were found to be rich in piperitenone oxide: 72.77% and 28.84%, respectively. Each of the oils was found to possess antimicrobial properties against test microorganisms. Essential oils obtained from Mentha species give positive effect on all microorganisms.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of beta-lactams against multiresistant micro-organisms from the family Enterobacteriaceae, and genus Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebla, A; González, I; Vallín, C

    1994-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twenty beta-lactams was determined against multiresistant micro-organisms from the Enterobacteriaceae family (450) and the genus Pseudomonas (90). The antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed by the disk diffusion method. The most effective antibiotics were cephalosporins of the second and third generation, and non-classical beta-lactams (imipenem and moxalactam). A pronounced resistance was found to carbenicillin, ampicillin, cephalotin and cefazolin. These resistance patterns corresponded to a high consumption of these antibiotics.

  14. Biosurfactants from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppasil Maneerat

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are the surface-active molecules synthesized by microorganisms. With the advantage of environmental compatibility, the demand for biosurfactants has been steadily increasing and may eventually replace their chemically synthesized counterparts. Marine biosurfactants produced by some marine microorganisms have been paid more attention, particularly for the bioremediation of the sea polluted by crude oil. This review describes screening of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, the determination of biosurfactant activity as well as the recovery of marine surfactant. The uses of marine biosurfactants for bioremediation are also discussed.

  15. Organic Waste Anaerobic degradation with bio-activator-5 Effective Microorganism (EM-5) to Produce Biogas

    OpenAIRE

    Metri Dian Insani

    2014-01-01

    Degradasi Anaerob Sampah Organik dengan Bioaktivator Effective Microorganism-5 (EM-5) untuk Menghasilkan Biogas Abstract: The purpose of this study was to: (1) analyze the differences in the use of corn cobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to biogas pressure, (2) analyze the differences in the use of corn cobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow dung for a long time flame biogas produced, and (3) analyze the different uses corn cobs,...

  16. The Characterization of Psychrophilic Microorganisms and their potentially useful Cold-Active Glycosidases Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenchly, Jean E.

    2008-06-30

    Our studies of novel, cold-loving microorganisms have focused on two distinct extreme environments. The first is an ice core sample from a 120,000 year old Greenland glacier. The results of this study are particularly exciting and have been highlighted with press releases and additional coverage. The first press release in 2004 was based on our presentation at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology and was augmented by coverage of our publication (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2005. Vol. 71:7806) in the Current Topics section of the ASM news journal, “Microbe.” Of special interest for this report was the isolation of numerous, phylogenetically distinct and potentially novel ultrasmall microorganisms. The detection and isolation of members of the ultrasmall population is significant because these cells pass through 0.2 micron pore filters that are generally used to trap microorganisms from environmental samples. Thus, analyses by other investigators that examined only cells captured on the filters would have missed a significant portion of this population. Only a few ultrasmall isolates had been obtained prior to our examination of the ice core samples. Our development of a filtration enrichment and subsequent cultivation of these organisms has added extensively to the collection of, and knowledge about, this important population in the microbial world.

  17. Enrichment of specific electro-active microorganisms and enhancement of methane production by adding granular activated carbon in anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-04-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) via conductive materials can provide significant benefits to anaerobic methane formation in terms of production amount and rate. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) demonstrated its applicability in facilitating DIET in methanogenesis, DIET in continuous flow anaerobic reactors has not been verified. Here, evidences of DIET via GAC were explored. The reactor supplemented with GAC showed 1.8-fold higher methane production rate than that without GAC (35.7 versus 20.1±7.1mL-CH4/d). Around 34% of methane formation was attributed to the biomass attached to GAC. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the enrichment of exoelectrogens (e.g. Geobacter) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanospirillum and Methanolinea) from the biomass attached to GAC. Furthermore, anodic and cathodic currents generation was observed in an electrochemical cell containing GAC biomass. Taken together, GAC supplementation created an environment for enriching the microorganisms involved in DIET, which increased the methane production rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitive and substrate-specific detection of metabolically active microorganisms in natural microbial consortia using community isotope arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlousse, Dieter M; Kurisu, Futoshi; Tobino, Tomohiro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and validate a novel fosmid-clone-based metagenome isotope array approach - termed the community isotope array (CIArray) - for sensitive detection and identification of microorganisms assimilating a radiolabeled substrate within complex microbial communities. More specifically, a sample-specific CIArray was used to identify anoxic phenol-degrading microorganisms in activated sludge treating synthetic coke-oven wastewater in a single-sludge predenitrification-nitrification process. Hybridization of the CIArray with DNA from the (14) C-phenol-amended sample indicated that bacteria assimilating (14) C-atoms, presumably directly from phenol, under nitrate-reducing conditions were abundant in the reactor, and taxonomic assignment of the fosmid clone end sequences suggested that they belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria. The specificity of the CIArray was validated by quantification of fosmid-clone-specific DNA in density-resolved DNA fractions from samples incubated with (13) C-phenol, which verified that all CIArray-positive probes stemmed from microorganisms that assimilated isotopically labeled carbon. This also demonstrated that the CIArray was more sensitive than DNA-SIP, as the former enabled positive detection at a phenol concentration that failed to yield a 'heavy' DNA fraction. Finally, two operational taxonomic units distantly related to marine Gammaproteobacteria were identified to account for more than half of 16S rRNA gene clones in the 'heavy' DNA library, corroborating the CIArray-based identification. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of Microorganisms with Improved Transport and Biosurfactant Activity for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McInerney; K.E. Duncan; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; Randy R. Simpson; N.Ravi; D. Nagle

    2005-08-15

    The project had three objectives: (1) to develop microbial strains with improved biosurfactant properties that use cost-effective nutrients, (2) to obtain biosurfactant strains with improved transport properties through sandstones, and (3) to determine the empirical relationship between surfactant concentration and interfacial tension and whether in situ reactions kinetics and biosurfactant concentration meets appropriate engineering design criteria. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns and Berea sandstone cores when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0.1 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1 g/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) recovered 10-40% of residual oil from Berea sandstone cores. Even low biosurfactant concentrations (16 mg/l) mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon (29%). The bio-surfactant lowered IFT by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. A mathematical model that relates oil recovery to biosurfactant concentration was modified to include the stepwise changes in IFT as biosurfactant concentrations changes. This model adequately predicted the experimentally observed changes in IFT as a function of biosurfactant concentration. Theses data show that lipopeptide biosurfactant systems may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic

  20. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia; Vargas, Ignacio T.; Bruns, Mary Ann; Regan, John M.

    2017-01-01

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  1. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia

    2017-08-03

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; D.P. Nagle, Jr.; Kathleen Duncan; N. Youssef; M.J. Folmsbee; S. Maudgakya

    2003-06-26

    production. As an initial step in the search for a better biosurfactant-producing microorganism, 157 bacterial strains were screened for biosurfactant production under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A hundred and forty seven strains produced either equal or higher amounts of biosurfactant compared to B. mojavensis JF-2 and the 10 best strains were chosen for further study. In an attempt to increase biosurfactant production, a genetic recombination experiment was conducted by mixing germinating spores of four of the best strains with B. mojavensis JF-2. Biosurfactant production was higher with the mixed spore culture than in the cocultures containing B. mojavensis JF-2 and each of the other 4 strains or in a mixed culture containing all five strains that had not undergone genetic exchange. Four isolates were obtained from the mixed spores culture that gave higher biosurfactant production than any of the original strains. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction analysis showed differences in the band pattern for these strains compared to the parent strains, suggesting the occurrence of genetic recombination. We have a large collection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and a natural mechanism to improve biosurfactant production in these organisms.

  3. Antimicrobial activities of essential oil and hexane extract of Florence fennel [Foeniculum vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell.] against foodborne microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Bülent; Ozer, Hakan; Cakir, Ahmet; Polat, Taşkin; Dursun, Atilla; Mete, Ebru; Oztürk, Erdoğan; Ekinci, Melek

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chemical compositions of the essential oil and hexane extract isolated from the inflorescence, leaf stems, and aerial parts of Florence fennel and the antimicrobial activities of the essential oil, hexane extract, and their major component, anethole, against a large variety of foodborne microorganisms. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the essential oils obtained from inflorescence, leaf stems, and whole aerial parts contained (E)-anethole (59.28-71.69%), limonene (8.30-10.73%), apiole (trace to 9.23%), beta-fenchyl acetate (3.02-4.80%), and perillene (2.16-3.29%) as the main components. Likewise, the hexane extract of the plant sample exhibited a similar chemical composition, and it contained (E)-anethole (53.00%), limonene (27.16%), gamma-terpinene (4.09%), and perillene (3.78%). However, the hexane extract also contained less volatile components such as n-hexadecanoic acid (1.62%), methyl palmitate (1.17%), and linoleic acid (1.15%). The in vitro antimicrobial assays showed that the essential oil, anethole, and hexane extract were effective against most of the foodborne pathogenic, saprophytic, probiotic, and mycotoxigenic microorganisms tested. The results of the present study revealed that (E)-anethole, the main component of Florence fennel essential oil, is responsible for the antimicrobial activity and that the essential oils as well as the hexane extract can be used as a food preservative. This study is the first report showing the antimicrobial activities of essential oil and hexane extract of Florence fennel against probiotic bacteria.

  4. Screening for antibacterial and antibiofilm activity in Thai medicinal plant extracts against oral microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Teanpaisan, Rawee; Kawsud, Pajaree; Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 12 ethanol extracts of Thai traditional herb against oral pathogens. The antibacterial activities were assessed by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-kill methods. Antibiofilm activity was investigated using a 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprinting, and TLC-bioautography were used to determine the active ...

  5. Organic Waste Anaerobic degradation with bio-activator-5 Effective Microorganism (EM-5 to Produce Biogas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metri Dian Insani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradasi Anaerob Sampah Organik dengan Bioaktivator Effective Microorganism-5 (EM-5 untuk Menghasilkan Biogas Abstract: The purpose of this study was to: (1 analyze the differences in the use of corn cobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to biogas pressure, (2 analyze the differences in the use of corn cobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow dung for a long time flame biogas produced, and (3 analyze the different uses corn cobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to the C / N ratio end. Experimental study was designed using a completely randomized design (CRD, with three treatments each in 3 repetitions. The research proves that: (1 there is a difference corncobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to biogas pressure, (2 there is a difference corncobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to the length of time the flame and (3 there is a difference corncobs, kelaras bananas and banana peel with the addition of cow manure to the C / N ratio end. Key Words: anaerobic degradation, organic waste, EM-5, biogas Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk: (1 menganalisis perbedaan penggunaan tongkol jagung, kelaras pisang, dan kulit pisang dengan penambahan kotoran sapi terhadap tekanan biogas, (2 menganalisis perbedaan penggunaan tongkol jagung, kelaras pisang, dan kulit pisang dengan penam-bahan kotoran sapi terhadap lama waktu nyala api biogas yang dihasilkan, dan (3 menganalisis per-bedaan penggunaan tongkol jagung, kelaras pisang, dan kulit pisang dengan penambahan kotoran sapi terhadap rasio C/N akhir. Penelitian eksperimen didesain menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap (RAL, dengan tiga perlakuan masing-masing dalam 3 kali ulangan. Hasil penelitian membuktikan bahwa: (1 terdapat perbedaan tongkol jagung, kelaras pisang, dan kulit pisang dengan penambahan kotoran sapi terhadap tekanan biogas, (2 terdapat

  6. Nucleic-acid characterization of the identity and activity of subsurface microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, E. L.

    Nucleic-acid approaches to characterizing naturally occurring microorganisms in their habitats have risen to prominence during the last decade. Extraction of deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) and ribonucleic-acid (RNA) biomarkers directly from environmental samples provides a new means of gathering information in microbial ecology. This review article defines: (1) the subsurface habitat; (2) what nucleic-acid procedures are; and (3) the types of information nucleic-acid procedures can and cannot reveal. Recent literature examining microbial nucleic acids in the terrestrial subsurface is tabulated and reviewed. The majority of effort to date has focused upon insights into the identity and phylogeny of subsurface microorganisms afforded by analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. Given the power of nucleic-acid-based procedures and their limited application to subsurface habitats to date, many future opportunities await exploration. Au cours des derniers dix ans, les approches basées sur les acides nucléiques sont apparues et devenues essentielles pour caractériser dans leurs habitats les microorganismes existant à l'état naturel. L'extraction directe de l'ADN et de l'ARN, qui sont des biomarqueurs, d'échantillons environnementaux a fourni un nouveau moyen d'obtenir des informations sur l'écologie microbienne. Cet article synthétique définit 1) l'habitat souterrain, 2) ce que sont les procédures basées sur les acides nucléiques, 3) quel type d'informations ces procéedures peuvent et ne peuvent pas révéler. Les travaux récemment publiés concernatn les acides nucléiques microbiens dans le milieu souterrain terrestre sont catalogués et passés en revue. La majorité des efforts pour obtenir es données s'est concentrée sur l'identité et la phylogénie des microorganismes souterrains fournies par l'analyse de leurs gènes 16S rRNA. Étant donné la puissance des procédures basées sur les acides nucléiques et leur application limitée aux habitats souterrains

  7. Differentiation of enzymatic activity of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms isolated from various environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bogusławska-Wąs

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determinate enzymatic activity of yeast-like organisms - Candida lipolytica, Rhodotorula rubra, Trichosporon beigelii, Zygosaccharomyces sp. - isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon and herring salads. We have shown that lipolytic activity was higher than protcolytic for every strain tested. The lowest activity level was found out for amylolytic hydrolases. The results also demonstrated that yeast-like organisms isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon revealed much higher average enzymatic activity compared to tbe same species isolated from herring salads, excepting C. lipolytica.

  8. Biomass of active microorganisms is not limited only by available carbon in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmullina, Aliia

    2017-04-01

    Microbial activity is generally limited by carbon (C) availability. The easily available substrate release by roots creates so called "hotspots" in the rhizosphere that drives microbial activity removing C limitation. We simulated a gradient of root exudates by glucose addition at different concentrations to stimulate the activation of microbial biomass (MB). Glucose was added at the rates lower than MB (5, 10, 25 and 50%) and at the rates similar or higher than MB (100, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 400%). During incubation CO2 efflux was measured by conductometry, the size of active MB and specific growth rate were estimated by substrate-induced growth response method. We tested a hypothesis that glucose addition exceeding 100% MB is able to activate major fraction of soil microbial community. Addition of glucose at concentrations higher than 5% decreased specific growth rate, demonstrating the shift of microbial community from r-strategy to K-strategy. The percentage of active MB grew up by the increase of glucose concentration. The treatment with glucose at 100% presented a dramatic shift in the activation of MB up to 14%. Contrary to our hypothesis, further increase in glucose rate caused moderate stimulation of active MB up to 22% of total MB. Furthermore, glucose addition above 200% did not increase the fraction of active biomass indicating glucose oversaturation and possible limitation by other nutrients. The results suggest that despite the fact that C is the most important limitation factor, limitless C supply is not able to activate MB up to 100%. Thus, if the rhizosphere is limited by nutrients, the fraction of active biomass remains at low level despite an excess of available C.

  9. Lignite microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulankina, M.A.; Lysak, L.V.; Zvyagintsev, D.G. [Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Moscow (Russian Federation). Faculty of Soil Science

    2007-03-15

    The first demonstration that samples of lignite at a depth of 10 m are considerably enriched in bacteria is reported. According to direct microscopy, the abundance of bacteria was about 10{sup 7} cells/g. About 70% of cells had intact cell membranes and small size, which points to their anabiotic state. The fungal mycelium length was no more than 1 m. Lignite inoculation onto solid glucose-yeast-peptone medium allowed us to isolate bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Spirillum, and Cytophaga. Representatives of the genera Penicillium and Trichoderma were identified on Czapek medium. Moistening of lignite powder increased the microbial respiration rate and microbial and fungal abundance but did not increase their generic diversity. This finding suggests that the studied microorganisms are autochthonous to lignite.

  10. The effect of chlorsulfurone and MCPB-Na on the enzymatic activity of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filimon Marioara Nicoleta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available herbicides, have a broad spectrum effect on weeds, in relatively low doses and with a much reduced toxicity on livestock. In this study were used two herbicides: dacsulfuron with the active substance chlorsulfuron (0.005 - 0.035 μg/g soil and butoxone with the active substance MCPB-Na (0.005 - 0.035 mg/L/g soil. The samples were collected from a depth of 0-20 cm from chernozem soil. The effect of herbicide was estimated by measuring the activity of catalase, actual and potential dehydrogenase, urease and cellulase activities. All samples being incubated for 10 days at 27°C using Sapp medium for isolation and study of cellulosolytic bacteria. The inhibitory effect of the tested herbicides was the most intense for the urease and dehydrogenase enzymatic activities. The most resistant cellulosolytic bacteria to the effects of dacsulfuron were Cellfalcicula fusca, Cellfalcicula viridis, Cellvibrio fulvus and Fuseaux veris and for butoxone Cellfalcicula mucosa, C. viridis and C. fulvus.

  11. Screening for antibacterial and antibiofilm activity in Thai medicinal plant extracts against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanpaisan, Rawee; Kawsud, Pajaree; Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 12 ethanol extracts of Thai traditional herb against oral pathogens. The antibacterial activities were assessed by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-kill methods. Antibiofilm activity was investigated using a 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprinting, and TLC-bioautography were used to determine the active antibacterial compounds. Piper betle showed the best antibacterial activities against all tested strains in the minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration, ranged from 1.04-5.21 mg/mL and 2.08-8.33 mg/mL, respectively. Killing ability depended on time and concentrations of the extract. P. betle extract acts as a potent antibiofilm agent with dual actions, preventing and eradicating the biofilm. The major constituent of P. betle extract was 4-chromanol, which responded for antibacteria and antibiofilm against oral pathogens. It suggests that the ethanol P. betle leaves extract may be used for preventing oral diseases.

  12. Anti-lipolytic activity and phytochemical screening ofChelianthesalbomarginataagainst pathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Jarial

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic properties of selected fern, Chelianthusalbomarginataand to identify its functional compounds. The methanolic fern-extract (MFE of these ferns was assessed for anti-bacterial activities by measuring inhibition zones against a panel of pathogenic bacterial strains using agar diffusion method. MFE at a concentration of 25 μg/ml showed marked anti-bacterial activity against all bacterial strains (6-23mm zone of inhibition and was maximum against Enterobacter sp (23 mm. In addition, the MFE of C. albomarginatahad the best MIC values of 2.25µg/ml against S. aureus and Enterobacter sp., respectively. The MFE also possessed good anti-lipolytic activity (66.5% against a porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL and cholesterol oxidase inhibition (79%. This result showed that MFE of C. albomarginataunder optimal concentrationis not only a potent source of natural anti-oxidants and anti-bacterial activity but also possesses efficient cholesterol degradation and anti-lipolytic activities, that is to be beneficial in the body weight management.

  13. Application of a redox gradostat reactor for assessing rhizosphere microorganism activity on lambda-cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, T J; Mikell, A T; Moore, M T; Smith, S

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial activity on pesticides can lead to decreased toxicity or persistence in aquatic systems. Rhizosphere activity is difficult to measure in situ. To mimic rhizosphere properties of the soft rush, Juncus effusus, a single-stage gradostat reactor was developed to study cycling of lambda-cyhalothrin by rhizobacteria and the effects of Fe(III) and citrate, both common in wetland soil, on lambda-cyhalothrin degradation. Redox gradient changes, greater than ± 10 mV, were apparent within days 5-15 both in the presence and absence of ferric citrate. Through the production of a redox gradient (p < 0.05) by rhizobacteria and the ability to measure pesticide loss over time (p < 0.05), reactors were useful in expanding knowledge on this active environment.

  14. Biofilm inhibition activity of traditional medicinal plants from Northwestern Argentina against native pathogen and environmental microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Mariana Romero

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Plants have been commonly used in popular medicine of most cultures for the treatment of disease. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of certain Argentine plants used in traditional medicine has been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial, anti-biofilm, and anti-cell adherence activities of native plants (Larrea divaricata, Tagetes minuta, Tessaria absinthioides, Lycium chilense, and Schinus fasciculatus collected in northwestern Argentina. METHODS: The activities of the five plant species were evaluated in Bacillus strains and clinical strains of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolated from northwestern Argentina and identified by 16S rDNA. RESULT: Lycium chilense and Schinus fasciculatus were the most effective antimicrobial plant extracts (15.62µg/ml and 62.50µg/ml for Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1 and Bacillus sp. Mcn4, respectively. The highest (66% anti-biofilm activity against Bacillus sp. Mcn4 was observed with T. absinthioides and L. divaricate extracts. The highest (68% anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1 was observed with L. chilense extract. T. minuta, T. absinthioides, and L. divaricata showed percentages of anti-biofilm activity of between 55% and 62%. The anti-adherence effects of T. minuta and L. chilense observed in Bacillus sp. Mcn4 reflected a difference of only 22% and 10%, respectively, between anti-adherence and biofilm inhibition. Thus, the inhibition of biofilm could be related to cell adherence. In Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1, all plant extracts produced low anti-adherence percentages. CONCLUSION: These five species may represent a source of alternative drugs derived from plant extracts, based on ethnobotanical knowledge from northwest Argentina.

  15. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  16. DNA-, RNA-, and Protein-Based Stable-Isotope Probing for High-Throughput Biomarker Analysis of Active Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Eleanor; Taubert, Martin; Coyotzi, Sara; Chen, Yin; Eyice, Özge; Schäfer, Hendrik; Murrell, J Colin; Neufeld, Josh D; Dumont, Marc G

    2017-01-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) enables researchers to target active populations within complex microbial communities, which is achieved by providing growth substrates enriched in heavy isotopes, usually in the form of 13 C, 18 O, or 15 N. After growth on the substrate and subsequent extraction of microbial biomarkers, typically nucleic acids or proteins, the SIP technique is used for the recovery and analysis of isotope-labeled biomarkers from active microbial populations. In the years following the initial development of DNA- and RNA-based SIP, it was common practice to characterize labeled populations by targeted gene analysis. Such approaches usually involved fingerprint-based analyses or sequencing of clone libraries containing 16S rRNA genes or functional marker gene amplicons. Although molecular fingerprinting remains a valuable approach for rapid confirmation of isotope labeling, recent advances in sequencing technology mean that it is possible to obtain affordable and comprehensive amplicon profiles, metagenomes, or metatranscriptomes from SIP experiments. Not only can the abundance of microbial groups be inferred from metagenomes, but researchers can bin, assemble, and explore individual genomes to build hypotheses about the metabolic capabilities of labeled microorganisms. Analysis of labeled mRNA is a more recent advance that can provide independent metatranscriptome-based analysis of active microorganisms. The power of metatranscriptomics is that mRNA abundance often correlates closely with the corresponding activity of encoded enzymes, thus providing insight into microbial metabolism at the time of sampling. Together, these advances have improved the sensitivity of SIP methods and allow the use of labeled substrates at ecologically relevant concentrations. Particularly as methods improve and costs continue to drop, we expect that the integration of SIP with multiple omics-based methods will become prevalent components of microbial ecology studies

  17. In vitro antimicrobial activity of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions against 12 oral microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Casemiro,Luciana Assirati; Pires-de-Souza,Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Panzeri,Heitor; Martins,Carlos Henrique Gomes; Ito,Isabel Yoko

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial activity of irreversible hydrocolloids (one containing an antimicrobial agent) prepared with water or with a 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution against 12 strains of the oral microbiota. Twenty specimens (0.5 x 1.0 cm) for each group (1. Jeltrate mixed with water; 2. Jeltrate mixed with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution; 3. Greengel mixed with water; 4. Greengel mixed with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution) were prepared under s...

  18. Rapid determination of filamentous microorganisms in activated sludge; Determinacion rapida de microorganismos filamentosos en fangos activados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, C.; Jimenez, C.; Estevez, F. [Empresa Municipal de Abastecimiento y Saneamiento de Aguas de Sevilla (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Despite many methods available biomass estimation of a bioprocess may sometimes become laborious and impracticable. Samples containing filamentous organisms, as in Wastewater Treatment Plants, present special counting difficulties. If they are abundant they may need to be estimated separately. In this work a counting method for these organisms is show. The main goal is to improve chlorination of activated sludge suffering bulking or foaming through a quantitative record of filamentous bacteria. (Author) 12 refs.

  19. Evaluation of wild herbivore faeces from South Africa as a potential source of hydrolytically active microorganisms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, LL

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available once hydrolysis (FDA) or reduction (TTC) occurred. The fluorescein diacetate assay operates on the princi- ple of hydrolytic release of two acetate groups via ester bond cleavage by free and membrane-bound hydrolytic enzymes, yielding the yellow... hydrolytic enzymes such as amylases can cleave its ester bonds as well (Lundgren 1981; Green et  al. 2006). The FDA hydrolysis assay has also been utilised and recommended as an efficient method to estimate active cells within environmental samples...

  20. Antimicrobial effect of selected lactic acid bacteria against microorganisms with decarboxylase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatantuul Purevdorj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of twenty-one bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (12 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, 4 strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, 3 strains of Lb. helveticus and 2 strains of Lb. acidophilus, LAB against 28 Staphylococcus and 33 Enterococcus strains able to produce tyramine, putrescine, 2-phenylethylamine and cadaverine. The antimicrobial activity of cell-free supernatants (CFS from tested LAB was examined by an agar-well diffusion assay. Nine out of twenty-one strains (33% showed the inhibitory effect on tested enterococci and staphylococci, namely 9 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The diameters of inhibition zones ranged between 7 mm and 14 mm. The biggest diameter of 14 mm inhibition was obtained with the CFS's from strains CCDM 670 and CCDM 731 on Enterococcus sp. E16 and E28. The cell-free supernatants from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 71 and from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 731 displayed the broadest antibacterial activity (52% inhibition of all tested strains. On the other hand, the cell-free supernatants from the screened Lactobacillus strains did not show any inhibitory effect on the tested Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains. Nowadays, the great attention is given to the antibacterial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria. With the ability to produce a variety of metabolites displaying inhibitory effect, the LAB have great potential in biopreservation of food.

  1. Volatile constituents of Dianthus rupicola Biv. from Sicily: activity against microorganisms affecting cellulosic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Simona; Bruno, Maurizio; Senatore, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Dianthus rupicola Biv. (cliffs carnation) is a camephytic, suffruticous, perennial plant growing up to 40 cm high. The plant is widespread in Sicily and neighbouring islands (Egadi, Lampedusa, Lipari) and in some areas of southern Italy. GC and GC-MS analyses of the essential oil distilled from the flowers showed the presence of 66 components. Its composition is characterised by the high content of thymol and carvacrol derivatives. A good antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus and Bacillussubtilis, both infesting cellulosic historical material, was shown, whereas the antioxidant capacity was determined to be quite poor.

  2. Screening of novel microorganisms for biosurfactant and biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Sonica; Singh, B P; Lal, Mehi; Ma, Khan; Hussain, Touseef; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kaushik, S K; Kumar, Satish

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, 95 isolates of bacteria were tested for their biosurfactant as well as biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans. The results revealed that only 15.8% isolates showed biosurfactant activity. The emulsification index ranged from 0-68% and 24.2% isolates showed positive reaction for biosurfactant properties. In emulsification assay and oil spreading test, 18.95% and 5.26% isolates, respectively scored positive for biosurfactant production. Among all, only five isolates were found effective against P. infestans, for biocontrol properties. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-1 showed 62.22% inhibition zone after 72 hrs while P. aeruginosa-3 showed 46.42%. Forty-eight hrs old culture supernatants were highly effective in food-poisoning test, tuber slice test and detached leaf method against P. infestans. In whole potato plant test, bacterial cell based formulation, culture supernatant and bacterial cell suspension of P. aeruginosa-1 showed 10.42%, 9.94% and 17.96% diseases severity respectively, as against 53.96% in control. This isolate holds promise as biological control agent against P. infestans in field.

  3. [Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Salvia apiana against clinically important microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel H; Díaz-Rubio, Laura; Franco-Cabrera, Santiago; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolas A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Soto-Castro, Tely A; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario

    Due to the great global concern regarding bacterial resistance to antibiotics, an ongoing search for new molecules having antibacterial activity is necessary. This study evaluated the antibacterial and anticandidal effects of a hexane extract from the root of Salvia apiana. Salvia extracts at concentrations of 27, 13.5, 6.8 and 3.4mg/ml caused growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. However, no significant effect was observed on Escherichia coli and Candida tropicalis in comparison to vehicle. It was here demonstrated for the first time that Salvia apiana has an important antimicrobial effect on human pathogens of great clinical value, thus opening the field to continue the evaluation of this lamiaceous plant for its future use as a therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening of antagonistic activity of microorganisms against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antagonistic activities of five biocontrol agents: Trichoderma harzianum, Gliocladium roseum, Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces noursei and Streptomyces natalensis, were tested in vitro against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the causal agents of anthracnose disease in fruit crops. The microbial antagonists inhibited mycelial growth in the dual culture assay and conidial germination of Colletotrichum isolates. The two Streptomyces species exhibited the strongest antagonism against isolates of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. Microscopic examination showed that the most common mode of action was antibiosis. The results of this study identify T. harzianum, G. roseum, B. subtilis, S. natalensis and S. noursei as promising biological control agents for further testing against anthracnose disease in fruits. .

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of some microorganisms producing biogenic amines in some foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Bassiony, K.R.A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the proximate chemical composition ( moisture content , protein , fat, ash) chemical freshness tests (TBA, TVB-N, TMA, FAN, ph) and microbiological changes (total bacterial count, proteolytic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts counts) occurred in sardine fish and pastirma during cold storage at (4 ± 1 degree C) were fully investigated. Furthermore, the bacterial activity causing the formation of biogenic amines were also studied. In addition, the determination of biogenic amines in sardine fish and pastirma produced by these bacteria were explored. The effects of irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) which were applied as a trial to reduce biogenic amines formation in sardine fish and pastirma were also investigated. In addition, the effect of the tested irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) on organoleptic properties of the treated sardine fish and pastirma were determined.

  6. Metabolic products of microorganisms. 170. On the antibiotic activity of cladosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anke, H; Zähner, H

    1978-03-01

    Cladosporin was isolated from the cultures of three species of the genus Eurotium. Cladosporin inhibited the growth of several fungi and at very low concentrations the growth of Bacillus brevis and Clostridium pasteurianum. Bacillus subtilis and most other Gram-positive bacteria were not sensitive. Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts were not affected by concentrations up to 100 microgram/ml. Dimethyl cladosporin showed only week activity against Bacillus brevis with the minimal inhibitory concentrations being a 100 times higher than of cladosporin. The incorporation of leucine and uracil into acid insoluble material in Bacillus brevis cells was completely inhibited by concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml cladosporin. The incorporation of thymidine was not affected at this concentration.

  7. Antimicrobial activities of essential oils and crude extracts from tropical Citrus spp. against food-related microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipparat Hongpattarakere

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl acetate extracts and hydrodistillated-essential oils from peels of Citrus spp. were investigated for their antimicrobial activities against food related microorganisms by broth microdilution assay. Overall, ethyl acetate extracts from all citrus peels showed stronger antimicrobial activities than their essential oils obtained from hydrodistillation. The ethyl acetate extract of kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix DC. peel showed broad spectrum of inhibition against all Gram-positive bacteria, yeast and molds including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. sake and Aspergillus fumigatus TISTR 3180. It exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 0.28 and 0.56 mg/ml against Sac. cerevisiae var. sake and B. cereus, respectively while the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values against both microbes were 0.56 mg/ml. The MIC values of the extract against L. monocytogenes, A. fumigatus TISTR 3180 and S. aureus were 1.13 mg/ml while the MBC values against L. monocytogenes as well as A. fumigatus TISTR 3180 and S. aureus were 2.25 and 1.13 mg/ml, respectively. The major components of the ethyl acetate extract from kaffir lime were limonene (31.64 %, citronellal (25.96 % and b-pinene (6.83 % whereas b-pinene (30.48 %, sabinene (22.75 % and citronellal (15.66 % appeared to be major compounds of the essential oil obtained from hydrodistillation.

  8. Transformation of the insecticide teflubenzuron by microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkelstein, Z.I.; Baskunov, B.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, J.; Golovleva, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Transformation of teflubenzuron, the active component in the insecticide commercialized as Nomolt, by soil microorganisms was studied. It was shown that microorganisms, belonging to Bacillus, Alcaligenes, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter genera are capable to perform the hydrolytic cleavage of the

  9. "Petit suisse" cheese from kefir: an alternative dessert with microorganisms of probiotic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanise Sabrina Souza Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available "Petit Suisse" is a creamy cheese. Kefir is a symbiotic mixture of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts with probiotic activity including immunomodulation and balance of intestinal microflora. The present study aims to develop "Petit Suisse" cheese from kefir. Kefir grains were grown in pasteurized cow milk, and after the separation of kefir the serum was discarded and the "Petit Suisse" cheese was prepared using strawberry, mangaba, herbs, and dried tomatoes. The acceptance of the different preparations was evaluated using a nine-point hedonic scale followed by ANOVA. The sweet and salty products were compared by the Student's t-test. Purchase intent was evaluated by the means test and frequency distribution. All products were well accepted by the judges. The product was characterized by low yield, but it can be prepared at home at low cost. The nutritional composition analyses and the variety of flavors as well as the range of age of the judges are alternatives for further studies.

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF NONTRADITIONAL PLANT POLLEN AGAINST DIFFERENT SPECIES OF MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Kačániová

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the antimicrobial activity of four plant pollen samples to pathogenic bacteria, microscopic fungi and yeasts. Pollens of dogwood common (Cornus mas, ray mountain (Secale strictum spp. strictum, pumpkin rape (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca and grape vine (Vitis vinifera were collected in 2010 in Slovakia. The antimicrobial effects of the four nontraditional plant pollens were tested using the agar well diffusion method. For extraction, 70% ethanol (aqueous, v/v was applied. Antimicrobial susceptibility of five different strains of bacteria - three gram positive (Listeria monocytogenes CCM 4699, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953 and gram negative (Salmonella enterica CCM 4420, Escherichia coli CCM 3988, as well as three different strains of microscopic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and three different strains of yeasts Candida albicans, Geotrichum candidum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, were examinated. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive among bacteria to the three ethanol extracts of plant pollen after 24 hours of inoculation, A. flavus and C. albicans were the most sensitive microscopic fungi and yeast species, respectively.

  11. EVALUATION OF PHOSPHATE SOLUBILIZING MICROORGANISMS (PSMs FROM RHIZOSPHERE SOIL OF DIFFERENT CROP PLANTS AND ITS ANTAGONISTIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samikan Krishnakumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous rhizosphere soil samples were collected during study period (October 2011 – March 2012 of different crop plant from Thiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, India for the enumeration of Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSMs. Efficient phosphate solubilizing bacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria were enumerated. Maximum heterotrophic bacterial populations (19.4 X105, phosphate solubilizing bacteria (4.7 X 105 were recorded in the month of February and phosphate solubilizing fungi (3.9 X 102 were documented in the month of December in rhizosphere soil of ground nut. Minimum bacterial populations (14.3 X 105 were observed in rhizosphere soil of chilli in the month of March. Lowest phosphate solubilizing bacteria (1.2 X105 and phosphate solubilzing fungi (1.2 X 102 were observed in rhizosphere soil of paddy during the month of October. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria Pseudomonassp. - BS1, Bacillus sp. – BS2, Micrococcus sp. – BS3 and fungi Aspergillus sp. – FS1, Penicillium sp. – FS2.and Trichoderma sp. – FS3 were identified. Pseudomonas sp. - BS1. exhibited maximum solubilizing efficiency (SE and solubilizing index (SI of 300.0 and 4.0 respectively. In fungi Aspergillus sp. – FS1 showed a maximum solubilizing efficiency (SE and solubilizing index(SI of 283.3 and 3.8 respectively. Antagonistic activity of P-solubilizing Pseudomonassp. - BS1 was deliberated against selected fungal plant pathogens. Among pathogens studied Aspergillus sp. showed a maximum inhibition activity (16 mm and minimum activity (12 mm was observed against Fusarium sp. Moreover inhibition efficiency (IE and inhibition index (II of Pseudomonas sp. - BS1. also calculated base on the antagonistic activity. Aspergillus sp. exhibited highest inhibition efficiency and inhibition index of 166.6 and 3.6 respectively.

  12. Effect of Using Effective Microorganisms EM-1 on the Performance of Extended Aeration Activated Sludge in Treating Domestic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed M. Sheet

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available       This research concerning with the effect of using the effective microorganisms on the efficiency of extended Aeration Activated Sludge Units which consist from many strain of Bacteria, Fungi and Actinomycetes  in addition to board spectrum of nutrient and elements which important to growth, The use of this product is practically applied by using two bench scale laboratory units where they are operated to treat the wastewater after completing and preparing the activated sludge units to work under the same conditions of temperature and detention time (DT.54One bench scale is fed with wastewater and the other is operated by using a mixture of EM-1 along with the wastewater. It is noticed that the use of EM-1 with wastewater has reduced the smell resulting from disintegration in the aeration basin. Further, the color of sludge in the unit where EM-1 is added is light brown which means more activity and vitality. Besides, the concentration of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS is increased by using EM-1 by 30% due to the increase of nutrients and a reduction in the sludge volume index (SVI which is an important factor in the performance of the secondary settling basins which means a reduction in bulking of sludge, which is considered one of the most notable operating problem in activated sludge units. As a result bulking of sludge reduced by25% when EM-1 is used. Thus, EM-1 has participated in solving three important operating problems suffered by operators of these treatment units easily and without using complicated technologies or appliances. Further, EM-1 improves the removal efficiency of the units about 6-8% due to the reduction in chemical oxygen demand in the treated wastewater leaving the unit by 32%.

  13. P contribution derived from phosphate solubilizing microorganism activity, rock phosphate and SP-36 determination by isotope "3"2P technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anggi Nico Flatian; Iswandi Anas; Atang Sutandi; Ishak

    2016-01-01

    The "3"2P isotope technique has been used to trace P nutrients in the soil and soil-plant systems. The use of the isotope "3"2P has made it possible to differentiate the P contribution derived from phosphate solubilizing microorganism activity and the fertilizer P in the soil. The aims of the study were to obtain the quantitative data of P contribution derived from phosphate-solubilizing microorganism activity (Aspergillus niger and Burkholderia cepacia), rock phosphate and SP-36 through P uptake by the plants using isotope "3"2P technique and also to study the effects on growth and production of corn plants. The results were showed that phosphate-solubilizing microorganism, rock phosphate and SP-36 was produced specific activity ("3"2P) lower than control. The results were indicated that all treatments could contribute P for the plants. The lower specific activity was caused by supply P from rock phosphate and SP-36, and also was caused by solubilized of unavailable "3"1P from PSM activity, which decreased specific activity on labeled soil. The combination of phosphate-solubilizing microorganism and SP-36 treatments produced the highest P contribution, significantly higher than control and SP-36 only. Phosphate derived from combination of microorganism and SP-36 treatments ranging from 56.06% - 68.54% after 50 days planting, after 35 days planting, 51.96% - 59.65% on stover, 46.33% - 47.70% on grain and 53.02% - 59.87% on corn cob. In addition, the treatments could significantly support the plant growth and yield. It is expressed by increased number of leave at 35 days after planting, dry weight of leave at 35 days after planting and dry weight of grain. (author)

  14. Identification of metabolites involved in the biodegradation of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium bromide by activated sludge microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Cho, Chul-Woong; Jeon, Che-Ok; Chung, Yun-Jo; Lee, Min-Woo; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2009-01-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are low melting organic salts that potentially comprise wide application due to their fascinating properties and have emerged as promising "green" replacements for volatile organic solvents. Despite their nonmeasurable vapor pressure, some quantities of ILs will soon be present in effluent discharges since they do have significant solubility in water. Recently, the toxic effects of ILs toward aquatic communities have been intensively investigated, but little information is available concerning the biodegradable properties of these compounds. The objective of this study was to identify the metabolites generated during the biotransformation of 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium by microorganisms in aerobic activated sludge. The obtained results revealed that the alkylpyridinium salt was metabolized through the sequential oxidization in different positions of the alkyl side chains. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass-spectrometry analyses demonstrated that this biodegradation led to the formation of 1-hydroxybutyl-3-methylpyridinium, 1-(2-hydroxybutal)-3-methylpyridinium, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylpyridinium, and methylpyridine. On the basis of these intermediate products, biodegradation pathways were also suggested. These findings provide the basic information that might be useful for assessing the factors related to the environmental fate and behavior of this commonly used pyridinium IL.

  15. Study on the killing of oceanic harmful micro-organisms in ship's ballast water using oxygen active particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C; Meng, X Y; Bai, M D; Tian, Y P; Jing, Y

    2013-01-01

    Global Environment Facility has identified that the spread of marine invasive alien species is one of the four major risk factors threatening the safety of global marine environments. Ballast water discharge is the main cause of biological invasion. With physical methods of strong electric field ionization discharge at atmospheric pressure, O 2 and sea water (gaseous) were ionized, and then dissociated to a number of oxygen active particles (ROS) such as ·OH, O 2 + , H 2 O + , etc. ROS was injected into 0.6 t h −1 ballast water treatment system to form high concentration ROS solution in order to kill the harmful micro-organisms in ballast water. According to the land-based test standard of International Maritime Organization (IMO) Guidelines for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8), this paper concludes that single-cell algae of 3.0 × 10 4 cell ml −1 and bacteria of 2.0 × 10 4 cfu ml −1 were killed by ROS solution of 2.0 ppm. Death rate could reach almost 100%. The results meet the requirements of Regulation D-2 of International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments completely.

  16. Determination of bacteriocin activity with bioassays carried out on solid and liquid substrates: assessing the factor "indicator microorganism"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosiadis Ioannis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful application of growth inhibition techniques for quantitative determination of bacteriocins relies on the sensitivity of the applied indicator microorganism to the bacteriocin to which is exposed. However, information on indicator microorganisms' performance and comparisons in bacteriocin determination with bioassays is almost non-existing in the literature. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the parameter "indicator microorganism" in bioassays carried out on solid -agar diffusion assay- and liquid -turbidometric assay- substrates, applied in the quantification of the most studied bacteriocin nisin. Results The performance of characterized microorganisms of known sources, belonging to the genera of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Micrococcus and Leuconostoc, has been assessed in this work in the assays of plate agar diffusion and turbidometry. Dose responses and sensitivities were examined and compared over a range of assay variables in standard bacteriocin solutions, fermentation broth filtrates and processed food samples. Measurements on inhibition zones produced on agar plates were made by means of digital image analysis. The data produced were analyzed statistically using the ANOVA technique and pairwise comparisons tests. Sensitivity limits and linearity of responses to bacteriocin varied significantly among different test-microorganisms in both applied methods, the lower sensitivity limits depending on both the test-microorganism and the applied method. In both methods, however, only two of the nine tested microorganisms (Lactobacillus curvatus ATCC 51436 and Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 25740 were sensitive to very low concentrations of the bacteriocin and produced a linear-type of response in all kinds of samples used in this work. In all cases, very low bacteriocin concentrations, e.g. 1 IU/ml nisin, were more accurately determined in the turbidometric assay. Conclusion The present work shows that in

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis and chlorhexidine against the adherence of microorganisms to sutures after extraction of unerupted third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Lourdes Faria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial effect of mouthwashes containing Calendula officinalis L., Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate on the adherence of microorganisms to suture materials after extraction of unerupted third molars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with unerupted maxillary third molars indicated for extraction were selected (n=6 per mouthwash. First, the patients were subjected to extraction of the left tooth and instructed not to use any type of antiseptic solution at the site of surgery (control group. After 15 days, the right tooth was extracted and the patients were instructed to use the Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis or chlorhexidine mouthwash during 1 week (experimental group. For each surgery, the sutures were removed on postoperative day 7 and placed in sterile phosphate-buffered saline. Next, serial dilutions were prepared and seeded onto different culture media for the growth of the following microorganisms: blood agar for total microorganism growth; Mitis Salivarius bacitracin sucrose agar for mutans group streptococci; mannitol agar for Staphylococcus spp.; MacConkey agar for enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp., and Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol for Candida spp. The plates were incubated during 24-48 h at 37ºC for microorganism count (CFU/mL. RESULTS: The three mouthwashes tested reduced the number of microorganisms adhered to the sutures compared to the control group. However, significant differences between the control and experimental groups were only observed for the mouthwash containing 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate. CONCLUSIONS: Calendula officinalis L. and Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze presented antimicrobial activity against the adherence of microorganisms to sutures but were not as efficient as chlorhexidine digluconate.

  18. Phytochemical profiles and antimicrobial activity of aromatic Malaysian herb extracts against food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziman, Nurain; Abdullah, Noriham; Noor, Zainon Mohd; Kamarudin, Wan Saidatul Syida Wan; Zulkifli, Khairusy Syakirah

    2014-04-01

    Preliminary phytochemical and flavonoid compounds of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 6 aromatic Malaysian herbs were screened and quantified using Reverse-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC). The herbal extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 10 food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms using disk diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)/minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of herbal extracts were determined. In the phytochemical screening process, both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. hydropiper exhibited presence of all 7 tested phytochemical compounds. Among all herbal extracts, the aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts demonstrated the highest antibacterial activity against 7 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with diameter ranging from 7.0 to 18.5 mm and 6.5 to 19 mm, respectively. The MIC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 18.75 to 175 mg/mL and 0.391 to 200 mg/mL, respectively while the MBC/MFC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 25 to 200 mg/mL and 3.125 to 50 mg/mL, respectively. Major types of bioactive compounds in aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts were identified using RP-HPLC instrument. Flavonoids found in these plants were epi-catechin, quercetin, and kaempferol. The ability of aqueous Persicaria hydropiper (L.) H. Gross and Etlingera elatior (Jack) R.M. Sm. extracts to inhibit the growth of bacteria is an indication of its broad spectrum antimicrobial potential. Hence these herbal extracts may be used as natural preservative to improve the safety and shelf-life of food and pharmaceutical products. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics of Agave Sap (Agave salmiana after Its Inoculation with Microorganisms Isolated from Agave Sap Concentrate Selected to Enhance Anticancer Activity

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    Luis M. Figueroa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Saponins have been correlated with the reduction of cancer cell growth and the apoptotic effect of agave sap concentrate. Empirical observations of this artisanal Mexican food have shown that fermentation occurs after agave sap is concentrated, but little is known about the microorganisms that survive after cooking, or their effects on saponins and other metabolites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in metabolites found in agave (A. salmiana sap after its fermentation with microorganisms isolated from agave sap concentrate, and demonstrate its potential use to enhance anticancer activity. Microorganisms were isolated by dilution plating and identified by 16S rRNA analysis. Isolates were used to ferment agave sap, and their corresponding butanolic extracts were compared with those that enhanced the cytotoxic activity on colon (Caco-2 and liver (Hep-G2 cancer cells. Metabolite changes were investigated by mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Among 69 isolated microorganisms, the actinomycetes Arthrobacter globiformis and Gordonia sp. were used to analyze the metabolites, along with bioactivity changes. From the 939 ions that were mainly responsible for variation among fermented samples at 48 h, 96 h, and 192 h, four were correlated to anticancer activity. It was shown that magueyoside B, a kammogenin glycoside, was found at higher intensities in the samples fermented with Gordonia sp. that reduced Hep-G2 viability better than controls. These findings showed that microorganisms from agave sap concentrate change agave sap metabolites such as saponins. Butanolic extracts obtained after agave sap fermentation with Arthrobacter globiformis or Gordonia sp. increased the cancer cell growth inhibitory effect on colon or liver cancer cells, respectively.

  20. Membrane Separated Flow Cell for Parallelized Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy to Characterize Electro-Active Microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stöckl, Markus; Schlegel, Christin; Sydow, Anne; Holtmann, Dirk; Ulber, Roland; Mangold, Klaus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a membrane separated electrochemical flow cell. • Simultaneous combination of EIS and CLSM. • Monitoring of bacterial cell attachment to anode of MFC. • Cell attachment of Shewanella oneidensis is shown. - Abstract: Understanding the attachment of electro-active bacteria to electrode surfaces and their subsequent biofilm formation is one of the major challenges for the establishment of bacterial bioelectrochemial systems (BES). For a constant observation of biofilm growth, providing information on different stages of biofilm formation, continuous monitoring methods are required. In this paper a combination of two powerful analytical methods, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), for biofilm monitoring is presented. A custom-built flow cell with a transparent indium tin oxide working electrode (WE) was constructed allowing monitoring of cell attachment to a working electrode simultaneously by EIS and CLSM. Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and EIS of an iron (II)/iron (III) redox couple indicate that the flow cell is suitable for electrochemical experiments. An engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (ATCC700550) producing eGFP was used as electro-active model organism to demonstrate the practical application of the flow cell as BES to monitor cell attachment simultaneously with EIS and CLSM. Applying the flow cell as MFC (transparent working electrode poised as anode) produced a typical current curve for such a system. From the equivalent circuit used to interpret EIS data the charge transfer resistance R CT is sensitive to attachment of microorganisms. Fitted R CT was increased initially after cell inoculation and then lowered constantly with progressing experimental time. In parallel taken CLSM images show that bacteria already adhered to the WE 5 min after inoculation. A mono- respectively bilayer of electro-active cells was observed after 17 h on the WE surface. With the presented

  1. Properties of thermophilic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Microorganisms are called thermophilic or extreme thermophilic (caldo-active) if they grow and reproduce over 47 0 C and 70 0 C, respectively. A survey of growth characteristics of thermophiles is presented and it includes those which also live at extreme pH. The prevalent but not completely emcompassing theory of the ability of thermophiles to grow at high temperatures is that they have macromolecules and cell organelles with high thermostability. Work on some proteins and cell organelles from thermophiles is reviewed. The thermostabilities of these components are compared with those of the living cells, and factors which may govern optimum as well as minimum growth temperatures of microorganisms are discussed. Examples are from the literature but also include enzymes involved in tetrahydrofolate metabolism and other proteins of acetogenic therhmophilic bacteria which are presently studied in the author's laboratory

  2. [Effects of relic microorganism B. sp. on development, gaseous exchange, spontaneous motor activity, stress resistance and survival of Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brushkov, A V; Bezrukov, V V; Griva, G I; Muradian, Kh K

    2011-01-01

    The effect of relic microorganism B. sp., living in severe environment of Siberian permafrost during thousands and millions of years, on development and stress resistance of Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. In manipulating with such objects with practically "eternal life span", molecular carriers of the unprecedented longevity potential and possibilities of their transmission to other biological objects should primarily be addressed. Here we discuss for the first time the influence of B. sp. application on development, survival, stress resistance and the gross physiological predictors of aging rate in D. melanogaster. To establish optimal and toxic doses, wide range of B. sp. concentrations were tested (1-500 million cells of B. sp. per 1 ml of the flies feeding medium). Surprisingly, no toxic effects of B. sp. could be registered even on such a "sensitive" model as the developing larvae. In fact, the rate of development, survival and body mass gradually increased with elevation of B. sp. concentration. The gain of higher body mass within shorter periods of development could indicate enhanced anabolic and/ or declined catabolic effects of B. sp. Higher motor activity and gaseous exchange rates were observed in imagoes developed on the mediums with B. sp. application. Survival of these flies at the heat shock (30 min at 38 degrees C) and ultraviolet irradiation (60 min, 50W UV lamp) was increased, indicating elevated stress resistance, apparently due to stimulation of DNA-repair and chaperone-mediated protection of macromolecules. Further research is clearly warranted to identify more efficient anti-stress and antiaging preparations and schemes of B. sp. application on models of laboratory mammals and human cell cultures.

  3. Changes in Leaf Anatomical Traits Enhanced Photosynthetic Activity of Soybean Grown in Hydroponics with Plant Growth-Promoting Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Roberta; Arena, Carmen; De Micco, Veronica; Giordano, Maria; Aronne, Giovanna; De Pascale, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    The use of hydroponic systems for cultivation in controlled climatic conditions and the selection of suitable genotypes for the specific environment help improving crop growth and yield. We hypothesized that plant performance in hydroponics could be further maximized by exploiting the action of plant growth-promoting organisms (PGPMs). However, the effects of PGPMs on plant physiology have been scarcely investigated in hydroponics. Within a series of experiments aimed to identify the best protocol for hydroponic cultivation of soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.], we evaluated the effects of a PGPMs mix, containing bacteria, yeasts, mycorrhiza and trichoderma beneficial species on leaf anatomy, photosynthetic activity and plant growth of soybean cv. 'Pr91m10' in closed nutrient film technique (NFT). Plants were grown in a growth chamber under semi-aseptic conditions and inoculated at seed, seedling and plant stages, and compared to non-inoculated (control) plants. Light and epi-fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that leaves of inoculated plants had higher density of smaller stomata (297 vs. 247 n/mm 2 ), thicker palisade parenchyma (95.0 vs. 85.8 μm), and larger intercellular spaces in the mesophyll (57.5% vs. 52.2%), compared to non-inoculated plants. The modifications in leaf functional anatomical traits affected gas exchanges; in fact starting from the reproductive phase, the rate of leaf net photosynthesis (NP) was higher in inoculated compared to control plants (8.69 vs. 6.13 μmol CO 2 m -2 s -1 at the beginning of flowering). These data are consistent with the better maximal PSII photochemical efficiency observed in inoculated plants (0.807 vs. 0.784 in control); conversely no difference in leaf chlorophyll content was found. The PGPM-induced changes in leaf structure and photosynthesis lead to an improvement of plant growth (+29.9% in plant leaf area) and seed yield (+36.9%) compared to control. Our results confirm that PGPMs may confer benefits in

  4. Changes in Leaf Anatomical Traits Enhanced Photosynthetic Activity of Soybean Grown in Hydroponics with Plant Growth-Promoting Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Paradiso

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydroponic systems for cultivation in controlled climatic conditions and the selection of suitable genotypes for the specific environment help improving crop growth and yield. We hypothesized that plant performance in hydroponics could be further maximized by exploiting the action of plant growth-promoting organisms (PGPMs. However, the effects of PGPMs on plant physiology have been scarcely investigated in hydroponics. Within a series of experiments aimed to identify the best protocol for hydroponic cultivation of soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.], we evaluated the effects of a PGPMs mix, containing bacteria, yeasts, mycorrhiza and trichoderma beneficial species on leaf anatomy, photosynthetic activity and plant growth of soybean cv. ‘Pr91m10’ in closed nutrient film technique (NFT. Plants were grown in a growth chamber under semi-aseptic conditions and inoculated at seed, seedling and plant stages, and compared to non-inoculated (control plants. Light and epi-fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that leaves of inoculated plants had higher density of smaller stomata (297 vs. 247 n/mm2, thicker palisade parenchyma (95.0 vs. 85.8 μm, and larger intercellular spaces in the mesophyll (57.5% vs. 52.2%, compared to non-inoculated plants. The modifications in leaf functional anatomical traits affected gas exchanges; in fact starting from the reproductive phase, the rate of leaf net photosynthesis (NP was higher in inoculated compared to control plants (8.69 vs. 6.13 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 at the beginning of flowering. These data are consistent with the better maximal PSII photochemical efficiency observed in inoculated plants (0.807 vs. 0.784 in control; conversely no difference in leaf chlorophyll content was found. The PGPM-induced changes in leaf structure and photosynthesis lead to an improvement of plant growth (+29.9% in plant leaf area and seed yield (+36.9% compared to control. Our results confirm that PGPMs may confer benefits in

  5. Microorganisms in food technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, A H

    1981-11-01

    Man has been using microorganisms for thousands of years to make bread, cheese, beer, wine, etc. Today, microorganisms can be specially grown or genetically manipulated so as to synthesize high-quality proteins even from low-grade basic materials.

  6. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M.; Hozalski, Raymond M.; Sadowksy, Michael J.; Hamilton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB. PMID:26209671

  7. Abundance and activity of soil microorganisms in Cedrus atlantica forests are more related to land use than to altitude or latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Perez Fernandez, María; Moreno Gallardo, Laura; Lechuga Ordoñez, Victor; Linares, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Several environmental traits might change the abundance and the function of soil microorganisms in forest soils by plant-mediated reactions. Few studies have related the landscape-scale forest structural diversity with the micro-scale distribution of microorganism and their activities. High mountain environments harbor ecosystems that are very sensitive to global change and hence highly vulnerable, as those of Atlantic cedar. Altitudinal gradients in mountains are orrelated with changes in vegetation. We propose that altitudinal gradients drive shifts in microbial communities and are correlated with land uses. Thus, the latitudinal and longitudinal pattern of abundance and activity of soil micro-organisms was studied in an intercontinental comparison. We investigate soil extractable organic carbon (EOC) and nitrogen and carbon, microbial biomass and microbial metabolic activities at eight different sites along the latitudinal range of Cedrus atlantica, covering different altitudes and soils characteristics both in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco. Analyses of the abundances of total bacteria, (16S rRNA gene), was conducted using the Ilumina metagenomics technique. Results show that the stands at the highest altitudes had distinct microbial and biochemical characteristics compared with other areas. Overall, microbial activity, as measured by soil respiration, is higher in forests subjected to lower human pressure than in stands highly degraded, probably reflecting the quality of litter input that results of the influence of local assemblage of different tree, shrub and annual species, though changes in the soil N and C contents. Indeed, total soil C and N contents explained the microbial properties at every scale. Our results suggest that in contrast to the observed pronounced altitudinal changes, the kind of human-mediate land management has a stronger role in defining changes in microbial composition and activities in the investigated forest systems.

  8. Microorganisms, Organic Carbon, and Their Relationship with Oxidant Activity in Hyper-Arid Mars-Like Soils: Implications for Soil Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Karouia, Fathi; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Soil samples from the hyper-arid region in the Atacama 23 Desert in Southern Peru (La Joya Desert) were analyzed for total and labile organic carbon (TOC & LOC), phospholipid fatty acids analysis (PLFA), quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 4',6- diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-fluorescent microscopy, culturable microorganisms, and oxidant activity, in order to understand the relationship between the presence of organic matter and microorganisms in these types of soils. TOC content levels were similar to the labile pool of carbon suggesting the absence of recalcitrant carbon in these soils. The range of LOC was from 2 to 60 micro-g/g of soil. PLFA analysis indicated a maximum of 2.3 x 10(exp 5) cell equivalents/g. Culturing of soil extracts yielded 1.1 x 10(exp 2)-3.7 x 10(exp 3) CFU/g. qRT-PCR showed between 1.0 x 10(exp 2) and 8 x 10(exp 3) cells/g; and DAPI fluorescent staining indicated bacteria counts up to 5 x 104 cells/g. Arid and semiarid samples (controls) showed values between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 11) cells/g with all of the methods used. Importantly, the concentration of microorganisms in hyper-arid soils did not show any correlation with the organic carbon content; however, there was a significant dependence on the oxidant activity present in these soil samples evaluated as the capacity to decompose sodium formate in 10 hours. We suggest that the analysis of oxidant activity could be a useful indicator of the microbial habitability in hyper-arid soils, obviating the need to measure water activity over time. This approach could be useful in astrobiological studies on other worlds.

  9. [Phylogenetic diversity and activity of anaerobic microorganisms of high-temperature horizons of the Dagang Oilfield (China)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazina, T N; Shestakova, N M; Grigor'ian, A A; Mikhaĭlova, E M; Turova, T P; Poltaraus, A B; Feng, C; Ni, F; Beliaev, S S

    2006-01-01

    The number of microorganisms of major metabolic groups and the rates of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic processes in the formation waters of the high-temperature horizons of Dagang oilfield have been determined. Using cultural methods, it was shown that the microbial community contained aerobic bacteria oxidizing crude oil, anaerobic fermentative bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria. Using cultural methods, the possibility of methane production from a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (H2 + CO2) and from acetate was established, and this result was confirmed by radioassays involving NaH14CO3 and 14CH3COONa. Analysis of 16S rDNA of enrichment cultures of methanogens demonstrated that these microorganisms belong to Methanothermobacter sp. (M. thermoautotrophicus), which consumes hydrogen and carbon dioxide as basic substrates. The genes of acetate-utilizing bacteria were not identified. Phylotypes of the representatives of Thermococcus spp. were found among 16S rDNAs of archaea. 16S rRNA genes of bacterial clones belong to the orders Thermoanaerobacteriales (Thermoanaerobacter, Thermovenabulum, Thermacetogenium, and Coprothermobacter spp.), Thermotogales, Nitrospirales (Thermodesulfovibrio sp.) and Planctomycetales. 16S rDNA of a bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate in the course of syntrophic growth with H2-utilizing methanogens was found at high-temperature petroleum reservoirs for the first time. These results provide further insight into the composition of microbial communities of high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, indicating that syntrophic processes play an important part in acetate degradation accompanied by methane production.

  10. ATIVIDADE ENZIMÁTICA DE MICRORGANISMOS ISOLADOS DO JACATUPÉ (Pachyrhizus erosus L. Urban ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY OF MICROORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM YAM BEAN LEGUME (Pachyrhizus erosus L. Urban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia L. Montenegro STAMFORD

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available O isolamento e a identificação de microrganismos produtores de enzimas de interesse comercial, utilizando tubérculos de jacatupé (Pachyrhizus erosus L. Urban, foi o objetivo principal deste trabalho. Isolaram-se microrganismos endofíticos e epifíticos identificados por observação micromorfológica. A avaliação da atividade enzimática das linhagens foi determinada pelo método de difusão em ágar. As sessenta e oito linhagens isoladas dos tubérculos de jacatupé foram cultivadas em meio sólido específico para amilase, lipase, protease e celulase por 96h a 280 C. Os microrganismos epifíticos encontrados foram Pithomyces (7,3%, Aspergillus (19,2%, Fusarium (5,9% e Trichoderma (5,8%, e os endofíticos foram Mucor (7,3%, Rhizopus (10,3%, Bacillus (19,0%, Staphylococcus (10,3% e Nocardiopsis (15%. As linhagens de Nocardiopsis sp. apresentaram atividade lipolítica superior à do padrão, porém a atividade amilolítica não apresentou diferença significativa comparada com o padrão. As linhagens de Mucor sp., Pithomyces sp. e Staphylococcus sp. produziram atividade proteolítica abaixo do padrão. Nenhum isolado apresentou atividade celulolítica.The isolation and identification of microorganisms that produce enzyme of commercial interest utilizing tubers of yam bean legume (Pachyrrizus erosus L. Urban was the main objective of this work. Endophytic and epiphytic microorganisms were isolated by micromorphologyc observation. The agar diffusion method was used to determine the enzymatic activity. Sixty-eight isolates from yam bean tubers were cultured at 280 C in solid medium specific to amylase, lipase, protease and cellulase for 96h. The epiphytic microorganisms Pithomyces (7,3%, Aspergillus (19,2%, Fusarium (5,9% and Trichoderma (5,8% and the endophytic microorganisms Mucor (7,3%, Rhizopus (10,3% Bacillus (19%, Staphylococcus (10,3% and Nocardiopsis (15% were isolated. Compared to the specific standard culture Nocardiopsis sp. showed

  11. Composition of the Essential Oil of Allium neapolitanum Cirillo Growing Wild in Sicily and its Activity on Microorganisms Affecting Historical Art Crafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Simona; Bruno, Maurizio; Senatore, Federica; Senatore, Felice

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil of the aerial parts of Allium neapolitanum Cirillo collected in Sicily were analyzed by gas-chromatography-flame-ionization detection and gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nineteen compounds were identified in the oil and the main components were found to be (E)-chrysanthenyl acetate (28.1%), (Z)-chrysanthenyl acetate (23.8%), (E)-β-farnesene (9.6%), dimethyl trisulfide (9.6%), camphor (7.4%), methyl allyl disulfide (6.8%) and 1-methyl-3-allyl trisulfide (5.8%). The essential oil showed good antimicrobial activity against 11 strains of test microorganisms, including several species infesting historical material.

  12. GC-MS analysis and antimicrobial activity determination of Citrus medica L. var proper leaf essential oil from South Sulawesi against skin pathogen microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyah; Himawan, A.; Rante, H.; Mufidah; Ningsih, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    A research about Citrus medica L. var sarcodactylis had been conducted and it showed a significant antimicrobial activity, thus drive our curiosity to investigate the other variety from the same species, Citrus medica L. var proper. This research focuses in chemical compound study and antimicrobial activity screening against Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acne, and Candida albicans of Citrus medica L. var Proper leaves’ essential oil. The essential oil is distillated from fresh leaves by hydrodestillation. The chemical compound was analysed using GC-MS instrument while the antimicrobial activity was tested using disk diffusion method. The results showed that the major component of the essential oil was Z-citral, citral and limonene compounds. The antimicrobial activity test results against the test microorganism are 9.15±0.15 mm, 11.15±1.3 mm and 8.02±0.48 mm, consecutively, for Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acne and Candida albicans.

  13. The Effect of Sedimentation Conditions of Frozen Deposits at the Kolyma Lowland on the Distribution of Methane and Microorganisms Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshurkova, V.; Kholodov, A. L.; Spektor, V.; Sherbakova, V.; Rivkina, E.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical and microbiological investigations of methane distribution and origin in Northeastern Arctic permafrost sediments indicated that microbial methane production was observed in situ in thawed and permanently frozen deposits (Rivkina et al., 2007). To check the hypothesis about the correlation between permafrost ground type and quantity of methane, produced by microorganisms, the samples from deposits of thermokarst depression (alas), Yedoma and fluvial deposits of Kolyma floodplain for gas measurements and microbiological study were collected and the experiment with anaerobic incubation was conducted. Gas analysis indicated that alas and floodplain samples were characterized by high methane concentrations whereas Yedoma samples had only traces of methane. Two media with different substrates were prepared anaerobically for incubation. First medium contained sucrose as a substrate for hydrolytic microflora and the second one contained acetate as a substrate for methanogens. Two samples from alas, one sample from Yedoma and one from floodplain were placed in anaerobic bottles and media under gas mixture (N2, CO2 and H2) were added. The bottles were incubated for 2 weeks at room temperature. The results of the experiment showed that there was the increase of methane concentrations in the bottles with Yedoma and Floodplain samples to 52-60 and 67-90 %, respectively, from initial concentrations in contrast with Alas sample inoculated bottles. At the same time the concentration of methane in control bottles, which did not include substrates, increased to 15-19%. Current research is a part of NSF funded project "The Polaris".

  14. Seasonality distribution of the abundance and activity of nitrification and denitrification microorganisms in sediments of surface flow constructed wetlands planted with Myriophyllum elatinoides during swine wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Liu, Feng; Chen, Liang; Li, Yuyuan; Li, Yong; Xiao, Rulin; Wu, Jinshui

    2018-01-01

    Surface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) planted with Myriophyllum elatinoides for treatment of swine wastewater were examined to evaluate the effect of season, segment (site S1, S2, and S3), and treatment (100mgL -1 TN, T1; 300mgL -1 TN, T2; 500mgL -1 TN, T3) on the activity, and abundances of nitrifying and, denitrifying microorganisms, and on the abundance of sediment bacteria. The activity and abundances of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and the abundance of bacteria were the highest in T3 samples, especially in S1 (Pswine wastewater treatment stimulate the growth of nitrifiers, denitrifiers and bacteria in sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biofouling of marbles by oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Zeki; Öztürk, Ayten; Çolak, Emel

    2015-08-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms disfigure the surfaces of different types of stone. Stone structure is damaged by the activity of photoautotrophic and other microorganisms. However, to date few, investigations have been undertaken into the relationship between microorganisms and the properties of different types of marble. In this study, biological activity of photoautotrophic microorganisms on three types of marble (Yatagan White, Giallo Anticato and Afyon White) was investigated under laboratory conditions over a short period of time. The three types of marble supported the growth of phototrophic microbial communities on their outer and inner layers, turning their original colour from white to a yellowish green colour. The porosity of the marble types facilitated filamentous microbial growth in the presence of water. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the accumulation of aggregates such as small spherical, fibrillar, calcified globular bodies on the inner surfaces of the marbles. This suggests that the microscopic characteristics of particular marble types may stimulate the growth of certain types of microorganisms.

  16. Quantifying filamentous microorganisms in activated sludge before, during, and after an incident of foaming by oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and antibody staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerther, D B; de los Reyes, F L; de los Reyes, M F; Raskin, L

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridizations, immunostaining, and a simple foaming potential test were used to follow an incident of seasonal filamentous foaming at the Urbana-Champaign Sanitary District, Northeast Wastewater Treatment Plant. A positive correlation was observed between an increase in foaming potential and the appearance of foam on the surfaces of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. In addition, during the occurrence of foaming, the mass and activity of Gordonia spp. increased as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization, antibody staining, and quantitative membrane hybridization of RNA extracts. An increase in Gordonia spp. rRNA levels from 0.25 to 1.4% of total rRNA was observed using quantitative membrane hybridizations, whereas during the same period, the fraction of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids attributed to Gordonia spp. increased from 4% to more than 32% of the total mixed liquor volatile suspended solids. These results indicate that both the activity and biomass level of Gordonia spp. in activated sludge increased relative to the activity aid the biomass level of the complete microbial community during a seasonal occurrence of filamentous foaming. Thus, Gordonia spp. may represent a numerically dominant but metabolically limited fraction of the total biomass, and the role of Gordonia spp. in filamentous foaming may be linked more tightly to the physical presence of filamentous microorganisms than to the metabolic activity of the cells.

  17. Microorganisms involved in MIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, K. [Danish Technological Institute (Denmark)

    2011-07-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a widespread problem that is difficult to detect and assess because of its complex mechanism. This paper presents the involvement of microorganisms in MIC. Some of the mechanisms that cause MIC include hydrogen consumption, production of acids, anode-cathode formation and electron shuttling. A classic bio-corrosive microorganism in the oil and gas industry is sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). Methanogens also increase corrosion rates in metals. Some of the phylogenetic orders detected while studying SRP and methanogens are archaeoglobales, clostridiales, methanosarcinales and methanothermococcus. There were some implications, such as growth of SRP not being correlated with growth of methanogens; methanogens were included in MIC risk assessment. A few examples are used to display how microorganisms are involved in topside corrosion and microbial community in producing wells. From the study, it can be concluded that, MIC risk assessment includes system data and empirical knowledge of the distribution and number of microorganisms in the system.

  18. Microorganisms' mediated reduction of β-ketoesters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... Whole cells usually express a multitude of enzymatic activities; therefore an ... Each microorganism was cultivated for the biomass development on specific medium ..... Ketoester reductase for conversion of keto acid esters to ...

  19. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increased with age of the heap. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans kept constant throughout the leaching cycle, and Firmicutes group showed a low and a patchy distribution in the heap. The Acidiphilium‐like bacteria reached their highest abundance corresponding to the amount of autotrophs. The active microorganisms in the leaching system were determined using two RNA‐based sensitive techniques. In most cases, the 16S rRNA copy numbers of At. ferrooxidans, L. ferriphilum, At. thiooxidans and F. acidiphilum, was concomitant with the DNA copy numbers, whereas Acidiphilium‐like bacteria and some Firmicutes members did not show a clear correlation between 16S rRNA accumulation and DNA copy numbers. However, the prokaryotic acidophile microarray (PAM) analysis showed active members of Alphaproteobacteria in all samples and of Sulfobacillus genus in older ones. Also, new active groups such as Actinobacteria and Acidobacterium genus were detected by PAM. The results suggest that changes during the leaching cycle in chemical and physical conditions, such as pH and Fe3+/Fe2+ ion rate, are primary factors shaping the microbial dynamic in the heap. PMID:21255296

  20. Micro-Organ Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  1. Microorganisms and methods for producing pyruvate, ethanol, and other compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Xiaolin

    2017-12-26

    Microorganisms comprising modifications for producing pyruvate, ethanol, and other compounds. The microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate activity of one or more of pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, phosphate acetyltransferase, acetate kinase, pyruvate oxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, cytochrome terminal oxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, pyruvate formate lyase, pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme, and isocitrate lyase. The microorganisms optionally comprise modifications that enhance expression or activity of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The microorganisms are optionally evolved in defined media to enhance specific production of one or more compounds. Methods of producing compounds with the microorganisms are provided.

  2. Characterization of functional microorganism groups and substrate in activated sludge and wastewater by AUR, NUR and OUR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, G. Holm; Jørgensen, P. Elberg; Henze, Mogens

    1992-01-01

    . The results indicated that influent biomass is of significance for the obtained fraction of denitrifiers to heterotrophs. For a separate nitrification stage activated sludge without denitrification a fraction of denitrifiers of 15-20% was found. The results of endogenous NUR and OUR determinations indicated...

  3. The antimicrobial efficacy and structure activity relationship of novel carbohydrate fatty acid derivatives against Listeria spp. and food spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobmann, Patricia; Smith, Aoife; Dunne, Julie; Henehan, Gary; Bourke, Paula

    2009-01-15

    Novel mono-substituted carbohydrate fatty acid (CFA) esters and ethers were investigated for their antibacterial activity against a range of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria focussing on Listeria monocytogenes. Carbohydrate derivatives with structural differences enable comparative studies on the structure/activity relationship for antimicrobial efficacy and mechanism of action. The antimicrobial efficacy of the synthesized compounds was compared with commercially available compounds such as monolaurin and monocaprylin, as well as the pure free fatty acids, lauric acid and caprylic acid, which have proven antimicrobial activity. Compound efficacy was compared using an absorbance based broth microdilution assay to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), increase in lag phase and decrease in maximum growth rate. Among the carbohydrate derivatives synthesized, lauric ether of methyl alpha-d-glucopyranoside and lauric ester of methyl alpha-d-mannopyranoside showed the highest growth-inhibitory effect with MIC values of 0.04 mM, comparable to monolaurin. CFA derivatives were generally more active against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. The analysis of both ester and ether fatty acid derivatives of the same carbohydrate, in tandem with alpha and beta configuration of the carbohydrate moiety suggest that the carbohydrate moiety is involved in the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid derivatives and that the nature of the bond also has a significant effect on efficacy, which requires further investigation. This class of CFA derivatives has great potential for developing antibacterial agents relevant to the food industry, particularly for control of Listeria or other Gram-positive pathogens.

  4. Effect of Erica sp. Honey against Microorganisms of Clinical Importance: Study of the Factors Underlying this Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia M. Estevinho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the factors (phenolic compounds, flavonoids, sugars or H2O2 that contribute the most to the antimicrobial activity of heather honey samples against four yeasts and four bacteria with medical importance. To discard the effect of H2O2 in the antimicrobial activity, catalase was added. To evaluate the osmotic pressure’s effect, artificial honey was also used. Phenolic compounds and flavonoids were determined and Pearson’s correlation analysis was performed to assess whether these correlated with antimicrobial activity. The amount of phenolic compounds ranged from 630.89 ± 5.21 GAE kg−1 to 718.92 ± 4.41 GAE kg−1, while the flavonoids varied between 450.72 ± 5.67 CAE kg−1 and 673.98 ± 4.33 CAE kg−1. For the bacteria, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the honey without catalase ranged from 1.01 ± 0.50% to 10.00 ± 4.72% and was between 2.00 ± 0.94% and 13.27 ± 5.23% for honey with catalase. Concerning the yeasts, the MICs was between 13.16 ± 4.08% and 20.00 ± 5.09% for honey without catalase and between 14.95 ± 4.16% and 25.67 ± 5.50% for honey with catalase. The elucidation of the antimicrobial factors and action mechanisms is essential for the correct use of honey in therapeutic applications.

  5. Effects of Metal Nanoparticles on Methane Production from Waste-Activated Sludge and Microorganism Community Shift in Anaerobic Granular Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Xiaohu

    2016-05-01

    Extensive use of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer and industrial products has led to concerns about their potential environmental impacts; however, the influences of different NPs (e.g., nZVI (nano zero-valent iron), Ag NPs, Fe2O3 NPs and MgO NPs) on the anaerobic digestion of sludge have not yet been studied in depth. Additionally, a new guideline or the use of different NPs in the anaerobic digestion of sludge should be established to improve the anaerobic digestion of sludge and avoid inhibitory effects. This study investigated the effects of four representative NPs (i.e., nZVI, Ag NPs, Fe2O3 NPs and MgO NPs) on methane production during the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). The presence of 10 mg/g total suspended solids (TSS) nZVI and 100 mg/g TSS Fe2O3 NPs increased methane production to 120% and 117% of the control, respectively, whereas 500 mg/g TSS Ag NPs and 500 mg/g TSS MgO NPs generated lower levels of methane production (73.52% and 1.08% that of the control, respectively). These results showed that low concentrations of nZVI and Fe2O3 NPs promoted the amount of microbes (Bacteria and Archaea) and activities of key enzymes but that higher concentrations of Ag NPs and MgO NPs inhibited them.

  6. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafleva, Marina; Hoover, Richard; Rozanov, Alexei; Vrevskiy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ancient Archean and Proterozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. The first of Archean fossil microorganisms from Baltic shield have been reported at the last SPIE Conference in 2005. Since this confeence biomorphic structures have been revealed in Archean rocks of Karelia. It was determined that there are 3 types of such bion structures: 1. structures found in situ, in other words microorganisms even-aged with rock matrix, that is real Archean fossils biomorphic structures, that is to say forms inhabited early formed rocks, and 3. younger than Archean-Protherozoic minerali microorganisms, that is later contamination. We made attempt to differentiate these 3 types of findings and tried to understand of burial of microorganisms. The structures belongs (from our point of view) to the first type, or real Archean, forms were under examination. Practical investigation of ancient microorganisms from Green-Stone-Belt of Northern Karelia turns to be very perspective. It shows that even in such ancient time as Archean ancient diverse world existed. Moreover probably such relatively highly organized cyanobacteria and perhaps eukaryotic formes existed in Archean world.

  7. Biological treatment of H(2)S using pellet activated carbon as a carrier of microorganisms in a biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huiqi; Koe, Lawrence C C; Yan, Rong; Chen, Xiaoge

    2006-08-01

    Biological treatment is an emerging technology for treating off-gases from wastewater treatment plants. The most commonly reported odourous compound in off-gases is hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), which has a very low odor threshold. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of using a biological activated carbon as a novel packing material, to achieve a performance-enhanced biofiltration processes in treating H(2)S through an optimum balance and combination of the adsorption capacity with the biodegradation of H(2)S by the bacteria immobilized on the material. The biofilm was mostly developed through culturing the bacteria in the presence of carbon pellets in mineral media. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to identify the biofilm development on carbon surface. Two identical laboratory scale biofilters, one was operated with biological activated carbon (BAC) and another with virgin carbon without bacteria immobilization. Various concentrations of H(2)S (up to 125 ppmv) were used to determine the optimum column performance. A rapid startup (a few days) was observed for H(2)S removal in the biofilter. At a volumetric loading of 1600 m(3)m(-3)h(-1) (at 87 ppmv H(2)S inlet concentration), elimination capacity of the BAC (181 gH(2)Sm(-3)h(-1)) at removal efficiency (RE) of 94% was achieved. If the inlet concentration was kept at below 30 ppmv, high H(2)S removal (over 99%) was achieved at a gas retention time (GRT) as low as 2s, a value, which is shorter than most previously reported for biofilter operations. The bacteria population in the acidic biofilter demonstrated capacity for removal of H(2)S in a broad pH range (pH 1-7). There are experimental evidences showing that the spent BAC could be re-used as packing material in a biofilter based on BAC. Overall, the results indicated that an unprecedented performance could be achieved by using BAC as the supporting media for H(2)S biofiltration.

  8. Bioplastics from microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, José M; García, Belén; Sandoval, Angel; Naharro, Germán; Olivera, Elías R

    2003-06-01

    The term 'biomaterials' includes chemically unrelated products that are synthesised by microorganisms (or part of them) under different environmental conditions. One important family of biomaterials is bioplastics. These are polyesters that are widely distributed in nature and accumulate intracellularly in microorganisms in the form of storage granules, with physico-chemical properties resembling petrochemical plastics. These polymers are usually built from hydroxy-acyl-CoA derivatives via different metabolic pathways. Depending on their microbial origin, bioplastics differ in their monomer composition, macromolecular structure and physical properties. Most of them are biodegradable and biocompatible, which makes them extremely interesting from the biotechnological point of view.

  9. Motion of magnetotactic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, D.M.S.; Barros, H.G. de P.L. de.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic moments for different magnetotactic microorganisms are obtained by electron microscopy analyses and studies of motion by optical microscopy. The results are analysed in terms of a model due to C.Bean. The considerations presented suggest that magnetotaxy is an efficient mechanism for orientation only if the time for reorientation is smaller than the cycles of environmental perturbations. (Author) [pt

  10. Application of RNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to Link Community Activity with Microorganisms Responsible for Autotrophy in the Subseafloor at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Fortunato, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global ocean comprises the Earth's largest biome, with microorganisms playing a dominant biogeochemical role. However, the potential for production of new microbial biomass within the subseafloor is rarely considered in traditional oceanographic paradigms of carbon cycling or microbial food webs. In this study, we used RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) to determine the microbial community composition and genetic repertoire of active subseafloor autotrophs in warm venting fluids from Axial Seamount. RNA is a responsive biomarker because it is a reflection of cellular activity independent of replication, and RNA SIP thus provides access to both the function of a microbial community and the phylogeny of the organisms accountable for key functions. Diffuse fluids were incubated shipboard at 30°C, 55°C, and 80°C with 13DIC and H2. Metatranscriptomic sequencing of both the enriched and non-enriched RNA was carried out from 13C and 12C controls. In addition, filtered fluid samples were preserved in situ for comparative meta -transcriptomic and -genomic analyses. Diverse lineages of bacteria and archaea and accompanying metabolisms were detected in situ, but RNA SIP results show dominance of three different groups of autotrophs active under each experimental condition. At 30°C, members of the Sulfurimonas genus dominated, with genes for hydrogen oxidation, nitrate reduction, and carbon fixation via the rTCA cycle highly expressed. At 55°C, both Caminibacter and Nautilia transcripts were detected for rTCA cycle, hydrogen oxidation, and nitrate reduction. At 80°C, transcripts for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis mediated by members of Methanocaldococcus were detected. These results suggest the subseafloor hosts various anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs that span a wide temperature range, with hydrogen playing a key role in microbial metabolism. Complementary experiments are currently being carried out on the seafloor with a novel in situ incubator unit to provide

  11. The effect of dietary Chlorella vulgaris supplementation on micro-organism community, enzyme activities and fatty acid profile in the rumen liquid of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiplakou, E; Abdullah, M A M; Skliros, D; Chatzikonstantinou, M; Flemetakis, E; Labrou, N; Zervas, G

    2017-04-01

    Microalgae might be considered as an alternative source of fat and/or protein for ruminant's diets. However, changes in populations of ruminal micro-organisms associated with biohydrogenation process, methane and ammonia production in response to microalgae dietary supplementation have not been well characterized. Thus, 16 cross-bred goats were divided into two groups. Each goat of both groups was fed individually with alfalfa hay and concentrates separately. The concentrates of the control group had no microalgae while those of the treated group were supplemented with 10 g lyophilized Chlorella vulgaris/kg concentrate (chlor). On the 30th experimental day, samples of rumen fluid were collected for microbial DNA extraction, fatty acid profile and enzyme activity analyses. The results showed that the chlor diet compared with the control increased significantly the populations of Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanobrevibacter ruminantium and Methanogens bacteria and protozoa in the rumen of goats. A significant reduction in the cellulase activity and in the abundance of Ruminococcus albus, and a significant increase in the protease activity and in the abundance of Clostridium sticklandii in the rumen liquid of goats fed with the chlor diet, compared with the control, were found. Chlorella vulgaris supplementation promoted the formation of trans C 18:1 , trans-11 C 18:1 and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), while the proportions of C 18:0 and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) reduced significantly in the rumen liquid of goats. This shift in ruminal biohydrogenation pathway was accompanied by a significant increase in Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens trans C 18:1 -producing bacteria. In conclusion, the supplementation of diets with microalgae needs further investigation because it enhances the populations of methane-producing bacteria and protozoa. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Replacement of alfalfa hay (Medicago sativa L.) with subabul (Leucaena leucocephala) leaf meal in diets of Najdi goats: effect on digestion activity of rumen microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabadi, Tahereh; Jolazadeh, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of replacing alfalfa hay by subabul leaf meal (SLM) on digestion, fermentation parameters and rumen bacteria and fungi activity of Najdi goats. Six Najdi goats (150 ± 15 days of age and initial body weight of 35 ± 1.1 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments in a balanced completely randomized design (three goats per treatment) for 56 days. Experimental treatments included alfalfa hay as control group and diet containing SLM (SLM replacing alfalfa hay at 50% level). Bacterial and fungi activity and rumen fermentation parameters of animals fed experimental diets were determined. Dry matter disappearance (DMD) was unaffected by replacing SLM with alfalfa hay for both rumen bacteria and fungi in different incubation times, except for 48 h of incubation in specific culture medium of mixed rumen bacteria, which decreased for SLM group (P > 0.05). NDF disappearance (NDFD) and ADF disappearance (ADFD) after 24 and 48 h of incubation in specific culture medium of mixed rumen bacteria was not affected by experimental diets (P > 0.05). However, 72 h after incubation, NDFD in SLM treatment decreased (P > 0.05). Gas production parameters of rumen bacteria were similar for both experimental diets, but partitioning factor (PF), efficiency microbial biomass production (EMBP), microbial protein production (MP), and organic matter truly digested (OMTD) decreased (p alfalfa hay by SLM had no major effect on rumen microorganisms' activity of Najdi goats, so it may be used as an alternative for alfalfa (at 50% level) in susceptible areas.

  13. Marine microorganisms. Umi no biseibutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, U. (Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Applied Biological Science)

    1992-11-10

    This paper explains properties, interactions, and activities of marine microorganisms. Marine bacteria include bacteria of vibrio family of arteromonas genus, luminous bacteria, and aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. Majority of marine bacteria is halophilic, and many proliferate at 5[degree]C or lower. Some of them can proliferate at 20[degree]C to 30[degree]C, or as high temperature as 80[degree]C and higher. Spongiaria and tumicata have many symbiotic microorganisms, and genes equivalent to luminous bacteria genes were discovered in DNA of light emitting organs in luminous fishes. It was verified that animal groups in upwelling zones are supported by bacteria that assimilate inorganics supplied from ocean bottoms. Marine bacteria decompose almost all of organics brought in from land to sea, and those produced in sea. Marine bacteria engage in complex interrelations with other organisms for competition, antagonism, parasitism, and symbiosis. The bacteria make antibacterial substances, anti-algae bacteria, enzyme inhibitors, toxins, pharmacologically active substances, and such physiologically active substances as deposition promoting substances to undersea structures including shells and barnacles, and deposition blocking substances. 53 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  15. Metal-microorganism interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, Y.; Thouand, G.; Redercher, S.; Boualam, M.; Texier, A.Cl.; Hoeffer, R.

    1997-01-01

    The physico-chemical procedures of treating the metalliferous effluents are not always adapted to de polluting the slightly concentrated industrial wastes. An alternative idea was advanced, implying the ability of some microorganisms to fix in considerable amounts the metal ions present in aqueous solutions, possibly in a selective way. This approach has been investigated thoroughly during the last 30 years, particularly from a mechanistic point of view. The advantage of the microorganisms lies mainly in the large diversity of bacteria and in their chemical state dependent interaction with metals, as well as, in the possibilities of developing their selective and quantitative separation properties. A biomass from Mycobacterium smegmatis, an acidic alcoholic resistant bacteria, has been used to prepare a bio-sorption support allowing the preferential sorption of thorium as compared to uranium and lanthanum. These studies have been extended to biological polymers such as chitosan and to studies related to bioaccumulation mechanisms and/or to the microbial resistances towards metals

  16. Microorganisms of Grape Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kántor Attila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Grape surface is an unstable habitat that changes greatly according to the stage of grape ripening. Different bacteria and yeasts can colonise the surface of grape berry and the diversity of microorganisms depends on the stage of ripening, pesticide application and health condition. The aim of this study was to study the microflora of the surface of grape berries. Altogether, 19 grape samples from Slovakia were collected. The spread plate method was applied and a 100 μL inoculum of each dilution (10−2, 10−3 was plated on TSA, MEA, and MRS agar for isolation of microorganisms from grapes. Proteins were extracted from cells by ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry was used for identification of microorganisms. In total, 11 genera of Gram-negative bacteria, 11 of Gram-positive bacteria and nine of yeasts were identified. Among 200 isolates, Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts represented 11%, 27% and 62% of the total number of isolates studied. The most common genera of isolated yeasts were Hanseniaspora (37%, Metschnikowia (31%, and Rhodotorula (10%. The most frequently isolated among Gram-negative bacteria were Acinetobacter (22%, Pseudomonas (22% and Sphingomonas (13%. The most common genera of Gram-positive bacteria were Bacillus (20%, Lactobacillus (19%, Leuconostoc and Staphylococcus (11%, respectively.

  17. Activity and population dynamics of heterotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil surrounding sludge bands spiked with linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, K. K.; Sørensen, J.; Krogh, P. H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent research has documented soil microorganisms to be rather sensitive to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), which may enter the soil environment in considerable quantities following sewage sludge disposal. We here report field effects of LAS on selected microbial populations present in a s...

  18. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  19. Esterase screening using whole cells of Brazilian soil microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovani, Simone M.; Oliveira, Luciana G. de; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: anita@iqm.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    A miniaturized enzymatic assay using fluorescent probes to reveal esterase producing microorganisms was optimized and applied to screen 64 soil bacterial strains. The best results were validated using traditional non-fluorogenic assays with acetyl and propanoyl phenylethanol to confirm the miniaturized results. The most active microorganisms belong to the genus Bacillus showing esterase activity and good enantiomeric ratios for the resolution of phenylethanol derivatives (E > 30). Part of the microorganisms are kept in our laboratory in glycerol or freezedried and the best microorganisms will be deposited in the CBMAI/CPQBA/UNICAMP culture collection. (author)

  20. Biosurfactants, bioemulsifiers and exopolysaccharides from marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Surekha K; Banat, Ibrahim M; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Chopade, Balu A

    2010-01-01

    Marine biosphere offers wealthy flora and fauna, which represents a vast natural resource of imperative functional commercial grade products. Among the various bioactive compounds, biosurfactant (BS)/bioemulsifiers (BE) are attracting major interest and attention due to their structural and functional diversity. The versatile properties of surface active molecules find numerous applications in various industries. Marine microorganisms such as Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Myroides, Corynebacteria, Bacillus, Alteromonas sp. have been studied for production of BS/BE and exopolysaccharides (EPS). Due to the enormity of marine biosphere, most of the marine microbial world remains unexplored. The discovery of potent BS/BE producing marine microorganism would enhance the use of environmental biodegradable surface active molecule and hopefully reduce total dependence or number of new application oriented towards the chemical synthetic surfactant industry. Our present review gives comprehensive information on BS/BE which has been reported to be produced by marine microorganisms and their possible potential future applications.

  1. Study of radioresistance of microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olbrichova, D.

    1983-01-01

    Strain radiosensitivity was evaluated on the basis of the determination of inactivation curve parameters and the determination of the D 10 value. The course of curves was investigated for two 60 Co sources, RCHM-gamma-20 (USSR) with an activity of 2.54x10 14 Bq and AECL (type J-6000, Canada) with an activity of 4.92x10 16 Bq. The curve parameters were determined for microorganisms in buffer medium and for cultures in dehydrated condition. Coccus germs were irradiated with doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy and aerobic sporulates with doses of 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 kGy. For comparing the resistance of isolated strains the t-test was used. The most resistant of the isolated strains were Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus megatherium. (E.S.)

  2. Plasma inactivation of food-related microorganisms in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsili, Lisa; Espie, Steven; Anderson, J.G.John G.; MacGregor, S.J.Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on a plasma process that inactivates microorganisms in liquids through the application of high-voltage pulses. These pulses result in breakdown of the gas and liquid layers, producing many active species such as UV photons, ozone, free radicals and free electrons. Several test microorganisms representing a range of problematic microorganisms were investigated. Significant reductions in microbial population were achieved, demonstrating the effectiveness of using the plasma discharge process to treat contaminated liquids

  3. Application of thermotolerant microorganisms for biofertilizer preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Shu; Lin, Yann-Shying; Yang, Shang-Shyng

    2007-12-01

    Intensive agriculture is practised in Taiwan, and compost application is very popular as a means of improving the soil physical properties and supplying plant nutrition. We tested the potential of inoculation with thermotolerant microorganisms to shorten the maturity and improve the quality of biofertilizer prepared by composting. Thermotolerant microorganisms were isolated from compost and reinoculated for the preparation of biofertilizer. The physical, chemical and biological properties of the biofertilizer were determined during composting. The effects of biofertilizer application on the growth and yield of rape were also studied. Among 3823 colonies of thermotolerant microorganisms, Streptomyces thermonitrificans NTU-88, Streptococcus sp. NTU-130 and Aspergillus fumigatus NTU-132 exhibited high growth rates and cellulolytic and proteolytic activities. When a mixture of rice straw and swine manure were inoculated with these isolates and composted for 61 days, substrate temperature increased initially and then decreased gradually during composting. Substrate pH increased from 7.3 to 8.5. Microbial inoculation enhanced the rate of maturity, and increased the content of ash and total and immobilized nitrogen, improved the germination rate of alfalfa seed, and decreased the content of total organic carbon and the carbon/nitrogen ratio. Biofertilizer application increased the growth and yield of rape. Inoculation of thermotolerant and thermophilic microorganisms to agricultural waste for biofertilizer preparation enhances the rate of maturity and improves the quality of the resulting biofertilizer. Inoculation of appropriate microorganisms in biofertilizer preparation might be usefully applied to agricultural situations.

  4. New micro-organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakuwa, Masayoshi; Hashimoto, Gotaro

    1987-09-12

    Invention relates with a new organism for the coal liquefying desulfurization. This micro-organism conducts a good sporulation on a culture medium which contains a coal as an only carbon source. It belongs to Penicillium and named Penicillium MT-6001 registered at Fermentation Research Institute No. 8463. Coal powder is thrown into a reaction vessel which accommodated a culture solution of this bacteria, and the surface of the solution is covered with liquid paraffin; coal powder is treated of liquefaction for about 5 hours while maintaining the anaerobic condition and slowly agitating to form a transparent solution layer on the surface of the reactor together with liquid paraffin. Liquefied product shows an analysis pattern similar to naphthenic petroleum containing a lipid with polar radical. (2 figs)

  5. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E. Ward

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus, the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus, and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima. An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putative proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.

  6. Novel Industrial Enzymes from Uncultured Arctic Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede

    , and reduce the risk of contaminations. Cold- and alkaline-active enzymes can be found in microorganisms adapted to living in natural environments with these conditions, which are extremely rare but found in the unique ikaite columns from SW Greenland (4-6 °C, pH >10). It is estimated that less than 1...

  7. Thermophilic microorganisms in biomining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Edgardo Rubén; Castro, Camila; Urbieta, María Sofía

    2016-11-01

    Biomining is an applied biotechnology for mineral processing and metal extraction from ores and concentrates. This alternative technology for recovering metals involves the hydrometallurgical processes known as bioleaching and biooxidation where the metal is directly solubilized or released from the matrix for further solubilization, respectively. Several commercial applications of biomining can be found around the world to recover mainly copper and gold but also other metals; most of them are operating at temperatures below 40-50 °C using mesophilic and moderate thermophilic microorganisms. Although biomining offers an economically viable and cleaner option, its share of the world´s production of metals has not grown as much as it was expected, mainly considering that due to environmental restrictions in many countries smelting and roasting technologies are being eliminated. The slow rate of biomining processes is for sure the main reason of their poor implementation. In this scenario the use of thermophiles could be advantageous because higher operational temperature would increase the rate of the process and in addition it would eliminate the energy input for cooling the system (bioleaching reactions are exothermic causing a serious temperature increase in bioreactors and inside heaps that adversely affects most of the mesophilic microorganisms) and it would decrease the passivation of mineral surfaces. In the last few years many thermophilic bacteria and archaea have been isolated, characterized, and even used for extracting metals. This paper reviews the current status of biomining using thermophiles, describes the main characteristics of thermophilic biominers and discusses the future for this biotechnology.

  8. Radioresistant microorganisms and food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with Micrococcus radiodurans, Arthrobacter radiotolerance, etc., which were isolated and discovered as radioresistant microorganisms. As for the explanation of the mechanism of radioresistance of these microorganisms, the consideration that these organisms have marked repair power of the damaged DNA and have many opportunity to repair the damaged DNA because of their long fission term were cited. The relationship between the radioresistance of microorganisms and food irradiation was also mentioned.

  9. Bioremediation of Industrial Waste Through Enzyme Producing Marine Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaperumal, P; Kamala, K; Rajaram, R

    Bioremediation process using microorganisms is a kind of nature-friendly and cost-effective clean green technology. Recently, biodegradation of industrial wastes using enzymes from marine microorganisms has been reported worldwide. The prospectus research activity in remediation area would contribute toward the development of advanced bioprocess technology. To minimize industrial wastes, marine enzymes could constitute a novel alternative in terms of waste treatment. Nowadays, the evidence on the mechanisms of bioremediation-related enzymes from marine microorganisms has been extensively studied. This review also will provide information about enzymes from various marine microorganisms and their complexity in the biodegradation of comprehensive range of industrial wastes. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pesticides in Soil: Effects on Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Radivojević

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery to the present day, pesticides have been an inevitable segment of agricultural production and efforts have been made to synthesize compounds that would share a required efficacy along with selectivity, sufficient persistence on the object of protection and favourable toxicological and ecotoxicological characteristics so as to minimize their effect on the environment.When a pesticide gets into soil after application, it takes part in a number of physical, chemical and biological processes that depend not only on the compound itself, but a number of other factors as well, such as: physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soil; climatic factors, equipment used, method of application, method of storage, handling and disposal of waste, site characteristics (proximity of ground and underground waters, biodiversity and sensitivity of the environment. Microorganisms play an important role in pesticide degradation as they are able to utilize the biogenic elements from those compounds, as well as energy for their physiological processes. On the other hand, pesticides are more or less toxic substances that can have adverse effect on populations of microorganisms and prevent their development, reduce their abundance, deplete their taxonomic complexity and create communities with a lower level of diversity and reduced physiological activity.The article discusses complex interactions between pesticides and microorganisms in soil immediately after application and over the ensuing period. Data on changes in the abundance of some systematic and physiological groups of microorganisms, their microbial biomass and enzymatic activity caused under pesticide activity are discussed as indicators of these processes.

  11. the economic importance of microorganism in food processing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    This paper attempts to highlight the Economic Importance of microorganisms in food processing and manufacturing; it goes further to differentiate between the desirable ... Desirable importance are those cost saving and revenue generating activities ... Microorganism (yeast) play very useful role in the Bakery industries.

  12. Antimicrobial Compounds from Marine Invertebrates-Derived Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Jung, Jee H; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    It is known that marine invertebrates, including sponges, tunicates, cnidaria or mollusks, host affluent and various communities of symbiotic microorganisms. The microorganisms associated with the invertebrates metabolized various biologically active compounds, which could be an important resource for the discovery and development of potentially novel drugs. In this review, the new compounds with antimicrobial activity isolated from marine invertebrate-derived microorganisms in the last decade (2004-2014) will be presented, with focus on the relevant antimicrobial activities, origin of isolation, and information of strain species. New compounds without antimicrobial activity were not revealed.

  13. Polysaccharides from Extremophilic Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, B.; Moriello, V. Schiano; Lama, L.; Poli, A.; Gambacorta, A.

    2004-02-01

    Several marine thermophilic strains were analyzed for exopolysaccharide production. The screening process revealed that a significant number of thermophilic microorganisms were able to produce biopolymers, and some of them also revealed interesting chemical compositions. We have identified four new polysaccharides from thermophilic marine bacteria, with complex primary structures and with different repetitive units: a galacto-mannane type from strain number 4004 and mannane type for the other strains. The thermophilic Bacillus thermantarcticus produces two exocellular polysaccharides (EPS 1, EPS 2) that give the colonies a typical mucous character. The exopolysaccharide fraction was produced with all substrates assayed, although a higher yield 400 mg liter-1 was obtained with mannose as carbon and energy source. NMR spectra confirmed that EPS 1 was a heteropolysaccharide of which the repeating unit was constituted by four different α-D-mannoses and three different β-D-glucoses. It seems to be close to some xantan polymers. EPS 2 was a mannan. Four different α-D-mannoses were found as the repeating unit. Production and chemical studies of biopolymers produced by halophilic archaea, Haloarcula species were also reported.

  14. Chemical composition of the essential oils of Centaurea tomentella Hand.-Mazz. and C. haussknechtii Boiss. (Asteraceae) collected wild in Turkey and their activity on microorganisms affecting historical art craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Maurizio; Modica, Aurora; Catinella, Giorgia; Canlı, Cem; Arasoglu, Tülin; Çelik, Sezgin

    2018-04-18

    In the present study the chemical composition of the essential oils from aerial parts of Centaurea tomentella Hand.-Mazz. and C. haussknechtii Boiss. collected in Turkey was evaluated by GC and GC-MS. The main components of C. tomentella L. were hexadecanoic acid (19.7%), caryophyllene oxide (6.6%) and spathulenol (4.8%) whereas C. haussknechtii was rich in hexadecanoic acid (26.2%), (Z,Z)-9,12-octadecadienoic acid (19.3%), heptacosane (5.3%) and nonacosane (5.1%). Antibacterial and antifungal activities against some microorganisms infesting historical art craft, were also determined.

  15. [DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MICROORGANISMS TO POLYHEXAMETHYLENEGUANIDINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysytsya, A V; Mandygra, Y M; Bojko, O P; Romanishyna, O O; Mandygra, M S

    2015-01-01

    Factors identified that affect the sensitivity of microorganisms to polyhexamethyleneguanidine (PHMG). Salts of PHMG chloride, valerate, maleate, succinate was to use. Test strains of Esherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Leptospira interrogans, Paenibacillus larvae, Mycobacterium bovis, M. avium, M. fortuitum, Aspergillus niger and some strains of viruses are taken as objects of research. We have determined that the cytoplasm membrane phospholipids is main "target" for the polycation molecules of PHMG. A differential sensitivity of the microorganisms to this drug is primarily determined by relative amount of lipids in membrane and their accessibility. Such trends exist: increase the relative contents of anionic lipids and more negative surface electric potential of membrane, and reduction of the sizes fat acid remainder of lipids bring to increase of microorganism sensitivity. Types of anion salt PHMG just have a certain value. Biocide activity of PHMG chloride is more, than its salts with organic acid. Feasibility of combining PHMG with other biocides in the multicomponent disinfectants studied and analyzed. This combination does not lead to a significant increase in the sensitivity of microorganisms tested in most cases. Most species of pathogenic bacteria can be quickly neutralized by aqueous solutions of PHMG in less than 1% concentrations.

  16. Ecology of Hypersaline Microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, S.

    of ancient seas. Deep Sea brines are relatively stable as a result of their higher density as reported in the Red Sea and Gulf of Mexico (MacDonald et al, 1990). Preliminary studies have suggested that microbial activity occurs in some Deep Sea hypersaline... partially characterized extreme halophile called ?Halobacterium sp GN101? (GN = Guerrero Negro, Mexico) (Ebert and Goebel, 1985). Hal R1 activity is typical with first activity detected during the transition from exponential to stationary phase...

  17. Assessment of microorganisms from Indonesian Oil Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadarwati, S.; Udiharto, M.; Rahman, M.; Jasjfi, E.; Legowo, E.H. [Research and Development Centre for Oil and Gas Technology LEMIGAS, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum resources have been the mainstay of the national development in Indonesia. However, resources are being depleted after over a century of exploitation, while the demand continues to grow with the rapid economic development of the country. In facing the problem, EOR has been applied in Indonesia, such as the steamflooding project in Duri field, but a more energy efficient technology would be preferable. Therefore, MEOR has been recommended as a promising solution. Our study, aimed at finding indigenous microorganisms which can be developed for application in MEOR, has isolated microbes from some oil fields of Indonesia. These microorganisms have been identified, their activities studied, and the effects of their metabolisms examined. This paper describes the research carried out by LEMIGAS in this respect, giving details on the methods of sampling, incubation, identification, and activation of the microbes as well as tests on the effects of their metabolites, with particular attention to those with potential for application in MEOR.

  18. Influence of microorganisms on the alteration of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnainou, B.; Libert, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Under specific conditions, microorganisms may enhance the alteration process of basaltic glass. However bacterial activity in the near field of a glass container would be possible only in environmental conditions provide nutrients and energetic substrates for bacterial growth. Depending of these conditions, microorganisms can: - modify the pH or the medium, - consume or produce soluble organic acids. To qualify the long term behaviour of glass, in presence of microorganisms, a qualitative and quantitative estimation of microbial activity potentialities and their consequences is needed. This must be achieved in studying the availability of the chemical species in the environment. (authors)

  19. Bioemulsan Production by Iranian Oil Reservoirs Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Amiriyan, M Mazaheri Assadi, VA Saggadian, A Noohi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The biosurfactants are believed to be surface active components that are shed into the surrounding medium during the growth of the microorganisms. The oil degrading microorganism Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 produces a poly-anionic biosurfactant, hetero-polysaccharide bioemulsifier termed as emulsan which forms and stabilizes oil-water emulsions with a variety of hydrophobic substrates. In the present paper results of the possibility of biosurfactant (Emulsan production by microorganisms isolated from Iranian oil reservoirs is presented. Fourthy three gram negative and gram positive, non fermentative, rod bacilli and coccobacilli shaped baceria were isolated from the oil wells of Bibi Hakimeh, Siri, Maroon, Ilam , East Paydar and West Paydar. Out of the isolated strains, 39 bacterial strains showed beta haemolytic activity, further screening revealed the emulsifying activity and surface tension. 11 out of 43 tested emulsifiers were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reduction, indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production. Further investigation revealed that, two gram negative, oxidase negative, aerobic and coccoid rods isolates were the best producers and hence designated as IL-1, PAY-4. Whole culture broth of isolates reduced surface tension from 68 mN /m to 30 and 29.1mN/m, respectively, and were stable during exposure to high salinity (10%NaCl and elevated temperatures(120C for 15 min .

  20. Biofuel production by recombinant microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James C.; Atsumi, Shota; Cann, Anthony F.

    2017-07-04

    Provided herein are metabolically-modified microorganisms useful for producing biofuels. More specifically, provided herein are methods of producing high alcohols including isobutanol, 1-butanol, 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol from a suitable substrate.

  1. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste.

  2. Isolation and characterization of Arctic microorganisms decomposing bioplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Aneta K; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Strzelecki, Mateusz C; Kociuba, Waldemar; Franczak, Łukasz; Mirończuk, Aleksandra M

    2017-12-01

    The increasing amount of plastic waste causes significant environmental pollution. In this study, screening of Arctic microorganisms which are able to degrade bioplastics was performed. In total, 313 microorganisms were isolated from 52 soil samples from the Arctic region (Spitsbergen). Among the isolated microorganisms, 121 (38.66%) showed biodegradation activity. The ability of clear zone formation on emulsified poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) was observed for 116 microorganisms (95.87%), on poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) for 73 microorganisms (60.33%), and on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) for 102 microorganisms (84.3%). Moreover, the growth of microorganisms on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) agar plates was observed for 56 microorganisms (46.28%). Based on the 16S rRNA sequence, 10 bacterial strains which showed the highest ability for biodegradation were identified as species belonging to Pseudomonas sp. and Rhodococcus sp. The isolated fungal strains were tested for polycaprolactone films and commercial corn and potato starch bags degradation under laboratory conditions. Strains 16G (based on the analysis of a partial 18S rRNA sequence, identified as Clonostachys rosea) and 16H (identified as Trichoderma sp.) showed the highest capability for biodegradation. A particularly high capability for biodegradation was observed for the strain Clonostachys rosea, which showed 100% degradation of starch films and 52.91% degradation of PCL films in a 30-day shake flask experiment. The main advantage of the microorganisms isolated from Arctic environment is the ability to grow at low temperature and efficient biodegradation under this condition. The data suggest that C. rosea can be used in natural and laboratory conditions for degradations of bioplastics.

  3. Interspecies Electron Transfer during Propionate and Butyrate Degradation in Mesophilic, Granular Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, J. E.; Ahring, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    Granules from a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor were disintegrated, and bacteria utilizing only hydrogen or formate or both hydrogen and formate were added to investigate the role of interspecies electron transfer during degradation of propionate and butyrate. The data indicate that the major electron transfer occurred via interspecies hydrogen transfer, while interspecies formate transfer may not be essential for interspecies electron transfer in this system during degrada...

  4. Kinetics of Butyrate, Acetate, and Hydrogen Metabolism in a Thermophilic, Anaerobic, Butyrate-Degrading Triculture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, Km, for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hyd...

  5. Microorganisms .

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and heat/pH-shift treatments. This technique resulted in 47% enzyme yield with a purification fac- tor of 12. Technique II which involved two extraction steps by' aqueous two - phase system. (APS) coupled with UF resulted in 62 % enzyme ...

  6. Assessment of cellulolytic microorganisms in soils of Nevados Park, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellaneda-Torres, Lizeth Manuela; Pulido, Claudia Patricia Guevara; Rojas, Esperanza Torres

    2014-01-01

    A systematized survey was conducted to find soil-borne microbes that degrade cellulose in soils from unique ecosystems, such as the Superpáramo, Páramo, and the High Andean Forest in the Nevados National Natural Park (NNNP), Colombia. These high mountain ecosystems represent extreme environments, such as high levels of solar radiation, low atmospheric pressure, and extreme daily changes in temperature. Cellulolytic activity of the microorganisms was evaluated using qualitative tests, such as growth in selective media followed by staining with congo red and iodine, and quantitative tests to determine the activity of endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, exoglucanase, and total cellulase. Microorganisms were identified using molecular markers, such as the 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of ribosomal DNA for fungi. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVA) was used to select microorganisms with high cellulolytic capacity. A total of 108 microorganisms were isolated from the soils and, in general, the enzymatic activities of fungi were higher than those of bacteria. Our results also found that none of the organisms studied were able to degrade all the components of the cellulose and it is therefore suggested that a combination of bacteria and/or fungi with various enzymatic activities be used to obtain high total cellulolytic activity. This study gives an overview of the potential microorganism that could be used for cellulose degradation in various biotechnological applications and for sustainable agricultural waste treatment.

  7. Assessment of cellulolytic microorganisms in soils of Nevados Park, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Manuela Avellaneda-Torres

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A systematized survey was conducted to find soil-borne microbes that degrade cellulose in soils from unique ecosystems, such as the Superpáramo, Páramo, and the High Andean Forest in the Nevados National Natural Park (NNNP, Colombia. These high mountain ecosystems represent extreme environments, such as high levels of solar radiation, low atmospheric pressure, and extreme daily changes in temperature. Cellulolytic activity of the microorganisms was evaluated using qualitative tests, such as growth in selective media followed by staining with congo red and iodine, and quantitative tests to determine the activity of endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, exoglucanase, and total cellulase. Microorganisms were identified using molecular markers, such as the 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS of ribosomal DNA for fungi. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVA was used to select microorganisms with high cellulolytic capacity. A total of 108 microorganisms were isolated from the soils and, in general, the enzymatic activities of fungi were higher than those of bacteria. Our results also found that none of the organisms studied were able to degrade all the components of the cellulose and it is therefore suggested that a combination of bacteria and/or fungi with various enzymatic activities be used to obtain high total cellulolytic activity. This study gives an overview of the potential microorganism that could be used for cellulose degradation in various biotechnological applications and for sustainable agricultural waste treatment.

  8. Microorganisms as bioindicators of pollutants in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are the predominant portion of the soil's biological phase and they are indicators of soil health and quality. Soil microorganisms a take part in degradation of organic and inorganic compounds, b their activity, number and diversity may serve as bioindicators of toxic effects on soil biological activity, c some microbial species may be used for soil bioremediation and d some sensitive microbes are used in eco-toxicity tests. The primary microbial population starts to decompose herbicides several days after their arrival into the soil. The secondary population produces induced enzymes and decomposes herbicides after a period of adaptation. Certain microbial groups are indifferent to the applied herbicides. Effect of heavy metals on soil microbial activity depends on the element, their concentration, microbial species, as well as physical and chemical soil properties. Toxic level of individual pollutants depends on their origin and composition. However, combined application of chemicals makes room for the occurrence of synergistic toxic effects detrimental for the ecosystem and human health. .

  9. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  10. The useful micro-organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Can man survive civilization? Academician Ivan Malek, Director of the Institute of Microbiology in Prague, a member of the Agency's Scientific Advisory Committee and for many years an adviser to the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Health Organization and UNESCO, believes he can, But he also considers that if man is to survive he must study and use all the resources at his disposal - including the micro-organisms of the planet earth. (author)

  11. Metagenomic insights into the carbohydrate-active enzymes carried by the microorganisms adhering to solid digesta in the rumen of cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Wang

    Full Text Available The ruminal microbial community is a unique source of enzymes that underpin the conversion of cellulosic biomass. In this study, the microbial consortia adherent on solid digesta in the rumen of Jersey cattle were subjected to an activity-based metagenomic study to explore the genetic diversity of carbohydrolytic enzymes in Jersey cows, with a particular focus on cellulases and xylanases. Pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analyses of 120 carbohydrate-active fosmids identified genes encoding 575 putative Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes and proteins putatively related to transcriptional regulation, transporters, and signal transduction coupled with polysaccharide degradation and metabolism. Most of these genes shared little similarity to sequences archived in databases. Genes that were predicted to encode glycoside hydrolases (GH involved in xylan and cellulose hydrolysis (e.g., GH3, 5, 9, 10, 39 and 43 were well represented. A new subfamily (S-8 of GH5 was identified from contigs assigned to Firmicutes. These subfamilies of GH5 proteins also showed significant phylum-dependent distribution. A number of polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs were found, and two of them contained genes encoding Sus-like proteins and cellulases that have not been reported in previous metagenomic studies of samples from the rumens of cows or other herbivores. Comparison with the large metagenomic datasets previously reported of other ruminant species (or cattle breeds and wallabies showed that the rumen microbiome of Jersey cows might contain differing CAZymes. Future studies are needed to further explore how host genetics and diets affect the diversity and distribution of CAZymes and utilization of plant cell wall materials.

  12. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelecom, Alphonse

    2002-03-01

    After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  13. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  14. PROBIOTICS BASED ON TRANSGENIC MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. А. Starovoitova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern tendencies of recombinant microorganisms creation for obtaining on their basis a new effective biopreparations (probiotics with wider spectrum of biological and therapeutic properties were considered. A lot of attention was focused on the main genera of perspective bacteria for creation of recombinant probiotics particularly: Lactococcus, Bifidobac terium,Bacillus, Escherichia. The main created Ukrainian and foreign gene-modified strains, that are widely used today in creation of effective recombinant biopreparations were characterized. Some fundamental directions and methods of gene-modified strains obtaining, which are used in getting effective biopreparations that used for therapy and prophylactic illness were reported, under which this group of pharmaceutical drugs were not used earlier. The safety matters of probiotics using on basis of genemodified strains were examined. Medical and veterinary biopreparations on basis of recombinant microorganisms could be used directly and effectively for therapy and prophylaxis of different illness, beginning from disbacteriosis up to cardiovascular diseases. It is related with some probiotic microorganisms ability for lowering of serum cholesterol at the host organism.

  15. Microorganisms as sources of oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thevenieau France

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of microorganism belonging to the genera of yeast, fungi, bacteria and microalgae have ability to accumulate substantial amounts of oil, sometimes up to an even in excess of 70% of their biomass weight under specific cultivation conditions. For nearly 100 years, the commercial opportunities of using microorganisms as sources of oils have been continuously examined. Although it was evident that microbial oils could never compete commercially with the major commodity plant oils, there were commercially opportunities for the production of some of the higher valued oils. Today, with the great progress of metabolic and genetic engineering, the developments are focus on the high value oils containing important polyunsaturated or specific fatty acids. Such oils have the potential to be used in different applications area as food, feed and oleochemistry. This review is covering the related researches about different oleaginous microorganisms for lipids production and microbial oils biosynthesis process. In add, the lipid metabolism, metabolic engineering strategies to increase lipid production and the economics of microbial oils production are introduced.

  16. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2016-02-18

    Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens), and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics) constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments.

  17. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J. Gudiña

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens, and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments.

  18. Volatilization of Po by microorganisms at laboratory culture experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momoshima, N.; Ishida, A.; Yoshinaga, C.; Fukuda, A.

    2005-01-01

    The previous experiments proved the volatility of polonium form culture medium in which microorganisms were propagated from seed of seawater, river water or pond water, therefore we did not know what kind of species are responsible to Po volatility. To search microorganisms, which concerned with Po emission we carried out culture experiments using known microorganisms. Three microorganisms were examined; Escherichia coli K-12, Bacillus subtilis and Chromobacterium violaceum. The microorganisms were pre-cultured in LB medium at 30 degree C and a small portion of the pre-cultured was transferred to a culture bottle in which LB medium and 208 Po tracer were contained. The culture was done at 30 degree C with shaking the culture bottle and air passed through a filter was introduced. The Po volatilized was transferred into the trap vials in which scintillator for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was contained. The Po activity was measured by LSC. All of the microorganisms examined volatilized Po but their ability was quite different each other. Highest ability was observed on Chromobacterium violaceum and then Escherichia coli K-12 followed by Bacillus subtilis, the relative magnitude of the ability was 10 2 , 10, 1, respectively. Chromobacterium violaceum and Escherichia coli K-12 showed high volatility for the first 24 h but Escherichia coli K-12 showed a decrease thereafter. However high volatility was continued on Chromobacterium violaceum during the culture. The low culture temperature suppressed Po volatility, supporting biologically mediated Po emission from the culture.

  19. Synergistic interface behavior of strontium adsorption using mixed microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyuan; Dong, Faqin; Yang, Guangmin; Peng, Xin; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Mingxue; Zhang, Jing

    2017-08-10

    The proper handling of low-level radioactive waste is crucial to promote the sustainable development of nuclear power. Research into the mechanism for interactions between bacterium and radionuclides is the starting point for achieving successful remediation of radionuclides with microorganisms. Using Sr(II) as a simulation radionuclide and the mixed microorganisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bacillus subtilis as the biological adsorbent, this study investigates behavior at the interface between Sr(II) and the microorganisms as well as the mechanisms governing that behavior. The results show that the optimal ratio of mixed microorganisms is S. cerevisiae 2.0 g L -1 to B. subtilis 0.05 g L -1 , and the optimal pH is about 6.3. Sr(II) biosorption onto the mixed microorganisms is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The kinetics and the equilibrium isotherm data of the biosorption process can be described with pseudo-second-order equation and the Langmuir isotherm equation, respectively. The key interaction between the biological adsorbent and Sr(II) involves shared electronic pairs arising from chemical reactions via bond complexation or electronic exchange, and spectral and energy spectrum analysis show that functional groups (e.g., hydroxyl, carboxyl, amino, amide) at the interface between the radionuclide and the mixed microorganisms are the main active sites of the interface reactions.

  20. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) reduces activity of ammonia oxidizers without adverse effects on non-target soil microorganisms and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xianwang; Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    , dehydrogenase activity, phospholipid fatty acid composition and potential ammonia oxidation. DMPP showed no significant nontarget effects (p > 0.05), but a possible stress response in HD was indicated by a factor analysis of phospholipid fatty acid composition. There was a strong DMPP inhibition on potential...... of ammonia oxidation. We investigated effects of DMPP amendment equivalent to 0 (Control), 1 (regular dose, RD) or 10 (high dose, HD) kg ha1 in a sandy loam grassland soil at 50% water-filled pore space. Following incubation for 1, 7 or 14 d, soil was analyzed for fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis...... ammonia oxidation which was still significant (p HD after 14 d. In separate treatments receiving 50 mg NH4 +-N kg1 dry soil in addition to DMPP, the inhibition of nitrate accumulation was similar in RD and HD at around 75%. Abundances of the gene amoA from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB...

  1. Atividade antibacteriana de óleos essenciais em cepas isoladas de infecção urinária Antibacterial activity of essential oils on microorganisms isolated from urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos Pereira

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A análise da atividade antibacteriana de óleos essenciais de ervas medicinais (Ocimum gratissimum, L., Cybopogum citratus (DC Stapf. e Salvia officinalis, L. foi verificada frente a 100 cepas de bactérias isoladas de indivíduos da comunidade com diagnóstico de infecção urinária. Os microrganismos foram semeados em ágar Muller Hinton e os extratos aplicados com replicador de Steers e incubados a 37°C por 24 horas. Verificou-se que Salvia officinalis, L. apresentou ação inibitória superior às outras ervas, tendo eficácia de 100% quando testadas em espécies de Klebsiella e Enterobacter, 96% em Escherichia coli, 83% contra Proteus mirabilis e 75% contra Morganella morganii.The antibacterial activity of essential oils extracted from medicinal plants (Ocimum gratissimum, L., Cybopogum citratus (DC Stapf., and Salvia officinalis, L. was assessed on bacterial strains derived from 100 urine samples. Samples were taken from subjects diagnosed with urinary tract infection living in the community. Microorganisms were plated on Müller Hinton agar. Plant extracts were applied using a Steers replicator and petri dishes were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Salvia officinalis, L. showed enhanced inhibitory activity compared to the other two herbs, with 100% efficiency against Klebsiella and Enterobacter species, 96% against Escherichia coli, 83% against Proteus mirabilis, and 75% against Morganella morganii.

  2. 40 CFR 725.85 - Microorganism identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Microorganism identity. 725.85 Section... to Information § 725.85 Microorganism identity. (a) Claims applicable to the period prior to... specific microorganism identity at the time of submission of the information. This claim will apply only to...

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine dihydrochloride in elimination of microorganisms within dentinal tubules of primary and permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirali, Resmiye-Ebru; Bodur, Haluk; Ece, Gülden

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different irrigation solutions at different time intervals for the elimination of E. faecalis and C. albicans penetrated into the dentine tubules of primary and permanent teeth in vitro. The 4 mm primary and permanent teeth sections were sterilized and contaminated with a mixture of E. faecalis and C. albicans strains. After the application of different irrigation solutions (Sodium hypochlorite, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, saline) to the contaminated tooth sections according to study groups, neutralizers were applied for inactivation of the solutions after 30 sec, 1 min and 5 min. Dentine shavings were placed into TSB and 10 µL from each tube was inoculated on agar plates, followed by an incubation period of 24 h at 37°C. The colonies were counted macroscopically. The results were compared by using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests, with a significance level at pteeth, the most effective one was found as 5-minute application of 0.1% Octenidine Dihydrochloride. The antibacterial effects of the tested solutions on the same time periods against C. albicans revealed no significant difference. There were no statistically significant differences between primary and permanent teeth with respect to the antimicrobial activity of the tested solutions. Moreover, Octenidine Dihydrochloride may be used as an alternative endodontic irrigant.

  4. Ultraviolet-Mediated Activation of Photo toxins from Peganum Harmala L. Seedlings to Control both Human-and Phyto-Pathogenic Microorganisms and Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kord, M.; Khafagi, I.; Dewedar, A.

    2003-01-01

    The medicinal plant Peganum harmala L. (zygophyllaceae) contains a number of Beta-carboline alkaloids, which are photosensitizers to bacteria, yeasts and eukaryotic cells in the presence of sunlight and artificial sources of long-wave UV radiation (365 nm). Ultraviolet irradiation of ten-day old aseptically germinated Peganum harmala inoculated on bacterial and yeast bioassay plates elicits strong phototoxic antimicrobials. Callus as well as crude methanol extracts of in vitro cultures were also investigated for the accumulation of photosensitizers. High performance liquid chromatographic analyses of irradiated and control tissues followed by fluorescent detection at 302 nm revealed the formation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in irradiated tissues only. Eluted compounds detected at 330 nm revealed more than ten-fold accumulation of harmine, isoharmine and harmol in irradiated tissues. Moreover, several simple beta-carboline alkaloids were produced through irradiation with UV such as harmalanine and harmalacidine. UV-induced phototoxicity was proven against phyto pathogenic bacteria and human-pathogenic bacteria and yeasts. Photo-induced cytotoxicity was observed from two different toxicity bioassays, which are Artemia saline and potato discs tumor assay. The selective UV-dependent biological activities may imply a pharmacological potential of Peganum harmala in the control of infectious diseases and tumor tissues

  5. Evaluation of the antibiotic activity and genetic mutation of microorganisms in the effluent treated with the electron-beam from waste-water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Nam, Ji Hyun; Shin, Ji Hye; Yun, Seo Yeon; Cho, Young Cheol; Oh, Kyoung hee [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    In this study, the residual concentrations and activities of antibiotics after UV or gamma-ray treatments were estimated, and the effect of irradiation of UV, gamma-ray, or electron beam was estimated on the survivability and less mutagenic effect on bacteria. The changes of bacterial communities and radiation resistant population in the effluent treated with UV and electron-beam were analyzed. The gamma-ray irradiation was more effective than UV in degradation of antibiotics. The extent of mutagenicity of electron-beam irradiation was less than those of UV or gamma-ray irradiations. The application of election-beam to the wastewater treatment system showed the high efficiency of destroying and removal effects on bacterial cells. The selective increase in population of radiation resistant bacteria was not observed. These results indicate that the application of ionizing radiation to the processes of wastewater treatment system will be suitable than UV irradiation because of its degradability of variable antibiotics, high removal rate of harmful bacteria, less mutagenicity of bacteria, and low selective effect on radiation resistant bacteria

  6. Evaluation of the antibiotic activity and genetic mutation of microorganisms in the effluent treated with the electron-beam from waste-water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Nam, Ji Hyun; Shin, Ji Hye; Yun, Seo Yeon; Cho, Young Cheol; Oh, Kyoung hee

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the residual concentrations and activities of antibiotics after UV or gamma-ray treatments were estimated, and the effect of irradiation of UV, gamma-ray, or electron beam was estimated on the survivability and less mutagenic effect on bacteria. The changes of bacterial communities and radiation resistant population in the effluent treated with UV and electron-beam were analyzed. The gamma-ray irradiation was more effective than UV in degradation of antibiotics. The extent of mutagenicity of electron-beam irradiation was less than those of UV or gamma-ray irradiations. The application of election-beam to the wastewater treatment system showed the high efficiency of destroying and removal effects on bacterial cells. The selective increase in population of radiation resistant bacteria was not observed. These results indicate that the application of ionizing radiation to the processes of wastewater treatment system will be suitable than UV irradiation because of its degradability of variable antibiotics, high removal rate of harmful bacteria, less mutagenicity of bacteria, and low selective effect on radiation resistant bacteria

  7. Looking at the stability of life-support microorganisms in space : the MELGEN activity highlights the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC8005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicolas

    The MELGEN activity (MELiSSA Genetic Stability Study) mainly covers the molecular aspects of the regenerative life-support system MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) of the European Space Agency (ESA). The general objective of MELGEN is to establish and validate methods and the related hardware in order to detect genetic instability and microbial contaminants in the MELISSA compartments. This includes (1) a genetic description of the MELISSA strains, (2) studies of microbial behavior and genetic stability in bioreactors and (3) the detection of chemical, genetical and biological contamination and their effect on microbial metabolism. Selected as oxygen producer and complementary food source, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 plays a major role within the MELiSSA loop. As the genomic information on this organism was insufficient, sequencing of its genome was proposed at the French National Sequencing Center, Genoscope, as a joint effort between ESA and different laboratories. So far, a preliminary assembly of 16 contigs representing circa 6.3 million basepairs was obtained. Even though the finishing of the genome is on its way, automatic annotation of the contigs has already been performed on the MaGe annotation platform, and curation of the sequence is currently being carried out, with a special focus on biosynthesis pathways, photosynthesis, and maintenance processes of the cell. According to the index of repetitiveness described by Haubold and Wiehe (2006), we discovered that the genome of Arthrospira sp. is among the 50 most repeated bacterial genomes sequenced to date. Thanks to the sequencing project, we have identified and catalogued mobile genetics elements (MGEs) dispersed throughout the unique chromosome of this cyanobacterium. They represent a quite large proportion of the genome, as genes identified as putative transposases are indeed found in circa 5 Results : We currently have a first draft of the complete genome of

  8. Effects of Atrazine on Soil Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Radivojević

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the herbicide atrazine on soil microorganisms was investigated. Trials were set up in laboratory, on a clay loam soil. Atrazine was applied at 8.0, 40.0 and 80.0 mg/kg soil rates. The abundance of total microorganisms, fungi, actinomycetes, cellulolytic microorganisms and amino-heterotrophs was recorded. Soil samples were collected 1, 7, 14, 21, 30 and 60 days after atrazine treatment for microbiological analyses.The results showed that the intensity of atrazine effect on soil microorganisms depended on treatment rate, exposure time and group of microorganisms. Atrazine had an inhibiting effect on cellulolytic microorganisms and amino-heterotrophs. Initially, it inhibited fungiand actinomycetes but its effect turned into a stimulating one once a population recovered. Atrazine had a stimulating effect on total abundance of microorganisms.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Extremophile Microorganisms with Significance to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bej, Asim K.

    2003-01-01

    It is now well recognized that microorganisms thrive in extreme ecological conditions such as geothermal vents, polar region, acid and alkaline lakes, and the cold pressurized depth of the ocean floor of this planet. Morphological, physiological, biochemical and genetic adaptations to extreme environments by these extremophile microorganisms have generated immense interest amongst astrobiologists who increasingly believe in the existence of extraterrestrial life. The evidence collected by NASA's space probe Galileo suggested the presence of liquid water and volcanic activity on Mars and Jupiter's satellite Europa. Volcanic activity provides some of the heat necessary to keep the water on Europa from freezing that could provide important dissolved chemicals needed by living organisms. The possibility of the existence of hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters on Mars, and a layer of liquid water under the ice on Europa provide sufficient 'raison d'etre' to study microorganisms in similar extreme environments on Earth, which could provide us with a model that would help establish the existence of extraterrestrial life on other planetary bodies. The objectives of the summer research project were as follows: (1) application of molecular approaches to help establish new species of extremophile microorganisms isolated from a hypersaline alkaline lake; and (2) identification of a major cold-shock gene (cspA) homolog from a psychrotolerant microorganism, PmagG1.

  10. Interactions Between Beneficial and Harmful Microorganisms: From the Composting Process to Compost Application

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Jacques G.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous microorganisms are involved in the composting process, but their precise roles are often unknown. Compost microorganisms are influenced by the composition of the substrate and by the temperature in the compost pile. In addition, different microorganisms also influence each other, e.g. through competition. In the first phase of composting, microbial activity increase drastically, leading to a rise in temperature. The initial bacterial dominance is replaced by a fungal one during compo...

  11. Mini-review: Inhibition of biofouling by marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Abed, Raeid M M; Teplitski, Max

    2013-01-01

    Any natural or artificial substratum exposed to seawater is quickly fouled by marine microorganisms and later by macrofouling species. Microfouling organisms on the surface of a substratum form heterogenic biofilms, which are composed of multiple species of heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, protozoa and fungi. Biofilms on artificial structures create serious problems for industries worldwide, with effects including an increase in drag force and metal corrosion as well as a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Additionally, microorganisms produce chemical compounds that may induce or inhibit settlement and growth of other fouling organisms. Since the last review by the first author on inhibition of biofouling by marine microbes in 2006, significant progress has been made in the field. Several antimicrobial, antialgal and antilarval compounds have been isolated from heterotrophic marine bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. Some of these compounds have multiple bioactivities. Microorganisms are able to disrupt biofilms by inhibition of bacterial signalling and production of enzymes that degrade bacterial signals and polymers. Epibiotic microorganisms associated with marine algae and invertebrates have a high antifouling (AF) potential, which can be used to solve biofouling problems in industry. However, more information about the production of AF compounds by marine microorganisms in situ and their mechanisms of action needs to be obtained. This review focuses on the AF activity of marine heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi and covers publications from 2006 up to the end of 2012.

  12. Biotechnologies for Marine Oil Spill Cleanup: Indissoluble Ties with Microorganisms

    KAUST Repository

    Mapelli, Francesca; Scoma, Alberto; Michoud, Gregoire; Aulenta, Federico; Boon, Nico; Borin, Sara; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous exploitation of petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) has been accompanied by accidental spills and chronic pollution in marine ecosystems, including the deep ocean. Physicochemical technologies are available for oil spill cleanup, but HCs must ultimately be mineralized by microorganisms. How environmental factors drive the assembly and activity of HC-degrading microbial communities remains unknown, limiting our capacity to integrate microorganism-based cleanup strategies with current physicochemical remediation technologies. In this review, we summarize recent findings about microbial physiology, metabolism and ecology and describe how microbes can be exploited to create improved biotechnological solutions to clean up marine surface and deep waters, sediments and beaches.

  13. Biotechnologies for Marine Oil Spill Cleanup: Indissoluble Ties with Microorganisms

    KAUST Repository

    Mapelli, Francesca

    2017-05-13

    The ubiquitous exploitation of petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) has been accompanied by accidental spills and chronic pollution in marine ecosystems, including the deep ocean. Physicochemical technologies are available for oil spill cleanup, but HCs must ultimately be mineralized by microorganisms. How environmental factors drive the assembly and activity of HC-degrading microbial communities remains unknown, limiting our capacity to integrate microorganism-based cleanup strategies with current physicochemical remediation technologies. In this review, we summarize recent findings about microbial physiology, metabolism and ecology and describe how microbes can be exploited to create improved biotechnological solutions to clean up marine surface and deep waters, sediments and beaches.

  14. Methods for identifying lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyyssola, A.; Heshof, R.; Haarmann, T.; Eidner, J.; Westerholm-Parvinen, A.; Langfelder, K.; Kruus, K.; Graaff, de L.H.; Buchert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Plate assays for lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates have been developed. Both potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were effective for detecting soybean lipoxygenase activity on agar plates. A positive result was also achieved using the beta-carotene bleaching

  15. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O; Vogel, Timothy M; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-08-01

    Correctly identifying nearest "neighbors" of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned with

  16. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Correctly identifying nearest “neighbors” of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned

  17. Organotins and microorganisms. Yuki suzu kagobutsu to biseibutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, S.; Onogi, H. (Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences)

    1992-08-10

    Tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin have higher toxicity than other organotin compounds and are used as biocides, but in recent years the pollution of water and aquatic organisms has become a social problem. This paper describes the interaction between organotin compounds and microorganisms, centering on the decomposition of TBT. Part of microalgae whose activity is promoted by light or nutritive salts within an aquatic environment play an important role in TBT decomposition. Diatoms, and dinoflagellataes are mentioned as the examples. Moreover, an example in which microorganisms promote the transformation of inorganotin compounds to dimethyltin or trimethyltin is given. However, it is pointed out in this paper that the action of microorganisms relates greatly to the continuance of existence of organotins in environments, but the degradation efficiency is considered to be very low and prevention against pollution is of primary importance. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Microscale interactions between earthworms and microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirbes, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are well adapted to their soil microhabitat where they live together in consortia, interacting with other living members, including earthworms. This literature review consists of four sections that focus on microscale interactions between earthworms and microorganisms. The first part is devoted to nephridia symbiosis. Recent discoveries show that Verminephrobacter spp. is present as a symbiont in earthworm nephridia. The second section deals with earthworm food preference and focuses on the major hypotheses of foraging strategies. The third section presents evidence of gut symbionts and highlights the need for additional studies in this field. The last section of this review explains why microorganism activities are enhanced in burrows and casts of earthworms.

  19. Use of Probiotic Microorganisms for Bio-Protective Aims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz YANGILAR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It was known that some diseases can be treated as the result of the use of antibiotics in certain periods and at certain dosages while inactivating and deteriorating normal microorganisms performing useful activities in human metabolism (in especially intestinal flora. It was occured that after the use of antibiotics, some defects can be seen resulting from antibiotics (such as allergy, diarrhea, gas formation etc. With this aim, nutraceutics and functional food have gained importance over the last years and consumers began to be interested in probiotics, natural antioxidants, dietary fibres, products with low calorie and cholesterol contents, especially the products containing probioticbacteria. Bacteriocins produced by probiotic bacteria can play important roles as food protective and safeguarding since they can compete with unwanted or pathogen microorganisms survive in the media and colonize in intestines. In this review, is aimed to emphasis bioprotective compounds, advantages and disadvantages of biopreservation method and the importance of the mechanisms of probiotic microorganisms.

  20. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make students understand that microorganisms are always associated with humans, and that microorganisms have the ability to degrade chemicals? The presence of microorganisms on humans can be shown by incubating agar plates after they are touched by the hands of students. The ability of microorganisms to degrade chemicals can be shown by an analytical measurement of the degradation of chemicals. When the chemicals are dyes (colorants in water, microbial activity on degradation of dyes can be demonstrated by observing a decreasing degree of color as a result of the enzymatic activity (e.g., azoreductase. Dyes are widely used in the textile, food, and cosmetic industries. They are generally resistant to conventional biological wastewater treatment systems such as the activated sludge process (4. The discharge of wastewater containing dye pollutes surface water. The ability of microorganisms to decolorize and degrade dyes has been widely investigated to use for bioremediation purposes (5. The goal of this tip is to understand the presence of bacteria on human skin and the ability of bacteria to degrade colorant chemicals (decolorization. In this tip, students first cultivate and isolate bacteria on their hands, and then examine potential decolorization activity of each bacterium by observing the degree of color of the liquid in tubes in which bacteria isolated from students’ hands were inoculated. Decolorization activity of bacterial isolates from human skin has been

  1. Effective Microorganisms: Myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal F. Cóndor_Golec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Th e increase in population has lead to intensifi cation of agricultural systems. Due to the use of pesticides the productivity of agricultural systems has increased but environmental deterioration and unsustainable systems are the consequences of these ways of management. Th e environmentally friendly Eff ective Microorganisms (EM technology claims an enormous amount of benefi ts (claimed by the companies. Th e use of EM as an addictive to manure or as a spray directly in the fi elds may increase the microfauna diversity of the soil and many benefi ts are derived from that increase. It seems that suffi cient information is available about this new technology. Th e aim of this project is to make an analysis of the literature about EM and answer the following questions: 1 how much is known about EM?, 2 how much research is done on EM?, 3 what are the principals of EM?, what are the socio-economic implications of EM?. We want to answer these questions in order to publish the facts about EM and its socio-economic implications.

  2. Systems Biology of Industrial Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Marta; Salazar, Margarita; Nielsen, Jens

    The field of industrial biotechnology is expanding rapidly as the chemical industry is looking towards more sustainable production of chemicals that can be used as fuels or building blocks for production of solvents and materials. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocesses, it is a major challenge to design and develop efficient cell factories that can ensure cost efficient conversion of the raw material into the chemical of interest. This is achieved through metabolic engineering, where the metabolism of the cell factory is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of sugars, the typical raw materials in the fermentation industry, into the desired product. However, engineering of cellular metabolism is often challenging due to the complex regulation that has evolved in connection with adaptation of the different microorganisms to their ecological niches. In order to map these regulatory structures and further de-regulate them, as well as identify ingenious metabolic engineering strategies that full-fill mass balance constraints, tools from systems biology can be applied. This involves both high-throughput analysis tools like transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies. It is in fact expected that systems biology may substantially improve the process of cell factory development, and we therefore propose the term Industrial Systems Biology for how systems biology will enhance the development of industrial biotechnology for sustainable chemical production.

  3. [Genome editing of industrial microorganism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Genome editing is defined as highly-effective and precise modification of cellular genome in a large scale. In recent years, such genome-editing methods have been rapidly developed in the field of industrial strain improvement. The quickly-updating methods thoroughly change the old mode of inefficient genetic modification, which is "one modification, one selection marker, and one target site". Highly-effective modification mode in genome editing have been developed including simultaneous modification of multiplex genes, highly-effective insertion, replacement, and deletion of target genes in the genome scale, cut-paste of a large DNA fragment. These new tools for microbial genome editing will certainly be applied widely, and increase the efficiency of industrial strain improvement, and promote the revolution of traditional fermentation industry and rapid development of novel industrial biotechnology like production of biofuel and biomaterial. The technological principle of these genome-editing methods and their applications were summarized in this review, which can benefit engineering and construction of industrial microorganism.

  4. Identification of anaerobic microorganisms for converting kitchen waste to biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirhossein Malakahmad; Shahrom Mohd Zain; Noor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Shamsul Rahman Mohamed Kutty; Mohd Hasnain Isa

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion process is one of the alternative methods to convert organic waste into methane gas which is a fuel and energy source. Activities of various kinds of microorganisms are the main factor for anaerobic digestion which produces methane gas. Therefore, in this study a modified Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with working volume of 50 liters was designed to identify the microorganisms through biogas production. The mixture of 75% kitchen waste and 25% sewage sludge was used as substrate. Observations on microorganisms in the ABR showed that there exists a small amount of protozoa (5%) and fungi (2%) in the system, but almost 93% of the microorganism population consists of bacteria. It is definitely clear that bacteria are responsible for anaerobic biodegradation of kitchen waste. Results show that in the acidification zone of the ABR (front compartments of reactor) fast growing bacteria capable of growth at high substrate levels and reduced pH was dominant. A shift to slower growing scavenging bacteria that grow better at higher pH was occurring towards the end of the reactor. Due to the ability of activity in acetate environment the percentages of Methanococcus, Methanosarcina and Methanotrix were higher than other kinds of methane former in the system. (Author)

  5. The functional role of microorganisms in soil biocenoses in Ignalina NPP region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdanavichiene, Z.; Budavichiene, I.; Ramanauskiene, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Studies on group structure of soil microorganisms as well as regularities of changes in cellulotic activity in marsh biotopes of pine and birch forests in the littoral district of lake Drukshiai were carried out. The activity and directness of microorganisms, as well as dissociation rate of cellulose in soil depending on the changes of climatic conditions were evaluated. The effect of climate factors and thermal pollution on the activity of microorganisms and rate of cellulose degradation in soil was revealed in the standard area (Shashkai) near the disposal canal of Ignalina NPP. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Screening of microorganisms for microbial enhanced oil recovery processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonebayashi, H. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, S. [Japan Food Research Laboratiories, Tokyo (Japan). Div. of Microbiology; Ono, K. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan). Tech. Research Center; Enomoto, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Geoscience and Tech.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to screen effective microorganisms for the Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery process (or simply as MEOR). Samples of drilling cuttings, formation water, and soil were collected from domestic drilling sites and oil fields. Moreover, samples of activated-sludge and compost were collected from domestic sewage treatment facility and food treatment facility. At first, microorganisms in samples were investigated by incubation with different media; then they were isolated. By two stage-screening based on metabolizing ability, 4 strains (Bacillus licheniformis TRC-18-2-a, Enterobacter cloacae TRC-322, Bacillus subtilis TRC-4118, and Bacillus subtilis TRC-4126) were isolated as effective microorganisms for oil recovery. B. licheniformis TRC-18-2-a is a multifunctional microorganism possessing excellent surfactant productivity, and in addition it has gas, acid and polymer productivities. E. cloacae TRC-332 has gas and acid producing abilities. B. subtilis TRC-4118 and TRC-4126 are effective biosurfactant producers, and they reduce the interfacial tension to 0.04 and 0.12 dyne/cm, respectively. (author)

  7. Genome-Based Studies of Marine Microorganisms to Maximize the Diversity of Natural Products Discovery for Medical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Qing Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms are rich source for natural products which play important roles in pharmaceutical industry. Over the past decade, genome-based studies of marine microorganisms have unveiled the tremendous diversity of the producers of natural products and also contributed to the efficiency of harness the strain diversity and chemical diversity, as well as the genetic diversity of marine microorganisms for the rapid discovery and generation of new natural products. In the meantime, genomic information retrieved from marine symbiotic microorganisms can also be employed for the discovery of new medical molecules from yet-unculturable microorganisms. In this paper, the recent progress in the genomic research of marine microorganisms is reviewed; new tools of genome mining as well as the advance in the activation of orphan pathways and metagenomic studies are summarized. Genome-based research of marine microorganisms will maximize the biodiscovery process and solve the problems of supply and sustainability of drug molecules for medical treatments.

  8. Decomposition of diesel oil by various microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Netzsch-Lehner, A

    1969-01-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated the decomposition of diesel oil in different soils. In this experiment the decomposition of /sup 14/C-n-Hexadecane labelled diesel oil by special microorganisms was studied. The results were as follows: (1) In the experimental soils the microorganisms Mycoccus ruber, Mycobacterium luteum and Trichoderma hamatum are responsible for the diesel oil decomposition. (2) By adding microorganisms to the soil an increase of the decomposition rate was found only in the beginning of the experiments. (3) Maximum decomposition of diesel oil was reached 2-3 weeks after incubation.

  9. Tapping uncultured microorganisms through metagenomics for drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... Microorganisms are major source of bioactive natural products, and several ... This review highlights the recent methodologies, limitations, and applications of metagenomics for the discovery of new drugs.

  10. Defensive properties of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of the selection factors that drive chemical diversification of secondary metabolites of constitutive defence systems in plants, such as pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), is still incomplete. Historically, plants always have been confronted with microorganisms. Long before herbivores

  11. Genetic fingerprint of microorganisms associated with the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inviting range of elements which microorganisms use in their ... ization and degradation of organic binders leading to struc- tural damage (Herrera et al. 2004). Microbial solubilization of materials involves the produc- ... architectural cement.

  12. Halophilic microorganisms in deteriorated historic buildings: insights into their characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Justyna; Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata; Pietrzak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Historic buildings are constantly being exposed to numerous climatic changes such as damp and rainwater. Water migration into and out of the material's pores can lead to salt precipitation and the so-called efflorescence. The structure of the material may be seriously threatened by salt crystallization. A huge pressure is produced when salt hydrates occupy larger spaces, which leads at the end to cracking, detachment and material loss. Halophilic microorganisms have the ability to adapt to high salinity because of the mechanisms of inorganic salt (KCl or NaCl) accumulation in their cells at concentrations isotonic to the environment, or compatible solutes uptake or synthesis. In this study, we focused our attention on the determination of optimal growth conditions of halophilic microorganisms isolated from historical buildings in terms of salinity, pH and temperature ranges, as well as biochemical properties and antagonistic abilities. Halophilic microorganisms studied in this paper could be categorized as a halotolerant group, as they grow in the absence of NaCl, as well as tolerate higher salt concentrations (Staphylococcus succinus, Virgibacillus halodenitrificans). Halophilic microorganisms have been also observed (Halobacillus styriensis, H. hunanensis, H. naozhouensis, H. litoralis, Marinococcus halophilus and yeast Sterigmatomyces halophilus). With respect to their physiological characteristics, cultivation at a temperature of 25-30°C, pH 6-7, NaCl concentration for halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, 0-10% and 15-30%, respectively, provides the most convenient conditions. Halophiles described in this study displayed lipolytic, glycolytic and proteolytic activities. Staphylococcus succinus and Marinococcus halophilus showed strong antagonistic potential towards bacteria from the Bacillus genus, while Halobacillus litoralis displayed an inhibiting ability against other halophiles.

  13. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Macomber, Lee; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological co...

  14. Pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms in caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Moral Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With today’s leisure tourism, the frequency of visits to many caves makes it necessary to know about possible potentially pathogenic microorganisms in caves, determine their reservoirs, and inform the public about the consequences of such visits. Our data reveal that caves could be a potential danger to visitors because of the presence of opportunistic microorganisms, whose existence and possible development in humans is currently unknown.

  15. Effect of Dettol® on viability of some microorganisms associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... activity of this disinfectant on microorganisms causing nosocomial infections. ... resistance to more than 3 antibiotics and it is from this group that the test organisms S. ..... them to produce a form less readily adsorbed on the.

  16. Assessment of cellulolytic microorganisms in soils of Nevados Park, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Avellaneda-Torres,Lizeth Manuela; Pulido,Claudia Patricia Guevara; Rojas,Esperanza Torres

    2014-01-01

    A systematized survey was conducted to find soil-borne microbes that degrade cellulose in soils from unique ecosystems, such as the Superpáramo, Páramo, and the High Andean Forest in the Nevados National Natural Park (NNNP), Colombia. These high mountain ecosystems represent extreme environments, such as high levels of solar radiation, low atmospheric pressure, and extreme daily changes in temperature. Cellulolytic activity of the microorganisms was evaluated using qualitative tests, such as ...

  17. The effect of adhesion on survival and growth of microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Or, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms to solid surfaces or water/air interfaces can significantly influence cellular metabolic activity, development and viability. Attachment is of advantage particularly for organisms growing under oligotrophic or otherwise extreme conditions. However, the ability to detach and migrate is of vital importance when prevailing conditions become too harsh or in situations of population explosion. Adhesion can cause alterations in the physical and chemical properties of substratum surfaces as well, by means of degradation, aggregation, emulsification etc. (author) 48 refs

  18. Turbulence from a microorganism's perspective: Does the open ocean feel different than a coral reef?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Rachel; Variano, Evan; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2012-11-01

    Microorganisms in the ocean live in turbulent flows. Swimming microorganisms navigate through the water (e.g. larvae land on suitable substrata, predators find patches of prey), but the mechanisms by which they do so in turbulent flow are poorly understood as are the roles of passive transport versus active behaviors. Because microorganisms are smaller than the Kolmagorov length (the smallest scale of eddies in turbulent flow), they experience turbulence as a series of linear gradients in the velocity that vary in time. While the average strength of these gradients and a timescale can be computed from some typical characteristics of the flow, such as the turbulent kinetic energy or the dissipation rate, there are indications that organisms are disproportionally affected by rare, extreme events. Understanding the frequency of such events in different environments will be critical to understanding how microorganisms respond to and navigate in turbulence. To understand the hydrodynamic cues that microorganisms experience in the ocean we must measure velocity gradients in realistic turbulent flow on the spatial and temporal scales encountered by microorganisms. We have been exploring the effect of the spatial resolution of PIV and DNS of turbulent flow on the presence of velocity gradients of different magnitudes at the scale of microorganisms. Here we present some results of PIV taken at different resolutions in turbulent flow over rough biological substrata to illustrate the challenges of quantifying the fluctuations in velocity gradients encountered by aquatic microorganisms.

  19. Titanium photocatalyst against human pathogenic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussovski, V.; Stefchev, P.; Kirilov, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional methods of disinfection are not effective in the longer term. They are time and staff intensive and use aggressive chemicals. Photocatalytic oxidation on surfaces coated with titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) might offer a possible alternative. The antimicrobial activity of TiO 2 powder P25 and thin films of TiO 2 on glass slides against representative strains of microorganisms associated with hospital-acquired infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) was investigated in vitro. High efficiency has been found in the case of the studied bacterial strains, particularly for the P. aeruginosa. It was shown that it is possible to disinfect surfaces coated with TiO 2 and stimulated by UV-A light. The reduction efficiencies for P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and C. albicans were 3.19, 2.32 and 1.22. In all cases sublethal UV-A doses provoked an important lethality in the presence of TiO 2 . (authors)

  20. Detection of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein an improved assay for detecting the presence of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates. Using different substrates (gelatin, BSA, hemoglobin incorporated into the agar and varying the culture medium composition, we were able to detect proteolytic activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus and Serratia marcescens as well as the influence that these components displayed in the expression of these enzymes. For all microorganisms tested we found that in agar-BHI or yeast extract medium containing gelatin the sensitivity of proteinase detection was considerably greater than in BSA-agar or hemoglobin-agar. However, when BSA or hemoglobin were added to the culture medium, there was an increase in growth along with a marked reduction in the amount of proteinase production. In the case of M. luteus the incorporation of glycerol in BHI or yeast extract gelatin-agar induced protease liberation. Our results indicate that the technique described here is of value for detecting extracellular proteases directly in the culture medium, by means of a qualitative assay, simple, inexpensive, straight forward method to assess the presence of the proteolytic activity of a given microorganism colony with great freedom in substrate selection.

  1. Selection of potential microorganism for sago starch fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUTH MELLIAWATI

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation process of sago starch for the production of bioproduct requires potential microorganism that have ability to hydrolyze sago starch. The purpose of this research was to get the potential of amylolytic microorganisms for their capability of amyloglucosidase activity and to know the sugar strains of the fermentation result. Eleven amylolytic microorganisms (9 strains of mold and 2 strains of yeast were obtained from the collection Research Centre for Biotechnology – Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI, Cibinong-Bogor were used. The selection step was carried out based on their capability of starch hydrolysis to reducing sugar. The best result indicates that the production of reducing sugar reached the highest 18.485 ppm and amyloglucosidase activities was 3.583 units by KTU-1 strain. The highest total acid obtained was 5.85 mg/mL by Rhizopus IFO.R5442. The cell biomass was obtained between 0.5 to 1.74 g dry weight/100 mL and pH of the final fermentation (72 h were 3.57 to 8.38.

  2. Experimental studies of biodegradation of asphalt by microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao; Lin, Kong-hua; Kawakami, Yasushi

    2000-04-01

    On the geological disposal system of the radioactive wastes, the activities of the microorganisms that could degrade the asphalt might be significant for the assessment of the system performance. As the main effects of the biodegradation of the asphalt, the fluctuation of leaching behavior of the nuclides included in asphalt waste has been indicated. In this study, the asphalt biodegradation test was carried out. The microorganism of which asphalt degradation ability was comparatively higher under aerobic condition and anaerobic condition was used. The asphalt biodegradation rate was calculated and it was evaluated whether the asphalt biodegradation in this system could occur. The results show that the asphalt biodegradation rate under anaerobic and high alkali condition will be 300 times lower than under aerobic and neutral pH. (author)

  3. Synthesis of biosurfactants and their advantages to microorganisms and mankind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Makkar, Randhir S; Kaur, Jasminder; Mehta, S K

    2010-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds synthesized by a wide variety of microorganisms. They are molecules that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains and are capable of lowering the surface tension and the interfacial tension of the growth medium. Biosurfactants possess different chemical structures--lipopeptides, glycolipids, neutral lipids and fatty acids. They are nontoxic biomolecules that are biodegradable. Biosurfactants also exhibit strong emulsification of hydrophobic compounds and form stable emulsions. The low water solubility of these hydrophobic compounds limits their availability to microorganisms, which is a potential problem for bioremediation of contaminated sites. Microbially produced surfactants enhance the bioavailability of these hydrophobic compounds for bioremediation. Therefore, biosurfactant-enhanced solubility of pollutants has potential applications in bioremediation. Not only are the biosurfactants useful in a variety of industrial processes, they are also of vital importance to the microbes in adhesion, emulsification, bioavailability, desorption and defense strategy. These interesting facts are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Ecological aspects of microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.L.; Landa, E.R.; Updegraff, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numbers and types of microorganisms in uranium mill tailings were determined using culturing techniques. Arthrobacter were found to be the predominant microorganism inhabiting the sandy tailings, whereas Bacillus and fungi predominated in the slime tailings. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, capable of leaching radium, were isolated in low numbers from tailings samples but were isolated in significantly high numbers from topsoil in contact with the tailings. The results are placed in the context of the magnitude of uranium mill tailings in the United States, the hazards posed by the tailings, and how such hazards could be enhanced or diminished by microbial activities. Patterns in the composition of the microbial population are evaluated with respect to the ecological variables that influence microbial growth. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  5. Functional microorganisms for functional food quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, M; Cagno, R Di; De Angelis, M

    2010-09-01

    Functional microorganisms and health benefits represent a binomial with great potential for fermented functional foods. The health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Since the importance of high viability for probiotic effect, two major options are currently pursued for improving it--to enhance bacterial stress response and to use alternative products for incorporating probiotics (e.g., ice cream, cheeses, cereals, fruit juices, vegetables, and soy beans). Further, it seems that quorum sensing signal molecules released by probiotics may interact with human epithelial cells from intestine thus modulating several physiological functions. Under optimal processing conditions, functional microorganisms contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. Overproduction of free amino acids and vitamins are two classical examples. Besides, bioactive compounds (e.g., peptides, γ-amino butyric acid, and conjugated linoleic acid) may be released during food processing above the physiological threshold and they may exert various in vivo health benefits. Functional microorganisms are even more used in novel strategies for decreasing phenomenon of food intolerance (e.g., gluten intolerance) and allergy. By a critical approach, this review will aim at showing the potential of functional microorganisms for the quality of functional foods.

  6. Microorganism identification technique using radioactive and fluorescent agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silman, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    A method for identifying microorganisms is claimed. An emissive agent is added to a specimen of microorganisms to produce a mix of emissive products. These products are detected and characteristic pattern functioning as an identifier for the microorganisms is derived. The identifier is then compared with identifiers representing known microorganisms

  7. Food fermentations: Microorganisms with technological beneficial use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdichon, François; Casaregola, Serge; Farrokh, Choreh

    2012-01-01

    Microbial food cultures have directly or indirectly come under various regulatory frameworks in the course of the last decades. Several of those regulatory frameworks put emphasis on “the history of use”, “traditional food”, or “general recognition of safety”. Authoritative lists of microorganism......, legumes, cereals, beverages, and vinegar). We have also reviewed and updated the taxonomy of the microorganisms used in food fermentations in order to bring the taxonomy in agreement with the current standing in nomenclature....... cultures in practical use. However, as the focus mainly was on commercially available dairy cultures, there was an unmet need for a list with a wider scope. We present an updated inventory of microorganisms used in food fermentations covering a wide range of food matrices (dairy, meat, fish, vegetables...

  8. Selection of Suitable Microorganism for Biocatalytic Oxidation Reaction of Racemic Propranolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime SONGÜR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Propranolol is one of the β-blockers which are pharmaceutically important, especially used for treatment of cardiovasculer disease. In this study, the production of enantiomerically pure propranolol was aimed via biocatalytic deracemization including tandem oxidation-reduction reactions of racemic propranolol. Within this content, firstly suitable microorganism for the oxidation of racemic propranolol was investigated. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH enzyme for oxidation of propranolol and NADH oxidase enzyme for cofactor regeneration were necessary for the oxidation reactions. For this reason, ADH and NADH oxidase enzymes activities of different microorganisms were measured to select the microorganism for using as enzyme source. These microorganisms are Lactobacillus kefir NRRL B-1839, Rhodotorula glutunis DSM 70398, Rhizopus oryzae CBS 111718, Rhizopus arhizus. The highest ADH and NADH oxidase activities were obtained for L. kefir.

  9. Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. L.; Wilcks, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    the industry, national administration and research institutions were gathered to discuss which elements should be considered in a risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms used as food or food ingredients. The existing EU and national regulations were presented, together with the experiences......The rapid development of recombinant DNA techniques for food organisms urges for an ongoing discussion on the risk assessment of both new as traditional use of microorganisms in food production. This report, supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers, is the result of a workshop where people from...... with risk assessment of these organisms in each Nordic country....

  10. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Tamang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers.

  11. Electrode Cultivation and Interfacial Electron Transport in Subsurface Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbelkar, A. A.; Jangir, Y.; Reese, B. K.; Wanger, G.; Anderson, C.; El-Naggar, M.; Amend, J.

    2016-12-01

    Continental subsurface environments can present significant energetic challenges to the resident microorganisms. While these environments are geologically diverse, potentially allowing energy harvesting by microorganisms that catalyze redox reactions, many of the abundant electron donors and acceptors are insoluble and therefore not directly bioavailable. Microbes can use extracellular electron transfer (EET) as a metabolic strategy to interact with redox active surfaces. This process can be mimicked on electrode surfaces and hence can lead to enrichment and quantification of subsurface microorganisms A primary bioelectrochemical enrichment with different oxidizing and reducing potentials set up in a single bioreactor was applied in situ to subsurface microorganisms residing in iron oxide rich deposits in the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Secondary enrichment revealed a plethora of classified and unclassified subsurface microbiota on both oxidizing and reducing potentials. From this enrichment, we have isolated a Gram-positive Bacillus along with Gram-negative Cupriavidus and Anaerospora strains (as electrode reducers) and Comamonas (as an electrode oxidizer). The Bacillus and Comamonas isolates were subjected to a detailed electrochemical characterization in half-reactors at anodic and cathodic potentials, respectively. An increase in cathodic current upon inoculation and cyclic voltammetry measurements confirm the hypothesis that Comamonas is capable of electron uptake from electrodes. In addition, measurements of Bacillus on anodes hint towards novel mechanisms that allow EET from Gram-positive bacteria. This study suggests that electrochemical approaches are well positioned to dissect such extracellular interactions that may be prevalent in the subsurface, while using physical electrodes to emulate the microhabitats, redox and geochemical gradients, and the spatially dependent interspecies interactions encountered in the subsurface. Electrochemical

  12. Uric acid in plants and microorganisms: Biological applications and genetics - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Rehab M; Abdel-Rahman, Tahany M; Naguib, Rasha M

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid increased accumulation and/or reduced excretion in human bodies is closely related to pathogenesis of gout and hyperuricemia. It is highly affected by the high intake of food rich in purine. Uric acid is present in both higher plants and microorganisms with species dependent concentration. Urate-degrading enzymes are found both in plants and microorganisms but the mechanisms by which plant degrade uric acid was found to be different among them. Higher plants produce various metabolites which could inhibit xanthine oxidase and xanthine oxidoreductase, so prohibit the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine then to uric acid in the purine metabolism. However, microorganisms produce group of degrading enzymes uricase, allantoinase, allantoicase and urease, which catalyze the degradation of uric acid to the ammonia. In humans, researchers found that several mutations caused a pseudogenization (silencing) of the uricase gene in ancestral apes which exist as an insoluble crystalloid in peroxisomes. This is in contrast to microorganisms in which uricases are soluble and exist either in cytoplasm or peroxisomes. Moreover, many recombinant uricases with higher activity than the wild type uricases could be induced successfully in many microorganisms. The present review deals with the occurrence of uric acid in plants and other organisms specially microorganisms in addition to the mechanisms by which plant extracts, metabolites and enzymes could reduce uric acid in blood. The genetic and genes encoding for uric acid in plants and microorganisms are also presented.

  13. Uric acid in plants and microorganisms: Biological applications and genetics - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab M. Hafez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid increased accumulation and/or reduced excretion in human bodies is closely related to pathogenesis of gout and hyperuricemia. It is highly affected by the high intake of food rich in purine. Uric acid is present in both higher plants and microorganisms with species dependent concentration. Urate-degrading enzymes are found both in plants and microorganisms but the mechanisms by which plant degrade uric acid was found to be different among them. Higher plants produce various metabolites which could inhibit xanthine oxidase and xanthine oxidoreductase, so prohibit the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine then to uric acid in the purine metabolism. However, microorganisms produce group of degrading enzymes uricase, allantoinase, allantoicase and urease, which catalyze the degradation of uric acid to the ammonia. In humans, researchers found that several mutations caused a pseudogenization (silencing of the uricase gene in ancestral apes which exist as an insoluble crystalloid in peroxisomes. This is in contrast to microorganisms in which uricases are soluble and exist either in cytoplasm or peroxisomes. Moreover, many recombinant uricases with higher activity than the wild type uricases could be induced successfully in many microorganisms. The present review deals with the occurrence of uric acid in plants and other organisms specially microorganisms in addition to the mechanisms by which plant extracts, metabolites and enzymes could reduce uric acid in blood. The genetic and genes encoding for uric acid in plants and microorganisms are also presented.

  14. Coal Enrichment Methods by Using Microorganisms and Their Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Deska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to review the literature on the methods of low-rank coal enrichment by using microorganisms and their metabolites. Effective bio-beneficiation technologies for low-rank coals in the future are also suggested throughout this paper. An extensive literature review highlights recent advances in bio-beneficiation technologies for low rank coals. This paper presents the state of the art in the field of the bio-beneficiation technology - carbon leaching with the aid of microorganisms, especially fungi. The knowledge of the low-rank coals leaching is an important step to meet the carbon eco-requirements and improve the economics of mining companies. There are several reasons to investigate microbial activities towards coal. This paper presents the current state of knowledge concerning bioleaching of coal. Thus, in view of the increasing importance of hard coal as a raw material and energy source, it seems hopeful to study the potential of microorganisms to modify the low-rank coal structure.

  15. Development of Novel Drugs from Marine Surface Associated Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhelen Egan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While the oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth’s surface, marine derived microbial natural products have been largely unexplored. The marine environment is a habitat for many unique microorganisms, which produce biologically active compounds (“bioactives” to adapt to particular environmental conditions. For example, marine surface associated microorganisms have proven to be a rich source for novel bioactives because of the necessity to evolve allelochemicals capable of protecting the producer from the fierce competition that exists between microorganisms on the surfaces of marine eukaryotes. Chemically driven interactions are also important for the establishment of cross-relationships between microbes and their eukaryotic hosts, in which organisms producing antimicrobial compounds (“antimicrobials”, may protect the host surface against over colonisation in return for a nutrient rich environment. As is the case for bioactive discovery in general, progress in the detection and characterization of marine microbial bioactives has been limited by a number of obstacles, such as unsuitable culture conditions, laborious purification processes, and a lack of de-replication. However many of these limitations are now being overcome due to improved microbial cultivation techniques, microbial (meta- genomic analysis and novel sensitive analytical tools for structural elucidation. Here we discuss how these technical advances, together with a better understanding of microbial and chemical ecology, will inevitably translate into an increase in the discovery and development of novel drugs from marine microbial sources in the future.

  16. Environment purification using microorganisms. Biseibutsu ni yoru kankyo joka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H [Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Harada, S

    1993-12-01

    Technologies to purify polluted soils vary with kinds of pollutants, spread of pollution, and shapes of water veins. A method is used often that several wells are drilled in a polluted area, and water is circulated between upstream wells and downstream wells, where activities of microorganisms living in that particular environment are utilized to biodegrade the pollutants. This technology is called bioremediation. This paper deals with soil pollution by chemical substances, and describes development of a technology to remove pollution caused by PCB and petroleum which is thought difficult to apply the bioremediation technology among environment purifying technologies using microorganisms. The bioremediation of petroleum pollution assumes petroleum pollution on seashores. Discussions have been given on separation from sea water of petroleum decomposing microorganisms to be used in the bioremediation, and the number of petroleum decomposing bacteria in seas near Japan. As a result, it was made clear that a few kinds of bacteria will suffice for decomposition of main components in a mixture as complex as petroleum. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Isolation of Electrogenic Microorganisms with Potential to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of cultivable microorganisms was made from the biofilm formed on the anode of a microbial fuel cell put into operation for 30 days; isolated microorganisms were evaluated for their ability to produce energy and reduce the hexavalent chromium Cr (VI. Five microorganisms were isolated, which were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, placing them in four bacterial genera: Exiguobacterium (CrMFC1, Acinetobacter (CrMFC2, Aeromonas (CrMFC3 and CrMFC5 and Serratia (CrMFC4. All isolates showed electrogenic activity and ability to reduce hexavalent chromium; the Acinetobacter CrMFC1 strain showed the best electrochemical performance registering a maximum power density of 18.61 mW/m2; the other strains showed values of maximum power density between 4.6 mW/m2and 7.1 mW/m2. Strains Aeromonas CrMFC5 and Exiguobacterium CrMFC1 showed the best rates of chromium reduction being able to reduce 100 % of the Cr (VI in less than 24 hours, the Aeromonas CrMFC5 strain was the most efficient, reducing 100 % of Cr (VI in 10 hours; the other strains reduced 100% of the contaminant after 28 to 30 hours. The microorganisms isolated in this study are hardly known for their electrogenic capacity and for reducing Cr (VI; however, show promise for their use in combined systems involving energy production system coupled to bioremediation of chromium contaminated water.

  18. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauga, Eric; Powers, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  19. Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern of Microorganisms Isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of microorganisms isolated from smoked and frozen fishes sold in Benin and Warri metropolis were investigated. Adopting microbiological standard techniques, the results of the bacterial counts and fungal counts ranged from 5.4 x 106 (Ekpan market) to 25.1 x 106 (Ekpan market) and 1.1 x 105 ...

  20. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  1. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macomber, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological concern. To date, the mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms and higher eukaryotes are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize nickel homeostasis processes used by microorganisms and highlight in vivo and in vitro effects of exposure to elevated concentrations of nickel. On the basis of this evidence we propose four mechanisms of nickel toxicity: 1) nickel replaces the essential metal of metalloproteins, 2) nickel binds to catalytic residues of non-metalloenzymes; 3) nickel binds outside the catalytic site of an enzyme to inhibit allosterically, and 4) nickel indirectly causes oxidative stress. PMID:21799955

  2. False identification of other microorganisms as Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: 507 microorganisms which have been previously identified as S. aureus in 8 States in Southern Nigeria through characteristic morphology on blood agar, Gram staining, growth and fermentation on Mannitol Salt Agar and coagulase formation were collected. All the isolates were identified in this study through ...

  3. Host Defense against Opportunist Microorganisms Following Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    Guide for Laboratory Animal, Resources, National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. I ii t ___ ii A- KNOWLEDMENT The investigators express...and Candida albicans are the microorganisms which are most frequently associated with septic complica- tions in thermally injured patients. Management

  4. Atmospheric Sampling of Microorganisms with UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, D. G., III

    2017-12-01

    Many microorganisms relevant to crops, domestic animals, and humans are transported over long distances through the atmosphere. Some of these atmospheric microbes catalyze the freezing of water at higher temperatures and facilitate the onset of precipitation. A few have crossed continents. New technologies are needed to study the movement of microorganisms in the atmosphere. We have used unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to study the transport of microorganisms tens to hundreds of meters above the ground. These UAS are equipped with unique devices for collecting microbes in the atmosphere during flight. Autonomous systems enable teams of UAS to perform complex atmospheric sampling tasks, and coordinate flight missions with one another. Data collected with UAS can be used to validate and improve disease forecasting models along highways in the sky, connecting transport scales across farms, states, and continents. Though terrestrial environments are often considered a major contributor to atmospheric microbial aerosols, little is known about aquatic sources of microbial aerosols. Droplets containing microorganisms can aerosolize from the water surface, liberating them into the atmosphere. We are using teams of unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) and UAS to study the aerosolization of microbes from aquatic environments. Controlled flume studies using highspeed video have allowed us to observe unique aerosolization phenomena that can launch microbes out of the water and into the air. Unmanned systems may be used to excite the next generation of biologists and engineers, and raise important ethical considerations about the future of human-robot interactions.

  5. Ecophysiology of microorganisms in microbial elctrolysis cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croese, E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges for improvement of the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) has been the reduction of the cost of the cathode catalyst. As catalyst at the cathode, microorganisms offer great possibilities. Previous research has shown the principle possibilities for the biocathode for H2

  6. Ecology and metagenomics of soil microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr; Head, I. M.; Prosser, J. I.; Schloter, M.; Smalla, K.; Tebbe, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 1 (2011), s. 1-2 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA MŠk(CZ) LA10001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : microorganism * bioremediation * biogenesis of soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.408, year: 2011

  7. Novel genome alteration system for microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daran, J.G.; Geertman, J.M.; Bolat, I.

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a set of targeting constructs, comprising a first construct comprising a recognition site for an endonuclease, a first region of homology with a target gene of a microorganism, and a first part of a selection marker, and a second construct comprising a second part of the

  8. The influence of selected nanomaterials on microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brandeburová, P.; Birošová, L.; Vojs, M.; Kromka, Alexander; Gál, M.; Tichý, J.; Híveš, J.; Mackul´ak, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 525-530 ISSN 0026-9247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01687S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanomaterials * nanotechnologies * microorganisms * toxicity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  9. Artifical Microorganism Infection in Aviation Kerosene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Vallo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The fuel used in the aviation engineering has to be clean and dry, it may not contain mechanical impurities and water. Water inaviation kerosene may occur in soluble and insoluble form. The danger inheres in the insoluble form, which may drop out in the crystallineform and cause various failures, such as those caused by mechanical impurities. The water assists in the biological matter formation createdby various species of microorganisms (bacteria, mould fungi and yeast. The microorganisms, present in water phase occurring on thebottom of tanks or on the interface water phase – kerosene, grow and reproduce and subsequently may pollute (impair the fuel by thebiomass or by the products of their metabolism. There is a possibility to infect the fuel artificially by a selected reference microorganismstrain, which usually occur in contaminated fuel, or by microorganisms which cause a biological contamination of aviation kerosene.Out of the selected reference strains used in the experiments, the reference strains of Proteus vulgaris, Sacharamyces cerevisiae andClostridium perfringens were not cultivated in the sterile aviation kerosene and the propagating nutrient medium. The aviation kerosene actsas a biocide medium for the presented reference microorganism strains.

  10. [Sorption of microorganisms by fiber materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikovskaia, G N; Gordienko, A S; Globa, L I

    1986-01-01

    Candida guilliermondii and Escherichia coli cells were adsorbed on glass and basalt fibres with a similar specific surface, but with a different charge. The quantity of adsorbed microorganisms did not depend on the type and charge of a fibre surface. However, cells were adsorbed faster and more firmly on positively charged and uncharged fibres than on negatively charged fibres.

  11. Doppler speedometer for micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkov, F.; Tuleushev, A.; Lisitsyn, V.; Kim, S.; Tuleushev, Yu.

    1996-01-01

    Objective of Investigations: Development and creation of the Doppler speedometer for micro-organisms which allows to evaluate, in a real temporal scale, variations in the state of water suspension of micro-organisms under the effect of chemical, physical and other external actions. Statement of the Problem The main problem is absence of reliable, accessible for users and simple, in view of application, Doppler speedometers for micro-organisms. Nevertheless, correlation Doppler spectrometry in the regime of heterodyning the supporting and cell-scattered laser radiation is welt known. The main idea is that the correlation function of photo-current pulses bears an information on the averages over the assembly of cell velocities. For solving the biological problems, construction of auto-correlation function in the real-time regime with the delay time values comprising, function in the real-time regime with the delay time values comprising, nearly, 100 me (10 khz) or higher is needed. Computers of high class manage this problem using but the program software. Due to this, one can simplify applications of the proposed techniques provided he creates the Doppler speedometer for micro-organism on a base of the P entium . Expected Result Manufactured operable mock-up of the Doppler speedometer for micro-organisms in a form of the auxiliary computer block which allows to receive an information, in the real time scale, on the results of external effects of various nature on the cell assembly in transparent medium with a small volume of the studied cell suspension

  12. Analysis of bioremediation of pesticides by soil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruml, Tomas; Klotz, Dietmar; Tykva, Richard

    1995-10-01

    The application of new pesticides requires careful monitoring of their distribution in the environment. The effect of the soil microflora on the stability of the [14C]- labelled juvenoid hormone analogue W-328 was estimated. The micro-organisms from two different soil samples were isolated and tested for their ability to decompose W-328. One bacterial strain, yeast and mold isolates, exhibited the degradation activity. The growth characteristics such as pH and temperature optima were determined. The degradation products were estimated using HPLC.

  13. Electrokinetic transport of aerobic microorganisms under low-strength electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillacheruvu, Krishnanand Y; Chinchoud, Preethi R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of utilizing low strength electric fields to transport commonly available mixed cultures such as those from an activated sludge process, bench scale batch reactor studies were conducted in sand and sandy loam soils. A readily biodegradable substrate, dextrose, was used to test the activity of the transported microorganisms. Electric field strengths of 7V, 10.5V, and 14V were used. Results from this investigation showed that an electric field strength of 0.46 Volts per cm was sufficient to transport activated sludge microorganisms across a sandy loam soil across a distance of about 8 cm in 72 h. More importantly, the electrokinetically transported microbial culture remained active and viable after the transport process and was biodegrade 44% of the dextrose in the soil medium. Electrokinetic treatment without microorganisms resulted in removal of 37% and the absence of any treatment yielded a removal of about 15%.

  14. Effects of Hangeshashinto on Growth of Oral Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Fukamachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy has a significant impact on quality of life, and causes considerable morbidity. Oral microorganisms are likely to intensify the inflammatory process and aggravate the formation of ulcers. Hangeshashinto (HST, a Japanese kampo medicine, has been reported to be effective when used as a gargle for the treatment of OM. To clarify the effects of HST on oral microorganisms, we assessed its antimicrobial activity against 27 microbial species, including 19 oral bacteria and one fungus. HST extract inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, though inhibitory effects were less pronounced for Gram-positive bacteria and the fungal strain. We then investigated the effects of antibacterial activities on 15 purified ingredients of HST and determined that baicalein, berberine, coptisine, [6]-shogaol, and homogentisic acid actively inhibited the growth of these bacteria. These findings showed that HST inhibits the growth of specific Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, which are significant pathogens in OM, without disturbing the normal oral flora. Our data suggest that HST may be a useful treatment for OM in patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  15. Identification of Microorganisms by Modern Analytical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszewski, Bogusław; Rogowska, Agnieszka; Pomastowski, Paweł; Złoch, Michał; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica

    2017-11-01

    Rapid detection and identification of microorganisms is a challenging and important aspect in a wide range of fields, from medical to industrial, affecting human lives. Unfortunately, classical methods of microorganism identification are based on time-consuming and labor-intensive approaches. Screening techniques require the rapid and cheap grouping of bacterial isolates; however, modern bioanalytics demand comprehensive bacterial studies at a molecular level. Modern approaches for the rapid identification of bacteria use molecular techniques, such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing based on polymerase chain reaction or electromigration, especially capillary zone electrophoresis and capillary isoelectric focusing. However, there are still several challenges with the analysis of microbial complexes using electromigration technology, such as uncontrolled aggregation and/or adhesion to the capillary surface. Thus, an approach using capillary electrophoresis of microbial aggregates with UV and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS detection is presented.

  16. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts

  17. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  18. Influence of near ultraviolet light on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.A.; Rubin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    Our results and the recent literature data on the biological action of near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) are examined in the review. Factual material is presented on the principles governing the manifestation of the following effects of near ultraviolet light in microorganisms: inactivation, delayed growth, photoreactivation, photoprotection, photoinduced sporulation (in fungi), and carotene synthesis. The mature and possible mechanisms of the effects examined are discussed

  19. Chemosensing in microorganisms to practical biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Surya K.; Kundu, Tapanendu; Sain, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms like bacteria can sense concentration of chemo-attractants in its medium very accurately. They achieve this through interaction between the receptors on their cell surface and the chemo-attractant molecules (like sugar). But the physical processes like diffusion set some limits on the accuracy of detection which was discussed by Berg and Purcell in the late seventies. We have a re-look at their work in order to assess what insight it may offer towards making efficient, practica...

  20. In vitro minocycline activity on superinfecting microorganisms isolated from chronic periodontitis patients Atividade in vitro de minociclina sobre microrganismos superinfectantes isolados de pacientes com periodontite crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Fernandes de Oliveira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is the most common type of periodontitis and it is associated with various species of microorganisms. Enteric rods, Pseudomonas, Staphyloccocus and Candida have been retrieved from periodontal pockets of patients with chronic periodontitis and correlated to cases of superinfection. Local or systemic antibiotic therapy is indicated to reinforce the effects of the conventional mechanical therapy. Minocycline has been suggested as one of the most effective drugs against periodontal pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of minocycline on superinfecting microorganisms isolated from the periodontal pocket and the oral cavity of individuals with chronic periodontitis. Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (n = 25, Staphylococcus spp. (n = 25, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 9 and Candida spp. (n = 25 were included in the study. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC of minocycline were determined using the Müeller-Hinton agar dilution method. Staphylococcus spp. isolates were the most sensitive to minocycline with a MIC of 8 µg/mL, followed by Enterobacteriaceae with a MIC of 16 µg/mL. The concentration of 16 µg/mL inhibited 96% of Candida spp. isolates. The MIC for 88.8% of the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 128 µg/mL. A concentration of 1,000 µg/mL was not enough to inhibit 100% of the tested isolates.Periodontite crônica é a forma mais comum de periodontite e está associada a diversas espécies de microrganismos. Enterobactérias, Pseudomonas, Staphyloccocus e Candida têm sido recuperados de bolsas periodontais de indivíduos com periodontite crônica e implicados em casos de superinfecção. A terapia antimicrobiana local ou sistêmica pode ser utilizada para reforçar os efeitos da terapia mecânica convencional, e a minociclina tem sido sugerida como antimicrobiano eficaz frente a periodontopatógenos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a concentração inibit

  1. [Succession of chitinolytic microorganisms in chernozem soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucharova, N A; Belova, E V; Vorob'ev, A V; Polianskaia, L M; Stepanov, A L

    2005-01-01

    The chitinolytic prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial complex of chernozem soil has been investigated in the course of a succession initiated by the introduction of chitin and humidification. The dynamics of the cell numbers of chitinolytic microorganisms and of their biomass was assessed by fluorescent microscopy and by inoculation of selective media. Emission of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, as well as dinitrogen fixation, was assessed by gas chromatography. It was found that, when the succession was initiated by the introduction of both chitin and humidification, it resulted in greater cell numbers and biomass of chitinolytic microorganisms and higher levels of CO2 and N2O emission and of nitrogen fixation than when the succession was initiated by humidification alone. As compared to the control samples, a significant (twofold) increase in the prokaryote cell number and biomass was found on the fourth day of the succession initiated by humidification and introduction of chitin. One week after the initiation of succession, the fungal biomass and length of mycelium were twice as high as those in the control samples. These results led to the conclusion that chitin utilization in chernozem soil starts during the initial stages of succession and is performed by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms.

  2. Monitoring of psychrotrophic microorganisms in raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Burdychová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The group of psychrotrophic microorganisms belongs to the microorganisms representing a risk for human health as well as a risk of milk and milk products spoilage. Some genus are considered to be significant producers of proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes. In this work, we analysed raw milk samples (n = 109 originated from 26 different suppliers from the area of North and Middle Moravia. The screening was performed from March 2007 to February 2008. The total bacterial counts (TBC ranged between 3.2 × 103 to 8.3 × 106 CFU/ml. The psychrotrophic bacterial counts (PBC ranged between 1.0 × 103 to 8.2 × 106 CFU/ml. Total of 48.62 % and 48.62 % of samples exceeded the hygienic limit in raw milk for TBC and PBC, respectively. The correlation between TBC and PBC was highly significant (r = 0.87.Significantly higher (P < 0.05 numbers of psychrotrophic microorganisms were detected in summer months. The identification of isolates was carried out and all strains were sreened for ability to produce proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes. The most commonly identified genus in raw milk was of the genus Pseudomonas. The ability to produce proteases or lipases was found at 76 % identified bacterial strains.

  3. Selection of mesophilic microorganisms with biodesulfuration capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madero, A; Mogollon, L. I; Mora, A.L; Osorio, L.F

    1998-01-01

    The development of bio desulfurization (BDS) processes for hydrocarbons requires fast and reliable methods for the screening of microorganisms. This work shows the results of the screening process for indigenous Colombian strains with a BDS potential capacity. The main criteria for the screening were the qualitative and quantitative determination of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) as the typical metabolite of the 4S specific pathway. Microorganisms were cultured by two methodologies, A and B, using DBT as the model compound. The quantitative determination of metabolites was made by HPLC. Thirteen strains were evaluated, including the strain Rhodococcus rhodocrous IGTS8, by methods A and B. In method A, the inoculum was exposed to DBT since the beginning of the culture. Method B, employed two stages: (i) Growth period under limiting sulfur conditions, (ii) Transforming period, in which the pre-grown inoculum was exposed to the organic sulfur substrate. The culture of mesophilic microorganisms isolated by method B, served to find a mechanism for the organic sulfur metabolism, and the evaluation of the sulfur removal capability of five indigenous strains. In the cultures of these strains, 2- hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) was detected as a byproduct of DBT metabolism, both qualitatively and quantitatively

  4. Magnetotaxy in microorganisms of Rio de Janeiro region: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, H.G. de P.L. de; Esquivel, D.M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some characteristics of several magnetotactic microorganisms found in sediments collected in Rio de Janeiro region are presented. The study of magnetic characteristics of these microorganisms indicate some general properties of the magnetotaxy phenomenons. (L.C.) [pt

  5. Antimicrobial Effects of Garcinia Mangostana on Cariogenic Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Mahendra, Jaideep; Girija, A S Smiline; Mahendra, Little; Priyadharsini, Vijayashree

    2017-01-01

    Garcinia mangostana commonly called as Mangosteen fruit has been used as an antibacterial agent since age old times. The mangosteen pericarp has proven to have antibacterial effect, but the effect of the same on cariogenic organisms has not been explored. The present study was an attempt to gain a better understanding of the antibacterial effect of mangosteen pericarp on the cariogenic bacteria, to unravel the therapeutic potential for the same. The aim of the study was to assess the antibacterial efficacy of the crude chloroform extract of mangosteen pericarp against cariogenic bacteria. The study was done under laboratory settings using an in vitro design. The microorganisms namely Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus oralis and Lactobacillus acidophilus were procured from American Type Cell Culture (ATCC) and Microbial Type Culture Collection (MTCC) were revived and lawn cultured. The antibacterial effect of mangosteen pericarp was tested using agar well diffusion method on Trypticase Soy Agar-Blood Agar (TSA-BA) and de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) agar media. The standard antiplaque agent chlorhexidine was used as the positive control. This cross-sectional, experimental study was done in Central Research laboratory, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College for period of eight weeks. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) values were determined by microbroth dilution method. Statistical analysis was done by calculating the mean of the zones of inhibition on tested microorganisms. Mann-Whitney test was done to compare the zones of inhibition of mangosteen and chlorhexidine. The antibacterial bioassay showed the highest activity for Lactobacillus acidophilus (13.6 mm) and Streptococcus sanguis (13.6 mm), whereas, it showed a medium and low activity for Streptococcus oralis (11.3 mm), Streptococcus mutans (10.6 mm) and Streptococcus salivarius (3 mm) respectively. The MBC and MIC

  6. Microorganisms control during processing of germinated brown rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Maekawa, T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to limit the growth of microorganisms during processing of germinated brown rice (GBR), three kinds of operations for sanitation control were investigated. For a surface-disinfection treatment of brown rice, soaking in 1% of sodium hypochlorite for 10min. and 0.1% of calcium preparation solutions for 10min. at 30°C, resulted in 2log decrease by aerobic plate count in culture water after 1h of the germination processing. Soaking in 10% of sodium hypochlorite for 10min. and 1% of calcium preparation solutions for 10min at 30°C were found to inhibit germination, respectively. During the germination processing, including aeration stage and non-aeration stage, continuous ultraviolet irradiation on the culture water in the water tank resulted in limited bacterial growth in culture water below 102CFU/ml by aerobic plate count. Moreover, the turbidity of the culture water was improved by filtration of the stored water using activated carbon-hollow fiber filter. The filtration by activated carbon-hollow fiber filter during the germination processing was an effective method to eliminate microorganisms and contamination factor during GBR production. It also improved the efficiency of ultraviolet irradiation effect on the culture water

  7. Ocean acidification and marine microorganisms: responses and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Das

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is one of the global issues caused by rising atmospheric CO2. The rising pCO2 and resulting pH decrease has altered ocean carbonate chemistry. Microbes are key components of marine environments involved in nutrient cycles and carbon flow in marine ecosystems. However, these marine microbes and the microbial processes are sensitive to ocean pH shift. Thus, OA affects the microbial diversity, primary productivity and trace gases emission in oceans. Apart from that, it can also manipulate the microbial activities such as quorum sensing, extracellular enzyme activity and nitrogen cycling. Short-term laboratory experiments, mesocosm studies and changing marine diversity scenarios have illustrated undesirable effects of OA on marine microorganisms and ecosystems. However, from the microbial perspective, the current understanding on effect of OA is based mainly on limited experimental studies. It is challenging to predict response of marine microbes based on such experiments for this complex process. To study the response of marine microbes towards OA, multiple approaches should be implemented by using functional genomics, new generation microscopy, small-scale interaction among organisms and/or between organic matter and organisms. This review focuses on the response of marine microorganisms to OA and the experimental approaches to investigate the effect of changing ocean carbonate chemistry on microbial mediated processes.

  8. Bioprospecting of lipolytic microorganisms obtained from industrial effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GREICE H.S. PEIL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The lipases have ability to catalyze diverse reactions and are important in different biotechnological applications. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterize microorganisms that produce lipases, from different food industry effluents localized in Pelotas, RS/Brazil. Bacteria were identified using Gram stain and biochemical tests (Vitek 2(r. Fungi were identified according to macro and micromorphology characteristics. The extracellular lipase production was evaluated using the Rhodamine B test and the enzymatic activity by titration. Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter aerogenes, Raoultella ornithinolytica and Raoultella planticola. Were characterized isolated filamentous fungi by the following genera: Alternaria sp., Fusarium sp., Geotrichum sp., Gliocladium sp., Mucor sp., Paecilomyces sp. and Trichoderma sp. Extracellular lipase production was observed in 71.43% of the bacteria and 57.14% of the fungi. The bacterium that presented better promising enzymatic activity was E. aerogenes (1.54 U/ml however between fungi there was not significant difference between the four isolates. This study indicated that microorganisms lipase producers are present in the industrial effluents, as well as these enzymes have potential of biodegradation of lipid compounds.

  9. Bioprospecting of lipolytic microorganisms obtained from industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peil, Greice H S; Kuss, Anelise V; Rave, Andrés F G; Villarreal, José P V; Hernandes, Yohana M L; Nascente, Patrícia S

    2016-01-01

    The lipases have ability to catalyze diverse reactions and are important in different biotechnological applications. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterize microorganisms that produce lipases, from different food industry effluents localized in Pelotas, RS/Brazil. Bacteria were identified using Gram stain and biochemical tests (Vitek 2(r)). Fungi were identified according to macro and micromorphology characteristics. The extracellular lipase production was evaluated using the Rhodamine B test and the enzymatic activity by titration. Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter aerogenes, Raoultella ornithinolytica and Raoultella planticola. Were characterized isolated filamentous fungi by the following genera: Alternaria sp., Fusarium sp., Geotrichum sp., Gliocladium sp., Mucor sp., Paecilomyces sp. and Trichoderma sp. Extracellular lipase production was observed in 71.43% of the bacteria and 57.14% of the fungi. The bacterium that presented better promising enzymatic activity was E. aerogenes (1.54 U/ml) however between fungi there was not significant difference between the four isolates. This study indicated that microorganisms lipase producers are present in the industrial effluents, as well as these enzymes have potential of biodegradation of lipid compounds.

  10. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain their cell turgor and metabolism. Osmotic potential is a function of the salt concentration in the soil solution and therefore affected by both salinity (measured as electrical conductivity at a certain water content and soil water content. Soil salinity and water content vary in time and space. Understanding the effect of changes in salinity and water content on soil microorganisms is important for crop production, sustainable land use and rehabilitation of saline soils. In this review, the effects of soil salinity and water content on microbes are discussed to guide future research into management of saline soils.

  11. Biotechnical leaching of lean ores using heterotrophic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, W.; Naeveke, R.

    1980-01-01

    After reporting briefly on leaching with Thiobacillus, it is discussed whether in those cases where thiobacilli fail to work the limits of microbial leaching are reached or still other groups of microorganisms will be suitable. In this relation the great number of carbon-heterotrophic fungi and bacteria have to be considered which are partly oligotrophic and occur e.g. in weathering biotopes of rocks and minerals and which may even include heavy metals in the dissolving processes of weathering. The active agents are, as far as is known up to now, organic acids which are produced by microorganisms and given off to the medium where they may combine with metals to form water-soluble complex compounds. In order to detect and isolate suitable strains of fungi and bacteria it will be necessary to work out a screening program which proceeds from general to special selections. Experiments to identify the active agents and the conditions of their production will have to follow. It remains still an open question whether such studies will result in technical processes. Mass production processes which are possible with the carbon-autotrophic and acidophilic thiobacilli are less probable than special processes to get hold of rare and economically valuable metals whose extraction would be difficult by other means. (orig.) [de

  12. Antibacterial Effect of Copper on Microorganisms Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Jara, Angelica; Cordero, Ninoska; Aguirre, Juan; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper have been recognized for several years; applying these properties to the prevention of diseases such as bovine mastitis is a new area of research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of copper on bacteria isolated from subclinical and clinical mastitis milk samples from two regions in Chile. A total of 327 microorganisms were recovered between March and September 2013, with different prevalence by sample origin (25 and 75% from the central and southern regions of Chile, respectively). In the central region, Escherichia coli and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) were the most frequently detected in clinical mastitis cases (33%), while in the southern region S. uberis, S. aureus, and CNS were detected with frequencies of 22, 21, and 18%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility studies revealed that 34% of isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the resistance profile was different between bacterial species and origins of isolation of the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of copper (MIC-Cu) was evaluated in all the isolates; results revealed that a concentration as low as 250 ppm copper was able to inhibit the great majority of microorganisms analyzed (65% of isolates). The remaining isolates showed a MIC-Cu between 375 and 700 ppm copper, and no growth was observed at 1000 ppm. A linear relationship was found between the logarithm of viable bacteria number and time of contact with copper. With the application of the same concentration of copper (250 ppm), CNS showed the highest tolerance to copper, followed by S. uberis and S. aureus; the least resistant was E. coli. Based on these in vitro results, copper preparations could represent a good alternative to dipping solutions, aimed at preventing the presence and multiplication of potentially pathogenic microorganisms involved in bovine mastitis disease. PMID:27199953

  13. Surfactant producing TNT-degrading microorganisms for bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A.; Marchenko, A.; Rudneva, O.; Borovick, R. [Research Center for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations, Serpukhov, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Radosevich, M. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Sciences

    2003-07-01

    In general the biodegradation of nitroaromatic hydrocarbons is influenced by their bioavailability. 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene is very poorly soluble in water. TNT is easily adsorbed to clay or humus fractions in the soil, and pass very slowly to the aqueous phase, where microorganisms metabolize it. Biosurfactants that increase TNT solubility and improve its bioavailability can thereby accelerate degradation. Pure cultures of microorganisms-TNT degraders were isolated by the method of enrichment cultures from samples of different-type soil contaminated by TNT (soddy-podzol, black earth, and gray forest ones). From 28 soil samples 35 isolates of microorganisms degrading TNT were taken. The isolated soil samples had been tested for availability of microbial activity towards TNT. By10 g of air-dried soil, 10 ml of distilled water, and 2 mg of TNT were placed into 750 ml shaken flasks. The flasks were incubated at 150 rev/min and 24 C. Glucose, sodium succinate or sodium acetate had been used as co-substrates. The ability of the strains to produce surfactants was studied by drop collapsing test and direct measuring of surface tension of cultural liquid after cultivation with TNT. Cells of the strains were cultivated on solid and liquid nutrient media. For drop collapsing test the cells were cultivated on solid nutrient media; the separated colonies were suspended in distilled water. Drop sustainability test ws conducted on a standard 96-well plates coated with a thin layer of vaseline oil. Surface tension of cultural liquid ws measured after cultivation of strains in the presence of TNT with the use of a ring tensiometer. Before measuring of surface tension microbial cells were collected from liquid culture by centrifugation. (orig.)

  14. Influence of microorganisms on the alteration of glasses; Influence des microorganismes sur l'alteration des verres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnainou, B; Libert, M F [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets

    1997-07-01

    Under specific conditions, microorganisms may enhance the alteration process of basaltic glass. However bacterial activity in the near field of a glass container would be possible only in environmental conditions provide nutrients and energetic substrates for bacterial growth. Depending of these conditions, microorganisms can: - modify the pH or the medium, - consume or produce soluble organic acids. To qualify the long term behaviour of glass, in presence of microorganisms, a qualitative and quantitative estimation of microbial activity potentialities and their consequences is needed. This must be achieved in studying the availability of the chemical species in the environment. (authors)

  15. Atividade antimicrobiana, antiaderente e antifúngica in vitro de plantas medicinais brasileiras sobre microrganismos do biofilme dental e cepas do gênero Candida In vitro antimicrobial, antiadherent and antifungal activity of Brazilian medicinal plants on oral biofilm microorganisms and strains of the genus Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollianna Muniz Alves

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se in vitro a atividade antimicrobiana, antifúngica e antiaderente da aroeira-do-sertão, malva e goiabeira sobre microrganismos do biofilme dental e candidose oral. Os extratos mostraram-se eficazes, inibindo o crescimento das bactérias do biofilme dental e fungos da candidose oral, sugerindo a utilização dessas plantas como meio alternativo na terapêutica odontológica.The antimicrobial, antifungal and antiadherent activity of aroeira-do-sertão, mallow and guava tree on oral biofilm microorganisms and oral candidiasis was evaluated in vitro. The extracts were shown to be effective in inhibiting the growth of bacteria of the oral biofilm and fungi of oral candidiasis, thus suggesting that these extracts can be used as alternative means of dental therapy.

  16. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Progress report, June 1, 1990--May 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  17. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  18. Screening of biosurfactants from cloud microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancelme, Martine; Canet, Isabelle; Traikia, Mounir; Uhliarikova, Yveta; Capek, Peter; Matulova, Maria; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not well understood and a main source of uncertainties in the climate budget today. One of the principal parameters in these processes is the surface tension of atmospheric particles, which can be strongly affected by trace compounds called surfactants. Within a project devoted to bring information on atmospheric surfactants and their effects on cloud droplet formation, we focused on surfactants produced by microorganisms present in atmospheric waters. From our unique collection of microorganisms, isolated from cloud water collected at the Puy-de-Dôme (France),1 we undertook a screening of this bank for biosurfactant producers. After extraction of the supernatants of the pure cultures, surface tension of crude extracts was determined by the hanging drop technique. Results showed that a wide variety of microorganisms are able to produce biosurfactants, some of them exhibiting strong surfactant properties as the resulting tension surface decreases to values less then 35 mN.m-1. Preliminary analytical characterization of biosurfactants, obtained after isolation from overproducing cultures of Rhodococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., allowed us to identify them as belonging to two main classes, namely glycolipids and glycopeptides. 1. Vaïtilingom, M.; Attard, E.; Gaiani, N.; Sancelme, M.; Deguillaume, L.; Flossmann, A. I.; Amato, P.; Delort, A. M. Long-term features of cloud microbiology at the puy de Dôme (France). Atmos. Environ. 2012, 56, 88-100. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the French-USA ANR SONATA program and the French-Slovakia programs Stefanik and CNRS exchange.

  19. Impact of microorganism on polonium volatilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momoshima, N.; Ishida, A.; Fukuda, A.; Yoshinaga, C.

    2007-01-01

    Volatilization of polonium by microorganisms, Chromobacterium violaceum, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis was examined for pure cultures in LB medium at 30 deg C, showing relative Po emission intensity 100, 10 and 1, respectively. Chromobacterium violaceum pre-cultured in LB medium without Po and suspended in water with Po showed high Po volatilization in spite of poor nutriment condition. Antibiotics inhibit volatilization of Po and cultivation at low temperature greatly reduced volatilization. The results strongly support the biological effects on Po volatilization. (author)

  20. Microorganisms in human milk: lights and shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Elisa; Garofoli, Francesca; Tzialla, Chryssoula; Paolillo, Piermichele; Bollani, Lina; Stronati, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Human milk has been traditionally considered germ free, however, recent studies have shown that it represents a continuous supply of commensal and potentially probiotic bacteria to the infant gut. Mammary microbioma may exercise anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and metabolic properties. Moreover human milk may be a source of pathogenic microorganism during maternal infection, if contaminated during expression or in case of vaccination of the mother. The non-sterility of breast milk can, thus, be seen as a protective factor, or rarely, as a risk factor for the newborn.

  1. Microbial biogeography: putting microorganisms on the map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Jennifer B Hughes; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Brown, James H; Colwell, Robert K; Fuhrman, Jed A; Green, Jessica L; Horner-Devine, M Claire; Kane, Matthew; Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Kuske, Cheryl R; Morin, Peter J; Naeem, Shahid; Ovreås, Lise; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Smith, Val H; Staley, James T

    2006-02-01

    We review the biogeography of microorganisms in light of the biogeography of macroorganisms. A large body of research supports the idea that free-living microbial taxa exhibit biogeographic patterns. Current evidence confirms that, as proposed by the Baas-Becking hypothesis, 'the environment selects' and is, in part, responsible for spatial variation in microbial diversity. However, recent studies also dispute the idea that 'everything is everywhere'. We also consider how the processes that generate and maintain biogeographic patterns in macroorganisms could operate in the microbial world.

  2. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  3. Engineering photosynthesis in plants and synthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurino, Veronica G; Weber, Andreas P M

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, sustain life on earth by converting light energy, water, and CO(2) into chemical energy. However, due to global change and a growing human population, arable land is becoming scarce and resources, including water and fertilizers, are becoming exhausted. It will therefore be crucial to design innovative strategies for sustainable plant production to maintain the food and energy bases of human civilization. Several different strategies for engineering improved photosynthesis in crop plants and introducing novel photosynthetic capacity into microorganisms have been reviewed.

  4. Microorganisms as Indicators of Soil Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. N.; Winding, A.; Binnerup, S.

    ecosystem parameters representing policy relevant end points. It is further recommended to identify a specific minimum data set for specific policy relevant end points, to carefully establish baseline values, to improve scientific knowledge on biodiversity and modelling of soil data, and to implement new......Microorganisms are an essential part of living soil and of outmost importance for soil health. As such they can be used as indicators of soil health. This report reviews the current and potential future use of microbial indicators of soil health and recommends specific microbial indicators for soil...... indicators into soil monitoring programmes as they become applicable....

  5. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains against pathogenic microorganisms “in vitro”Atividade antimicrobiana de Lactobacillus e Bifodobacterium frente a microrganismos patogênicos “in vitro”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Nobre Costa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria have a long history of safe use in foods. These bacteria have biotechnological characteristics of interest such as the inhibition of pathogens. In this work, two lactobacilli strain and a bifidobacterium strain isolated from human gut were evaluated concerning to their ability to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms in foods by diffusion agar tests. Moreover, we assessed the metabolites produced in culture broth under static and shaking growth to simulate anaerobiosis and aerobiosis conditions, respectively. L. acidophilus LA5, L. plantarum DCTA 8420 and B. lactis DCTA 8724 showed ability to inhibit S. aureus FRI 196, strains producer toxins A and D, as well as B. cereus ATCC 25923, E. coli ATCC 25922 and S. Enteritidis, whose inhibition halos reached, on average, 24 mm in diameter. In the agar diffusion method with concentrated culture medium, it was possible to observe the effect of oxygen on the production of toxic substances. This result showed that cultivation of Lactobacillus under aerobic conditions seems to exert greater inhibitory effect, whereas for Bifidobacterium strain the effect was the opposite.Lactobacilos e bifidobactérias apresentam um longo histórico de uso seguro em alimentos, além de apresentarem características de interesse biotecnológico como a inibição de patógenos. Neste trabalho duas linhagens de lactobacilos e uma de bifidobactéria, isoladas do intestino humano, foram avaliadas em testes de difusão em ágar, quanto à capacidade de inibição de microrganismos patogênicos de ocorrência comuns em toxinfecções alimentares. Adicionalmente, foram avaliados os metabólitos produzidos em caldo de cultivo estático e em agitação para simular condições de anaerobiose a aerobiose, respectivamente. As três bactérias, L. acidophilus LA5, L. plantarum DCTA 8420 e B. lactis DCTA 8724 apresentaram capacidade de inibição para S. aureus FRI 196 linhagem produtora de toxinas A e D

  6. Fossil micro-organisms evidenced by electronic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prashnowsky, A.A.; Oberlies, F.; Burger, K.

    1983-04-01

    Fossil microorganisms in colonies and in the form of isolated cells (iron bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes etc.) were detected by electron microscopy of rocks containing remains of plant roots, carbonaceous substance, and strata of clay iron stone with ooids. These findings suggest an environment favourable to bacterial activity during sedimentation in the Upper Carboniferous and during the later processes of peat and coal formation. They also suggest that bacterial processes are an important factor in coal formation. Accurate data on coal formation can only be obtained by systematic biochemical studies. Analyses of the defined organic substances provide a better understanding of the conversion processes of the original substances. For example, the results of sterine analysis provide information on the mycoplancton, phytoplancton and zooplancton of the Upper Carboniferous. For some types of rock, the ratio of saponifiable to non-saponifiable constituents of the organic compounds yield information on stability under various geochemical conditions. The interactions between the various groups of microorganisms also play a major role in the solution of ecological problems.

  7. Identification of periodontopathogen microorganisms by PCR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milićević Radovan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth and is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. The onset and progression of periodontal disease is attributed to the presence of elevated levels of a consortium of pathogenic bacteria. Gram negative bacteria, mainly strict anaerobes, play the major role. OBJECTIVE The present study aimed to assess the presence of the main types of microorganisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of periodontal disease: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Treponema denticola, Tanerella forsythia and Prevotella intermedia in different samples collected from the oral cavity of 90 patients diagnosed with periodontitis. METHOD Bacterial DNA detection was performed in diverse biological materials, namely in dental plaque, gingival tissue and saliva, by means of multiplex PCR, a technique that allows simultaneous identification of two different bacterial genomes. RESULTS In the dental plaque of the periodontitis patients, Treponema denticola dominated. In the gingival tissue, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were the microbiota most frequently detected, whilst in saliva Treponema denticola and Eikenella corrodens were found with the highest percentage. CONCLUSION The identification of microorganisms by multiplex PCR is specific and sensitive. Rapid and precise assessment of different types of periodontopathogens is extremely important for early detection of the infection and consequently for the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease. In everyday clinical practice, for routine bacterial evaluation in patients with periodontal disease, the dental plaque is the most suitable biological material, because it is the richest in periodontal bacteria.

  8. Sterilization of Microorganisms by Ozone and Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnyj, V. V.; Klosovskij, A. V.; Panasko, T. A.; Shvets, O. M.; Semenova, O. T.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    The results of recent experimental methods of sterilization of microorganisms with the use of ozone and ultrasound are presented. The main aim was to optimize the process of sterilization in water solution taking into account the ozone concentration, the power of ultrasonic emitter and the temperature of water. In the present work, the ultrasonic cavitation with simultaneous ozone generation has been used. The high ozone concentration in water solution was achieved by two-barrier glow discharge generated at atmospheric pressure and a cooling thermo-electric module. Such a sterilizer consists of ozone generator in a shape of flat electrodes covered with dielectric material and a high-voltage pulsed power supply of 250 W. The sterilization camera was equipped with ultrasonic source operated at 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. The ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 10 mg/1, whereas the ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator was 30 mg/1. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min. Selection of the temperature of water, the ozone concentrations and ultrasonic power allowed to determine the time necessary for destroying the row of microorganisms.

  9. Venturing into new realms? Microorganisms in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Cockell, Charles; Rettberg, Petra

    2016-09-01

    One of the biggest challenges of science is the determination of whether extraterrestrial life exists. Although potential habitable areas might be available for complex life, it is more likely that microbial life could exist in space. Many extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes have been found to be able to withstand numerous, combined environmental factors, such as high or low temperatures and pressures, high-salt conditions, high doses of radiation, desiccation or nutrient limitations. They may even survive the transit from one planet to another. Terrestrial Mars-analogue sites are one focus of researchers, in order to understand the microbial diversity in preparation for upcoming space missions aimed at the detection of life. However, such missions could also pose a risk with respect to contamination of the extraterrestrial environment by accidentally transferred terrestrial microorganisms. Closer to the Earth, the International Space Station is the most enclosed habitat, where humans work and live-and with them numerous microorganisms. It is still unknown how microbes adapt to this environment, possibly even creating a risk for the crew. Information on the microbiology of the ISS will have an impact on the planning and implementation of long-term human spaceflights in order to ensure a safe, stable and balanced microbiome on board. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Medical Significance of Microorganisms in Spacecraft Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms can spoil food supplies, contaminate drinking water, release noxious volatile compounds, initiate allergic responses, contaminate the environment, and cause infectious diseases. International acceptability limits have been established for bacterial and fungal contaminants in air and on surfaces, and environmental monitoring is conducted to ensure compliance. Allowable levels of microorganism in water and food have also been established. Environmental monitoring of the space shuttle, the Mir, and the ISS have allowed for some general conclusions. Generally, the bacteria found in air and on interior surfaces are largely of human origin such as Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp. Common environmental genera such as Bacillus spp. are the most commonly isolated bacteria from all spacecraft. Yeast species associated with humans such as Candida spp. are commonly found. Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and Cladosporium spp. are the most commonly isolated filamentous fungi. Microbial levels in the environment differ significantly depending upon humidity levels, condensate accumulation, and availability of carbon sources. However, human "normal flora" of bacteria and fungi can result in serious, life-threatening diseases if human immunity is compromised. Disease incidence is expected to increase as mission duration increases.

  11. Bioremediation of trinitrotolulene by a ruminal microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taejin; Williamson, K.J.; Craig, A.M. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1995-10-01

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been widely used for the production of explosives because of its low boiling point, high stability, low impact sensitivity, and safe manufacture. More than 1,100 military facilities, each potentially contaminated with munitions waste, are expected to require treatment of more than one million cubic yards of contaminated soils. The cost associated with remediation of these sites has been estimated to be in excess of $1.5 billion. Recently, researchers have studied ruminal microorganisms in relation to their ability to degrade xenobiotic compounds. Many of these organisms are strict anaerobes with optimal redox potentials as low as -420 mV. Ruminal organisms have been shown capable of destroying some pesticides, such as parathion, p-nitrophenol, and biphenyl-type compounds; thiono isomers, and nitrogen-containing heterocyclic plant toxins such as the pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Many of these compounds have structures similar to TNT. A TNT-degrading ruminal microorganism has been isolated from goat rumen fluid with successive enrichments on triaminotoluene (TAT) and TNT. The isolate, designated G.8, utilizes nitrate and lactate as the primary energy source. G.8 was able to tolerate and metabolite levels of TNT up to the saturation point of 125 mg/l.

  12. Studies on the radiation sensitivity of food microorganism by high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Han Joon; Lee, Eun Jung; Yu, Hyun Hee; Lee, Jae Ho

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the radio resistance of pathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) and Escherichia coli O157) in irradiating environments. Their radiation conditions of pathogenic microorganisms varied with pH(3-10), salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition. In addition, the effect of γ-irradiation on the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms inoculated into food (saengsik, sliced ham, chopped beef) was investigated. The radiation dose ranged from 0 to 3 kGy. The γ--irradiated B.cereus(γ--BC) St.aureus(γ--SA), MRSA(γ--MRSA) and E.coli O157(γ--EC) were then cultured and the viable cell count on plate count agar and D10-values(dose required to inactivate 90% of a microbial population) were calculated. The number of pathogenic microorganisms at pH(3-10) and salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition decreased by 1 log CFU/ml after irradiation. The D 10 -value of γ--SA in the optimum condition was 0.152 kGy, and these of γ--MRSA and γ--EC were 0.346 and 0.240 kGy, respectively. The initial cell counts of pathogenic microorganisms in culture broth were slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration. However, radiation resistance of pathogenic microorganisms was increased at frozen state. Moreover, D 10 -values of these is test strains in saengsik, sliced ham and chopped beef were 0.597, 0.226 , 0.398 and 0.416 kGy, respectively. These results provide the basic information for the in activation of pathogenic microorganisms in foods by irradiation

  13. Studies on the radiation sensitivity of food microorganism by high dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Han Joon; Lee, Eun Jung; Yu, Hyun Hee; Lee, Jae Ho [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We investigated the radio resistance of pathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) and Escherichia coli O157) in irradiating environments. Their radiation conditions of pathogenic microorganisms varied with pH(3-10), salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition. In addition, the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms inoculated into food (saengsik, sliced ham, chopped beef) was investigated. The radiation dose ranged from 0 to 3 kGy. The {gamma}--irradiated B.cereus({gamma}--BC) St.aureus({gamma}--SA), MRSA({gamma}--MRSA) and E.coli O157({gamma}--EC) were then cultured and the viable cell count on plate count agar and D10-values(dose required to inactivate 90% of a microbial population) were calculated. The number of pathogenic microorganisms at pH(3-10) and salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition decreased by 1 log CFU/ml after irradiation. The D{sub 10}-value of {gamma}--SA in the optimum condition was 0.152 kGy, and these of {gamma}--MRSA and {gamma}--EC were 0.346 and 0.240 kGy, respectively. The initial cell counts of pathogenic microorganisms in culture broth were slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration. However, radiation resistance of pathogenic microorganisms was increased at frozen state. Moreover, D{sub 10}-values of these is test strains in saengsik, sliced ham and chopped beef were 0.597, 0.226 , 0.398 and 0.416 kGy, respectively. These results provide the basic information for the in activation of pathogenic microorganisms in foods by irradiation

  14. A new thermophilic nitrilase from an antarctic hyperthermophilic microorganism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine V. Dennett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental samples from Antarctica were collected and enriched to search for microorganisms with nitrilase activity. A new thermostable nitrilase from a novel hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus sp. M24D13 was purified and characterized. The activity of this enzyme increased as the temperatures rise from 70 up to 85 °C. Its optimal activity occurred at 85 °C and pH 7.5. This new enzyme shows a remarkable resistance to thermal inactivation retaining more than 50% of its activity even after 8 h of incubation at 85 °C.In addition, this nitrilase is highly versatile demonstrating activity towards different substrates such as benzonitrile (60 mM, aromatic nitrile and butyronitrile (60 mM, aliphatic nitrile, with a specific activity of 3286.7 U mg-1 of protein and 4008.2 U mg-1 of protein respectively. Moreover the enzyme NitM24D13 also presents cyanidase activity.The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km and Vmáx of this Nitrilase for benzonitrile were 0.3 mM and 333.3 µM min-1, respectively, and the specificity constant (kcat/Km for benzonitrile was 2.05×105 s-1 M-1.

  15. SCREENING OF THERMOPHYLIC MICROORGANISM FROM IJEN CRATER BANYUWANGI AS PHYTASE ENZYME PRODUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Puspita Kusumadjaja

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytase is enzyme which hydrolysis phytic acid to anorganic phosphate and myo-inositol pentakis-, tetrakis-, tris-, bis-, and monophosphate. The use of phytase in feed industry can overcome environment and nutrition problems which were arisen from unmetabolism phytic acid or its salt by poultry, swine and fish. The feed industry needs a thermostable enzyme due to the need of high temperature in pelleting process, i.e. 81 °C. By using thermostabile phytase, the pelleting process will not affect the enzyme activity. Thermostabile phytase can be isolated from microorganism live in hot spring water or volcano crater. In this study, the screening of thermophylic microorganism having thermostabile phytase activity in Ijen Crater, Banyuwangi, has been done. From this process, it was obtained 33 isolates that produce phytase enzyme. Isolate was code by AP-17 yields highest phytase activity, that is 0.0296 U/mL, so this isolate was choosen for further study. The activity of crude phytase enzyme was measured based on the amount of anorganic phosphate that was produced in enzymatic reaction using UV-VIS spectrophotometer at 392 nm. Based on morphology test to identify the gram type of microorganism, isolate AP-17 has a bacill cell type and identified as positive gram bacteria. This isolate was assumed as Bacillus type.   Keywords: Phytase, thermophilic microorganism, phytase activity

  16. Appraisal of the biocide activity of products for the control of microorganisms associated with corrosive processes in the Bacia de Campos pipelines; Avaliacao da acao biocida de produtos para o controle de microrganismos associados a processos corrosivos em oledutos da Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penna, Monica de Oliveira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Setor de Biotecnologia e Ecossistemas]. E-mail: mpena@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Andrade, Cynthia de Azevedo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Setor de Tecnologia de Materiais, Equipamentos e Corrosao]. E-mail: cynthiaandrade@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Nascimento, Juliana Rangel do; Silva, Edilson Domingos da; Souza, Leonardo Suhett de [Fundacao GORCEIX, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: julianarn@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; edilson@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; suhett@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2001-12-01

    The possible effect of corrosion inhibitors on bacteria has significant interest for the oil and gas industry since, in addition to presenting lower operational costs than biocides due to the low concentrations used, they allow a simultaneous activity on the inhibition of corrosion and adhesion of sulfate reducing-bacteria. In the case of pipes with low BSW oil fluid low, the benefit of using corrosion inhibitors in microorganism combat is even more significant in view of their dispersing characteristics during the oil phase. Herein presented are the laboratorial analysis results of the biocidal effects of six commercial products, four of which having corrosion inhibition function and two with biocidal quality. During this analysis, an oil sample collected from a Petrobras pipeline and a mixed culture of sulfate-reducing mesophilic bacteria (m-BRS) obtained from this sample were used. The study was divided in two phases: the first phase performed in semi-static conditions and, the second phase performed in dynamic conditions (loop). Compositions were analyzed according to their activities regarding the growth control of sulfate-reducing planktonic bacteria, according to their time reducing performance regarding microbial growth (activity) detection and regarding sessile bacteria (pre-adhered bacteria). Results showed that the two biocidal products had the best performance in the presence of oil and that the tetra kishidroximethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS) at 75% was the most effective. Of the four corrosion inhibitors tested for efficiency regarding BRS growth in solution, three were slightly stimulating and the fourth was intensely stimulating. (author)

  17. Role of soil micro-organisms in the sorption of radionuclides in organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Potter, E.D.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    Although the fraction of radionuclides linked to soil organic matter and soil microorganisms may be relatively small when compared to the amount bound to the mineral constituents, (mostly irreversibly bound), this fraction is of great importance as it remains readily exchangeable and is thus available for plant uptake. Many studies have measured the uptake of radionuclides by organic soils but the role of soil micro-organisms may have been masked by the presence of even small amounts of clay minerals occurring in these soils. We have carried out a series of experiments using a biologically active, 'mineral-free' organic soil produced under laboratory conditions, to determine the potential of soil micro-organisms to accumulate radionuclides Cs-134 and Sr-85. Biological uptake and release was differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing experimental results with inoculated and non-inoculated sterile organic material. We have investigated the role of different clay minerals, competing potassium and calcium ions, and changes in temperature on the sorption of Cs and Sr isotopes. The results from studies so far show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material, microorganisms also influence the importance of chemical factors (e.g. adsorption to clay minerals) which may play a secondary role in these highly organic systems. In further experiments we hope to define the precise role of specific soil micro-organisms in these organic systems. (author)

  18. Enhancement of Biodegradation of Palm Oil Mill Effluents by Local Isolated Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimaninanadegani, Mohammadreza; Manshad, Soheila

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the microorganisms associated with palm oil mill effluent (POME) in Johor Bahru state, Malaysia. Biodegradation of palm oil mill effluents (POME) was conducted to measure the discarded POME based on physicochemical quality. The bacteria that were isolated are Micrococcus species, Bacillus species, Pseudomonas species, and Staphylococcus aureus, while the fungi that were isolated are Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida species, Fusarium species, Mucor species, and Penicillium species. The autoclaved and unautoclaved raw POME samples were incubated for 7 days and the activities of the microorganisms were observed each 12 hours. The supernatants of the digested POME were investigated for the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color (ADMI), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) at the end of each digestion cycle. The results showed that the unautoclaved raw POME sample degraded better than the inoculated POME sample and this suggests that the microorganisms that are indigenous in the POME are more effective than the introduced microorganisms. This result, however, indicates the prospect of isolating indigenous microorganisms in the POME for effective biodegradation of POME. Moreover, the effective treatment of POME yields useful products such as reduction of BOD, COD, and color.

  19. Investigations of subterranean microorganisms. Their importance for performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    1995-06-01

    This report presents a broad and thorough description of how microorganisms may influence safety of repositories for radioactive waste. First, an overview of the Swedish concepts for disposal is given, including a discussion of the geological, chemical and hydrological conditions in repositories. Then the limiting and stimulating factors for life of microorganisms are reviewed, such as relations to oxygen, temperature, pH, radiation, pressure, water and nutrients availability. Bacteria in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, iron, manganese and hydrogen are also discussed. A literature review of subterranean bacteria is given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 treats investigations of microorganisms in repository-like environments, and microbial corrosion and redox processes relevant for materials in the repository and for the mobility of radionuclides. Possibilities to predict the activity and presence of microorganisms through mathematical models are discussed in chapter 6. Chapter 7 summarizes the conclusion drawn in the report, how microorganisms may influence performance safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, and also identifies research needs. 293 refs, 43 figs, 36 tabs

  20. Enhancement of Biodegradation of Palm Oil Mill Effluents by Local Isolated Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimaninanadegani, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the microorganisms associated with palm oil mill effluent (POME) in Johor Bahru state, Malaysia. Biodegradation of palm oil mill effluents (POME) was conducted to measure the discarded POME based on physicochemical quality. The bacteria that were isolated are Micrococcus species, Bacillus species, Pseudomonas species, and Staphylococcus aureus, while the fungi that were isolated are Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida species, Fusarium species, Mucor species, and Penicillium species. The autoclaved and unautoclaved raw POME samples were incubated for 7 days and the activities of the microorganisms were observed each 12 hours. The supernatants of the digested POME were investigated for the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color (ADMI), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) at the end of each digestion cycle. The results showed that the unautoclaved raw POME sample degraded better than the inoculated POME sample and this suggests that the microorganisms that are indigenous in the POME are more effective than the introduced microorganisms. This result, however, indicates the prospect of isolating indigenous microorganisms in the POME for effective biodegradation of POME. Moreover, the effective treatment of POME yields useful products such as reduction of BOD, COD, and color. PMID:27433516

  1. Investigations of subterranean microorganisms. Their importance for performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, K [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). General and Marine Microbiology; Karlsson, Fred [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    This report presents a broad and thorough description of how microorganisms may influence safety of repositories for radioactive waste. First, an overview of the Swedish concepts for disposal is given, including a discussion of the geological, chemical and hydrological conditions in repositories. Then the limiting and stimulating factors for life of microorganisms are reviewed, such as relations to oxygen, temperature, pH, radiation, pressure, water and nutrients availability. Bacteria in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, iron, manganese and hydrogen are also discussed. A literature review of subterranean bacteria is given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 treats investigations of microorganisms in repository-like environments, and microbial corrosion and redox processes relevant for materials in the repository and for the mobility of radionuclides. Possibilities to predict the activity and presence of microorganisms through mathematical models are discussed in chapter 6. Chapter 7 summarizes the conclusion drawn in the report, how microorganisms may influence performance safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, and also identifies research needs. 293 refs, 43 figs, 36 tabs.

  2. Combining nonthermal technologies to control foodborne microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexander I V; Griffiths, Mansel W; Mittal, Gauri S; Deeth, Hilton C

    2003-12-31

    Novel nonthermal processes, such as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), ionizing radiation and ultrasonication, are able to inactivate microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures. Many of these processes require very high treatment intensities, however, to achieve adequate microbial destruction in low-acid foods. Combining nonthermal processes with conventional preservation methods enhances their antimicrobial effect so that lower process intensities can be used. Combining two or more nonthermal processes can also enhance microbial inactivation and allow the use of lower individual treatment intensities. For conventional preservation treatments, optimal microbial control is achieved through the hurdle concept, with synergistic effects resulting from different components of the microbial cell being targeted simultaneously. The mechanisms of inactivation by nonthermal processes are still unclear; thus, the bases of synergistic combinations remain speculative. This paper reviews literature on the antimicrobial efficiencies of nonthermal processes combined with conventional and novel nonthermal technologies. Where possible, the proposed mechanisms of synergy is mentioned.

  3. Heterogeneity in isogenic populations of microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Egholm

    heterogeneity was detected when the culture had been propagated according to the guidelines of the Copenhagen School of Bacterial Growth Physiology. The L. lactis GFP reporter strain was more challenging to analyze. The population profile for this reporter strain was shown to be dependent on the type of medium...... values for quantifiable variables are used. The reproducibility of an experiment could thus be affected by the presence of subpopulations or high levels of phenotypic variations. Ole Maaløe and colleagues did in the late 1950’ties observe that the growth rate, RNA, DNA and protein synthesis and cell...... factor per unit of time. The use of a balanced growing culture is a cornerstone in the Copenhagen School of Bacterial Growth Physiology headed by Ole Maaløe. Due to the size of the microorganism it is challenging to measure a quantifiable variable in a single cell. However, fluorescence, whether being...

  4. Responsive Polydiacetylene Vesicles for Biosensing Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Lebègue

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Polydiacetylene (PDA inserted in films or in vesicles has received increasing attention due to its property to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition along with a change from non-fluorescent to fluorescent upon application of various stimuli. In this review paper, the principle for the detection of various microorganisms (bacteria, directly detected or detected through the emitted toxins or through their DNA, and viruses and of antibacterial and antiviral peptides based on these responsive PDA vesicles are detailed. The analytical performances obtained, when vesicles are in suspension or immobilized, are given and compared to those of the responsive vesicles mainly based on the vesicle encapsulation method. Many future challenges are then discussed.

  5. Pathogenic microorganisms of medicinal herbal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All the parts of plants (root, leaf, flower naturally have a high level of microorganisms, bacteria and fungi, especially molds. Microbial contamination could be a result of inappropriate harvesting, cleaning of the raw plant material, unhygienic processing of the plants, unsuitable transport and storage. After examination of over 40 dried medicinal plant species, the lowest microbial quality was determined for Maydis stigma, Mentha leaf and herb, Equisetum herb, Calendula flower, Urtica leaf, Melissa leaf, Serpylli herb, Chamomilla flower etc. Although mixed infections are recorded with different types of fungus, Fusarium was observed as the most dominant genus in most of the tested drugs, followed by Aspergillus and Alternaria. In addition to these fungi species from the following genera were identified: Phoma, Cephalosporium, Nigrospora, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Gliocladium, Myrothecium, Cercospora, Phomopsis, Verticillium, Dreschlera (=Bipolaris, Rhizoctonia, Septoria, Trichoderma, Curvularia, Stachybotrys, Trichothecium, Puccinia, Botrytis, Mucor and Rhizopus sp., depending on plant species.

  6. Synthetic biology expands chemical control of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Tyler J; Silver, Pamela A

    2015-10-01

    The tools of synthetic biology allow researchers to change the ways engineered organisms respond to chemical stimuli. Decades of basic biology research and new efforts in computational protein and RNA design have led to the development of small molecule sensors that can be used to alter organism function. These new functions leap beyond the natural propensities of the engineered organisms. They can range from simple fluorescence or growth reporting to pathogen killing, and can involve metabolic coordination among multiple cells or organisms. Herein, we discuss how synthetic biology alters microorganisms' responses to chemical stimuli resulting in the development of microbes as toxicity sensors, disease treatments, and chemical factories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic engineering of microorganisms for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Shen, Qi; Zhan, Jumei; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, as one type of renewable energy, is an ideal substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel and is usually made from triacylglycerides by transesterification with alcohols. Biodiesel production based on microbial fermentation aiming to establish more efficient, less-cost and sustainable biodiesel production strategies is under current investigation by various start-up biotechnology companies and research centers. Genetic engineering plays a key role in the transformation of microbes into the desired cell factories with high efficiency of biodiesel production. Here, we present an overview of principal microorganisms used in the microbial biodiesel production and recent advances in metabolic engineering for the modification required. Overexpression or deletion of the related enzymes for de novo synthesis of biodiesel is highlighted with relevant examples. PMID:23222170

  8. Mechanisms of hexavalent chromium resistance and removal by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutey, Nezha Tahri; Sayel, Hanane; Bahafid, Wifak; El Ghachtouli, Naïma

    2015-01-01

    Chromium has been and is extensively used worldwide in multiple industrial processes and is routinely discharged to the environment from such processes. Therefore, this heavy metal is a potential threat to the environment and to public health, primarily because it is non-biodegradable and environmentally persistent. Chromium exists in several oxidation states, the most stable of which are trivalent Cr(Ill) and hexavalent Cr(VI) species. Each species possesses its own individual chemical characteristics and produces its own biological effects. For example, Cr (Ill) is an essential oligoelement for humans, whereas Cr(VI) is carcinogenic and mutagenic. Several chemical methods are used to remove Cr(VI) from contaminated sites. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages. Currently, bioremediation is often the preferred method to deal with Cr contaminated sites, because it is eco-friendly, cost-effective and is a "natural" technology. Many yeast, bacterial and fungal species have been assessed for their suitability to reduce or remove Cr(VI) contamination. The mechanisms by which these microorganisms resist and reduce Cr(VI) are variable and are species dependent. There are several Cr-resistance mechanisms that are displayed by microorganisms. These include active efflux of Cr compounds, metabolic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr (ill), and either intercellular or extracellular prec1p1tation. Microbial Cr (VI) removal typically involves three stages: binding of chromium to the cell surface, translocation of chromium into the cell, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr (ill). Cr(VI) reduction by microorganisms may proceed on the cell surface, outside the cell, or intracellularly, either directly via chromate reductase enzymes, or indirectly via metabolite reduction of Cr(VI). The uptake of chromium ions is a biphasic process. The primary step is known as biosorption, a metabolic energyindependent process. Thereafter, bioaccumulation occurs, but is much slower, and is

  9. Role of Proteolytic Enzymes in the Interaction of Phytopathogenic Microorganisms with Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valueva, T A; Zaichik, B Ts; Kudryavtseva, N N

    2016-12-01

    Various forms of participation of proteolytic enzymes in pathogenesis and defense in plants are reviewed. Along with extracellular proteinases, phytopathogenic microorganisms produce specific effectors having proteolytic activity and capable of acting on proteins inside plant cells. In turn, for defense against pathogens, plants use both extracellular and intracellular proteinases.

  10. Identification of subsurface microorganisms at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetzenbach, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria isolated from ground water samples taken from 31 springs during 1993 were collected and processed according to procedures described in earlier reports. These procedures required aseptic collection of surface water samples in sterile screw-capped containers, transportation to the HRC microbiology laboratory, and culture by spread plating onto R2A medium. The isolates were further processed for identification using a gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) extracted from cell membranes. This work generated a presumptive identification of 113 bacterial species distributed among 45 genera using a database obtained from Microbial ID, Inc., Newark, Delaware (MIDI). A preliminary examination of the FAME data was accomplished using cluster analysis and principal component analysis software obtained from MIDI. Typically, bacterial strains that cluster at less than 10 Euclidian distance units have fatty acid patterns consistent among members of the same species. Thus an organism obtained from one source can be recognized if it is isolated again from the same or any other source. This makes it possible to track the distribution of organisms and monitor environmental conditions or fluid transport mechanisms. Microorganisms are seldom found as monocultures in natural environments. They are more likely to be closely associated with other genera with complementary metabolic requirements. An understanding of the indigenous microorganism population is useful in understanding subtle changes in the environment. However, classification of environmental organisms using traditional methods is not ideal because differentiation of species with small variations or genera with very similar taxonomic characteristics is beyond the capabilities of traditional microbiological methods

  11. Interactions of phytoplankton, zooplankton and microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, L. R.; Paffenhöfer, G.-A.; Yoder, J. A.

    We present evidence that there are significant interactions between heterotrophic microorganisms, doliolids and Fritillaria within intrusions of nutrient-rich Gulf Stream water stranding on the continental shelf. During the summer of 1981 cold, nutrient-rich water from below the surface of the Gulf Stream was repeatedly intruded and stranded on the continental shelf off northeastern Florida. On August 6 old, stranded Gulf Stream water depleted of nitrate occupied the lower layer on the outer shelf. The upper water was continental shelf water, older but of undefined age. On August 6 free-living bacteria were >10 6ml -1 everywhere at all depths, an order of magnitude greater than normal bacterial numbers on the northeastern Florida continental shelf. Over 10 days the numbers of free bacteria doubled while bacteria attached to particles increased by a factor of four. The adenylate/chlorophyll ratio showed that phytoplankton dominated the lower layers of intruded water, while the surface water became increasingly dominated by heterotrophic microorganisms (bacteria and protozoa) over 10 days. There were significant, negative correlations between bacteria and doliolids and between bacteria and Fritillaria. Regions of maximum bacterial numbers did not coincide with locations of salp swarms. The increased numbers of bacteria at all depths in a highly stratified system in which most phytoplankton are in the lower layer suggests a diverse source of bacterial growth substrates, some of which involve zooplankton as intermediaries. Production of autotrophs is more than twice that of microheterotrophs on average, but because of their differential distribution, microheterotrophs are the dominant biomass in much of the surface water and may be significant in energy flux to metazoan consumers as well as competitors for mutually useable sources of nutrition.

  12. System for identification of microorganism and detection of infectious disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for the identification of microorganisms or infectious disorders are disclosed, comprising obtaining a suitable sample from sources such as persons, animals, plants, food, water or soil. The methods also comprise providing tailored nucleic acid substrate(s) designed to react with a type 1...... topoisomerase from one or more microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s), and incubating said substrate with said sample, or extracts or preparations from the sample, so that the substrate is processed by said topoisomerase if said microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s) is present in the sample. Finally......, processed substrates are identified and potentially quantified by one or more of a range of standard molecular biology methods and read-out systems. The identification and potential quantification of microorganisms and infectious agents, including but not limited to Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium...

  13. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement of uranium-accumulating ability of microorganisms by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira; Tsuruta, Takehiko [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Some microorganisms having excellent ability to accumulate uranium were isolated, from soil and water systems in and around the Ningyo-toge Station of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The enhancement of uranium-accumulating ability of microorganisms by electron-beam irradiation was examined, and the ability of JW-046 was increased 3-5% by the irradiation. The irradiation affect the growth of some of microorganisms tested. (author)

  15. Assessment of impact of culture conditions on capability of wastewater's microorganisms to flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il'inskiy V. V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater is one of the significant sources of pollution of the aquatic ecosystems of the Kola North. Sewage coming to the ground waters, surface waters and near shore marine basin have a complex negative impact on the biocenosis of water objects. Considering the fact that basin self-purification process in climatic environment of the Far North is slow, it seems to be current problem to research influence of external factors on the native microorganisms involved in the biological transformation of most pollutants. Along with oxygenizing activity microorganisms are able to accumulate pollutant in the cells and to form floccules. As a result, microorganisms fix the dissolved contaminants that may be mechanically derived from water. Using the data on the chemical makeup of some urban and domestic sewage, nutrient media have been developed where microorganisms isolated from effluents have been cultivated. As major characteristics of the cultivation media affecting the intensity and direction of metabolic processes in microorganisms, the ratios C / N, C / P and N / P have been chosen. Intensity growth of bacteria in experimental nutrient media has been studied and the flocculating activity of bacterial suspensions has been determined. The rate of these microorganisms (Pseudomonas spp. and cultures of bacteria of Enterobacteriaceae family average has been 70∙103 and 117∙103 cells/h respectively. The growth rate of each culture on different composition nutrient media has varied within three orders, and has correlated with the relative content of phosphates in the nutrient media. The flocculating potential does not depend on the ratio of biogenic elements C / N, C / P and N / P. Both cultures have shown the ability to precipitate suspended matter at the level of 50 % or more after cultivation on nutrient media similar in composition to habitat conditions.

  16. Radiation resistance of microorganisms on unsterilized infusion sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E. Ahrensburg; Kristensen, H.; Hoborn, J.

    1991-01-01

    Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor in a steriliza......Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor...

  17. [Characteristics of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, T G; Barashkov, V A

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the biological value of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms--the hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus Z1 and Ralstonia eutropha B5786 and the CO-resistant strain of carboxydobacterium Seliberia carboxydohydrogena Z1062. Based on a number of significant parameters characterizing the biological value of a product, the proteins of hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms have been found to occupy an intermediate position between traditional animal and plant proteins. The high total protein in biomass of these microorganisms, their complete amino acid content, and availability to proteolytic enzymes allow for us to consider these microorganisms as potential protein producers.

  18. Spectroscopic evaluation of surface-bound cadmium on algal microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, V.; Laude, D.A.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Several species of algae have been employed for preconcentration of metals from aqueous solutions. In all cases it is postulated that these organisms achieve preconcentration by using the active sites present on the cell walls. Some authors have indicated the possible existence of multiple active sites, which are responsible for multiple adsorption mechanisms observed in many algae species. Although a wide range of functional groups have been suggested as the means for binding, the identity and chemical environment of these active sites remains unknown. In the present study the metal adsorption process for these microorganisms is investigated with the use of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance. In particular, this research is focused on adsorption of cadmium by a pure strain of algae (Stichococcus bacillaris). Initial experiments have indicated that as the pH of the solution changes, not only is the adsorption efficiency changed, but also a chemical shift for the adsorbed species is observed, suggesting major changes in the chemical environment of the active sites. Some of the topics discussed in detail include: competitive binding of various cations; the effect of anions; the effect of complexing ligands; the chemical nature of active sites; and the reversibility of adsorption process

  19. Assessment of soil properties by organic matter and EM-microorganism incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valarini P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of a claim loam soil, collected in Aranjuez (Madrid and enriched with organic matter and microorganisms, were evaluated under controlled temperature and moisture conditions, over a period of three months. The following treatments were carried out: soil (control; soil + 50 t ha-1 of animal manure (E50; soil + 50 t ha-1 of animal manure + 30 L ha-1 of effective microorganisms (E50EM; soil + 30 t ha-1 of the combination of various green crop residues and weeds (RC30 and soil + 30 t ha-1 of the combination of various green crop residues and weeds + 30 L ha-1 of effective microorganisms (RC30EM. Soil samples were taken before and after incubation and their physical, chemical, and microbiological parameters analyzed. Significant increase was observed in the production of exopolysaccharides and basic phosphatase and esterase enzyme activities in the treatments E50EM and RC30EM, in correlation with the humification of organic matter, water retention at field capacity, and the cationic exchange capacity (CEC of the same treatments. The conclusion was drawn that the incorporation of a mixture of effective microorganisms (EM intensified the biological soil activity and improved physical and chemical soil properties, contributing to a quick humification of fresh organic matter. These findings were illustrated by the microbiological activities of exopolysaccharides and by alkaline phosphatase and esterase enzymes, which can be used as early and integrated soil health indicators.

  20. Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann M. Stock

    2009-04-08

    Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and

  1. "Petit suisse" cheese from kefir: an alternative dessert with microorganisms of probiotic activity Queijo "Petit suisse" de kefir: uma alternativa de sobremesa com microorganismos de ação probiótica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanise Sabrina Souza Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available "Petit Suisse" is a creamy cheese. Kefir is a symbiotic mixture of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts with probiotic activity including immunomodulation and balance of intestinal microflora. The present study aims to develop "Petit Suisse" cheese from kefir. Kefir grains were grown in pasteurized cow milk, and after the separation of kefir the serum was discarded and the "Petit Suisse" cheese was prepared using strawberry, mangaba, herbs, and dried tomatoes. The acceptance of the different preparations was evaluated using a nine-point hedonic scale followed by ANOVA. The sweet and salty products were compared by the Student's t-test. Purchase intent was evaluated by the means test and frequency distribution. All products were well accepted by the judges. The product was characterized by low yield, but it can be prepared at home at low cost. The nutritional composition analyses and the variety of flavors as well as the range of age of the judges are alternatives for further studies.Petit suisse é um queijo de consistência pastosa. O kefir é um produto resultante da simbiose entre bactérias ácido-láticas e leveduras, e apresenta ação probiótica, como imunomodulação e balanço da microbiota intestinal. O presente estudo buscou desenvolver petit suisse de kefir. Os grãos foram cultivados no leite de vaca pasteurizado e, após separação do kefir, seguiu-se para dessoragem e preparo do petit suisse nos sabores morango, mangaba, ervas e tomate seco. Com escala hedônica estruturada de nove pontos, avaliou-se aceitação pela ANOVA. As amostras doces e salgadas foram comparadas por meio do teste t de Student e a intenção de compra foi avaliada por meio do teste de médias e de distribuição das frequências. As amostras apresentaram boa aceitação pelos julgadores. O produto pronto apresentou baixo rendimento, mas pode ser reproduzido em nível domiciliar com baixo custo. A análise da composição nutricional e a variação dos sabores e

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions against 12 oral microorganisms Atividade antimicrobiana in vitro de moldes de hidrocolóide irreversível contra 12 microrganismos orais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Assirati Casemiro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial activity of irreversible hydrocolloids (one containing an antimicrobial agent prepared with water or with a 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution against 12 strains of the oral microbiota. Twenty specimens (0.5 x 1.0 cm for each group (1. Jeltrate mixed with water; 2. Jeltrate mixed with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution; 3. Greengel mixed with water; 4. Greengel mixed with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution were prepared under sterile conditions and placed in culture media inoculated with the indicator strains. After incubation in aerobiosis or microaerophilia, inhibition of the microbial growth was measured and the results were interpreted. The normal adherence curve revealed a non-normal distribution of the data, so the non-parametric Friedman Test was performed (p Este trabalho avaliou in vitro a atividade antimicrobiana de alginatos (um deles contendo agente antimicrobiano manipulados com água ou solução de digluconato de clorexidina a 0,2% contra 12 cepas da microbiota oral. Vinte espécimes (0,5 x 1,0 cm para cada grupo (1. Jeltrate manipulado com água, 2. Jeltrate manipulado com solução de digluconato de clorexidina a 0,2%; 3. Greengel manipulado com água; 4. Greengel manipulado com solução de digluconato de clorexidina a 0,2% foram confeccionados sob condições estéreis e semeados em meios de cultura inoculados com as cepas indicadoras. Após incubação em aerobiose ou microaerofilia, a inibição do crescimento microbiano foi medida e os resultados foram interpretados. A curva normal de aderência revelou uma distribuição não-normal dos dados, então o teste não paramétrico de Friedman (p < 0,05 foi realizado. A atividade antimicrobiana dos grupos foi classificada na seguinte ordem crescente: 1, 3, 4 e 2. Os resultados sugerem que a manipulação de alginatos com solução de digluconato de clorexidina a 0,2% é um método efetivo para reduzir a contamina

  3. Biotransformation of Spanish coals by microorganisms; Biotransformacion de Carbones Espanoles por Microorganismos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    some newly isolated microorganisms could solubilized different kinds of Spanish coals (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite). Certain fungi and bacteria could solubilized lignite when growing in a mineral medium. However, to solubilized higher rank coals (hard coal and subbituminous coal) microorganisms require a complete medium. Microorganisms, which showed higher capacity to solubilized coal, were incubated in the presence of coal (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite) at the optimal conditions to get coal liquefaction/solubilization. The resultant products were analysed by IR and UV/visible spectrometry. No major differences among the original coal, solubilized/liquefied coal and residual coal were detected. However, an increase in metallic carboxylate and a decrease in OH'- carboxylic groups were observed in the liquefied lignite. Humic acids derived from original lignite residual lignite and liquefied/solubilized lignite by microorganisms were analysed. Several differences were observed in the humic acids extracted from the liquefied lignite, such as an increase in the total acidity and in the proportion of the phenolic groups. Differences on the humic acid molecular weight were observed too. Several fungal and bacterial strains were able to grow using humic acids as sole carbon source. Microorganisms growing in humic acid were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Besides, the coal solubilization capacity of several fungal strains (M2, m$ and AGI) growing in different culture media was assayed. In order to get some insight into the mechanisms of the liquefaction/solubilization of Spanish coals (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite) by these microorganisms, some features in the culture supernatants were studied: pH values; extracellular specific proteins; enzyme activities possibly related with coal solubilization and the presence of oxalate. M2 and M4 fungal strains grown in the presence of coal produced some specific extracellular proteins

  4. Biotransformation of Spanish coals by microorganisms; Biotransformacion de Carbones Espanoles por Microorganismos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    some newly isolated microorganisms could solubilized different kinds of Spanish coals (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite). Certain fungi and bacteria could solubilized lignite when growing in a mineral medium. However, to solubilized higher rank coals (hard coal and subbituminous coal) microorganisms require a complete medium. Microorganisms, which showed higher capacity to solubilized coal, were incubated in the presence of coal (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite) at the optimal conditions to get coal liquefaction/solubilization. The resultant products were analysed by IR and UV/visible spectrometry. No major differences among the original coal, solubilized/liquefied coal and residual coal were detected. However, an increase in metallic carboxylate and a decrease in OH'- carboxylic groups were observed in the liquefied lignite. Humic acids derived from original lignite residual lignite and liquefied/solubilized lignite by microorganisms were analysed. Several differences were observed in the humic acids extracted from the liquefied lignite, such as an increase in the total acidity and in the proportion of the phenolic groups. Differences on the humic acid molecular weight were observed too. Several fungal and bacterial strains were able to grow using humic acids as sole carbon source. Microorganisms growing in humic acid were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Besides, the coal solubilization capacity of several fungal strains (M2, m$ and AGI) growing in different culture media was assayed. In order to get some insight into the mechanisms of the liquefaction/solubilization of Spanish coals (hard coal, subbituminous coal and lignite) by these microorganisms, some features in the culture supernatants were studied: pH values; extracellular specific proteins; enzyme activities possibly related with coal solubilization and the presence of oxalate. M2 and M4 fungal strains grown in the presence of coal produced some specific extracellular

  5. Microorganisms associated with the spoilage of avocado pear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microorganisms associated with the spoilage of Avocado pear, Persea americana fruits, purchased fresh from various markets in Benin City were investigated. The pour plate method was used for the isolation. A total of nine species of microorganisms were isolated and identified in this study. They comprise of seven ...

  6. Gut Microorganisms Found Necessary for Successful Cancer Therapy | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Humans play host to trillions of microorganisms that help our bodies perform basic functions, like digestion, growth, and fighting disease. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to 1.1 The tens of trillions of microorganisms thriving in our intestines are known as gut microbiota, and those that are not harmful to

  7. 78 FR 42451 - Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    .... FDA-2013-N-0253] Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella Microorganisms AGENCY: Food and Drug... revoking an advisory opinion on animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella microorganisms. This action is... articulated in a final compliance policy guide (CPG) on Salmonella in food for animals. DATES: This rule is...

  8. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding

  9. Peat soils stabilization using Effective Microorganisms (EM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, N. Z.; Samsuddin, N. S.; Hanif, M. F.; Syed Osman, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Peat soil is known as geotechnical problematic soil since it is the softest soil having highly organic and moisture content which led to high compressibility, low shear strength and long-term settlement. The aim of this study was to obtain the stabilized peat soils using the Effective Microorganisms (EM). The volume of EM added and mixed with peat soils varied with 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% and then were cured for 7, 14 and 21 days. The experiment was done for uncontrolled and controlled moisture content. Prior conducting the main experiments, the physical properties such as moisture content, liquid limit, specific gravity, and plastic limit etc. were measure for raw peat samples. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) test was performed followed by regression analysis to check the effect of EM on the soil strength. Obtained results have shown that the mix design for controlled moisture contents showed the promising improvement in their compressive strength. The peat soil samples with 10% of EM shows the highest increment in UCS value and the percentage of increments are in the range of 44% to 65% after curing for 21 days. The regression analysis of the EM with the soil compressive strength showed that in controlled moisture conditions, EM significantly improved the soil stability as the value of R2 ranged between 0.97 – 0.78. The results have indicated that the addition of EM in peat soils provides significant improving in the strength of the soil as well as the other engineering properties.

  10. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  11. Snow as a habitat for microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoham, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    There are three major habitats involving ice and snow, and the microorganisms studied from these habitats are most eukaryotic. Sea ice is inhabited by algae called diatoms, glacial ice has sparse populations of green algai cal desmids, and the temporary and permanent snows in mountainous regions and high latitudes are inhabited mostly by green algal flagellates. The life cycle of green algal flagellates is summarized by discussing the effects of light, temperature, nutrients, and snow melts. Specific examples of optimal conditions and environmental effects for various snow algae are given. It is not likely that the eukaryotic snow algae presented are candidated for life on the planet Mars. Evolutionally, eukaryotic cells as know on Earth may not have had the opportunity to develop on Mars (if life evolved at all on Mars) since eukaryotes did not appear on Earth until almost two billion years after the first prokaryotic organisms. However, the snow/ice ecosystems on Earth present themselves as extreme habitats were there is evidence of prokaryotic life (eubacteria and cyanbacteria) of which literally nothing is known. Any future surveillances of extant and/or extinct life on Mars should include probes (if not landing sites) to investigate sites of concentrations of ice water. The possibility of signs of life in Martian polar regions should not be overlooked.

  12. Cyanide utilization and degradation by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, C J

    1988-01-01

    Various microorganisms can produce (cyanogenesis) or degrade cyanide. They degrade cyanide either to detoxify it, or to use it as a source of nitrogen for growth. Significant amounts of cyanide are formed as a secondary metabolite by a wide range of fungi and a few bacteria by decarboxylation of glycine. When cyanide has been formed by the snow mould fungus it is degraded by conversion to carbon dioxide and ammonia via an unknown pathway. In contrast, cyanogenic bacteria either do not further catabolize cyanide or they convert it into beta-cyanoalanine by addition to cysteine or O-acetylserine. Several non-cyanogenic fungi that are pathogens of cyanogenic plants are known to degrade cyanide by hydration to formamide by the enzyme cyanide hydratase. Such fungi can be immobilized and used in packed-cell columns to continuously detoxify cyanide. ICI Biological Products Business market a preparation of spray-dried fungal mycelia, 'CYCLEAR', to detoxify industrial wastes. Novo Industri have also introduced a cyanidase preparation to convert cyanide directly into formate and ammonia. Bacteria have been isolated that use cyanide as a source of nitrogen for growth. Because cyanide, as KCN or NaCN, is toxic for growth, the bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) have to be grown in fed-batch culture with cyanide as the limiting nutrient. Cyanide is converted to carbon dioxide and ammonia (which is then assimilated) by an NADH-linked cyanide oxygenase system.

  13. Tracking microorganisms and gene in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlas, R.M.; Sayler, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine the sensitivities and limitations of various methods for determining the fate of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) and their genes in the environment. Selective viable plate count procedures can be designed to detect the introduced organisms with high sensitivity; but they are restricted by potential mutations affecting the expression of the selective characteristic in the introduced organism, the occurrence of the particular selective characteristic in the indigenous organisms, and the need to culture the organism. The accuracy of this approach is greatly improved by colony hybridization procedures that use a specific gene probe to detect the introduced genes, but this approach is still only as sensitive as the plating procedure. Direct extraction of DNA from environmental samples, coupled with dot blot hybridization with radiolabeled probe DNA or solution hybridization, gives a high degree of both sensitivity and precision. This approach does not require culturing of the organism; and even if an introduced gene moves into a new organism or if the introduced organism is viable but nonculturable, the gene probe methods will detect the persistence of the introduced genes in the environment. Efficient direct DNA extraction methods have been developed and tested following in vitro experimental additions of GEMs to sediment and water samples

  14. Integrated evaluation of soil quality after the incorporation of organic matter and microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valarini Pedro J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The soil quality was evaluated following the addition of organic matter and microorganisms to a clay loam soil collected in Aranjuez (Madrid under controlled conditions of temperature and moisture, and over a period of three months. The following treatments were carried out: soil (control; soil + 50 t/ha of animal manure (E50; soil + 50 t/ha of animal manure + 30l/ha of effective microorganisms (E50EM; soil + 30 t/ha of combination of various green crop residues and weeds (RC30 and soil + 30 t/ha of combination of various green crop residues and weeds + 30l/ha of effective microorganisms (RC30EM. The soil samples were taken before and after the incubation and analysed using physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. A significant increase in the production of polysaccharides and alkaline phosphatase and esterase enzymes in the treatments E50EM and RC30EM was observed, being in direct correlation with the humification of the organic matter, with the water retention at field capacity, and with the cationic exchange capacity (CEC. It can be concluded that the incorporation of microorganisms EM potentialized the soil biological activity and improved physico-chemical soil properties, contributing to a quick humification of fresh organic matter. Those findings were proved by microbiological activities of exopolysaccharides by alcaline phosphatase and esterase enzymes, which can be used as earlier and integral soil health indicators.

  15. Dynamic size spectrometry of airborne microorganisms: Laboratory evaluation and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yinge; Willeke, Klaus; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Donnelly, Jean

    Bioaerosol samplers need to be calibrated for the microorganisms of interest. The Aerosizer, a relatively new aerodynamic size spectrometer, is shown to be a suitable dynamic instrument for the evaluation and calibration of such samplers in the laboratory, prior to their use in the field. It provides the necessary reference count against which the microbiological response of the sampler can be compared. It measures the health-significant aerodynamic diameters of microorganisms down to 0.5 μm, thus including most of the bacteria, fungi and pollen found in outdoor and indoor air environments. Comparison tests with a laser size spectrometer indicate that the suspension of microorganisms needs to be washed several times before aerosolization to avoid coating of the airborne microorganisms with nutrients and microbial slime from the suspension, and to reduce the residue particles to sizes below the lowest size of the aerosolized microorganisms.

  16. Biodiesel production by various oleaginous microorganisms from organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Uk; Park, Jong Moon

    2018-05-01

    Biodiesel is a biodegradable and renewable fuel. A large amount of research has considered microbial oil production using oleaginous microorganisms, but the commercialization of microbial lipids produced in this way remains uncertain due to the high cost of feedstock or low lipid yield. Microbial lipids can be typically produced by microalgae, yeasts, and bacteria; the lipid yields of these microorganisms can be improved by using sufficient concentrations of organic carbon sources. Therefore, combining low-cost organic compounds contained in organic wastes with cultivation of oleaginous microorganisms can be a promising approach to obtain commercial viability. However, to achieve effective bioconversion of low-cost substrates to microbial lipids, the characteristics of each microorganism and each substrate should be considered simultaneously. This article discusses recent approaches to developing cost-effective microbial lipid production processes that use various oleaginous microorganisms and organic wastes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling and application of the inactivation of microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oğuzhan, P.; Yangılar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of consuming contaminated food with toxic microorganisms causing infections and consideration of food protection and new microbial inactivation methods are obligatory situations. Food microbiology is mainly related with unwanted microorganisms spoiling foods during processing and transporting stages and causing diseases. Determination of pathogen microorganisms is important for human health to define and prevent dangers and elongate shelf life. Inactivation of pathogen microorganisms can provide food security and reduce nutrient losses. Microbial inactivation which is using methods of food protection such as food safety and fresh. With this aim, various methods are used such as classical thermal processes (pasteurisation, sterilisation), pressured electrical field (PEF), ionised radiation, high pressure, ultrasonic waves and plasma sterilisation. Microbial inactivation modelling is a secure and effective method in food production. A new microbiological application can give useful results for risk assessment in food, inactivation of microorganisms and improvement of shelf life. Application and control methods should be developed and supported by scientific research and industrial applications

  18. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: research challenges concerning the impact of airborne micro-organisms on the atmosphere and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Morris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  19. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: research challenges concerning the impact of airborne micro-organisms on the atmosphere and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Bardin, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Vogel, B.; Leyronas, C.; Ariya, P. A.; Psenner, R.

    2011-01-01

    For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  20. Physiological ecology of microorganisms in Subglacial Lake Whillans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trista J Vick-Majors

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Subglacial microbial habitats are widespread in glaciated regions of our planet. Some of these environments have been isolated from the atmosphere and from sunlight for many thousands of years. Consequently, ecosystem processes must rely on energy gained from the oxidation of inorganic substrates or detrital organic matter. Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW is one of more than 400 subglacial lakes known to exist under the Antarctic ice sheet; however, little is known about microbial physiology and energetics in these systems. When it was sampled through its 800 m thick ice cover in 2013, the SLW water column was shallow (~2 m deep, oxygenated, and possessed sufficient concentrations of C, N, and P substrates to support microbial growth. Here, we use a combination of physiological assays and models to assess the energetics of microbial life in SLW. In general, SLW microorganisms grew slowly in this energy-limited environment. Heterotrophic cellular carbon turnover times, calculated from 3H-thymidine and 3H-leucine incorporation rates, were long (60 to 500 days while cellular doubling times averaged 196 days. Inferred growth rates (average ~0.006 d-1 obtained from the same incubations were at least an order of magnitude lower than those measured in Antarctic surface lakes and oligotrophic areas of the ocean. Low growth efficiency (8% indicated that heterotrophic populations in SLW partition a majority of their carbon demand to cellular maintenance rather than growth. Chemoautotrophic CO2-fixation exceeded heterotrophic organic C-demand by a factor of ~1.5. Aerobic respiratory activity associated with heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolism surpassed the estimated supply of oxygen to SLW, implying that microbial activity could deplete the oxygenated waters, resulting in anoxia. We used thermodynamic calculations to examine the biogeochemical and energetic consequences of environmentally imposed switching between aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms

  1. Prospects of effective microorganisms technology in wastes treatment in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad A Shalaby

    2011-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and treatment may cost as much as the wastewater treatment. Usually large proportion of the pollutants in wastewater is organic. They are attacked by saprophytic microorganisms, i.e. organisms that feed upon dead organic matter. Activity of organisms causes decomposition of organic matter and destroys them, where the bacteria convert the organic matter or other constituents in the wastewater to new cells, water, gases and other products. Demolition activities, including renovation/remodeling works and complete or selective removal/demolishing of existing structures either by man-made processes or by natural disasters, create an extensive amount of wastes. These demolition wastes are characterized as heterogeneous mixtures of building materials that are usually contaminated with chemicals and dirt. In developing countries, it is estimated that demolition wastes comprise 20% to 30% of the total annual solid wastes. In Egypt, the daily quantity of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has been estimated as 10 000 tones. That is equivalent to one third of the total daily municipal solid wastes generated per day in Egypt. The zabbaliin have since expanded their activities and now take the waste they collect back to their garbage villages where it is sorted into recyclable components: paper, plastics, rags, glass, metal and food. The food waste is fed to pigs and the other items are sold to recycling centers. This paper summarizes the wastewater and solid wastes management in Egypt now and future.

  2. DENTINE CARIES: ACID-TOLERANT MICROORGANISMS AND ASPECTS ON COLLAGEN DEGRADATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Anders Hedenbjörk

    2014-01-01

    . Key findings: Each investigated lesion harbored a unique microbiota in terms of both species composition and numbers of microorganisms. This indicates that various combinations of aciduric microorganisms can colonize, survive in and probably also propagate dentine carious lesions. We also found that solid pH-selective agars can be used successfully to select acid-tolerant microorganisms in caries lesions. This would preserve their phenotypic traits for further study. In Paper III, the relation between salivary levels of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), salivary levels of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP-1), and the presence of manifest caries lesions in a large number of subjects was investigated. Saliva samples were collected and analyzed for concentrations of MMP-8, TIMP-1 and total protein using immunofluorometric assays, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays and Bradford assays, respectively. Key findings: Subjects with manifest caries lesions had significantly elevated levels of salivary MMP-8 compared to subjects without caries lesions. TIMP-1 was not significant in any case. In Paper IV, a new method for generating bioactive demineralized dentine matrix substrate (DDM) was developed using a dialysis system and two different demineralization approaches (acetic acid or EDTA). The generated DDM was subsequently analyzed for the presence of type 1 collagen, active MMP-8 and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels using SDS-PAGE, ELISA or immunofluorescence assay. Key findings: Both demineralization methods produced a substrate rich in collagen and with preserved MMP-8 activity. This report presents new knowledge on the composition of the acid tolerant dentine caries microbiota from three levels in dentine carious lesions and on the efficacy of operative caries removal on the numbers of viable microorganisms in the caries free cavity using two operative methods. Moreover, the basic mechanisms behind collagen degradation in the dentine caries process are studied from both a

  3. Formation of methylamine by rumen microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Hisao; Kandatsu, Makoto.

    1978-01-01

    An unknown ninhydrin positive peak on the chromatograms of amino acid analyzer of alkalified rumen fluid distillate of goats was isolated as DNP-derivative and identified as methylamine. Under normal feeding condition, its concentration in the rumen ranged 0.1-3.9 mgN/100 ml of rumen fluid and the proportion of methylamine in total volatile base, or apparent ammonia, ranged 0.5-13% during post-feeding. When ammonium salt was administered into the rumen with hay-concentrate ration, these values were increased up to 8.1 mgN/100 ml and 25.8% respectively. Concentrations of ammonia and methylamine when aspartic acid or alanine was administered into the rumen in place of concentrate mixture (control) were not markedly different from the control. In the case of arginine, glutamic acid or glycine administration, these concentrations were depressed as compared to the control. There were no distinct differences in the concentration of methylamine between the faunated and unfaunated goats. 14 C from 14 C-chlorella protein hydrolyzates, U- 14 C-alanine, 2- 14 C-glycine or 14 C-sodium bicarbonate was incorporated into methylamine in invitro incubation with rumen micro-organisms. When the washed suspensions of rumen bacteria or protozoa were incubated with 14 C-chlorella protein hydrolyzates, the radioactivity in methylamine appeared only in the case of bacteria suspensions. After the addition of 15 N-ammonium citrate into the rumen, the incorporation of 15 N into methylamine was observed during 1-9 hr. (auth.)

  4. Biodegradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Theresa M; Seech, Alan G; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T

    2005-08-01

    The organochlorine pesticide Lindane is the gamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). Technical grade Lindane contains a mixture of HCH isomers which include not only gamma-HCH, but also large amounts of predominantly alpha-, beta- and delta-HCH. The physical properties and persistence of each isomer differ because of the different chlorine atom orientations on each molecule (axial or equatorial). However, all four isomers are considered toxic and recalcitrant worldwide pollutants. Biodegradation of HCH has been studied in soil, slurry and culture media but very little information exists on in situ bioremediation of the different isomers including Lindane itself, at full scale. Several soil microorganisms capable of degrading, and utilizing HCH as a carbon source, have been reported. In selected bacterial strains, the genes encoding the enzymes involved in the initial degradation of Lindane have been cloned, sequenced, expressed and the gene products characterized. HCH is biodegradable under both oxic and anoxic conditions, although mineralization is generally observed only in oxic systems. As is found for most organic compounds, HCH degradation in soil occurs at moderate temperatures and at near neutral pH. HCH biodegradation in soil has been reported at both low and high (saturated) moisture contents. Soil texture and organic matter appear to influence degradation presumably by sorption mechanisms and impact on moisture retention, bacterial growth and pH. Most studies report on the biodegradation of relatively low (< 500 mg/kg) concentrations of HCH in soil. Information on the effects of inorganic nutrients, organic carbon sources or other soil amendments is scattered and inconclusive. More in-depth assessments of amendment effects and evaluation of bioremediation protocols, on a large scale, using soil with high HCH concentrations, are needed.

  5. Autecology of microorganisms of typical Ecuador biotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashyrev, O B; Pidgorskyi, V S; Toro, Miguel Naranjo; Gualoto, Miguel; Gladka, G V; Tashyreva, H O; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaya, V A

    2014-01-01

    34 strains of aerobic chemoorganotrophic microorganisms were isolated from 23 soil and plant samples selected from highland biotopes of Ecuador-Andes massif (Papallacta, 4020 m), ash at the foot of the volcano Tungurahua, mountainous jungle (La Favorita, 1600 m), as well as in humid tropic botanical garden (state Puyo, 950 m). In mountain jungle samples the high number of bacteria--10(5)-10(7) CFU/g of sample were represented by 2-5 morphotypes. In highland (4020 m) samples the bacterial counts made from 10(2) to 10(7) CFU/g of sample. The current study describes resistance of isolated strains to high salinity, UV radiation and toxic metal ions. The majority of isolated strains were halotolerant. Isolates from volcanic ash showed high resistance level to UV radiation--LD99,99 made 1000-1440 J/m2; resistance level for isolates from the soil of Puyo Botanical Garden and isolates from rock lichen (Papallacta) LD99,99 made 1160 and 800 J/m2 respectively. Strains isolated from mountain jungle (La Favorita) showed lower UV-resistance. In highland biotopes of Ecuador occurred bacteria resistant to toxic metal ions. The highest resistance to Hg2+ was shown by isolate of lichen from mountain jungle, the maximal growth concentration was 0.025 g/L; to Cr(VI)--by isolate from lichen rock massif--3,0 g/L. Correlation between metal-resistance, halotolerace and UV resistance for studied strains was not detected, probably because of different microbial cell damage/repair mechanisms under the action of these factors.

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ROSA CANINA FLOWERS AGAINST SELECTED MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Rovná

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rosa canina flowers were screened against various plant pathogenic microbial strains to study the antimicrobial properties of the plant. Ethanolic and methanolic extracts of flowers were screened applying agar well diffusion method against two Gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli CCM 3988 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960 and three microscopic filamentous fungi strains Aspergillus niger, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata, respectively. The best antimicrobial effect of ethanolic extract of Rosa canina flowers was found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the best antimicrobial effect of methanolic extract of Rosa canina flowers was found against Escherichia coli.

  7. Nitrogen acquisition by plants and microorganisms in a temperate grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianyuan; Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Xin, Xiaoping; Han, Jessie Yc; Tian, Yuqiang; Ouyang, Hua; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-03-10

    Nitrogen (N) limitation is common in most terrestrial ecosystems, often leading to strong competition between microorganisms and plants. The mechanisms of niche differentiation to reduce this competition remain unclear. Short-term (15)N experiments with NH4(+), NO3(-), and glycine were conducted in July, August and September in a temperate grassland to evaluate the chemical, spatial and temporal niche differentiation by competition between plants and microorganisms for N. Microorganisms preferred NH4(+) and NO3(-), while plants preferred NO3(-). Both plants and microorganisms acquired more N in August and September than in July. The soil depth had no significant effects on microbial uptake, but significantly affected plant N uptake. Plants acquired 67% of their N from the 0-5 cm soil layer and 33% from the 5-15 cm layer. The amount of N taken up by microorganisms was at least seven times than plants. Although microorganisms efficiently compete for N with plants, the competition is alleviated through chemical partitioning mainly in deeper soil layer. In the upper soil layer, neither chemical nor temporal niche separation is realized leading to strong competition between plants and microorganisms that modifies N dynamics in grasslands.

  8. Study of microorganisms present in deep geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, H.; Lion, R.; Bianchi, A.; Garcin, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work has been executed in the scope of the studies on high activity radioactive wastes storage in deep geological environments. The authors make reference to an as complete as possible literature on the existence of microorganisms in those environments or under similar conditions. Then they describe the equipment and methods they have implemented to perform their study of the populations present in three deep-reaching drill-holes in Auriat (France), Mol (Belgique) and Troon (Great Britain). The results of the study exhibit the presence of a certain biological activity, well adapted to that particular life environment. Strains appear to be very varied from the taxonomic point of view and seemingly show an important potential of mineral alteration when provided with an adequate source of energy. Complementary studies, using advanced techniques such as those employed during the work forming the basis of this paper, seem necessary for a more accurate evaluation of long-term risks of perturbation of a deep storage site [fr

  9. A patent landscape on application of microorganisms in construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapurkar, Dipti; Telang, Manasi

    2017-07-01

    Construction biotechnology includes research and development of construction materials and processes that make use of various microbes. The present technology landscape gives a perspective on how microbes have been used in construction industry as cement and concrete additives by analyzing patents filed in this technology arena. All patents related to the technology of interest published globally to date have been reviewed. The earliest patent filing in this technology domain was recorded in the year 1958 and the patenting activity reached its peak around mid to late 1990s. The early technology was mainly focused on microbial polysaccharides and other metabolic products as additives. Year 2002 onwards, biomineralization has taken precedence over the other technologies with consistent patent filings indicating a shift in innovation focus. Japan has been the global leader with highest number of patents filed on application of microbes in construction industry. Southeast University, China has topped the patent assignee list with maximum number of filings followed by Kajima Corp. and Shin-Etsu Chemical Co., Ltd. Most patent applications have claimed microbe based bio-products. Construction-related microbial technologies are mainly based on activity of different microorganisms such as urease-producing, acidogenic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, nitrate and iron-reducing bacteria. Sporosarcina pasteurii has been the most widely used microbe for biomineralization.

  10. Fate of indicator microorganisms under nutrient management plan conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Segal, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient management plans (NMPs) for application of wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations are designed to meet crop water and nutrient requirements, but implicitly assume that pathogenic microorganisms in the wastewater will be retained and die-off in the root zone. A NMP was implemented on a field plot to test this assumption by monitoring the fate of several fecal indicator microorganisms (Enterococcus, fecal coliforms, somatic coliphage, and total Escherichia coli). When well-water and wastewater were applied to meet measured evapotranspiration (ET), little advective transport of the indicator microorganisms occurred below the root zone and the remaining microorganisms rapidly died-off (within 1 mo). Additional experiments were conducted in the laboratory to better quantify microorganism transport and survival in the field soil. Batch survival experiments revealed much more rapid die-off rates for the bacterial indicator microorganisms in native than in sterilized soil, suggesting that biotic factors controlled survival. Saturated column experiments with packed field soil, demonstrated much greater transport potential for somatic coliphage than bacterial indicators (Enterococcus and total E. coli) and that the retention rates for the indicator microorganisms were not log-linear with depth. A worst case transport scenario of ponded infiltration on a large undistributed soil column from the field was also initiated and indicator microorganisms were not detected in the column outflow or in the soil at a depth of 65 cm. All of these observations support the hypothesis that a NMP at this site will protect groundwater supplies from microorganism contamination, especially when applied water and wastewater meet ET.

  11. Effects of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria, native microorganisms, and rock dust on Jatropha curcas L. growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, E B; Marques, E L S; Dias, J C T

    2016-10-05

    Microorganisms with the ability to release nutrients to the soil from insoluble sources may be useful for plant cultivation. We evaluated the growth-promoting effect on Jatropha curcas L. of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and the native microbiota in soil with or without rock dust. J. curcas L. is important for biodiesel production. The experiments were performed in a greenhouse under a random-statistical design with 14 replicates. The soil received increasing dosages of rock dust. The presence of resident microorganisms and PSB inoculum was correlated with plant height, biomass production, and phosphorus content in plants for 120 days. Native soil microorganisms were detected and identified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis. Several bacterial populations belonged to the genus Bacillus. Populations associated with the phyla Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were detected among the fungi. The best results for the variable plant height were correlated with the presence of resident microbiota and rock dust until the end of the experiment. The largest biomass production and the highest content of phosphorus occurred in the presence of soil-resident microbiota only up to 120 days. No significant effects were observed for biomass production with the use of PSB combined with rock dust. J. curcas L. under the influence of only resident microbiota showed the best plant growth results. Future research will focus on the specificity of resident microbiota activity in plant growth promotion and the isolation of these microorganisms to produce a new inoculum to be tested in various plants.

  12. Ionic liquid-tolerant microorganisms and microbial communities for lignocellulose conversion to bioproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaowei; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W; Thelen, Michael P; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2016-12-01

    Chemical and physical pretreatment of biomass is a critical step in the conversion of lignocellulose to biofuels and bioproducts. Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment has attracted significant attention due to the unique ability of certain ILs to solubilize some or all components of the plant cell wall. However, these ILs inhibit not only the enzyme activities but also the growth and productivity of microorganisms used in downstream hydrolysis and fermentation processes. While pretreated biomass can be washed to remove residual IL and reduce inhibition, extensive washing is costly and not feasible in large-scale processes. IL-tolerant microorganisms and microbial communities have been discovered from environmental samples and studies begun to elucidate mechanisms of IL tolerance. The discovery of IL tolerance in environmental microbial communities and individual microbes has lead to the proposal of molecular mechanisms of resistance. In this article, we review recent progress on discovering IL-tolerant microorganisms, identifying metabolic pathways and mechanisms of tolerance, and engineering microorganisms for IL tolerance. Research in these areas will yield new approaches to overcome inhibition in lignocellulosic biomass bioconversion processes and increase opportunities for the use of ILs in biomass pretreatment.

  13. Application of 13C-stable isotope probing to identify RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Roh, HyungKeun; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We employed stable isotope probing (SIP) with 13 C-labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) to identify active microorganisms responsible for RDX biodegradation in groundwater microcosms. Sixteen different 16S rRNA gene sequences were derived from microcosms receiving 13 C-labeled RDX, suggesting the presence of microorganisms able to incorporate carbon from RDX or its breakdown products. The clones, residing in Bacteroidia, Clostridia, α-, β- and δ-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were different from previously described RDX degraders. A parallel set of microcosms was amended with cheese whey and RDX to evaluate the influence of this co-substrate on the RDX-degrading microbial community. Cheese whey stimulated RDX biotransformation, altered the types of RDX-degrading bacteria, and decreased microbial community diversity. Results of this study suggest that RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater are more phylogenetically diverse than what has been inferred from studies with RDX-degrading isolates. Highlights: •SIP identified sixteen groundwater bacteria capable of using RDX and/or its metabolites as a carbon source. •The RDX degraders in groundwater are phylogenetically diverse and different from known RDX degraders. •Cheese whey induced community shift and altered diversity of the RDX-degrading microorganisms over time. -- RDX-degrading bacteria in contaminated groundwater, identified by SIP with 13 C-labeled RDX, are phylogenetically diverse and different from known RDX degraders

  14. Methylamine as a nitrogen source for microorganisms from a coastal marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Martin; Grob, Carolina; Howat, Alexandra M; Burns, Oliver J; Pratscher, Jennifer; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Richnow, Hans H; Chen, Yin; Murrell, J Colin

    2017-06-01

    Nitrogen is a key limiting resource for biomass production in the marine environment. Methylated amines, released from the degradation of osmolytes, could provide a nitrogen source for marine microbes. Thus far, studies in aquatic habitats on the utilization of methylamine, the simplest methylated amine, have mainly focussed on the fate of the carbon from this compound. Various groups of methylotrophs, microorganisms that can grow on one-carbon compounds, use methylamine as a carbon source. Non-methylotrophic microorganisms may also utilize methylamine as a nitrogen source, but little is known about their diversity, especially in the marine environment. In this proof-of-concept study, stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microorganisms from a coastal environment that assimilate nitrogen from methylamine. SIP experiments using 15 N methylamine combined with metagenomics and metaproteomics facilitated identification of active methylamine-utilizing Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria. The draft genomes of two methylamine utilizers were obtained and their metabolism with respect to methylamine was examined. Both bacteria identified in these SIP experiments used the γ-glutamyl-methylamide pathway, found in both methylotrophs and non-methylotrophs, to metabolize methylamine. The utilization of 15 N methylamine also led to the release of 15 N ammonium that was used as nitrogen source by other microorganisms not directly using methylamine. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Application of molecular techniques for the assessment of microorganism diversity on cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their unpredictable ability to adapt to varying environmental conditions, microorganisms inhabit different types of biological niches on Earth. Owing to the key role of microorganisms in many biogeochemical processes, trends in modern microbiology emphasize the need to know and understand the structure and function of complex microbial communities. This is particularly important if the strategy relates to microbial communities that cause biodeterioration of materials that constitute our cultural heritage. Until recently, the detection and identification of microorganisms inhabiting objects of cultural value was based only on cultivation-dependent methods. In spite of many advantages, these methods provide limited information because they identify only viable organisms capable of growth under standard laboratory conditions. However, in order to carry out proper conservation and renovation, it is necessary to know the complete composition of microbial communities and their activity. This paper presents and characterizes modern techniques such as genetic fingerprinting and clone library construction for the assessment of microbial diversity based on molecular biology. Molecular methods represent a favourable alternative to culture-dependent methods and make it possible to assess the biodiversity of microorganisms inhabiting technical materials and cultural heritage objects.

  16. Influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on sorption and remobilization of technetium and selenium in different aquifer materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueden, H.; Maue, G.; Stroetmann, I.; Hornemann, C.; Seichter, M.; Pekdeger, A.; Taute, T.; Winkler, A.; Lange, D.; Majerczyk, D.; Meyer, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this research project the influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on immobilisation and remobilization of Technetium and Selenium was investigated. Both radionuclides are part of the nuclear fuel waste (Tc app. 6%). Former investigations have shown, that immobilisation behaviour of both elements can be influenced by micro-organisms. The autochthonous population of micro-organisms in deep sediments and their influence on immobilisation of Tc and Se was investigated in this study. For this reason recirculation column tests were carried out. Absolutely sterile and anaerobic handling is necessary handling the sediments and waters used for the experiments. Special methods for sampling, storage and handling were developed. More than 30 sediments have been investigated. The number of colony forming units (CFU) has always been relatively low (less than E+06 CFU). The results of recirculation column tests with autochthonous micro-organisms were compared with sterilized (Co-60) parallel tests and were verified with the results of hydrochemical equilibration code PHREEQUE. Instead of the allochthonous micro-orgamisms the autochthonous organisms showed no significant fixation of the radionuclides due to microbial activity. This is true for various temperatures of 10 C (aquifer temperature) and 20 C (normal laboratory temperature). An addition of an inoculum of the autochthonous micro-organisms developed at breeding temperature of 10 and 20 C had no influence on the radionuclide mobility. Performing conventional laboratory experiments you have to consider an overestimated retardation capacity because of an inevitable contamination with allochthonous micro-organisms. (orig.) [de

  17. Screening and Isolation of Associated Bioactive Microorganisms from Fasciospongia cavernosa from of Visakhapatnam Coast, Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shamsher Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature, especially the marine environment, provides the most effective drugs used in human therapy. Among the metazoans, the marine sponges produce the most potent and highly selective bioactive secondary metabolites. These animals (or their associated symbiotic microorganisms synthesize secondary metabolites whose activity and selectivity has developed during their long evolutionary history. During the course of exploitation of these resources two marine sponges, Fasciospongia cavernosa doc var.brown (dark brown Fasciospongia cavernosa doc var.yellow (yellow collected from the visakhapatnam coast of Bay of Bengal were investigated in order to assess the potential of these microorganisms for the production of antimicrobial compounds. The aqueous and organic extracts of both the sponges showed broad spectrum antibiotic activity. In this study a total of 178 microorganisms were isolated from different parts of two sponges and most of them from middle part of the sponge. The isolates were investigated in order to assess the potential of these microorganisms for the production of antimicrobial compounds. Testing for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and 10 pathogenic organisms. Resulting mean diameter of inhibition zones revealed isolates B4 & B6 were the most potent of all the isolates. The present study has revealed the presence of high numbers of diverse culturable microorganisms associated with the marine sponges from Visakhapatnam Coast of Bay of Bengal as well as their potential to produce bioactive metabolites.

  18. Antibiotic cytotoxic effects of microorganisms isolated from Jachymov uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuska, J.; Fuskova, A.

    1982-01-01

    Microorganisms were isolated from old relinquished uranium mines in Jachymov; they had been growing for several decades in darkness in temperatures of 5 to 12 degC and relative humidity from 80 to 100%. The concentration of uranium salts in mine waters varied from 10 -4 to 10 -5 g.l -1 , that of Rn in the atmosphere was from 0.04 to 40 Bq.l -1 . Of 324 cultures, 18.8% inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Candida pseudotropicalis and 16.6% that of HeLa cells. The frequency of microorganisms inhibiting the growth of HeLa or Ehrlich ascites cells was markedly higher in this set of cultures than among microorganisms kept in culture collections or isolated from other natural habitats. About 10% of the isolated cultures were mycelia sterilia. The following antibiotics were isolated from microorganisms obtained from uranium mines: frequentin, vermiculin, vermicillin, vermistatin, cytostipin and duclauxin. (author)

  19. High throughput screening method for assessing heterogeneity of microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Sprenkels, A.J.; van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T.; Bomer, Johan G.; de Vos, W.M.; van den Berg, Albert

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to the field of microbiology. Provided is a method which is particularly powerful for High Throughput Screening (HTS) purposes. More specific a high throughput method for determining heterogeneity or interactions of microorganisms is provided.

  20. SELECTION OF MICROORGANISMS FOR FERMENTATION OF MEAT MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danylenko S. G.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Principal criteria for the selection of microorganisms with a wide range of biological and technological properties for fermentation of raw meats are considered. Attention is paid to the main groups of microorganisms such as Micrococсus, Staphylococcus, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Propionibacterium which are promising for creation of bacterial preparations. To create bacterial preparations, the basic criteria of selection for microorganisms were determined as follows: the ability of microorganisms to be developed within the specific ecological niche (raw meat materials and their influence on flavor characteristics of the final product under the conditions of intensification of production technologies of meat products. Methods used for search and retrieval of technologically promising strains from different natural sources (fresh meats, minced meats, meat, dairy and sour-milk products, vegetables, fruit, brines and mixtures for salting are considered.

  1. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  2. Marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Nam, Seung Yun; Oh, Junghwan

    2016-11-01

    The use of marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a relatively new field of research with considerable prospects. This method is eco-friendly, time saving, and inexpensive and can be easily scaled up for large-scale synthesis. The increasing need to develop simple, nontoxic, clean, and environmentally safe production methods for nanoparticles and to decrease environmental impact, minimize waste, and increase energy productivity has become important in this field. Marine microorganisms are tiny organisms that live in marine ecosystems and account for >98% of biomass of the world's ocean. Marine microorganisms synthesize metallic nanoparticles either intracellularly or extracellularly. Marine microbially-produced metallic nanoparticles have received considerable attention in recent years because of their expected impact on various applications such as medicine, energy, electronic, and space industries. The present review discusses marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and their potential applications.

  3. Effect of Microorganisms in the Bioremediation of Spent Engine Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    interaction of these factors as suitable conditions are provided (Rahman et al., ... Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Lead, Cadmium and so on from the wear and tear of the ..... microorganisms would also require essential nutrients as hydrocarbons ...

  4. Anisotropic structures of some microorganisms studied by polarization microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2014), s. 363-368 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Polarization microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  5. Diversity and adaptations of deep-sea microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.

    -tolerant enzymes, natural products of potential use in human health management and environmental bioremediation using solvent-tolerant microorganisms are some of the potential biotechnological applications of these deep-sea microbes....

  6. A device for continuous microscopic examination of aquatic microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.

    The device consists of a sealed microscopic mount provided with an inlet for liquid medium and an outlet, permitting continuous flow of the liquid. It permits observation of development of marine microorganisms such as thraustochytrids for 3 d...

  7. isolation and identification of the microorganisms most prevalent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    problems presenting in eye clinics on a daily basis. With one or two ... microorganisms most prevalent in external eye infections in Owerri urban (as seen Mercy Eye clinic). With the aid of sterile .... through personal contacts. Consequently, the.

  8. Multiorganismal insects: diversity and function of resident microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Angela E

    2015-01-07

    All insects are colonized by microorganisms on the insect exoskeleton, in the gut and hemocoel, and within insect cells. The insect microbiota is generally different from microorganisms in the external environment, including ingested food. Specifically, certain microbial taxa are favored by the conditions and resources in the insect habitat, by their tolerance of insect immunity, and by specific mechanisms for their transmission. The resident microorganisms can promote insect fitness by contributing to nutrition, especially by providing essential amino acids, B vitamins, and, for fungal partners, sterols. Some microorganisms protect their insect hosts against pathogens, parasitoids, and other parasites by synthesizing specific toxins or modifying the insect immune system. Priorities for future research include elucidation of microbial contributions to detoxification, especially of plant allelochemicals in phytophagous insects, and resistance to pathogens; as well as their role in among-insect communication; and the potential value of manipulation of the microbiota to control insect pests.

  9. Isolation and screening of microorganisms from a gari fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and screening of microorganisms from a gari fermentation process for starter culture development. Vinodh A Edward, Moutairou Egounlety, Melanie Huch, Petrus J Van Zyl, Suren Singh, Naledzani D Nesengani, Vetja M Haakuria, Charles MAP Franz ...

  10. Isolation of microorganisms for biological control the moniliophthora roreri

    OpenAIRE

    suarez contreras, liliana yanet; Rangel Riaño, Alba Luz

    2014-01-01

    Moniliophlhora roreri is the causal agent of cocoa Moniliasis, which produces losses of up to 60% of the crop, as it affects only its commercial product, the cob. Biological control appears as an alternative management, using endophytic microorganisms. The reason because of this research came up was that it was aimed to isolate microorganisms with antagonist potential for biological control towards the phytopathogen M. roreri in Norte de Santander. This is done through isolation and identifica...

  11. Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

    2014-07-29

    The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  12. Microorganisms -indicators of the level of soil pollution with lead

    OpenAIRE

    Stavreva Veselinovska, Snezana

    2011-01-01

    Environmental pollution with heavy metals present a real threat to wildlife because the metals cannot be naturally decomposed as is the case with organic pollutants, and as such they can survive in the environment while accumulating the heavy metals in different parts. Pollution with metals can affect different organisms in the environment, such as microorganisms, plants and animals, but the degree of toxicity depends on the species. Microorganisms have different mechanisms of coping with...

  13. The microorganisms as a renewable source of ecological clean fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalygo, N.V.; Mel'nikov, S.S.; Manankina, E.E.; Budakova, E.A.; Kolyago, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    Five families of microorganisms (Bacillaceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Cyanophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Euglenophyceae) as hydrogen producers were tested and the conditions that are necessary for hydrogen photoproduction were investigated. It was shown, that the most effective producers of hydrogen were Rhodobacter spheroides, Clostridium sp.; Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Addition of glucose, iron and vanadium salts resulted in the increase of hydrogen production. Polycultures consisted of two or three microorganisms were more effective hydrogen producers compared to separate monocultures. (authors)

  14. Method for treating wastewater using microorganisms and vascular aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method for treating wastewater compresses subjecting the wastewater to an anaerobic setting step for at least 6 hours and passing the liquid effluent from the anaerobic settling step through a filter cell in an upflow manner. There the effluent is subjected first to the action of anaerobic and facultative microorganisms, and then to the action of aerobic microorganisms and the roots of at least one vascular aquatic plant.

  15. Swimming of Microorganisms Viewed from String and Membrane Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Masako; Sugamoto, Akio; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    1993-01-01

    Swimming of microorganisms is studied from a viewpoint of extended objects (strings and membranes) swimming in the incompressible f luid of low Reynolds number. The flagellated motion is analyzed in two dimensional fluid, by using the method developed in the ciliated motion with the Joukowski transformation. Discussion is given on the conserved charges and the algebra which are associated with the area (volume)- preserving diffeomorphisms giving the swimming motion of microorganisms. It is al...

  16. Evolution, Metabolism and Biotechnological Usage of Methylotrophic Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophs – aerobic chemoheterotrophic microorganisms submitted by cocci and bacilli mobile forms, are inhabitants of reservoirs and soils of various type, where there are going on various processes of decomposition of organic substances with formation of the one-carbon С1-compounds and some С2-, and С3-compounds, capable to be assimilated by methylotrophs. These microorganisms assimilating carbon on ribuloso-5-monophospate and serine pathways, are allocated from soil ground, the sewage c...

  17. Bioprospection of marine microorganisms: biotechnological applications and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebe M Dionisi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental microorganisms constitute an almost inexhaustible reserve of genetic and functional diversity, accumulated during millions of years of adaptive evolution to various selective pressures. In particular, the extent of microbial biodiversity in marine habitats seems to grow larger as new techniques emerge to measure it. This has resulted in novel and more complex approaches for the screening of molecules and activities of biotechnological interest in these environments. In this review, we explore the different partially overlapping biotechnological fields that make use of microorganisms and we describe the different marine habitats that are particularly attractive for bioprospection. In addition, we review the methodological approaches currently used for microbial bioprospection, from the traditional cultivation techniques to state of the art metagenomic approaches, with emphasis in the marine environment.Bioprospección de microorganismos marinos: aplicaciones biotecnológicas y métodos. Los microorganismos ambientales constituyen una reserva prácticamente inagotable de diversidad genética, acumulada durante millones de años de evolución adaptativa a varias presiones selectivas. En particular, la magnitud de la biodiversidad microbiana en hábitats marinos parece crecer al emerger nuevas técnicas para medirla. Como resultado, se han comenzado a utilizar enfoques novedosos y más complejos para la búsqueda de moléculas y actividades de interés biotecnológico en estos ambientes. En este artículo de revisión, nosotros exploramos los diferentes campos de la biotecnología que utilizan microorganismos, los cuales se superponen parcialmente, y describimos los diferentes hábitats marinos que resultan particularmente atractivos para la bioprospección. Además, revisamos los enfoques metodológicos actualmente utilizados para la bioprospección microbiana, desde las técnicas de cultivo tradicionales hasta modernos enfoques

  18. Absence of surface-associated microorganisms in adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    OpenAIRE

    Garland, C D; Nash, G V; McMeekin, T A

    1982-01-01

    Healthy, actively feeding intertidal oysters were removed from an estuarine environment (Pipeclay Lagoon, Tasmania). The epithelial surfaces of various organs of the mantle cavity and alimentary tract were explored by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. All epithelial tissues examined were ciliated, and nearly all were partly covered with secreted mucus. However, microorganisms were seen rarely in the adhesive mucus and never attached to the epithelium. Electron microscopy also fai...

  19. In vitro degradation of linamarin by microorganisms isolated from cassava wastewater treatment lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P Vasconcellos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at isolating and characterizing of microorganisms able to use linamarin as sole carbon source. Thirty one microbial strains were isolated from manipueira, a liquid effluent of cassava processing factories. Among these strains, Bacillus licheniformis (isolate 2_2 and Rhodotorulla glutinis (isolate L1 were able to degrade 71% and 95% of added linamarin, respectively, within 7 days, showing high biodegradation activity and great potential for detoxification of cassava processing wastewaters.

  20. Deciphering the Role of Phytoalexins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jeandet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoalexins are low molecular weight antimicrobial compounds that are produced by plants as a response to biotic and abiotic stresses. As such they take part in an intricate defense system which enables plants to control invading microorganisms. In this review we present the key features of this diverse group of molecules, namely their chemical structures, biosynthesis, regulatory mechanisms, biological activities, metabolism and molecular engineering.

  1. Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingthom Chung; Stevens, S.E. Jr. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States). Dept. of Biology)

    1993-11-01

    The degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms, fungi, and helminths is reviewed. Azo dyes are used in a wide variety of products and can be found in the effluent of most sewage treatment facilities. Substantial quantities of these dyes have been deposited in the environment, particularly in streams and rivers. Azo dyes were shown to affect microbial activities and microbial population sizes in the sediments and in the water columns of aquatic habitats. Only a few aerobic bacteria have been found to reduce azo dyes under aerobic conditions, and little is known about the process. A substantial number of anaerobic bacteria capable of azo dye reduction have been reported. The enzyme responsible for azo dye reduction has been partially purified, and characterization of the enzyme is proceeding. The nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and the cestode Moniezia expanza have been reported to reduce azo dyes anaerobically. Recently the fungus Phanerochaete chrysoporium was reported to mineralize azo dyes via a peroxidation-mediated pathway. A possible degradation pathway for the mineralization of azo dye is proposed and future research needs are discussed.

  2. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms for biomass conversion: status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kataeva, Irina; Westpheling, Janet; Adams, Michael Ww; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-06-01

    Many microorganisms that grow at elevated temperatures are able to utilize a variety of carbohydrates pertinent to the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioenergy. The range of substrates utilized depends on growth temperature optimum and biotope. Hyperthermophilic marine archaea (T(opt)>or=80 degrees C) utilize alpha- and beta-linked glucans, such as starch, barley glucan, laminarin, and chitin, while hyperthermophilic marine bacteria (T(opt)>or=80 degrees C) utilize the same glucans as well as hemicellulose, such as xylans and mannans. However, none of these organisms are able to efficiently utilize crystalline cellulose. Among the thermophiles, this ability is limited to a few terrestrial bacteria with upper temperature limits for growth near 75 degrees C. Deconstruction of crystalline cellulose by these extreme thermophiles is achieved by 'free' primary cellulases, which are distinct from those typically associated with large multi-enzyme complexes known as cellulosomes. These primary cellulases also differ from the endoglucanases (referred to here as 'secondary cellulases') reported from marine hyperthermophiles that show only weak activity toward cellulose. Many extremely thermophilic enzymes implicated in the deconstruction of lignocellulose can be identified in genome sequences, and many more promising biocatalysts probably remain annotated as 'hypothetical proteins'. Characterization of these enzymes will require intensive effort but is likely to generate new opportunities for the use of renewable resources as biofuels.

  3. The Genome-Scale Integrated Networks in Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Hao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The genome-scale cellular network has become a necessary tool in the systematic analysis of microbes. In a cell, there are several layers (i.e., types of the molecular networks, for example, genome-scale metabolic network (GMN, transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, and signal transduction network (STN. It has been realized that the limitation and inaccuracy of the prediction exist just using only a single-layer network. Therefore, the integrated network constructed based on the networks of the three types attracts more interests. The function of a biological process in living cells is usually performed by the interaction of biological components. Therefore, it is necessary to integrate and analyze all the related components at the systems level for the comprehensively and correctly realizing the physiological function in living organisms. In this review, we discussed three representative genome-scale cellular networks: GMN, TRN, and STN, representing different levels (i.e., metabolism, gene regulation, and cellular signaling of a cell’s activities. Furthermore, we discussed the integration of the networks of the three types. With more understanding on the complexity of microbial cells, the development of integrated network has become an inevitable trend in analyzing genome-scale cellular networks of microorganisms.

  4. Characteristics of radiocesium concentration by mushrooms and microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Hideo; Terada, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Chikako; Shibata, Hisashi; Maeda, Yoko; Kato, Fumio

    2000-01-01

    The 137 Cs values in cultured edible fruiting bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus (Fr.) Kummer Y-1 (P. ostreatus) were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those in the wild mushrooms. The concentration ratio (CR, 137 Cs or Cs concentration in the dried cultured fruiting bodies or mycelia/ 137 Cs or Cs concentration in the fresh medium) suggested that 137 Cs in the medium actively migrated into the mushroom. The 137 Cs and stable Cs uptake by the cultured fruiting bodies of P. ostreatus were affected by the presence of K the same as the mycelia. Streptomyces lividans TK24 (S.lividans) and Streptomyces sp. TOHO-2 (Streptomyces sp.), one of the soil microorganisms, grown in the presence of Cs showed high accumulation of Cs in the mycelia. Elementary analysis of P. ostreatus and S. lividans were performed using a scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer. The ratio of Cs in the stationary phase to that in the proliferation phase at the mycelial root of P. ostreatus formed in the early stage was about five times that at the mycelial tip. S. lividans and Streptomyces sp. grown on the YM agar plate containing CsCl showed white spots locating at a similar intervals. Concentrations of Cs, P, O and Mg in the white spots were higher than those in other regions. (author)

  5. [Correlation analysis of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Luo, Shi-qiong; Yang, Zhan-nan; Ma, Jing; Hong, Liang

    2015-04-01

    The relationship of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata were investigated by measuring nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, concentrations of microbe phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils, and determining concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata. The research is aimed to understand characteristics of the planting soils and improve the quality of cultivated H. cordata. The soils at different sample sites varied greatly in nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, microbic PLFAs and polyphenols and all flavonoids. The content of total PLFAs in sample sites was following: bacteria > fungi > actinomyces > nematode. The content of bacteria PLFAs was 37.5%-65.0% at different sample sites. Activities of polyphenol oxidease, concentrations of available P and content of PLFAs of bacteria, actinomyces and total microorganisms in soils were significantly and positively related to the concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P soils was significantly and negatively related to concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P soil nutrient, which may be improved due to transformation of soil microorganisms and enzymes to N and P in the soils, was beneficial to adaptation of H. cordata adapted to different soil conditions, and significantly affects metabolic accumulation of polyphenols and flavonoids of H. cordata.

  6. Radiosensitivity of microorganisms isolated from radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, Lajos

    2001-01-01

    Bacteria are much more diverse in comparison with plants and animals. Among the huge diversity of bacteria there are microorganisms capable to grow at or adapt to extreme conditions. Some bacteria grow at temperature above 100 deg. C, other thrive in high salinity such as 20-30% NaCl, still others can live at pH lower than 2 or pH higher than 10 or exhibit high radioresistance. Due to accelerated disarmament and nuclear energy activities, large quantities of radioactive waste and nuclear fuel are being placed in storage areas. The awareness the microbial activity could potentially effect the performance of a system for geological disposal of radioactive waste gained acceptance in the early to middle 1980s, and as a result many countries considering developing programmes to study and quantify microbial effects in terms of their own particular disposal concept. A new research programme was launched in 1995, sponsored by the NATO Scientific Affairs Division, for studying microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in radioactive waste repositories and spent fuel storage area. Our programme concerns several major items that may have an influence on the mobility of radionuclides in direct and indirect ways thereby being important for the safety analysis. They are uptake and transport of radionuclides by microorganisms, diversity and distribution of subterranean bacteria in typical repository environments, environmental limitation and bacterial activity, effect of bacterial activity on the mobility of radionuclides, microbial gas production and consumption, bacterial recombination of hydrogen and oxygen from radiolysis, and microbially induced corrosion of waste canister. The Permian Boda Claystone Formation in the Mecsek Hill area is being considered for high level waste disposal. Groundwater, technical water, rock and surface samples were collected aseptically from different depths. The quantitative and qualitative analysis of aerobic and anaerobe isolates were

  7. Nutrition quality test of fermented waste vegetables by bioactivator local microorganisms (MOL) and effective microorganism (EM4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirwandono, E.; Sitepu, M.; Wahyuni, T. H.; Hasnudi; Ginting, N.; Siregar, G. AW; Sembiring, I.

    2018-02-01

    Livestock feed mostly used waste which has low nutrition content and one way to improve feed content by fermentation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bioactifator types on fermented vegetables waste for animal feed.The research was conducted in Nutrition and Animal Feed Laboratory, Universitas Sumatera Utara from May until July 2016. The research was factorial completely randomized design of 3 x 3 with 3 replications. Factor I were bioactivator types which were control, local bioactivator and EM4 (Effective Microorganisms 4). Factor II were time of incubation 3, 5 and 7 days. Parameters were moisture content, ash, Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE) and Total Digestible Nutrient (TDN). The results showed that bioactivator types either local activator or EM4 has highly significantly different effect (P<0,01) on water content, NFE and TDN on vegetables waste while there was no different between local bioactifator with EM4 on all parameters. Time of incubation 7 days has highly significantly different effect (P<0,01) on NFE, TDN and significant different (P<0,05) on water content and ash. In conclusion local bioactifators could improve animal feed by fermenting vegetables waste and it is more available for livestockers.

  8. Reductive Dehalogenation of Brominated Phenolic Compounds by Microorganisms Associated with the Marine Sponge Aplysina aerophoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Fennell, Donna E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Hentschel, Ute; Häggblom, Max M.

    2003-01-01

    Marine sponges are natural sources of brominated organic compounds, including bromoindoles, bromophenols, and bromopyrroles, that may comprise up to 12% of the sponge dry weight. Aplysina aerophoba sponges harbor large numbers of bacteria that can amount to 40% of the biomass of the animal. We postulated that there might be mechanisms for microbially mediated degradation of these halogenated chemicals within the sponges. The capability of anaerobic microorganisms associated with the marine sponge to transform haloaromatic compounds was tested under different electron-accepting conditions (i.e., denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic). We observed dehalogenation activity of sponge-associated microorganisms with various haloaromatics. 2-Bromo-, 3-bromo-, 4-bromo-, 2,6-dibromo-, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoate were reductively debrominated under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions with no activity observed in the presence of nitrate. Monochlorinated phenols were not transformed over a period of 1 year. Debromination of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 2,6-dibromophenol to 2-bromophenol was more rapid than the debromination of the monobrominated phenols. Ampicillin and chloramphenicol inhibited activity, suggesting that dehalogenation was mediated by bacteria. Characterization of the debrominating methanogenic consortia by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that different 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) phylotypes were enriched on the different halogenated substrates. Sponge-associated microorganisms enriched on organobromine compounds had distinct 16S rDNA TRFLP patterns and were most closely related to the δ subgroup of the proteobacteria. The presence of homologous reductive dehalogenase gene motifs in the sponge-associated microorganisms suggested that reductive dehalogenation might be coupled to dehalorespiration. PMID:12839794

  9. Compost supplementation with nutrients and microorganisms in composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Óscar J; Ospina, Diego A; Montoya, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The composting is an aerobic, microorganism-mediated, solid-state fermentation process by which different organic materials are transformed into more stable compounds. The product obtained is the compost, which contributes to the improvement of physical, chemical and microbiological properties of the soil. However, the compost usage in agriculture is constrained because of its long-time action and reduced supply of nutrients to the crops. To enhance the content of nutrients assimilable by the plants in the compost, its supplementation with nutrients and inoculation with microorganisms have been proposed. The objective of this work was to review the state of the art on compost supplementation with nutrients and the role played by the microorganisms involved (or added) in their transformation during the composting process. The phases of composting are briefly compiled and different strategies for supplementation are analyzed. The utilization of nitrogenous materials and addition of microorganisms fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere or oxidizing ammonia into more assimilable for plants nitrogenous forms are analyzed. Several strategies for nitrogen conservation during composting are presented as well. The supplementation with phosphorus and utilization of microorganisms solubilizing phosphorus and potassium are also discussed. Main groups of microorganisms relevant during the composting process are described as well as most important strategies to identify them. In general, the development of this type of nutrient-enriched bio-inputs requires research and development not only in the supplementation of compost itself, but also in the isolation and identification of microorganisms and genes allowing the degradation and conversion of nitrogenous substances and materials containing potassium and phosphorus present in the feedstocks undergoing the composting process. In this sense, most important research trends and strategies to increase nutrient content in the compost

  10. Cultivation of shear stress sensitive microorganisms in disposable bag reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Patrick; Takenberg, Meike; Hartwig, Steffen; Beutel, Sascha; Berger, Ralf G; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-09-20

    Technical scale (≥5l) cultivations of shear stress sensitive microorganisms are often difficult to perform, as common bioreactors are usually designed to maximize the oxygen input into the culture medium. This is achieved by mechanical stirrers, causing high shear stress. Examples for shear stress sensitive microorganisms, for which no specific cultivation systems exist, are many anaerobic bacteria and fungi, such as basidiomycetes. In this work a disposable bag bioreactor developed for cultivation of mammalian cells was investigated to evaluate its potential to cultivate shear stress sensitive anaerobic Eubacterium ramulus and shear stress sensitive basidiomycetes Flammulina velutipes and Pleurotus sapidus. All cultivations were compared with conventional stainless steel stirred tank reactors (STR) cultivations. Good growth of all investigated microorganisms cultivated in the bag reactor was found. E. ramulus showed growth rates of μ=0.56 h⁻¹ (bag) and μ=0.53 h⁻¹ (STR). Differences concerning morphology, enzymatic activities and growth in fungal cultivations were observed. In the bag reactor growth in form of small, independent pellets was observed while STR cultivations showed intense aggregation. F. velutipes reached higher biomass concentrations (21.2 g l⁻¹ DCW vs. 16.8 g l⁻¹ DCW) and up to 2-fold higher peptidolytic activities in comparison to cell cultivation in stirred tank reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of aflatoxin B1, zearalenone and ochratoxin A by microorganisms isolated from Kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheur, Fadia Ben; Fedhila, Kais; Chaieb, Kamel; Kouidhi, Bochra; Bakhrouf, Amina; Abrunhosa, Luís

    2017-06-19

    A strategy to reduce the deleterious effects of mycotoxins is to use dietary supplements that contain microorganisms that bind mycotoxins and decrease their gastrointestinal absorption. Novel strains were isolated from a Kefir culture and assessed for their mycotoxin adsorption and biotransformation ability. The most active strains were identified using DNA sequencing, and the stability of microorganism/mycotoxin complexes was evaluated using buffer solutions to simulate the pH conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Our results showed that the microorganism consortium of Kefir grains adsorbed 82 to 100% of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZEA) and ochratoxin A (OTA) when cultivated in milk. The main strains that were capable of mycotoxin adsorption were identified as Lactobacillus kefiri, Kazachstania servazzii and Acetobacter syzygii. The strain L. kefiri KFLM3 was the most active, adsorbing 80 to 100% of the studied mycotoxins when cultivated in milk. Nonetheless, the strain K. servazzii KFGY7 retained more mycotoxin after the desorption experiments (65, 69 and 67% for AFB1, OTA and ZEA, respectively). These findings suggest that Kefir consumption may help to reduce gastrointestinal absorption of these mycotoxins and consequently reduce their toxic effects. The isolated strains may be of interest for the development of fermented dairy products for human consumption that have a new probiotic characteristic, the adsorption of mycotoxins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of anaerobiosis on indigenous microorganisms in blackwater with fish offal as co-substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdottir, Ragnhildur; Heiske, Stefan; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    resistant bacteria were reduced in the anaerobic samples in the beginning of the study but increased towards the end of it. The opposite pattern was observed in the aerobic samples, with a growth in the beginning followed by a reduction. During the anaerobic digestion tetracycline resistant bacteria showed......The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mesophilic anaerobic digestion with aerobic storage on the survival of selected indigenous microorganisms and microbial groups in blackwater, including the effect of addition of Greenlandic Halibut and shrimp offal. The methane yield...... of the different substrate mixtures was determined in batch experiments to study possible correlation between methanogenic activity in the anaerobic digesters and reduction of indigenous microorganisms in the blackwater. By the end of the experiments a recovery study was conducted to determine possible injury...

  13. [Leaching of nonferrous metals from copper-smelting slag with acidophilic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murav'ev, M I; Fomchenko, N V

    2013-01-01

    The leaching process of copper and zinc from copper converter slag with sulphuric solutions of trivalent iron sulphate obtained using the association of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms was investigated. The best parameters of chemical leaching (temperature 70 degrees C, an initial concentration of trivalent iron in the leaching solution of 10.1 g/L, and a solid-phase content in the suspension of 10%) were selected. Carrying out the process under these parameters resulted in the recovery of 89.4% of copper and 39.3% of zinc in the solution. The possibility of the bioregeneration of trivalent iron in the solution obtained after the chemical leaching of slag by iron-oxidizingacidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms without inhibiting their activity was demonstrated.

  14. [Relationships between air conditioning, airborne microorganisms and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, S; Perdrix, A; Baconnier, P

    1999-01-01

    Concurrently with the increase of air-conditioning, potentially severe or frequent new diseases have emerged, giving rise to social and economical consequences. The first part of this work is a state of the art review of the relationships between air-conditioning, airborne microorganisms and health, through a technical, metrological and medical approach. The second part presents four studies performed in this field. Two of them deal with the relationship between airborne microorganisms and technical features of air-conditioning. Measurements performed on actual sites demonstrated the benefit of using high efficiency filters and low risk components in air-conditioning systems. The third study was aimed to look for a relationship between airborne microorganisms and sick building syndrome symptoms. Statistical analyses of individual data revealed significant associations between airborne bacteria or fungi and symptoms. These results may be the first step in determining a dose-response relationship, in order to define threshold limit values in this field. In the fourth study, the contribution of particle counting in assessing exposure to airborne microorganisms was explored by monitoring simultaneous variations of microbial and particle concentrations. The results showed that associating particle counting may allow to detect microbial variations instantaneously, and therefore improve the assessment of exposure to airborne microorganisms.

  15. Role of Microorganisms in the Removal of Radionuclides from Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashandy, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to radio nuclides and their accumulation by bacteria is a wide spread phenomenon that can be explored for the improvement of the environment. Metal resistant bacteria have developed very efficient and varying mechanisms for tolerating high levels of. toxic metals and thus hold potential for controlling heavy metal pollution. This property has been successfully applied for metal removal from soil. A total of 59 microorganisms were isolated from 5 locations in Sinai Desert. The microorganisms were examined for resistance to strontium, cobalt and cesium by spot technique on two kinds of media containing metals, Nutrient agar and King B agar. The resistant microorganisms were identified morphologically by Gram stain. The microorganisms were resistant to Sr and Cs at concentrations up to 200 mg/I and while Co proved to be toxic at a concentration of 100 mg/ I. The mechanisms of metal resistance to high concentrations were studied. Evidence show that the isolated microorganisms can uptake high concentrations of the studied elements. The results also, indicated that no binding proteins are released in the environment of the studied isolate

  16. Cybernetic modeling of adaptive prediction of environmental changes by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandli, Aravinda R; Modak, Jayant M

    2014-02-01

    Microorganisms exhibit varied regulatory strategies such as direct regulation, symmetric anticipatory regulation, asymmetric anticipatory regulation, etc. Current mathematical modeling frameworks for the growth of microorganisms either do not incorporate regulation or assume that the microorganisms utilize the direct regulation strategy. In the present study, we extend the cybernetic modeling framework to account for asymmetric anticipatory regulation strategy. The extended model accurately captures various experimental observations. We use the developed model to explore the fitness advantage provided by the asymmetric anticipatory regulation strategy and observe that the optimal extent of asymmetric regulation depends on the selective pressure that the microorganisms experience. We also explore the importance of timing the response in anticipatory regulation and find that there is an optimal time, dependent on the extent of asymmetric regulation, at which microorganisms should respond anticipatorily to maximize their fitness. We then discuss the advantages offered by the cybernetic modeling framework over other modeling frameworks in modeling the asymmetric anticipatory regulation strategy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effects of plutonium on soil microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    As a first phase in an investigation of the role of the soil microflora in Pu complex formation and solubilization in soil, the effects of Pu concentration, form, and specific activity on microbial types, colony-forming units, and CO 2 evolution rate were determined in soils amended with C and N sources to optimize microbial activity. The effects of Pu differed with organism type and incubation time. After 30 days of incubation, aerobic sporeforming and anaerobic bacteria were significantly affected by soil Pu levels as low as 1 μg/g when Pu was added as the hydrolyzable 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 (solubility, 2 evolution rate and total accumulated CO 2 were affected by Pu only at the 180 μg/g level. Because of the possible role of resistant organisms in complex formation, the mechanisms of effects of Pu on the soil fungi were further evaluated. The effect of Pu on soil fungal colony-forming units was a function of Pu-solubility in soil and Pu specific activity. When Pu was added in a soluble, complexed from [ 238 Pu 2 (diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) 3 ], effects occurred at Pu levels of 1 μg/g and persisted for at least 95 days. Toxicity was due primarily to radiation effects rather than to chemical effects, suggesting that, at least in the case of the fungi, formation of Pu complexes would result primarily from ligands associated with normal (in contrast to chemically-induced) biochemical pathways

  18. The environmental impact of mine wastes - roles of microorganisms and their significance in treatment of mine wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledin, M.; Pedersen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Mine wastes constitute a potential source of contamination to the environment, as heavy metals and acid are released in large amounts. A great variety of microorganisms has been found in mine wastes and microbiological processes are usually responsible for the environmental hazard created by mine wastes. However, microorganisms can also be used to retard the adverse impact of mine wastes on the environment. Conventionally, the mine drainage as well as the waste itself can be treated with alkali to increase pH and precipitate metals. The main drawback of this method is that it has to be continuously repeated to be fully effective. There may also be negative effects on beneficial microorganisms. Several other treatment methods have been developed to stop weathering processes thereby reducing the environmental impact of mine wastes. The other main approach is to treat the drainage water. Various methods aim at using microorganisms for this in natural or engineered systems. Recently, much interest has been focused on the use of natural or artificial wetlands for treatment. In general, the activity of microorganisms is neglected in the design of mine waste treatment systems, and the treatments are created merely from a technical point of view. This can result in situations where unexpected microbial processes take over, and, in the worst scenario, the overall effect is opposite to the desired

  19. Microbial genome-enabled insights into plant-microorganism interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, David S; McHardy, Alice C; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Advances in genome-based studies on plant-associated microorganisms have transformed our understanding of many plant pathogens and are beginning to greatly widen our knowledge of plant interactions with mutualistic and commensal microorganisms. Pathogenomics has revealed how pathogenic microorganisms adapt to particular hosts, subvert innate immune responses and change host range, as well as how new pathogen species emerge. Similarly, culture-independent community profiling methods, coupled with metagenomic and metatranscriptomic studies, have provided the first insights into the emerging field of research on plant-associated microbial communities. Together, these approaches have the potential to bridge the gap between plant microbial ecology and plant pathology, which have traditionally been two distinct research fields.

  20. Removal of triazine herbicides from freshwater systems using photosynthetic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Barreiro, O.; Rioboo, C.; Herrero, C.; Cid, A.

    2006-01-01

    The uptake of the triazine herbicides, atrazine and terbutryn, was determined for two freshwater photosynthetic microorganisms, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. An extremely rapid uptake of both pesticides was recorded, although uptake rate was lower for the cyanobacterium, mainly for atrazine. Other parameters related to the herbicide bioconcentration capacity of these microorganisms were also studied. Growth rate, biomass, and cell viability in cultures containing herbicide were clearly affected by herbicide uptake. Herbicide toxicity and microalgae sensitivity were used to determine the effectiveness of the bioconcentration process and the stability of herbicide removal. C. vulgaris showed higher bioconcentration capability for these two triazine herbicides than S. elongatus, especially with regard to terbutryn. This study supports the usefulness of such microorganisms, as a bioremediation technique in freshwater systems polluted with triazine herbicides

  1. Removal of triazine herbicides from freshwater systems using photosynthetic microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Barreiro, O. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Rioboo, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Herrero, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, A. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: cid@udc.es

    2006-11-15

    The uptake of the triazine herbicides, atrazine and terbutryn, was determined for two freshwater photosynthetic microorganisms, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. An extremely rapid uptake of both pesticides was recorded, although uptake rate was lower for the cyanobacterium, mainly for atrazine. Other parameters related to the herbicide bioconcentration capacity of these microorganisms were also studied. Growth rate, biomass, and cell viability in cultures containing herbicide were clearly affected by herbicide uptake. Herbicide toxicity and microalgae sensitivity were used to determine the effectiveness of the bioconcentration process and the stability of herbicide removal. C. vulgaris showed higher bioconcentration capability for these two triazine herbicides than S. elongatus, especially with regard to terbutryn. This study supports the usefulness of such microorganisms, as a bioremediation technique in freshwater systems polluted with triazine herbicides.

  2. Screening of cloud microorganisms isolated at the Puy de Dôme (France) station for the production of biosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Pascal; Canet, Isabelle; Sancelme, Martine; Wirgot, Nolwenn; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    A total of 480 microorganisms collected from 39 clouds sampled at the Puy de Dôme station (alt. 1465 m; 45°46'19'' N, 2°57'52'' E; Massif Central, France) were isolated and identified. This unique collection was screened for biosurfactant (surfactants of microbial origin) production by measuring the surface tension (σ) of the crude extracts, comprising the supernatants of the pure cultures, using the pendant drop technique. The results showed that 41 % of the tested strains were active producers (σ biosurfactant producers (σ biosurfactant production (45biosurfactants. We observed some correlations between the chemical composition of cloud water and the presence of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, suggesting the "biogeography" of this production. Moreover, the potential impact of the production of biosurfactants by cloud microorganisms on atmospheric processes is discussed.

  3. A stochastic model simulating the capture of pathogenic micro-organisms by superparamagnetic particles in an isodynamic magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotariu, O; Strachan, N J C; Badescu, V

    2004-01-01

    The method of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) has become an established technique to concentrate and separate animal cells, biologically active compounds and pathogenic micro-organisms from clinical, food and environmental matrices. One drawback of this technique is that the analysis is only possible for small sample volumes. We have developed a stochastic model that involves numerical simulations to optimize the process of concentration of pathogenic micro-organisms onto superparamagnetic carrier particles (SCPs) in a gradient magnetic field. Within the range of the system parameters varied in the simulations, optimal conditions favour larger particles with higher magnetite concentrations. The dependence on magnetic field intensity and gradient together with concentration of particles and micro-organisms was found to be less important for larger SCPs but these parameters can influence the values of the collision time for small particles. These results will be useful in aiding the design of apparatus for immunomagnetic separation from large volume samples

  4. Identification of beer spoilage microorganisms using the MALDI Biotyper platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth; Weiland, Florian; Meneses, Jon; Sterenberg, Nick; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Beer spoilage microorganisms present a major risk for the brewing industry and can lead to cost-intensive recall of contaminated products and damage to brand reputation. The applicability of molecular profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in combination with Biotyper software was investigated for the identification of beer spoilage microorganisms from routine brewery quality control samples. Reference mass spectrum profiles for three of the most common bacterial beer spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus lindneri, Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), four commercially available brewing yeast strains (top- and bottom-fermenting) and Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis wild yeast were established, incorporated into the Biotyper reference library and validated by successful identification after inoculation into beer. Each bacterial species could be accurately identified and distinguished from one another and from over 5600 other microorganisms present in the Biotyper database. In addition, wild yeast contaminations were rapidly detected and distinguished from top- and bottom-fermenting brewing strains. The applicability and integration of mass spectrometry profiling using the Biotyper platform into existing brewery quality assurance practices within industry were assessed by analysing routine microbiology control samples from a local brewery, where contaminating microorganisms could be reliably identified. Brewery-isolated microorganisms not present in the Biotyper database were further analysed for identification using LC-MS/MS methods. This renders the Biotyper platform a promising candidate for biological quality control testing within the brewing industry as a more rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective technology that can be tailored for the detection of brewery-specific spoilage organisms from the local environment.

  5. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on motile microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeder, D.P.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of slightly increased UV-B radiation was studied in four taxonomically very different microorganisms: the gliding prokaryotic cyanobacterium, Phormidium, the unicellular green alga Cosmarium, the flagellate Euglena and the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. UV-B doses which can be expected as a result of a slight decrease of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere, do not kill or damage the microorganisms visibly. However, such UV-B doses impair the development, motility and photoorientation of these organisms. Due to the inhibition of these physiological important parameters the organisms cannot respond adequately to the changing factors in their environment, which prevents the survival of the populations. (orig.) [de

  6. Stethoscopes as potential intrahospital carriers of pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Murguía, Alejandro; León-Lara, Ximena; Muñoz, Juan M; Macías, Alejandro E; Alvarez, José A

    2014-01-01

    Stethoscopes can take part in the transmission of health care-associated infections. We cultured 112 stethoscopes by direct imprint on blood agar to estimate the prevalence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Forty-eight (47%) produced 50 potentially pathogenic microorganisms; from these, 43 (86%) were Staphylococcus aureus, of which 18 (42%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We concluded that stethoscopes should be considered as potential fomites and must be disinfected routinely before and after each patient contact. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Collective Motion of Micro-organisms from Field Theoretical Viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Kawamura, Masako; Sugamoto, Akio

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the collective motion of micro-organisms in the fluid and consider the problem of the red tide. The red tide is produced by the condensation of the micro-organisms, which might be a similar phenomenon to the condensation of the strings. We propose a model of the generation of the red tide. By considering the interaction between the micro- organisms mediated by the velocity fields in the fluid, we derive the Van der Waals type equation of state, where the generation of the red tide ...

  8. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms and their polymer-hidrolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Carolina M.M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms are found as normal inhabitants of continental and submarine volcanic areas, geothermally heated sea-sediments and hydrothermal vents and thus are considered extremophiles. Several present or potential applications of extremophilic enzymes are reviewed, especially polymer-hydrolysing enzymes, such as amylolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. The purpose of this review is to present the range of morphological and metabolic features among those microorganisms growing from 70oC to 100°C and to indicate potential opportunities for useful applications derived from these features.

  9. 2.3. Global-scale atmospheric dispersion of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Hoose, C.; Smith, D.J.; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This chapter addresses long-range dispersion and the survival of microorganisms across a wide range of altitudes in Earth's atmosphere. Topics include mechanisms of dispersion, survivability of microorganisms known to be associated with long-range transport, natural and artificial sources of bioaerosols, residence time estimation through the use of proxy aerosols, transport and emission models, and monitoring assays (both culture and molecular based). We conclude with a discussion of the known limits for Earth's biosphere boundary, relating aerobiology studies to planetary exploration given the large degree of overlapping requirements for in situ studies (including low biomass life detection and contamination control).

  10. Susceptibility of cariogenic microorganisms to phytoconstituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. S. Ferreira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the phytochemicals thymol, linalool, and citronellol against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus oralis. Disk diffusion screening on solid medium and measurement of the diameter of the bacterial growth inhibition halos was the technique utilized. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the substances was determined using serial substance dilutions and microdilution technique in Brain Heart Infusion culture medium. After incubation for 24 hours in an oven at 37 °C, plate reading was completed and confirmed by visual method using 2,3,5 triphenyl tetrazolium chloride dye. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC was determined from MIC subcultures. Assays were performed in triplicate, and chlorhexidine was used as a positive control. The diameters in mm of the growth inhibition halos ranged between 7.3 and 10.7 for S. mutans, 7.3 and 10.0 for S. oralis, and 8.2 and 9.8 for S. salivarius. The MIC and MBC values obtained converged, ranging from maximum values in the presence of Linalool (1,250.0 mg/mL, 2,500.0 mg/mL and 2,500.0 mg/mL, respectively, for S. mutans, S. oralis, and S. salivarius; and minimum values with Thymol (312.5 μg/ml, 156.2 μg/mL and 156.2 μg/ml, respectively for S. mutans, S. oralis, and S. salivarius. All the tested phytochemicals displayed antibacterial activity, thus representing substances with potential applications in preventing tooth decay.

  11. Effects of a phosphinothricin based herbicide on selected groups of soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampulha, M E; Ferreira, M A S S; Oliveira, A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium on soil microbial populations and activity were observed in a laboratory microcosms over a 40 day period. Culturable aerobic bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes, the fundamental groups of heterotrophic microorganisms, were studied. Nitrifiers, considered a very sensitive group to these compounds were also evaluated. Since herbicides have been found to inhibit decomposition of cellulose in the soil, the effects of glufosinate on cellulolytic bacteria and fungi were determined. Dehydrogenase activity as a measure of microbial activity was another parameter considered. Both stimulating and inhibitory effects on microbial populations were observed, depending on concentration of the herbicide and the period of incubation. A severe inhibiting effect of glufosinate on dehydrogenase activity was found. We concluded that the widespread use of this herbicide may have possible injurious effects on soil microorganisms and their activities. The toxicity exerted by glufosinate may lead to a shift in microbial community structure tending toward a significant loss in functional diversity. Dehydrogenase activity was shown to be an important indicator of glufosinate side-effects.

  12. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods to Investigate the Predominant Microorganisms Associated with Wet Processed Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomin; Dong, Honghong; Yang, Pan; Yang, Ruijuan; Lu, Jun; Lv, Jie; Sheng, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fermentation process of Yunnan arabica coffee is a typical wet fermentation. Its excellent quality is closely related to microbes in the process of fermentation. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the microorganisms in the wet method of coffee processing in Yunnan Province, China. Microbial community structure and dominant bacterial species were evaluated by traditional cultivated separation method and PCR-DGGE technology, and were further analyzed in combination with the changes of organic acid content, activity of pectinase, and physical parameters (pH and temperature). A large number of microorganisms which can produce pectinase were found. Among them, Enterobacter cowanii, Pantoea agglomerans, Enterobacteriaceae bacterium, and Rahnella aquatilis were the predominant gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus cereus was the predominant gram-positive bacterium, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Pichia fermentans were the predominant yeasts, and all those are pectinase-producing microorganisms. As for the contents of organic acids, oxalic was the highest, followed by acetic and lactic acids. Butyrate and propionate, which were unfavorable during the fermentation period, were barely discovered.

  13. Impact on Human Health of Microorganisms Present in Fermented Dairy Products: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented dairy products provide nutrients in our diet, some of which are produced by the action of microorganisms during fermentation. These products can be populated by a diverse microbiota that impacts the organoleptic and physicochemical characteristics foods as well as human health. Acidification is carried out by starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB whereas other LAB, moulds, and yeasts become dominant during ripening and contribute to the development of aroma and texture in dairy products. Probiotics are generally part of the nonstarter microbiota, and their use has been extended in recent years. Fermented dairy products can contain beneficial compounds, which are produced by the metabolic activity of their microbiota (vitamins, conjugated linoleic acid, bioactive peptides, and gamma-aminobutyric acid, among others. Some microorganisms can also release toxic compounds, the most notorious being biogenic amines and aflatoxins. Though generally considered safe, fermented dairy products can be contaminated by pathogens. If proliferation occurs during manufacture or storage, they can cause sporadic cases or outbreaks of disease. This paper provides an overview on the current state of different aspects of the research on microorganisms present in dairy products in the light of their positive or negative impact on human health.

  14. Seeking key microorganisms for enhancing methane production in anaerobic digestion of waste sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nurul Asyifah; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping; Sharuddin, Siti Suhailah; Ramli, Norhayati; Shirai, Yoshihito; Maeda, Toshinari

    2018-04-25

    Efficient approaches for the utilization of waste sewage sludge have been widely studied. One of them is to use it for the bioenergy production, specifically methane gas which is well-known to be driven by complex bacterial interactions during the anaerobic digestion process. Therefore, it is important to understand not only microorganisms for producing methane but also those for controlling or regulating the process. In this study, azithromycin analogs belonging to macrolide, ketolide, and lincosamide groups were applied to investigate the mechanisms and dynamics of bacterial community in waste sewage sludge for methane production. The stages of anaerobic digestion process were evaluated by measuring the production of intermediate substrates, such as protease activity, organic acids, the quantification of bacteria and archaea, and its community dynamics. All azithromycin analogs used in this study achieved a high methane production compared to the control sample without any antibiotic due to the efficient hydrolysis process and the presence of important fermentative bacteria and archaea responsible in the methanogenesis stage. The key microorganisms contributing to the methane production may be Clostridia, Cladilinea, Planctomycetes, and Alphaproteobacteria as an accelerator whereas Nitrosomonadaceae and Nitrospiraceae may be suppressors for methane production. In conclusion, the utilization of antibiotic analogs of macrolide, ketolide, and lincosamide groups has a promising ability in finding the essential microorganisms and improving the methane production using waste sewage sludge.

  15. OPTICAL AND DIELECTRIC SENSORS BASED ON ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES FOR MICROORGANISMS DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ramos Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are natural compounds isolated from a wide variety of organisms that include microorganisms, insects, amphibians, plants and humans. These biomolecules are considered as part of the innate immune system and are known as natural antibiotics, presenting a broad spectrum of activities against bacteria, fungi and/or viruses. Technological innovations have enabled AMPs to be utilized for the development of novel biodetection devices. Advances in nanotechnology, such as the synthesis of nanocomposites, nanoparticles, and nanotubes have permitted the development of nanostructured platforms with biocompatibility and greater surface areas for the immobilization of biocomponents, arising as additional tools for obtaining more efficient biosensors. Diverse AMPs have been used as biological recognition elements for obtaining biosensors with more specificity and lower detection limits, whose analytical response can be evaluated through electrochemical impedance and fluorescence spectroscopies. AMP-based biosensors have shown potential for applications such as supplementary tools for conventional diagnosis methods of microorganisms. In this review, conventional methods for microorganism diagnosis as well new strategies using AMPs for the development of impedimetric and fluorescent biosensors are highlighted. AMP-based biosensors show promise as methods for diagnosing infections and bacterial contaminations as well as applications in quality control for clinical analyses and microbiological laboratories.

  16. STABILITY IN REAL TIME OF SOME CRYOPRESERVED MICROBIAL STRAINS WITH REFERENCE TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA VINTILĂ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the viability of microorganisms from Collection of Industrial Microorganisms from Faculty of Animal Science and Biotechnology – Timisoara, during freezing and thawing as part of cryopreservation technique. The stability in real time of 19 strains cryopreserved in 16% glycerol was evaluated during a 6-months period. The strains studied were: Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rhizobium meliloti, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride, Bacillus globigii, Bacillus licheniformis, and 9 strains of Bacillus subtilis. The strains cryopreserved at -20oC and -70oC were activated using the fast thawing protocol. A better cell recovery was achieved with the -70oC protocol reaching an average viability for E. coli of 86,3%, comparing with 78,6% in -20oC protocol. The cell recovery percentages for the other strains were: 92,4% for L. acidophilus, 93,9% for A.niger, 89% for A. oryzae, 86,7% for T. viride, 94,2% for R. meliloti, 82,1% for S. cerevisiae, 89,9% for B. licheniformis. Regarding the viability of genetically modified microorganisms, the values shows a good recovering after freezing and thawing, even after 180 days of cryopreservation. With the -20oC protocol lower viability was observed due probably to the formation of eutectic mixtures and recrystalization processes.

  17. The presence of biofilm forming microorganisms on hydrotherapy equipment and facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarząb, Natalia; Walczak, Maciej

    2017-10-01

    Hydrotherapy equipment provides a perfect environment for the formation and growth of microbial biofilms. Biofilms may reduce the microbiological cleanliness of hydrotherapy equipment and harbour opportunistic pathogens and pathogenic bacteria. The aims of this study were to investigate the ability of microorganisms that colonize hydrotherapy equipment to form biofilms, and to assess the influence of temperature and nutrients on the rate of biofilm formation. Surface swab samples were collected from the whirlpool baths, inhalation equipment and submerged surfaces of a brine pool at the spa center in Ciechocinek, Poland. We isolated and identified microorganisms from the swab samples and measured their ability to form biofilms. Biofilm formation was observed at a range of temperatures, in both nutrient-deficient and nutrient-rich environments. We isolated and identified microorganisms which are known to form biofilms on medical devices (e.g. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia). All isolates were classified as opportunistic pathogens, which can cause infections in humans with weakened immunity systems. All isolates showed the ability to form biofilms in the laboratory conditions. The potential for biofilm formation was higher in the presence of added nutrients. In addition, the hydrolytic activity of the biofilm was connected with the presence of nutrients.

  18. Impact on human health of microorganisms present in fermented dairy products: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María; Hudson, John Andrew; Korpela, Riitta; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G

    2015-01-01

    Fermented dairy products provide nutrients in our diet, some of which are produced by the action of microorganisms during fermentation. These products can be populated by a diverse microbiota that impacts the organoleptic and physicochemical characteristics foods as well as human health. Acidification is carried out by starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB) whereas other LAB, moulds, and yeasts become dominant during ripening and contribute to the development of aroma and texture in dairy products. Probiotics are generally part of the nonstarter microbiota, and their use has been extended in recent years. Fermented dairy products can contain beneficial compounds, which are produced by the metabolic activity of their microbiota (vitamins, conjugated linoleic acid, bioactive peptides, and gamma-aminobutyric acid, among others). Some microorganisms can also release toxic compounds, the most notorious being biogenic amines and aflatoxins. Though generally considered safe, fermented dairy products can be contaminated by pathogens. If proliferation occurs during manufacture or storage, they can cause sporadic cases or outbreaks of disease. This paper provides an overview on the current state of different aspects of the research on microorganisms present in dairy products in the light of their positive or negative impact on human health.

  19. Oil uptake by plant-based sorbents and its biodegradation by their naturally associated microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, Narjes; Ali, Nedaa; Khanafer, Majida; Radwan, Samir S.

    2017-01-01

    The plant waste-products, wheat straw, corn-cobs and sugarcane bagasse took up respectively, 190, 110 and 250% of their own weights crude oil. The same materials harbored respectively, 3.6 × 10 5 , 8.5 × 10 3 and 2.3 × 10 6  g −1  cells of hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, as determined by a culture-dependent method. The molecular, culture-independent analysis revealed that the three materials were associated with microbial communities comprising genera known for their hydrocarbonoclastic activity. In bench-scale experiments, inoculating oily media with samples of the individual waste products led to the biodegradation of 34.0–44.9% of the available oil after 8 months. Also plant-product samples, which had been used as oil sorbents lost 24.3–47.7% of their oil via their associated microorganisms, when kept moist for 8 months. In this way, it is easy to see that those waste products are capable of remediating spilled oil physically, and that their associated microbial communities can degrade it biologically. - Highlights: • Wheat straw, corn-cobs and sugarcane bagasse take up large amounts of oil. • The three materials harbor hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms. • Inoculating oily liquid media with the three materials separately led to biodegradation of oil. - Plant-based oil sorbents harbor microorganisms with hydrocarbon-utilization potential which makes such natural materials valuable tools for bioremediation of oil spilled in the environment.

  20. The Ecology of Acidophilic Microorganisms in the Corroding Concrete Sewer Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete corrosion is one of the most significant problems affecting valuable sewer infrastructure on a global scale. This problem occurs in the aerobic zone of the sewer, where a layer of surface corrosion develops on the exposed concrete and the surface pH is typically lowered from around 11–10 (pristine concrete to pH 2–4. Acidophilic microorganisms become established as biofilms within the concrete corrosion layer and enhance the loss of concrete mass. Until recently, the acidophilic community was considered to comprise relatively few species of microorganisms, however, the biodiversity of the corrosion community is now recognized as being extensive and varying from different sewer environmental conditions. The diversity of acidophiles in the corrosion communities includes chemolithoautotrophs, chemolithoheterotrophs, and chemoorganoheterotrophs. The activity of these microorganisms is strongly affected by H2S levels in the sewer gas phase, although CO2, organic matter, and iron in the corrosion layer influence this acidic ecosystem. This paper briefly presents the conditions within the sewer that lead to the development of concrete corrosion in that environment. The review focuses on the acidophilic microorganisms detected in sewer corrosion environments, and then summarizes their proposed functions and physiology, especially in relation to the corrosion process. To our knowledge, this is the first review of acidophilic corrosion microbial communities, in which, the ecology and the environmental conditions (when available are considered. Ecological studies of sewer corrosion are limited, however, where possible, we summarize the important metabolic functions of the different acidophilic species detected in sewer concrete corrosion layers. It is evident that microbial functions in the acidic sewer corrosion environment can be linked to those occurring in the analogous acidic environments of acid mine drainage and bioleaching.

  1. Micro-organisms and divers exposure to radioactivity in spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz de A, D. [Underwater Construction Corporation, Latin America, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Silva, R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gomes N, C. A., E-mail: dmuniz@uccdive.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia, Environmental Engineering Program, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-09-15

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world are in the process of extending their lifespan from 40 to 60 years of operation. The NPP; Angra 1 (Brazil) has performed a thorough evaluation of its Life Extension Engineering project. In this context, the spent fuel pool (SFP) was one of the areas studied in order to demonstrate the plants integrity for a life extension. Micro-organisms growing on the liner of the fuel transfer channel (Ftc) and SFP can form a film of bacteria, which is highly resistant to radiation. This paper aims to compare the micro-organisms found in NPP Angra 1 with those reported to other NPPs and also relates their occurrence with the radiation levels at the sites. It also compares divers exposure to radioactivity during underwater activities in the SFP. Fourteen samples were collected on the surface of the liners of the Ftc, the SFP and the drains within the fuel building (FB) of Angra 1. For the identification of the micro-organisms, a metagenomics analysis was performed by random sequencing (Shotgun) and the use of Ion Torrent PGM Sequence r. Twelve micro-organisms phyla were identified; Acido-bacteria, Actino-bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyano-bacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Proteo-bacteria, and Verrucomicrobia as well as organisms not classified. In the SFP of Angra 1, the bacteria survived the exposure to a radiation of 0.416 Gy/h (high radiation). Deinococcus-thermus, bacteria identified in Angra 1, has resisted an exposure to 30,000 Gy/h in another plant. (Author)

  2. Micro-organisms and divers exposure to radioactivity in spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz de A, D.; Silva, R.; Gomes N, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world are in the process of extending their lifespan from 40 to 60 years of operation. The NPP; Angra 1 (Brazil) has performed a thorough evaluation of its Life Extension Engineering project. In this context, the spent fuel pool (SFP) was one of the areas studied in order to demonstrate the plants integrity for a life extension. Micro-organisms growing on the liner of the fuel transfer channel (Ftc) and SFP can form a film of bacteria, which is highly resistant to radiation. This paper aims to compare the micro-organisms found in NPP Angra 1 with those reported to other NPPs and also relates their occurrence with the radiation levels at the sites. It also compares divers exposure to radioactivity during underwater activities in the SFP. Fourteen samples were collected on the surface of the liners of the Ftc, the SFP and the drains within the fuel building (FB) of Angra 1. For the identification of the micro-organisms, a metagenomics analysis was performed by random sequencing (Shotgun) and the use of Ion Torrent PGM Sequence r. Twelve micro-organisms phyla were identified; Acido-bacteria, Actino-bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyano-bacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Proteo-bacteria, and Verrucomicrobia as well as organisms not classified. In the SFP of Angra 1, the bacteria survived the exposure to a radiation of 0.416 Gy/h (high radiation). Deinococcus-thermus, bacteria identified in Angra 1, has resisted an exposure to 30,000 Gy/h in another plant. (Author)

  3. Soil microorganisms determine the sorption of radionuclides within organic soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Potter, E.D.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of soil microorganisms to enhance the retention of 137 Cs and 85 Sr in organic systems was assessed in a series of experiments. A biologically active, 'mineral-free', organic material, produced under laboratory conditions from leaves, was used as the uptake matrix in all experiments to minimise potential interference from competing clay minerals. Biological uptake and release were differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing the sorption of radionuclides in sterilised organic material with sterile material inoculated with soil extracts or single fungal strains. Our results show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material. The presence of soil microorganisms significantly enhanced the retention of Cs in organic systems and ∼70% of the Cs spike was strongly (irreversibly) bound (remained non-extractable) in the presence of microorganisms compared to only ∼10% in abiotic systems. Sorption of 85 Sr was not significantly influenced by the presence of soil microorganisms. A non-linear temperature response was observed for the retention in biotic systems with increased uptake at between 10 and 30 deg. C and lower retention at temperatures above or below the optimum range. The optimum temperatures for biological uptake were between 15 and 20 deg. C for Cs, and 25 and 30 deg. C for Sr. Our results indicate that single strains of soil and saprotrophic fungi make an important contribution to the sorption of Cs and Sr in organic systems, but can only account for part of the strong, irreversible binding observed in biotic systems. Single strains of soil fungi increased the amount of non-extractable 137 Cs (by ∼30%) and 85 Sr (by ∼20%) in the organic systems as compared to abiotic systems, but the major fraction of 137 Cs and 85 Sr sorbed in systems inoculated with saprotrophic fungi remained extractable

  4. Marine Enzymes and Microorganisms for Bioethanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M R; Natarajan, V; Krishnan, C

    Bioethanol is a potential alternative fuel to fossil fuels. Bioethanol as a fuel has several economic and environmental benefits. Though bioethanol is produced using starch and sugarcane juice, these materials are in conflict with food availability. To avoid food-fuel conflict, the second-generation bioethanol production by utilizing nonfood lignocellulosic materials has been extensively investigated. However, due to the complexity of lignocellulose architecture, the process is complicated and not economically competitive. The cultivation of lignocellulosic energy crops indirectly affects the food supplies by extensive land use. Marine algae have attracted attention to replace the lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol production, since the algae grow fast, do not use land, avoid food-fuel conflict and have several varieties to suit the cultivation environment. The composition of algae is not as complex as lignocellulose due to the absence of lignin, which renders easy hydrolysis of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars. Marine organisms also produce cold-active enzymes for hydrolysis of starch, cellulose, and algal polysaccharides, which can be employed in bioethanol process. Marine microoorganisms are also capable of fermenting sugars under high salt environment. Therefore, marine biocatalysts are promising for development of efficient processes for bioethanol production. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1993-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site

  6. Influence of microorganisms on swelling behavior of smectites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viefhaus, Hanna; Schanz, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Considerable interaction of smectitic clay minerals and water leads to the pronounced seal effect needed for barrier materials in the toxic and nuclear waste storage. Nano-structural processes on the molecular level cause macroscopic material properties such as fluid/ion permeability and volume change/swelling pressure development, that are taken into account when characterizing the barrier material. In situ behavior results from a combination of specific influence factors (e.g. electrolyte concentration, temperature, pH-value) due to the great dependence on the environmental conditions of clay water interaction. Considering this aspect, the origin of change in chemical and physical variables become relevant. Particularly in terms of naturally existing and rapid changing factors such as microbial activity. Due to the biodiversity of microorganisms and their individual diversity of metabolism processes, many species have been studied with respect to the influence on the different soil properties. In this study, the effects created by microbial biocenose have been the object of investigation. This corresponds to natural conditions rather than the isolated species. The present study concerns the swelling behavior of smectitic clay with respect to the influence of induced microbial accumulation. Two types of smectites were studied, Calcigel (Ca 2+ -ions embedded between the silicate layers) and MX80 (Na + -ions embedded). A natural silt was mixed at a ratio of 70:30 for the dry mass with smectites, this provided an amount of microbial portfolio. Using the mixtures, samples were created (20 mm height, 70 mm diameter) with two types of water contents. They exhibited the same dry densities of 1.495 g/cm 3 (Calcigel) and 1.386 g/cm 3 (MX80). Water adsorption was permitted through the contact of the sample with the liquid phase and also unhindered volume change in one dimension. The addition of nutrients to the liquid phase

  7. Microorganisms applying for artificial soil regeneration technology in space greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivobok, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    The space greenhouse and technology for growing plants are being designed in frame of bio-technical life support systems development. During long-term space missions such greenhouse could provide the crew with vitamins and rough plant fiber. One of the important elements of the plant cultivation technology in the absence of earth gravity is organization and support the optimum root area. The capillary-porous substrate composed of anionites (FIBAN -1) and cationites (FIBAN -22-1) synthetic salt-saturated fibers is developed for plant cultivation in space and named "BIONA-V3". The BIONA main features are high productivity and usability. But the pointed features are not constant: the substrate productivity will be decreasing gradually from vegetation to vegetation course of plant residues and root secretions accumulation. Also, the basic hydro-physical characteristic of root zone will be shifted. Furthermore, saprotrophic microflora will develop and lead to increasing the level of microbial contamination of whole inhabit isolated module. Due to these changes the substrate useful life is limited and store mass is increased in long-term missions. For overhaul-period renewal it' necessary to remove the roots residues and other organic accumulation providing safety of the substrate capillary-porous structure. The basic components of 24-days old plant roots (Brassica chinensis, L) are cellulose (35 %) hemicellulose (11 %) and lignin (10 %). We see that one of the possible ways for roots residues removal from fibrous BIONA is microorganisms applying with strong cellulolytic and ligninolytic activities. The fungi Trichoderma sp., cellulolytic bacteria associations, and some genus of anaerobic thermophilic cellulolitic bacteria have been used for roots residues biodegradation. In case of applying cellulolytic fungi Trichoderma sp. considerable decrease of microcrystalline cellulose has been noted in both liquid and solid state fermentation. Cellulolytic fungi weight has been

  8. Levels of Organic Compounds, Number of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Małgorzata; Słomka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbiological, biochemical and physiological aspects of phytoremediation of soil and water environments polluted to different degrees with heavy metals has very important theoretical and practical implications. In this study, a comparison was made between total cadmium concentration in root and shoot tissues as well as concentrations of particular fractions of Cd immobilized by roots of Festuca ovina (Sheep’s fescue) hydroponically cultivated in nutrient solutions supplemented with 1 μg Cd ml(–1) and those cultivated at 10 μg Cd ml(–1). After three weeks of F. ovina cultivation, the number of bacterial CFU and the amounts of organic chelators, siderophores, proteins and reducing sugars in the growth medium and on the root surface were higher at 10 than at 1 μg Cd ml(–1). The grass also reacted to the high Cd concentration by a decrease in plant growth and dehydrogenase activity in root tissues. The concentration of Cd determined in fractions bound with different strength in roots was significantly dependent on Cd concentration in the growth medium. When the plants were grown at 1 μg Cd ml(–1), 9% of the immobilized cadmium was loosely bound to the root surface, 20% was exchangeable adsorbed, and 28% was bound by chelation; at 10 μg Cd ml(–1), the respective values were 12%, 25%, and 20%. About 43% of the immobilized cadmium remained in roots after sequential extraction, and bioaccumulation factors in shoots had the same values independently of Cd concentration. At both Cd concentrations, the cadmium translocation index for F. ovina was low (< 1), which is why this grass can be recommended for phytostabilization of the metal under study.

  9. Characterisation of microorganisms responsible for EBPR in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that micro-organisms were selected by the repeated anaerobic-aerobic process and some non-phosphorus accumulating organisms were eliminated. The cultured strains obtained from acclimated sludges were purified and their DNA was amplified using F27 and R1522 to 1.5 kb; the gene sequences ...

  10. Characterization of the dominant microorganisms responsible for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nsiho (white kenkey) is a type of kenkey, a sour stiff dumpling, produced from fermented maize meal in Ghana. The dominant microorganisms responsible for the fermentation of nsiho were characterized by analysing samples from four traditional production sites at Anum in the Eastern Region of Ghana. During 48 h of ...

  11. Method and apparatus for detecting micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsky, J.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the presence and quantity of microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi and yeast, in a given sample. The apparatus includes two sealed containers, a portion of which may be penetrated by a sharp instrument, as for example, glass vials with flexible septum tops. One container includes a radioactive nutrient medium which is capable of supporting the life process of the microorganism whose presence is being tested. The second container includes a liquid scintillation solution which absorbs the product of metabolism of the organisms. The sample is introduced into the first sealed container, for example, by means of a standard syringe. Any microorganisms present will consume the radioactive nutrient and as a result produce radioactive waste. Means are then applied to penetrate the containers and allow the flow of the radioactive metabolic product from the first container to the second container while preventing any contamination from the ambient. The liquid scintillation solution will emit light in proportion to the amount of the product of metabolism collected from the first container. This light may be detected by standard liquid scintillation counters, thus providing a qualitative and quantitative measure of the microorganism in the tested sample

  12. Antibiotic cytotoxic effects of microorganisms isolated from Jachymov uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuska, J.; Fuskova, A. (Slovenska Vysoka Skola Technicka, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Chemickotechnologicka Fakulta); Jilek, R. (Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-01-01

    Microorganisms were isolated from old relinquished uranium mines in Jachymov; they had been growing for several decades in darkness in temperatures of 5 to 12 degC and relative humidity from 80 to 100%. The concentration of uranium salts in mine waters varied from 10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -5/ g.l/sup -1/, that of Rn in the atmosphere was from 0.04 to 40 Bq.l/sup -1/. Of 324 cultures, 18.8% inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Candida pseudotropicalis and 16.6% that of HeLa cells. The frequency of microorganisms inhibiting the growth of HeLa or Ehrlich ascites cells was markedly higher in this set of cultures than among microorganisms kept in culture collections or isolated from other natural habitats. About 10% of the isolated cultures were mycelia sterilia. The following antibiotics were isolated from microorganisms obtained from uranium mines: frequentin, vermiculin, vermicillin, vermistatin, cytostipin and duclauxin.

  13. Biological characterisation of Haliclona (?gellius) sp.: sponge and associated microorganisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Holmes, B.; Nichols, S.A.; Blanch, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    We have characterised the northern Pacific undescribed sponge Haliclona (?gellius) sp. based on rDNA of the sponge and its associated microorganisms. The sponge is closely related to Amphimedon queenslandica from the Great Barrier Reef as the near-complete 18S rDNA sequences of both sponges were

  14. Susceptibility of some oral microorganisms to chlorhexidine and paramonochlorophenol

    OpenAIRE

    Amorim,Crystiane Venditi Gomes do; Aun,Carlos Eduardo; Mayer,Marcia Pinto Alves

    2004-01-01

    Since the use of antimicrobial agents is required in endodontic therapies, this study aimed at determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of chlorhexidine digluconate and paramonochlorophenol (PMC) against microorganisms commonly found in endodontic infections. Both agents were tested by agar dilution tests against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromon...

  15. Production of gaba (γ - aminobutyric acid by microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  16. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  17. Prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the incidence of pathogenic microorganisms associated with dental caries and antimicrobial susceptibility test of some common dentifrice sold in Kano metropolis. A total of 50 samples were used in this study. The samples were taken using swab from human oral mucosa. The swabs ...

  18. Microorganisms from hands of traditional Chinese medical doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In a central hospital, the heavy clinical workload makes one to overlook its hazard to health and can to a large extent promote the transmission of pathogenic microorganisms. It is not uncommon however, to observe practices that deviate from normal standards of hygiene. Hand contact between doctors of TCM ...

  19. [Ants as carriers of microorganisms in hospital environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rogério Dos Santos; Ueno, Mariko

    2008-01-01

    Concern exists regarding the real possibility of public health threats caused by pathogenic agents that are carried by urban ants. The present study had the objective of isolating and identifying the microorganisms that are associated with ants in hospital environments. One hundred and twenty-five ants of the same species were collected from different units of a university hospital. Each ant was collected using a swab soaked with physiological solution and was transferred to a tube containing brain heart infusion broth and incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 hours. From each tube, with growth, inoculations were made into specific culturing media, to isolate any microorganisms. The ants presented a high capacity for carrying microorganism groups: spore-producing Gram-positive bacilli 63.5%, Gram-negative bacilli 6.3%, Gram-positive cocci 23.1%, filamentous fungi 6.7% and yeast 0.5%. Thus, it can be inferred that ants may be one of the agents responsible for disseminating microorganisms in hospital environments.

  20. Is arsenic biotransformation a detoxification mechanism for microorganisms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Hassler, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is extremely toxic to living organisms at high concentration. In aquatic systems, As exists in different chemical forms. The two major inorganic As (iAs) species are As V , which is thermodynamically stable in oxic waters, and As III , which is predominant in anoxic conditions. Photosynthetic microorganisms (e.g., phytoplankton and cyanobacteria) take up As V , biotransform it to As III , then biomethylate it to methylarsenic (MetAs) forms. Although As III is more toxic than As V , As III is much more easily excreted from the cells than As V . Therefore, majority of researchers consider the reduction of As V to As III as a detoxification process. The biomethylation process results in the conversion of toxic iAs to the less toxic pentavalent MetAs forms (monomethylarsonate; MMA V , dimethylarsonate; DMA V , and trimethylarsenic oxide; TMAO V ) and trimethylarsine (TMAO III ). However, biomethylation by microorganisms also produces monomethylarsenite (MMA III ) and dimethylarsenite (DMA III ), which are more toxic than iAs, as a result of biomethylation by the microorganisms, demonstrates the need to reconsider to what extent As biomethylation contributes to a detoxification process. In this review, we focused on the discussion of whether the biotransformation of As species in microorganisms is really a detoxification process with recent data

  1. Effect of effective microorganisms on broiler chicken performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted between January and March 2001 to assess the effects of Effective Microorganisms (EM) as feed additive in broiler chicken production on growth performance. The experiment involved 210 day-old broiler chicks which were randomly allocated to 14 pens of 15 birds each. There were seven ...

  2. Plant Growth-Promoting Microorganisms for Environmental Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, P C; Dubey, Rama Kant; Tripathi, Vishal; Gupta, Vijai K; Singh, Harikesh B

    2016-11-01

    Agrochemicals used to meet the needs of a rapidly growing human population can deteriorate the quality of ecosystems and are not affordable to farmers in low-resource environments. Here, we propose the use of plant growth-promoting microorganisms (PGPMs) as a tool for sustainable food production without compromising ecosystems services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Some estimates of the continuous cultivation of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Alekseev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteins, fats and carbohydrates received by the person traditionally from animal and vegetable sources don't cover all increasing needs of mankind any more today. At the same time proteins and fats of microorganisms with success can replace proteins and fats of a traditional origin. As protein producers microorganisms at the high content of protein in biomass and high growth rate of microorganisms have certain advantages. The present article is devoted to questions of numerical modeling of processes of cultivation of microorganisms. On the basis of the known model offered Mono in which saturation of growth rate of culture at increase in initial concentration of a substratum of S0 is considered the system of the differential equations describing the happening processes in that number before achievement of stationarity is written down. At the same time dependence of separate sizes, the systems entering the equations is insufficiently studied at change of parameters of process. The behavior of all system at violation of regulations is of interest or at unauthorized change of one of parameters. For studying of these questions numerical modeling is carried out and the basic picture of change of chemostate curves in these conditions is received

  4. General Purpose Segmentation for Microorganisms in Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sebastian H. Nesgaard; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Rankl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for achieving generalized segmentation of microorganisms in mi- croscopy images. It employs a pixel-wise classification strategy based on local features. Multilayer percep- trons are utilized for classification of the local features and is trained for each sp...

  5. Is arsenic biotransformation a detoxification mechanism for microorganisms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M. Azizur, E-mail: Mohammad.Rahman@uts.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Sustainability, School of the Environment, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Hassler, Christel [Marine and Lake Biogeochemistry, Institute F. A. Forel, University of Geneva, 10 rte de Suisse, Versoix, 1290 Switzerland (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    Arsenic (As) is extremely toxic to living organisms at high concentration. In aquatic systems, As exists in different chemical forms. The two major inorganic As (iAs) species are As{sup V}, which is thermodynamically stable in oxic waters, and As{sup III}, which is predominant in anoxic conditions. Photosynthetic microorganisms (e.g., phytoplankton and cyanobacteria) take up As{sup V}, biotransform it to As{sup III}, then biomethylate it to methylarsenic (MetAs) forms. Although As{sup III} is more toxic than As{sup V}, As{sup III} is much more easily excreted from the cells than As{sup V}. Therefore, majority of researchers consider the reduction of As{sup V} to As{sup III} as a detoxification process. The biomethylation process results in the conversion of toxic iAs to the less toxic pentavalent MetAs forms (monomethylarsonate; MMA{sup V}, dimethylarsonate; DMA{sup V}, and trimethylarsenic oxide; TMAO{sup V}) and trimethylarsine (TMAO{sup III}). However, biomethylation by microorganisms also produces monomethylarsenite (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsenite (DMA{sup III}), which are more toxic than iAs, as a result of biomethylation by the microorganisms, demonstrates the need to reconsider to what extent As biomethylation contributes to a detoxification process. In this review, we focused on the discussion of whether the biotransformation of As species in microorganisms is really a detoxification process with recent data.

  6. Isolation and identification of the microorganisms most prevalent in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infections of the external eye account for a significant percentage of ocular inflammations, some of which lead to visual losses as result of corneal involvement. This study purely isolated and identified the microorganisms most prevalent in external eye infections in Owerri urban (as seen Mercy Eye clinic). With the aid of ...

  7. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean deposits of Northern Karelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, M. M.; Hoover, R. B.; Rozanov, A. Y.; Vrevskiy, A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. The presence of various microorganisms of bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) is suggested. The necessity of employing methods of electron microscopy, as well as traditional methods, while studying the very early manifestations of life in Archaean and Early Proterozoic is noted.

  8. Fossil Microorganisms and Formation of Early Precambrian Weathering Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, A. Yu; Astafieva, M. M.; Vrevsky, A. B.; Alfimova, N. A.; Matrenichev, V. A.; Hoover, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Weathering crusts are the only reliable evidences of the existence of continental conditions. Often they are the only source of information about exogenous processes and subsequently about conditions under which the development of the biosphere occurred. A complex of diverse fossil microorganisms was discovered as a result of Scanning Electron Microscope investigations. The chemical composition of the discovered fossils is identical to that of the host rocks and is represented by Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg. Probably, the microorganisms fixed in rocks played the role of catalyst. The decomposition of minerals comprising the rocks and their transformation into clayey (argillaceous) minerals, most likely occurred under the influence of microorganisms. And may be unique weathering crusts of Early Precambrian were formed due to interaction between specific composition of microorganism assemblage and conditions of hypergene transformations. So it is possible to speak about colonization of land by microbes already at that time and about existence of single raw from weathering crusts (Primitive soils) to real soils.

  9. Engineering of microorganisms towards recovery of rare metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Div. of Applied Life Sciences

    2010-06-15

    The bioadsorption of metal ions using microorganisms is an attractive technology for the recovery of rare metal ions as well as removal of toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. In initial attempts, microorganisms with the ability to accumulate metal ions were isolated from nature and intracellular accumulation was enhanced by the overproduction of metal-binding proteins in the cytoplasm. As an alternative, the cell surface design of microorganisms by cell surface engineering is an emerging strategy for bioadsorption and recovery of metal ions. Cell surface engineering was firstly applied to the construction of a bioadsorbent to adsorb heavy metal ions for bioremediation. Cell surface adsorption of metal ions is rapid and reversible. Therefore, adsorbed metal ions can be easily recovered without cell breakage, and the bioadsorbent can be reused or regenerated. These advantages are suitable for the recovery of rare metal ions. Actually, the cell surface display of a molybdate-binding protein on yeast led to the enhanced adsorption of molybdate, one of the rare metal ions. An additional advantage is that the cell surface display system allows high-throughput screening of protein/peptide libraries owing to the direct evaluation of the displayed protein/peptide without purification and concentration. Therefore, the creation of novel metal-binding protein/ peptide and engineering of microorganisms towards the recovery of rare metal ions could be simultaneously achieved. (orig.)

  10. Rate of biodegradation of crude oil by microorganisms isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate of biodegradation of crude oil by micro-organisms isolated from crude oil sludge environment in Eket, Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria was studied. Mineral salt medium supplemented with crude oil was used and three most abundant species isolated from a crude oil sludged soil - Micrococcus varians, Bacillus subtilis ...

  11. [Long-term storage of obligate anaerobic microorganisms in glycerol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briukhanov, A I; Netrusov, A I

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the possibility of storing the cultures of obligate anaerobic microorganisms (clostridia. acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogenic archaea) in 25% glycerol at -70 degrees C for a long time (up to 3 years). This method of storage is adequate to preserve cell viability in most obligate anaerobes.

  12. Mitigating cyanobacterial blooms: how effective are 'effective microorganisms'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Tolman, Y.; Euwe, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 'Effective Microorganisms (EM)' on the growth of cyanobacteria, and their ability to terminate cyanobacterial blooms. The EM was tested in the form of 'mudballs' or 'Bokashi-balls', and as a suspension (EM-A) in laboratory experiments. No growth inhibition was

  13. Production of effective microorganism using halal- based sources: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... Key words: Component, effective microorganisms (EM), agriculture, halal-based source. INTRODUCTION. In recent years, with focus on feeding a rapidly growing human population, Malaysia has jeopardized the environ- ment and its natural resources, which are already under great stress. Consequently ...

  14. Colonization of compacted backfill materials by microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, L.M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Miller, S.H.; Hamon, C.J.; Dixon, D.A

    1997-11-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the occurrence of pore clogging in backfill by bacterial activity. Four differently prepared and treated backfill materials were used to determine the effects of the quality and preparation method of the backfill materials on the occurrence of pore clogging. The backfills were compacted in permeameters which were infused with either groundwater or sterile distilled water. A constant pressure was applied to increase the rate of saturation. Results showed different inflow rates for the four materials despite the use of the same packing method for each specimen, the same dry density for each backfill and indications of similar initial pore volumes. These differences were likely caused by the fact that the two slowest-flowing permeameters contained a mixture of Na-bentonite and illitic shale simulating a glacial lake clay. Hydraulic conductivities measured ranged from 5 x 10{sup -11} m/s to 5 x 10{sup -12} m/s for the backfills containing glacial lake clay and 4 x 10{sup -12} m/s to 9 s 10{sup -13} m/s for the backfills containing a mixture of Na-bentonite and illitic shale. Weekly samples of outflow from the permeameters were analyzed microbially. Aerobic heterotrophs were low initially but stabilized around 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} colony forming units (CFU)/mL after about one week. Anaerobic heterotrophs stabilized at around 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} CFU/mL. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were measured by the most probable number (MPN) method. Results showed low initial numbers but they stabilized around 10{sup 4} MPN/mL after one to two months. No significant numbers of aerobic or anaerobic sulphur oxidizing bacteria were found. Enumeration of methanogens indicated that they were generally present in the permeameters that contained non-autoclaved backfill. Results are partially inconclusive because of the lack of confirmation of methane gas present in the headspace of part of the MPN culture tubes. Microbial pore clogging

  15. Colonization of compacted backfill materials by microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, L.M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Miller, S.H.; Hamon, C.J.; Dixon, D.A.

    1997-11-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the occurrence of pore clogging in backfill by bacterial activity. Four differently prepared and treated backfill materials were used to determine the effects of the quality and preparation method of the backfill materials on the occurrence of pore clogging. The backfills were compacted in permeameters which were infused with either groundwater or sterile distilled water. A constant pressure was applied to increase the rate of saturation. Results showed different inflow rates for the four materials despite the use of the same packing method for each specimen, the same dry density for each backfill and indications of similar initial pore volumes. These differences were likely caused by the fact that the two slowest-flowing permeameters contained a mixture of Na-bentonite and illitic shale simulating a glacial lake clay. Hydraulic conductivities measured ranged from 5 x 10 -11 m/s to 5 x 10 -12 m/s for the backfills containing glacial lake clay and 4 x 10 -12 m/s to 9 s 10 -13 m/s for the backfills containing a mixture of Na-bentonite and illitic shale. Weekly samples of outflow from the permeameters were analyzed microbially. Aerobic heterotrophs were low initially but stabilized around 10 6 to 10 7 colony forming units (CFU)/mL after about one week. Anaerobic heterotrophs stabilized at around 10 2 to 10 3 CFU/mL. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were measured by the most probable number (MPN) method. Results showed low initial numbers but they stabilized around 10 4 MPN/mL after one to two months. No significant numbers of aerobic or anaerobic sulphur oxidizing bacteria were found. Enumeration of methanogens indicated that they were generally present in the permeameters that contained non-autoclaved backfill. Results are partially inconclusive because of the lack of confirmation of methane gas present in the headspace of part of the MPN culture tubes. Microbial pore clogging was not evident for the two fastest

  16. Search for and characterization of microorganisms in deep geological compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsotti, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the scientific community has shown a growing interest for deep geological compartments. However, these ecosystems remain largely unknown due to their inaccessibility. The aim of the present thesis was double; the first aim was to characterize, from a microbiological perspective, four terrestrial Triassic sedimentary formations located between 1700 and 2000 m depth in the Parisian Basin and collected by the ANDRA during a deep drilling campaign in 2008, and the second aim was to study the combined effects of temperature, pressure and salinity on the metabolic activity of anaerobic prokaryotes in order to predict their reaction to geological burial. Incubations in a large variety of media were carried out in order to stimulate the growth of the main trophic types found in such environments such as methanogens, fermenters and bacteria reducing sulphur compounds, however, no viable and cultivable microorganisms could be isolated. In parallel, a molecular approach was used to i) compare the efficacy of several DNA extractions methods and ii) analyse the bacterial diversity, using DGGE (Denaturing Gel Gradient Electrophoresis) and cloning, present in rock inner cores conserved either at atmospheric pressure or under pressure, in their initial states and following incubations in various media. The genetic exploration of these samples revealed a very low biomass and a poor diversity composed mainly of aerobic and mesophilic members of the Bacteria domain, a priori unadapted to such a deep, hot, saline and anoxic environment. This unexpected microbial community also found in many subsurface ecosystems as well as in extreme ecosystems could have partially originated from a paleo-recharge of the Trias aquifer with cold waters coming from the melting of ice formed during the last Pleistocene glaciation. The second objective was to study the combined effects of temperature (40, 55 and 70 C), pressure (1, 90 and 180 bars) and salinity (13, 50, 110, 180

  17. Antimicrobial effects of silver zeolite, silver zirconium phosphate silicate and silver zirconium phosphate against oral microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sirikamon Saengmee-anupharb; Toemsak Srikhirin; Boonyanit Thaweboon; Sroisiri Thaweboon; Taweechai Amornsakchai; Surachai Dechkunakorn; Theeralaksna Suddhasthira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of silver inorganic materials, including silver zeolite (AgZ), silver zirconium phosphate silicate (AgZrPSi) and silver zirconium phosphate (AgZrP), against oral microorganisms. In line with this objective, the morphology and structure of each type of silver based powders were also investigated. Methods: The antimicrobial activities of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP were tested against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, Candidaalbicans and Staphylococcus aureus using disk diffusion assay as a screening test. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum lethal concentration (MLC) were determined using the modified membrane method. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the morphology and structure of these silver materials. Results: All forms of silver inorganic materials could inhibit the growth of all test microorganisms. The MIC of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP was 10.0 g/L whereas MLC ranged between 10.0-60.0 g/L. In terms of morphology and structure, AgZrPSi and AgZrP had smaller sized particles (1.5-3.0 µm) and more uniformly shaped than AgZ. Conclusions: Silver inorganic materials in the form of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP had antimicrobial effects against all test oral microorganisms and those activities may be influenced by the crystal structure of carriers. These results suggest that these silver materials may be useful metals applied to oral hygiene products to provide antimicrobial activity against oral infection.

  18. Modelling the Ozone-Based Treatments for Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Joanna Brodowska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of a model for ozone treatment in a dynamic bed of different microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. pumilus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aspergillus niger, Eupenicillium cinnamopurpureum on a heterogeneous matrix (juniper berries, cardamom seeds initially treated with numerous ozone doses during various contact times was studied. Taking into account various microorganism susceptibility to ozone, it was of great importance to develop a sufficiently effective ozone dose to preserve food products using different strains based on the microbial model. For this purpose, we have chosen the Weibull model to describe the survival curves of different microorganisms. Based on the results of microorganism survival modelling after ozone treatment and considering the least susceptible strains to ozone, we selected the critical ones. Among tested strains, those from genus Bacillus were recognized as the most critical strains. In particular, B. subtilis and B. pumilus possessed the highest resistance to ozone treatment because the time needed to achieve the lowest level of its survival was the longest (up to 17.04 min and 16.89 min for B. pumilus reduction on juniper berry and cardamom seed matrix, respectively. Ozone treatment allow inactivate microorganisms to achieving lower survival rates by ozone dose (20.0 g O3/m3 O2, with a flow rate of 0.4 L/min and contact time (up to 20 min. The results demonstrated that a linear correlation between parameters p and k in Weibull distribution, providing an opportunity to calculate a fitted equation of the process.

  19. Potential applications of plant probiotic microorganisms in agriculture and forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Porto de Souza Vandenberghe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture producers, pushed by the need for high productivity, have stimulated the intensive use of pesticides and fertilizers. Unfortunately, negative effects on water, soil, and human and animal health have appeared as a consequence of this indiscriminate practice. Plant probiotic microorganisms (PPM, also known as bioprotectants, biocontrollers, biofertilizers, or biostimulants, are beneficial microorganisms that offer a promising alternative and reduce health and environmental problems. These microorganisms are involved in either a symbiotic or free-living association with plants and act in different ways, sometimes with specific functions, to achieve satisfactory plant development. This review deals with PPM presentation and their description and function in different applications. PPM includes the plant growth promoters (PGP group, which contain bacteria and fungi that stimulate plant growth through different mechanisms. Soil microflora mediate many biogeochemical processes. The use of plant probiotics as an alternative soil fertilization source has been the focus of several studies; their use in agriculture improves nutrient supply and conserves field management and causes no adverse effects. The species related to organic matter and pollutant biodegradation in soil and abiotic stress tolerance are then presented. As an important way to understand not only the ecological role of PPM and their interaction with plants but also the biotechnological application of these cultures to crop management, two main approaches are elucidated: the culture-dependent approach where the microorganisms contained in the plant material are isolated by culturing and are identified by a combination of phenotypic and molecular methods; and the culture-independent approach where microorganisms are detected without cultivating them, based on extraction and analyses of DNA. These methods combine to give a thorough knowledge of the microbiology of the studied

  20. Modelling the Ozone-Based Treatments for Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Nowak, Agnieszka; Kondratiuk-Janyska, Alina; Piątkowski, Marcin; Śmigielski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a model for ozone treatment in a dynamic bed of different microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. pumilus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aspergillus niger, Eupenicillium cinnamopurpureum) on a heterogeneous matrix (juniper berries, cardamom seeds) initially treated with numerous ozone doses during various contact times was studied. Taking into account various microorganism susceptibility to ozone, it was of great importance to develop a sufficiently effective ozone dose to preserve food products using different strains based on the microbial model. For this purpose, we have chosen the Weibull model to describe the survival curves of different microorganisms. Based on the results of microorganism survival modelling after ozone treatment and considering the least susceptible strains to ozone, we selected the critical ones. Among tested strains, those from genus Bacillus were recognized as the most critical strains. In particular, B. subtilis and B. pumilus possessed the highest resistance to ozone treatment because the time needed to achieve the lowest level of its survival was the longest (up to 17.04 min and 16.89 min for B. pumilus reduction on juniper berry and cardamom seed matrix, respectively). Ozone treatment allow inactivate microorganisms to achieving lower survival rates by ozone dose (20.0 g O3/m3 O2, with a flow rate of 0.4 L/min) and contact time (up to 20 min). The results demonstrated that a linear correlation between parameters p and k in Weibull distribution, providing an opportunity to calculate a fitted equation of the process. PMID:28991199

  1. [Preventive measures for avoiding transmission of microorganisms between hospitalised patients. Hand hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupión, Carmen; López-Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    Health-care associated infections are an important public health problem worldwide. The rates of health-care associated infections are indicators of the quality of health care. The infection control activities related to prevention of transmission of hospital microorganisms can be grouped in 4 mayor areas: standard precautions, specific precautions (including isolation if appropriate), environmental cleaning and disinfection, and surveillance activities (including providing infection rates and monitoring procedures). Hand hygiene and the correct use of gloves are the most important measures to prevent health-care associated infections and to avoid the dissemination of multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Continuous educational activities aimed at improving adherence to hand hygiene are needed. Periodical assessment of adherence to hand hygiene recommendations with feed-back have been shown to provide sustained improvement. Several complementary activities are being evaluated, including skin decolonization prior to certain surgeries, a package of measures in patients with central venous catheters or mechanical ventilation, and universal body hygiene with chlorhexidine. The present area of discussion concerns in which situations and in which groups would such measures be effective and efficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Photodynamic Action against Wastewater Microorganisms and Chemical Pollutants: An Effective Approach with Low Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bartolomeu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater (WW from urban and industrial activities is often contaminated with microorganisms and chemical pollutants. To reduce the concentration of microorganisms in WW to levels comparable to those found in natural waters, the sewage effluent is usually subjected to disinfection with chlorine, ozone, or ultraviolet light, which may lead to the formation of toxic products and contribute to the selection of resistant genes. Moreover, the changing patterns of infectious diseases and the emerging of multidrug resistant microbial strains entail the development of new technologies for WW decontamination. Microbial photodynamic inactivation (PDI with photosensitizers, oxygen, and visible light has demonstrated to be effective in the inactivation of microorganisms via photogeneration of reactive oxygen species able to induce microbial damage at the external structures level. The promising results of PDI suggest that this principle can be applied to WW treatment to inactivate microorganisms but also to photodegrade chemical pollutants. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of PDI for the microbial and chemical decontamination of secondarily treated WW. To evaluate the efficiency of bacterial inactivation in WW, experiments were done in both phosphate buffer saline (PBS and filtered WW with the bioluminescent Escherichia coli, using small and large volumes of WW. The potential of PDI to inactivate the native bacteria (E. coli and Enterococcus present in WW was tested and assays without the adding of bacteria to the WW were performed. It was also tested if the same PDI protocol was able to induce phototransformation of phenol. The cationic porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-ylporphyrin tetra-iodide (Tetra-Py+-Me was shown to be effective against both bacterial groups representing both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria used as microbiological parameters to instigate water quality and even showing the power to

  3. [Studies on metabolites from marine microorganism Aspergillus terreus collected from nature reserve region of mangrove].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Zou, Jianhua; Dai, Jungui

    2011-09-01

    To search for new antitumor active lead compounds from marine microorganism. A marine strain, Aspergillus terreus, was cultured and up-scaled in artificial seawater media, from which the metabolites were isolated and elucidated by using modern spectroscopy techniques. Twelve compounds were isolated from mycelia and fermentation broth of A. terreus. Compounds 1-4 were steroids, compounds 5-8 were organic acids and esters, compound 9 was an alkaloid, compound 10 was an isocoumarin, compound 11 was ceramide, compound 12 was propenyl cyclic pentanediol.

  4. Investigation of sea microorganisms of the genus Alteromonas by 31P-NMR of high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, E.P.; Isakov, V.V.; Mikhajlov, V.V.; Sokolova, S.V.; Gorshkova, N.M.; Fedosov, Yu.V.; Kiprianova, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the 31 P-NMR spectra of intact cells of bacteria belonging to the genus Alteromonas, the producers of alkaline phosphatase was carried out. Differences in the content of phosphate-containing compounds were detected in individual species of the genus Alteromonas. By comparing the data on 31 P-NMR spectra, the electron micrographs and phosphatase activities, the possibility of revealing the presence of capsules was shown. Peculiar features of the 31 P-NMR spectra of alteromonades, as compared with other taxonomic groups of microorganisms, have been discussed

  5. Description of bioremediation of soils using the model of a multistep system of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubysheva, A. I.; Potashev, K. A.; Sofinskaya, O. A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a mathematical model describing the interaction of a multi-step system of microorganisms in soil polluted with oil products. Each step in this system uses products of vital activity of the previous step to feed. Six different models of the multi-step system are considered. The equipping of the models with coefficients was carried out from the condition of minimizing the residual of the calculated and experimental data using an original algorithm based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method in combination with the Monte Carlo method for the initial approximation finding.

  6. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers–Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  7. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers-Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  8. Selection and application of microorganisms to improve oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P.F.; Moreira, R.S.; Almeida, R.C.C.; Guimaraes, A.K.; Carvalho, A.S. [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Ecologia de Microrganismos da Universidade Federal da Bahia, Avenida Reitor Miguel Calmon, s/n, Vale do Canela, CEP 41.160-100 Salvador BA (Brazil); Quintella, C.; Esperidia, M.C.A. [Instituto de Quimica da Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Barao de Geremoabo, s/n, Campus Universitario de Ondina, CEP 40.170-290, Salvador BA (Brazil); Taft, C.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-08-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (Meor) is an incontestably efficient alternative to improve oil recovery, especially in mature fields and in oil reservoirs with high paraffinic content. This is the case for most oil fields in the Reconcavo basin of Bahia, Brazil. Given the diverse conditions of most oil fields, an approach to apply Meor technology should consider primarily: (i) microbiological studies to select the appropriate microorganisms and (ii) mobilization of oil in laboratory experiments before oil field application. A total of 163 bacterial strains, selectively isolated from various sources, were studied to determine their potential to be used in Meor. A laboratory microbial screening based on physiological and metabolic profiles and growth rates under conditions representative for oil fields and reservoirs revealed that 10 bacterial strains identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2), Bacillus licheniformis (2), Bacillus brevis (1), Bacillus polymyxa (1), Micrococcus varians (1), Micrococcus sp. (1), and two Vibrio species demonstrated potential to be used in oil recovery. Strains of B. licheniformis and B. polymyxa produced the most active surfactants and proved to be the most anaerobic and thermotolerant among the selected bacteria. Micrococcus and B. brevis were the most salt-tolerant and polymer producing bacteria, respectively, whereas Vibrio sp. and B. polymyxa strains were the most gas-producing bacteria. Three bacterial consortia were prepared with a mixture of bacteria that showed metabolic and technological complementarity and the ability to grow at a wide range of temperatures and salinity characteristics for the oil fields in Bahia, Brazil. Oil mobilization rates in laboratory column experiments using the three consortia of bacteria varied from 11.2 to 18.3 % [v/v] of the total oil under static conditions. Consortia of B. brevis, B. icheniformis and B. polymyxa exhibited the best oil mobilization rates. Using these consortia under anaerobic

  9. Raft-like membrane domains in pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnoud, Amir M; Toledo, Alvaro M; Konopka, James B; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist, and reports on the presence of sterol- or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing. Despite increasing attention, little is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The current literature on characterization of microdomains in pathogens is reviewed, and their potential role in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance is discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of their pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The complexity of wine: clarifying the role of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempère, Sophie; Marchal, Axel; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Bely, Marina; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; Marullo, Philippe; Albertin, Warren

    2018-05-01

    The concept of wine complexity has gained considerable interest in recent years, both for wine consumers and wine scientists. As a consequence, some research programs concentrate on the factors that could improve the perceived complexity of a wine. Notably, the possible influence of microbiological factors is particularly investigated. However, wine complexity is a multicomponent concept not easily defined. In this review, we first describe the actual knowledge regarding wine complexity, its perception, and wine chemical composition. In particular, we emphasize that, contrary to expectations, the perception of wine complexity is not related to wine chemical complexity. Then, we review the impact of wine microorganisms on wine complexity, with a specific focus on publications including sensory analyses. While microorganisms definitively can impact wine complexity, the underlying mechanisms and molecules are far from being deciphered. Finally, we discuss some prospective research fields that will help improving our understanding of wine complexity, including perceptive interactions, microbial interactions, and other challenging phenomena.

  11. Impacts of Triclosan in Grey water on Soil Microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrow, D.I; Felker, J.M; Baker, K.H

    2011-01-01

    The use of grey water for irrigation is becoming a common practice in arid regions such as the Southwestern US, the Middle East, Australia, and China. While grey water supplies nutrients to soil ecosystems, the possible impact of trace contaminants, particularly pharmaceuticals and personal care products, has not been determined. This paper examined the impact of triclosan, an antibacterial agent commonly added to consumer products, on microbial populations and microbial diversity in soil irrigated with grey water. While there was no change in the total number of heterotrophic microorganisms in the soil, both the types and the antibiotic resistance of the microorganisms were significantly influenced by triclosan. The proportion of the microbial isolates resistant to antibiotics increased while at the same time, overall diversity of the microbial community decreased.

  12. Role and functions of beneficial microorganisms in sustainable aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qunlan; Li, Kangmin; Jun, Xie; Bo, Liu

    2009-08-01

    This paper aims to review the development of scientific concepts of microecology and ecology of microbes and the role and functions of beneficial microorganisms in aquaculture and mariculture. Beneficial microorganisms play a great role in natural and man-made aquatic ecosystems based on the co-evolution theory in living biosphere on earth. Their functions are to adjust algal population in water bodies so as to avoid unwanted algal bloom; to speed up decomposition of organic matter and to reduce CODmn, NH3-N and NO2-N in water and sediments so as to improve water quality; to suppress fish/shrimp diseases and water-borne pathogens; to enhance immune system of cultured aquatic animals and to produce bioactive compounds such as vitamins, hormones and enzymes that stimulate growth, thus to decrease the FCR of feed.

  13. Food environments select microorganisms based on selfish energetic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eMora

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient richness, and specifically the abundance of mono- and disaccharides that characterize several food matrixes, such as milk and grape juice, has allowed the speciation of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts with a high fermentation capacity instead of energetically favorable respiratory metabolism. In these environmental contexts, rapid sugar consumption and lactic acid or ethanol production, accumulation and tolerance, together with the ability to propagate in the absence of oxygen, are several of the ‘winning’ traits that have apparently evolved and become specialized to perfection in these fermenting microorganisms. Here, we summarize and discuss the evolutionary context that has driven energetic metabolism in food-associated microorganisms, using the dairy species Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus among prokaryotes and the bakers’ yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among eukaryotes as model organisms.

  14. The plastic-associated microorganisms of the North Pacific Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Henry S; Nerheim, Magnus S; Carroll, Katherine A; Eriksen, Marcus

    2013-10-15

    Microorganisms likely mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic pollution, including degradation, chemical adsorption, and colonization or ingestion by macroorganisms. We investigated the relationship between plastic-associated microorganism communities and factors such as location, temperature, salinity, plankton abundance, plastic concentration, item size, surface roughness, and polymer type. Small plastic items from the surface of the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Bacillus bacteria (mean 1664 ± 247 individuals mm(-2)) and pennate diatoms (1097 ± 154 mm(-2)) were most abundant, with coccoid bacteria, centric diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, and radiolarians present. Bacterial abundance was patchy, but increased on foamed polystyrene. Diatom abundance increased on items with rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic concentrations. Morphotype richness increased slightly on larger fragments, and a biogeographic transition occurred between pennate diatom groups. Better characterizing this community will aid in understanding how it interacts with plastic pollution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microorganism and filamentous fungi drive evolution of plant synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.

  16. Metabolic Engineering of Microorganisms for the Production of Higher Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Jun; Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to the increasing concerns about limited fossil resources and environmental problems, there has been much interest in developing biofuels from renewable biomass. Ethanol is currently used as a major biofuel, as it can be easily produced by existing fermentation technology, but it is not the best biofuel due to its low energy density, high vapor pressure, hygroscopy, and incompatibility with current infrastructure. Higher alcohols, including 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, which possess fuel properties more similar to those of petroleum-based fuel, have attracted particular interest as alternatives to ethanol. Since microorganisms isolated from nature do not allow production of these alcohols at high enough efficiencies, metabolic engineering has been employed to enhance their production. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the production of higher alcohols. PMID:25182323

  17. Biosynthesis of Nanoparticles by Microorganisms and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of eco-friendly technologies in material synthesis is of considerable importance to expand their biological applications. Nowadays, a variety of inorganic nanoparticles with well-defined chemical composition, size, and morphology have been synthesized by using different microorganisms, and their applications in many cutting-edge technological areas have been explored. This paper highlights the recent developments of the biosynthesis of inorganic nanoparticles including metallic nanoparticles, oxide nanoparticles, sulfide nanoparticles, and other typical nanoparticles. Different formation mechanisms of these nanoparticles will be discussed as well. The conditions to control the size/shape and stability of particles are summarized. The applications of these biosynthesized nanoparticles in a wide spectrum of potential areas are presented including targeted drug delivery, cancer treatment, gene therapy and DNA analysis, antibacterial agents, biosensors, enhancing reaction rates, separation science, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The current limitations and future prospects for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles by microorganisms are discussed.

  18. Biodeterioration Risk Threatens the 3100 Year Old Staircase of Hallstatt (Austria): Possible Involvement of Halophilic Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Dalnodar, Dennis; Voitl, Christian; Reschreiter, Hans; Sterflinger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The prosperity of Hallstatt (Salzkammergut region, Austria) is based on the richness of salt in the surrounding mountains and salt mining, which is documented as far back as 1500 years B.C. Substantial archaeological evidence of Bronze and Iron Age salt mining has been discovered, with a wooden staircase (1108 B.C.) being one of the most impressive and well preserved finds. However, after its discovery, fungal mycelia have been observed on the surface of the staircase, most probably due to airborne contamination after its find. As a basis for the further preservation of this valuable object, the active micro-flora was examined to investigate the presence of potentially biodegradative microorganisms. Most of the strains isolated from the staircase showed to be halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, due to the saline environment of the mine. Results derived from culture-dependent assays revealed a high fungal diversity, including both halotolerant and halophilic fungi, the most dominant strains being members of the genus Phialosimplex (synonym: Aspergillus). Additionally, some typical cellulose degraders, namely Stachybotrys sp. and Cladosporium sp. were detected. Numerous bacterial strains were isolated and identified as members of 12 different genera, most of them being moderately halophilic species. The most dominant isolates affiliated with species of the genera Halovibrio and Marinococcus. Halophilic archaea were also isolated and identified as species of the genera Halococcus and Halorubrum. Molecular analyses complemented the cultivation assays, enabling the identification of some uncultivable archaea of the genera Halolamina, Haloplanus and Halobacterium. Results derived from fungi and bacteria supported those obtained by cultivation methods, exhibiting the same dominant members in the communities. The results clearly showed the presence of some cellulose degraders that may become active if the requirements for growth and the environmental conditions

  19. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamprini Karygianni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra. Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  20. Biodeterioration Risk Threatens the 3100 Year Old Staircase of Hallstatt (Austria: Possible Involvement of Halophilic Microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Piñar

    Full Text Available The prosperity of Hallstatt (Salzkammergut region, Austria is based on the richness of salt in the surrounding mountains and salt mining, which is documented as far back as 1500 years B.C. Substantial archaeological evidence of Bronze and Iron Age salt mining has been discovered, with a wooden staircase (1108 B.C. being one of the most impressive and well preserved finds. However, after its discovery, fungal mycelia have been observed on the surface of the staircase, most probably due to airborne contamination after its find.As a basis for the further preservation of this valuable object, the active micro-flora was examined to investigate the presence of potentially biodegradative microorganisms.Most of the strains isolated from the staircase showed to be halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, due to the saline environment of the mine. Results derived from culture-dependent assays revealed a high fungal diversity, including both halotolerant and halophilic fungi, the most dominant strains being members of the genus Phialosimplex (synonym: Aspergillus. Additionally, some typical cellulose degraders, namely Stachybotrys sp. and Cladosporium sp. were detected. Numerous bacterial strains were isolated and identified as members of 12 different genera, most of them being moderately halophilic species. The most dominant isolates affiliated with species of the genera Halovibrio and Marinococcus. Halophilic archaea were also isolated and identified as species of the genera Halococcus and Halorubrum. Molecular analyses complemented the cultivation assays, enabling the identification of some uncultivable archaea of the genera Halolamina, Haloplanus and Halobacterium. Results derived from fungi and bacteria supported those obtained by cultivation methods, exhibiting the same dominant members in the communities.The results clearly showed the presence of some cellulose degraders that may become active if the requirements for growth and the environmental

  1. Cytotoxicity of Brazilian plant extracts against oral microorganisms of interest to dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jonatas Rafael; de Castro, Vinicius Carlos; das Graças Figueiredo Vilela, Polyana; Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2013-08-15

    With the emergence of strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, it is important to carry studies using alternative methods to control these microorganisms causing important infections, such as the use of products of plant origin that has demonstrated effective antimicrobial activity besides biocompatibility. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of plant extracts of Equisetum arvense L., Glycyrrhiza glabra L., Punica granatum L. and Stryphnodendron barbatimam Mart. against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata, and to analyze the cytotoxicity of these extracts in cultured murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts was evaluated by microdilution method based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), M7-A6 and M27-A2 standards. The cytotoxicity of concentrations that eliminated the microorganisms was evaluated by MTT colorimetric method and by quantification of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) using ELISA. In determining the minimum microbicidal concentration, E. arvense L., P. granatum L., and S. barbatimam Mart. extracts at a concentration of 50 mg/mL and G. glabra L. extract at a concentration of 100 mg/mL, were effective against all microorganisms tested. Regarding cell viability, values were 48% for E. arvense L., 76% for P. granatum L, 86% for S. barbatimam Mart. and 79% for G. glabra L. at the same concentrations. About cytokine production after stimulation with the most effective concentrations of the extracts, there was a significant increase of IL-1β in macrophage cultures treated with S. barbatimam Mart. (3.98 pg/mL) and P. granatum L. (7.72 pg/mL) compared to control (2.20 pg/mL) and a significant decrease of TNF-α was observed in cultures treated with G. glabra L. (4.92 pg/mL), S. barbatimam Mart. (0.85 pg/mL), E. arvense L. (0.83 pg/mL), and P. granatum L. (0.00 pg

  2. Cell surface hydrophobicity of dental plaque microorganisms in situ.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, M; Judes, H; Weiss, E

    1983-01-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria obtained directly from human tooth surfaces was assayed by measuring their adherence to liquid hydrocarbons. Fresh samples of supragingival dental plaque were washed and dispersed in buffer. Adherence of the plaque microorganisms to hexadecane, octane, and xylene was tested turbidimetrically and by direct microscopic observation. The results clearly show that the vast majority of bacteria comprising dental plaque exhibit pronounced cell surface hydr...

  3. Screening and characterization of useful microorganisms to arsenic removal

    OpenAIRE

    宮武, 宗利; 林, 幸男

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms were isolated from soil and their arsenic removal abilities were evaluated. Seven out of the 100 isolated strains showed more than 20% arsenic removal. Time courses of arsenic removal and cell growth were investigated in three of these isolated strains. Although the growth rates were different, the dependence of arsenic removal on cell growth was similar in three strains (A-84, 88, 89). Strain A-89 showed highest arsenic removal rate of 63% after first day. Strain A-88 was best...

  4. Uptake of nourseothricin by the producing microorganism, Streptomyces noursei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, B.; Graefe, U.

    1985-01-01

    The uptake of 14 C-(U)-nourseothricin by stationary phase mycelium of Streptomyces noursei JA 3890b-NG 13/14 was demonstrated. An energy-dependent transport system appears to be involved in the transport of the antibiotic. Relatively large quantities of the antibiotic were adsorbed to the surface of mycelium. Degradation of nourseothricin by the producing microorganism was not detectable. (author)

  5. Does nanobiotechnology create new tools to combat microorganisms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielinska-Górska, Marlena K.; Sawosz, Ewa; Górski, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is still a crucial global problem related to the overuse of antibiotics and natural microorganism capability for rapid horizontal evolution. Even new generations of drugs are not able to overcome bacterial defence mechanisms. A novel solution for this immense medical...... challenge can be nanomaterials. Researchers indicate that modern nanoforms can effectively support and perhaps in the long-term replace traditional bactericidal agents. Because of their unique physicochemical properties, nanotechnology products can exert multiple actions against bacteria, which might...

  6. Using natural biomass microorganisms for drinking water denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Darleila Damasceno; Gomes, Anderson Albino; Fernandes, Mylena; Lopes da Costa Bortoluzzi, Roseli; Magalhães, Maria de Lourdes Borba; Skoronski, Everton

    2018-07-01

    Among the methods that are studied to eliminate nitrate from drinking water, biological denitrification is an attractive strategy. Although several studies report the use of denitrifying bacteria for nitrate removal, they usually involve the use of sewage sludge as biomass to obtain the microbiota. In the present study, denitrifying bacteria was isolated from bamboo, and variable parameters were controlled focusing on optimal bacterial performance followed by physicochemical analysis of water adequacy. In this way, bamboo was used as a source of denitrifying microorganisms, using either Immobilized Microorganisms (IM) or Suspended Microorganisms (SM) for nitrate removal. Denitrification parameters optimization was carried out by analysis of denitrification at different pH values, temperature, nitrate concentrations, carbon sources as well as different C/N ratios. In addition, operational stability and denitrification kinetics were evaluated. Microorganisms present in the biomass responsible for denitrification were identified as Proteus mirabilis. The denitrified water was submitted to physicochemical treatment such as coagulation and flocculation to adjust to the parameters of color and turbidity to drinking water standards. Denitrification using IM occurred with 73% efficiency in the absence of an external carbon source. The use of SM provided superior denitrification efficiency using ethanol (96.46%), glucose (98.58%) or glycerol (98.5%) as carbon source. The evaluation of the operational stability allowed 12 cycles of biomass reuse using the IM and 9 cycles using the SM. After physical-chemical treatment, only SM denitrified water remained within drinking water standards parameters of color and turbidity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissgram, Michaela; Gstöttner, Janina; Lorantfy, Bettina; Tenhaken, Raimund; Herwig, Christoph; Weber, Hedda K

    2015-06-08

    Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE) on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL). The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB.

  8. Biotransformation of citrus aromatics nootkatone and valencene by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Mai; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Noma, Yoshiaki; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2005-11-01

    Biotransformations of the sesquiterpene ketone nootkatone from the crude drug Alpiniae Fructus and grapefruit oil, and the sesquiterpene hydrocarbon valencene from Valencia orange oil were carried out with microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger, Botryosphaeria dothidea, and Fusarium culmorum to afford structurally interesting metabolites. Their stereostructures were established by a combination of high-resolution NMR spectral and X-ray crystallographic analysis and chemical reaction. Metabolic pathways of compounds and by A. niger are proposed.

  9. Antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts from five indigenous Palestinian medicinal plants including Rosmarinus officinalis, Pisidium guajava, Punica granatum peel, grape seeds and Teucrium polium were investigated for antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities against eight microorganisms, using well diffusion method. The microorganisms ...

  10. MICROORGANISMS IN SELECTED CONFECTIONARY PRODUCTS DURING THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Petrová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the microbiological quality confectionery products during production. A total of 135 samples were analyzed: 45 samples of the punch balls, 45 Venček samples and 45 samples French cubes from home, school and private production. For microorganism cultivation VRBL agar for the isolation of coliform bacteria, DRBC and DG18 for microscopic fungi and yeasts, Plate Count Agar for total viable count, Meat peptone agar for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, XLD agar for Salmonella sp. and Baird Parker agar for Staphylococcus aureus were used. Following microbiological parameters were tested: total viable count, mesophilic anaerobic microorganisms, coliform bacteria, yeast and microscopic filamentous fungi, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus. Products are assessed according to the limit values of the number of microorganisms contained in the Codex Alimentary of the Slovak Republic. The overall assessment of the microbiological quality of the punch balls, we found that two samples from school factory and one sample from private producer did not meet CA SR for the total viable count. Comparing the microbiological quality of Venček with CA SR, we found that one sample of home production did not meet the requirements for this type of product. All the tested samples were Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. negative. Comparing the results of the samples with French cubes CA SR, we found that all the samples satisfy requirements.

  11. Periodontopathic microorganisms in peripheric blood after scaling and root planing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaurie, Gloria Inés; Mayorga-Fayad, Isabel; Torres, María Fernanda; Castillo, Diana Marcela; Aya, Maria Rosario; Barón, Alexandra; Hurtado, Paola Andrea

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of periodontopathic and other subgingival anaerobic and facultative bacteria in the bloodstream following scaling and root planing (SRP). Forty-two patients with severe generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) were included in the study. Four samples of peripheric blood were drawn from the cubital vein at different times: Pre-treatment: immediately before the SRP procedure (T1), immediately after treatment (T2), 15 min. post-treatment (T3) and 30 min. post-treatment (T4). In order to identify the presence of microorganisms in blood, subcultures were conducted under anaerobic conditions. 80.9% of the patients presented positive cultures after SRP and it occurred more frequently immediately after treatment; however, 19% of the patients still had microorganisms in the bloodstream 30 min. after the procedure. The periodontopathic microorganisms more frequently identified were Porphyromonas gingivalis and Micromonas micros. Campylobacter spp., Eikenella corrodens, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium spp. and Prevotella intermedia were isolated less often. Actinomyces spp. were also found frequently during bacteraemia after SRP. SRP induced bacteraemia associated with anaerobic bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease.

  12. The diversity of microorganisms associated with Acromyrmex leafcutter ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular biological techniques are dramatically changing our view of microbial diversity in almost any environment that has so far been investigated. This study presents a systematic survey of the microbial diversity associated with a population of Acromyrmex leafcutter ants. In contrast to previous studies on social insects, which targeted specific groups of symbionts occurring in the gut (termites, Tetraponera ants or in specialised cells (Camponotus ants the objective of our present study was to do a total screening of all possible micro-organisms that can be found inside the bodies of these leafcutter ants. Results We amplified, cloned and sequenced SSU rRNA encoding gene fragments from 9 microbial groups known to have insect-associated representatives, and show that: (1 representatives of 5 out of 9 tested groups are present, (2 mostly several strains per group are present, adding up to a total of 33 different taxa. We present the microbial taxa associated with Acromymex ants in a phylogenetic context (using sequences from GenBank to assess and illustrate to which known microorganisms they are closely related. The observed microbial diversity is discussed in the light of present knowledge on the evolutionary history of Acromyrmex leafcutter ants and their known mutualistic and parasitic symbionts. Conclusions The major merits of the screening approach documented here is its high sensitivity and specificity, which allowed us to identify several microorganisms that are promising candidates for further study of their interactions with Acromyrmex leafcutter ants or their gardens.

  13. Characterization of Microorganisms Isolated from Petroleum Hydrocarbon Polluted Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Criste

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation has received a great deal of attention, and bacteria isolated from polluted soil can be usedin that process. In this study, we performed an evaluation of the physiological groups of microorganisms fromsoil contaminated with petroleum. Bacterial strains were isolated from contaminated soil using the selectiveenrichment technique. Minimal Salt Media was used for serial dilutions to determine viable cell count. Thenumber of total viable cells and different types of microorganisms in the original sample was determined by serialdilution, agar plating procedure using selective media. The plates were incubated at 300C for 24-72 hours. Distinctcolonies growing on each plate were selected, and stored at freezing temperatures. The bacterial colonies werethen identified by Gram staining and biochemical tests. Following our research, it was observed that although thetotal microbial load of soil is relatively close in value, there are differences regarding the physiological group ofmicroorganisms. In the oil contaminated soil sample the largest group of microorganisms was the nitrous nitrifyingbacteria followed by nitrate bacteria. All bacterial strains that were isolated from soil samples contaminated withhydrocarbons but also the Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtillis strains can use diesel fuel as a food source.With the increase of diesel fuel concentration from culture medium, the majority of the bacterial strains that wereused in our experiments showed an increased value of absorbance. This fact suggests that these strains can be usedin bioremediation processes.

  14. Growth response of microorganisms to different molecular fractions of lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polman, J.K.; Breckenridge, C.R.; Dugan, P.R.; Quigley, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Our research is primarily concerned with isolating and characterizing microbes which are able to dissimilate coal and convert it to other useful chemicals. This quarter, general growth responses of microorganisms cultivated in the presence of different molecular weight fractions of lignite coal were examined. Aerobic and anaerobic environmental samples from a variety of ecological niches were used as inocula. Growth of the microorganisms in these samples on the following types of media was tested: COAL medium, containing alkali-solubilized whole coal; THFI medium, containing the alkali-solubilized, tetrahydrofuran-insoluble, macromolecular portion of whole coal; THFS medium, containing the THF-soluble, low molecular weight portion of whole coal; and CON medium, void of any coal constituent. Overall results indicated that the presence of the THF-soluble, low molecular weight coal fraction enhanced the growth yield and the variety of aerobic microorganisms compared to the other coal fractions or the control medium. Conversely, anaerobic microbes grew best on media which contained the macromolecular fraction. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Preparation of microorganism free carrier for biofertilizer product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latiffah Norddin; Maizatul Akmam Mhd Nasir; Phua Choo Kwai Hoe

    2007-01-01

    Biofertilizer has been identified as an alternative or complementary to chemical fertilizer to increase soil fertility and crop production in sustainable farming. Biofertilizers are products containing living cells of different types of known microorganisms that may increase crop productivity through N2 fixation, phosphate solubilization or stimulation of plant growth by synthesising phytohormones. A good biofertilizer product needs a good carrier or substrate. A good carrier is free from microbial contamination and can optimise the growth of the biofertilizer microorganisms. Compost is commonly used as carrier or substrate for biofertilizer microorganisms. In the present study, compost produced by Nuclear Malaysia using the Natural Farming was used as a carrier for the biofertilizer products. Gamma irradiation has been used to produce a ?clean? or sterile carrier. The sterilization effect of the carrier was checked by using serial dilution technique. Carriers that were irradiated at 50 kGy of gamma irradiation were found to be sterile. The shelf life of the sterile carriers was also determined. After six months the compost carriers were still free from microbial contamination. (Author)

  16. Microorganisms as potential vectors of the migration of radionuclides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yves, A.

    1998-01-01

    The aims of our work are the study of the sorption of radionuclides by bacteria as the first step in the microorganism-metal interaction. The latter involves the fixation of ions on a surface layer and it results in the immobilization of the metal, thus possibly being the primary step of bioaccumulation. After a rapid presentation of the direct and indirect mechanisms of the interactions, we shall present our experiments of radionuclide biosorption by bacteria. A salient feature of biosorption is the selectivity of the adsorption of some radionuclides from a composed solution. For example, Andres et al. (1993, 1995) have shown that Mycobacterium smegmatis, from a composed solution containing uranium, thorium, lanthanum, europium and ytterbium, selectively adsorbs thorium ions. The sequence of preferential fixation is: Th 4+ > UO 2 2+ > La 3+ = Eu 3+ = Yb 3+ . This selectivity is a function of the cell wall organization and of the speciation of the metal in the solution. Yet, each species of bacteria has characteristic and specific cell wall layer composition and organization. Moreover, the culture and the environmental conditions change the surface layer properties. Another parameter in the migration of radionuclides is the transfer from the soil to the microorganisms. In column experiments, Gd, and likely the rare earths, in general, adsorbed on sand can be removed with a suspension of bacteria (Thouand and Andres 1997). These examples will be discussed and serve as a basis to illustrate the diversity of the interactions between microorganisms and radionuclides

  17. The plastic-associated microorganisms of the North Pacific Gyre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, Henry S.; Nerheim, Magnus S.; Carroll, Katherine A.; Eriksen, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Microorganisms mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic. • North Pacific Gyre (NPG) plastics were examined with scanning-electron microscopy. • Bacillus bacteria and pennate diatoms dominated the NPG plastic fouling community. • Bacterial abundance was patchily distributed but increased on foamed polystyrene. • Diatom abundance increased on rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic density. -- Abstract: Microorganisms likely mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic pollution, including degradation, chemical adsorption, and colonization or ingestion by macroorganisms. We investigated the relationship between plastic-associated microorganism communities and factors such as location, temperature, salinity, plankton abundance, plastic concentration, item size, surface roughness, and polymer type. Small plastic items from the surface of the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Bacillus bacteria (mean 1664 ± 247 individuals mm −2 ) and pennate diatoms (1097 ± 154 mm −2 ) were most abundant, with coccoid bacteria, centric diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, and radiolarians present. Bacterial abundance was patchy, but increased on foamed polystyrene. Diatom abundance increased on items with rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic concentrations. Morphotype richness increased slightly on larger fragments, and a biogeographic transition occurred between pennate diatom groups. Better characterizing this community will aid in understanding how it interacts with plastic pollution

  18. Evidence and identification of microorganisms in argillite from Tournemire (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urios, L.; Magot, M.; Marsal, F.; Pellegrini, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Generalised corrosion is one of the main processes taken into account in the dimensioning of non-alloy steel overpacks for high level nuclear waste packages. However, the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria in the host rock in contact with these non-alloy materials may also influence localised corrosion processes, leading to a premature loss of the overpack watertightness. Available void and presence of free water are key conditions for bacterial development, which are not often met in an argillaceous environment. Nevertheless, microbial activity has been proven to occur in argillaceous formations such as the Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory. Indigenous sulfate-reducing bacteria have also been put into evidence in MX-80 bentonite, a clayey material likely to be used as engineered barrier in many countries for nuclear waste repositories. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has been conducting a research program at the Tournemire experimental platform on the biodiversity of Toarcian argillite, aiming at assessing the potential development of a microbial activity in deep clayey environments, disturbed or not by an excavation. The occurrence of microbial processes in this formation was first shown by the study of time evolution of the chemical and isotopic composition of fracture groundwaters collected in several boreholes. These investigations suggested that aqueous sulfates and their isotopic composition were controlled by bacterial sulfate reduction. The presence of living sulfate-reducing bacteria in water samples from an air-drilled borehole crossing a tectonic fracture (MB1) was later shown. Thus, a characterisation of the microbial biodiversity of the Toarcian argillite was launched. Samples have been collected in different locations of the Tournemire experimental platform: pieces of wall of the gallery, as well as cores from

  19. Evidence and identification of microorganisms in argillite from Tournemire (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urios, L.; Magot, M. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, IPREM UMR 5254, Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, IBEAS, F-64013 PAU (France); Marsal, F.; Pellegrini, D. [IRSN, DSU/SSIAD/BERIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Generalised corrosion is one of the main processes taken into account in the dimensioning of non-alloy steel overpacks for high level nuclear waste packages. However, the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria in the host rock in contact with these non-alloy materials may also influence localised corrosion processes, leading to a premature loss of the overpack watertightness. Available void and presence of free water are key conditions for bacterial development, which are not often met in an argillaceous environment. Nevertheless, microbial activity has been proven to occur in argillaceous formations such as the Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory. Indigenous sulfate-reducing bacteria have also been put into evidence in MX-80 bentonite, a clayey material likely to be used as engineered barrier in many countries for nuclear waste repositories. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has been conducting a research program at the Tournemire experimental platform on the biodiversity of Toarcian argillite, aiming at assessing the potential development of a microbial activity in deep clayey environments, disturbed or not by an excavation. The occurrence of microbial processes in this formation was first shown by the study of time evolution of the chemical and isotopic composition of fracture groundwaters collected in several boreholes. These investigations suggested that aqueous sulfates and their isotopic composition were controlled by bacterial sulfate reduction. The presence of living sulfate-reducing bacteria in water samples from an air-drilled borehole crossing a tectonic fracture (MB1) was later shown. Thus, a characterisation of the microbial biodiversity of the Toarcian argillite was launched. Samples have been collected in different locations of the Tournemire experimental platform: pieces of wall of the gallery, as well as cores from

  20. Bacterial community analysis of an industrial wastewater treatment plant in Colombia with screening for lipid-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Bedoya, Lina Marcela; Sánchez-Pinzón, María Solange; Cadavid-Restrepo, Gloria Ester; Moreno-Herrera, Claudia Ximena

    2016-11-01

    The operation of wastewater treatment technologies depends on a combination of physical, chemical and biological factors. Microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plants play essential roles in the degradation and removal of organic waste and xenobiotic pollutants. Several microorganisms have been used in complementary treatments to process effluents rich in fats and oils. Microbial lipases have received significant industrial attention because of their stability, broad substrate specificity, high yields, and regular supply, as well as the fact that the microorganisms producing them grow rapidly on inexpensive media. In Colombia, bacterial community studies have focused on populations of cultivable nitrifying, heterotrophic and nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in constructed wetlands. In this study, culture-dependent methods, culture-independent methods (TTGE, RISA) and enzymatic methods were used to estimate bacterial diversity, to monitor temporal and spatial changes in bacterial communities, and to screen microorganisms that presented lipolytic activity. The dominant microorganisms in the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) examined in this study belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The enzymatic studies performed indicated that five bacterial isolates and three fungal isolates possessed the ability to degrade lipids; additionally, the Serratia, Kosakonia and Mucor genera presented lipase-mediated transesterification activity. The implications of these findings in regard to possible applications are discussed later in this paper. Our results indicate that there is a wide diversity of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria inhabiting the different sections of the WWTP, which could indicate its ecological condition, functioning and general efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.