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Sample records for active blade tip

  1. Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2003-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor and high pressure turbine can provide dramatic improvements in specific fuel consumption, time-on-wing, compressor stall margin and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities of both military and commercial gas turbine engines. The preliminary design of a mechanically actuated active clearance control (ACC) system for turbine blade tip clearance management is presented along with the design of a bench top test rig in which the system is to be evaluated. The ACC system utilizes mechanically actuated seal carrier segments and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. The purpose of this active clearance control system is to improve upon current case cooling methods. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, re-burst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). The active turbine blade tip clearance control system design presented herein will be evaluated to ensure that proper response and positional accuracy is achievable under simulated high-pressure turbine conditions. The test rig will simulate proper seal carrier pressure and temperature loading as well as the magnitudes and rates of blade tip clearance changes of an actual gas turbine engine. The results of these evaluations will be presented in future works.

  2. Numerical analysis of turbine blade tip treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Nath S.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a turbine blade with a turning angle of 180 degrees have been computed, including blade tip treatments involving cavities. The geometry approximates a preliminary design for the GGOT (Generic Gas Oxidizer Turbine). The data presented here will be compared with experimental data to be obtained from a linear cascade using original GGOT blades. Results have been computed for a blade with 1 percent clearance, based on chord, and three different cavity sizes. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10 exp 7. The grid contains 39,440 points with 10 spanwise planes in the tip clearance region of 5.008E-04 m. Streamline plots and velocity vectors together with velocity divergence plots reveal the general flow behavior in the clearance region. Blade tip temperature calculations suggest placement of a cavity close to the upstream side of the blade tip for reduction of overall blade tip temperature. The solutions do not account for the relative motion between the endwall and the turbine blade. The solutions obtained are generally consistent with previous work done in this area,

  3. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  4. Online monitoring of dynamic tip clearance of turbine blades in high temperature environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Zhong, Chong; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Zhe, Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Minimized tip clearance reduces the gas leakage over turbine blade tips and improves the thrust and efficiency of turbomachinery. An accurate tip clearance sensor, measuring the dynamic clearances between blade tips and the turbine case, is a critical component for tip clearance control. This paper presents a robust inductive tip clearance sensor capable of monitoring dynamic tip clearances of turbine machines in high-temperature environments and at high rotational speeds. The sensor can also self-sense the temperature at a blade tip in situ such that temperature effect on tip clearance measurement can be estimated and compensated. To evaluate the sensor’s performance, the sensor was tested for measuring the tip clearances of turbine blades under various working temperatures ranging from 700 K to 1300 K and at turbine rotational speeds ranging from 3000 to 10 000 rpm. The blade tip clearance was varied from 50 to 2000 µm. The experiment results proved that the sensor can accurately measure the blade tip clearances with a temporal resolution of 10 µm. The capability of accurately measuring the tip clearances at high temperatures (~1300 K) and high turbine rotation speeds (~30 000 rpm), along with its compact size, makes it promising for online monitoring and active control of blade tip clearances of high-temperature turbomachinery.

  5. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  6. Aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with swept tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction.

  7. Turbine blade tip clearance measurement using a skewed dual-beam fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, De-chao; Duan, Fa-jie; Guo, Hao-tian; Li, Yangzong; Wang, Kai

    2012-08-01

    Optimization and active control of the tip clearance of turbine blades has been identified as a key to improve fuel efficiency, reduce emission, and increase service life of the engine. However, reliable and real-time tip clearance measurement is difficult due to the adverse environmental conditions that are typically found in a turbine. We describe a dual-beam fiber optic measurement system that can measure the tip timing and tip clearance simultaneously. Because the tip timing information is used to calculate the tip clearance, the method is insensitive to the signal intensity variation caused by fluctuations in environmental conditions such as light source instability, contamination, and blade tip imperfection. The system was calibrated and tested using experimental rotors. The test results indicated a high resolution of 4.5 μm and measurement accuracy of ±20 μm over the rotation speed range of 2000 to 10,000 rpm.

  8. A combined piezoelectric composite actuator and its application to wing/blade tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kwangtae

    A novel combined piezoelectric-composite actuator configuration is proposed and analytically modeled in this work. The actuator is a low complexity, active compliant mechanism obtained by coupling a modified star cross sectional configuration composite beam with a helicoidal bimorph piezoelectric actuator coiled around it. This novel actuator is a good candidate as a hinge tension-torsion bar actuator for a helicopter rotor blade flap or blade tip and mirror rotational positioning. In the wing tip case, the tip deflection angle is different only according to the aerodynamic moment depending on the hinge position of the actuator along the chord and applied voltage because there is no centrifugal force. For an active blade tip subject to incompressible flow and 2D quasi steady airloads, its twist angle is related not only to aerodynamic moment and applied voltage but also to coupling terms, such as the trapeze effect and the tennis racquet effect. Results show the benefit of hinge position aft of the aerodynamic center, such that the blade tip response is amplified by airloads. Contrary to this effect, results also show that the centrifugal effects and inertial effect cause an amplitude reduction in the response. Summation of these effects determines the overall blade tip response. The results for a certain hinge position of Xh=1.5% chord aft of the quarter chord point proves that the tip deflection target design range of beta ∈ [-2,+2] can be achieved for all pitch angle configurations chosen.

  9. A Blade Tip Timing Method Based on a Microwave Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is an effective method for blade vibration measurements in turbomachinery. This method is increasing in popularity because it is non-intrusive and has several advantages over the conventional strain gauge method. Different kinds of sensors have been developed for blade tip timing, including optical, eddy current and capacitance sensors. However, these sensors are unsuitable in environments with contaminants or high temperatures. Microwave sensors offer a promising potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this article, a microwave sensor-based blade tip timing measurement system is proposed. A patch antenna probe is used to transmit and receive the microwave signals. The signal model and process method is analyzed. Zero intermediate frequency structure is employed to maintain timing accuracy and dynamic performance, and the received signal can also be used to measure tip clearance. The timing method uses the rising and falling edges of the signal and an auto-gain control circuit to reduce the effect of tip clearance change. To validate the accuracy of the system, it is compared experimentally with a fiber optic tip timing system. The results show that the microwave tip timing system achieves good accuracy.

  10. Numerical investigation of three wind turbine blade tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J.; Soerensen, N.N.

    2002-08-01

    The complex three-dimensional flow around three different tip shapes on a rotating wind turbine blade is investigated and analyzed using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Differences in production, flap wise bending moments and forces are discussed. A method for determining the local inflow angle of attack is presented and further analysis is performed on lift and drag coefficients. It is shown that the original Standard tip results in a more concentrated tip vortex leading to a steeper gradient on both tangential and normal forces when approaching the tip, whereas the two tapered tips show a more flat behavior. This again leads to lower flap wise bending moments and lower production for the Standard tip compared to the two tapered tips. At 12 m/s, though, the Swept tip shows a separation pattern on the surface. This separation causes a decrease in normal force and an increase in tangential force. The Taper tip keeps the higher loading causing the flap wise bending moment to be higher as seen in measurements. To determine the radial variation of lift and drag coefficients the local inflow angle of attack is determined. It is shown that the Standard tip experiences a slightly larger angle of attack at the tip compared to the two tapered tips. The lift coefficients are kept at a more constant level for the two tapered tips due to the decrease in chord, while the drag coefficients actually decrease for the two tapered tips, especially for the Swept tip. For the Swept tip at 12 m/s both lift and drag coefficients changed considerably due to the separation. Differences in aerodynamic damping of the three tips were investigated using HAWCDAMP. The Standard tip seems to be slightly less damped with respect to the edgewise vibrations. (au)

  11. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  12. Turbine-blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements using an optical fiber bundle sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Iker; Beloki, Josu; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon

    2013-04-01

    Traditional limitations of capacitive, inductive or discharging probe sensor for tip timing and tip clearance measurements are overcome by reflective intensity modulated optical fiber sensors. This paper presents the signals and results corresponding to a one stage turbine rig which rotor has 146 blades, obtained from a transonic wind-tunnel test. The probe is based on a trifurcated bundle of optical fibers that is mounted on turbine casing. It is composed of a central illuminating fiber that guides the light from a laser to the turbine blade, and two concentric rings of receiving fibers that collect the reflected light. Two photodetectors turn this reflected light signal from the receiving rings into voltage. The electrical signals are acquired and saved by a high-sample-rate oscilloscope. In tip clearance calculations the ratio of the signals provided by each ring of receiving fibers is evaluated and translated into distance. In the case of tip timing measurements, only one of the signals is considered to get the arrival time of the blade. The differences between the real and theoretical arrival times of the blades are used to obtain the deflections amplitude. The system provides the travelling wave spectrum, which presents the average vibration amplitude of the blades at a certain nodal diameter. The reliability of the results in the turbine rig testing facilities suggests the possibility of performing these measurements in real turbines under real working conditions.

  13. Techniques for blade tip clearance measurements with capacitive probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Alexander

    2000-07-01

    This article presents a proven but advantageous concept for blade tip clearance evaluation in turbomachinery. The system is based on heavy duty probes and a high frequency (HF) and amplifying electronic unit followed by a signal processing unit. Measurements are taken under high temperature and other severe conditions such as ionization. Every single blade can be observed. The signals are digitally filtered and linearized in real time. The electronic set-up is highly integrated. Miniaturized versions of the electronic units exist. The small and robust units can be used in turbo engines in flight. With several probes at different angles in one radial plane further information is available. Shaft eccentricity or blade oscillations can be calculated.

  14. KNOW-BLADE task-3.2 report: Tip shape study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe; Conway, S.

    2005-01-01

    For modern rotor blades with their very large aspect ratio, the blade tip is a very limited part of the overall rotor, and as such of limited importance for the overall aerodynamics of the rotor. Even though they may not be very important for the overallpower production, the tip noise can be very...... important for the acoustics of the rotor [15], and the blade tips can as well be important for the aerodynamic damping properties of the rotor blades [13]. Unfortunately, not many options exists for predictingthe aerodynamic behavior of blade tips using computational methods. Experimentally it is di...

  15. Losses and blade tip clearance for a centrifugal compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana DUMITRESCU

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the numerical analysis for a transonic centrifugal compressor using steady state CFD. The blade tip clearance effect over the position of shock waves, tip losses and the performances of the impeller are studied. Numerical simulations have been performed using RANS modelling, with the k-omega SST turbulence model (Shear Stress Transport. Eight cases were taken into consideration for the impeller with the following blade tip clearances values: 0 mm, 0.1 mm, 0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5mm, 0.7 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, at the same operating conditions. For the entire stage only seven cases were studied, without the value for 0.1 mm because of its abnormal behaviour, as can be seen in the case of the impeller simulations. Results showed that the position of the shock wave does not change with the increase of the tip clearance. Aerodynamic losses due to shock wave, secondary flow and turbulence can be seen in the polytropic efficiency of the centrifugal impeller and the difference between the two extreme cases is about 3.2 %.

  16. Experimental investigation of turbine blade-tip excitation forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Jaroux, Belgacem; Song, Seung Jin; Yoo, Soom-Yung; Palczynski, Taras

    1994-01-01

    Results of a program to investigate the magnitude and parametric variations of rotordynamic forces which arise in high power turbines due to blade-tip leakage effects are presented. Five different unshrouded turbine configurations and one configuration shrouded with a labyrinth seal were tested with static offsets of the turbine shaft. The forces along and perpendicular to the offset were measured directly with a rotating dynometer. Exploration of casing pressure and flow velocity distributions was used to investigate the force-generating mechanisms. For unshrouded turbines, the cross-forces originate mainly from the classical Alford mechanisms while the direct forces arise mainly from a slightly skewed pressure pattern. The Alford coefficient for cross-force was found to vary between 2.4 and 4.0, while the similar direct force coefficient varied from 1.5 to 3.5. The cross-forces are found to increase substantially when the gap is reduced from 3.0 to 1.9% of blade height, probably due to viscous blade-tip effects. The forces also increase when the hub gap between stator and rotor decreases. The force coefficient decreased with operating flow coefficient. In the case of the shrouded turbine, most of the forces arise from nonuniform seal pressures. This includes about 80% for the transverse forces. The rest appears to come from uneven work extraction. Their level is about 50% higher in the shrouded case.

  17. Effect on Torque and Thrust of the Pointed Tip Shape of a Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungsoo Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of the tip shape of a wind turbine blade on aerodynamic forces, including the effects of separation, transition and stall. A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL Phase-VI wind turbine blade was used, in which the shape of the tip was modified to a pointed tip. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations were employed for the analysis and the results were compared with the original NREL blade CFD and experimental data using ANSYS CFX (Ansys Inc., Delaware, PA, USA. To predict the separation and separation-induced transition on both near wall and far away, the shear-stress-transport (SST Gamma-Theta turbulent model was used. The stall onset of a 20° angle of attack and its effects were also analyzed and presented. The value of torque with the pointed tip blade was found to be 3%–8% higher than the original NREL blade showing the benefit of the pointed tip. Normal force coefficient is lower at the tip for the pointed tip blade, which results in lower deformation of the blade. It was found that the pointed-tip blade is more efficient in terms of generating torque than the original NREL Phase-VI blade in the dynamic stall region of 10–15 m/s wind speeds.

  18. A new aeroelastic model for composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    An analytical model for predicting the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips is presented. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements along the elastic axis. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. Tip sweep can induce aeroelastic instability by flap-twist coupling. Tip anhedral causes lag-torsion and flap-axial couplings, however, its effects on blade stability is less pronounced than the effect due to sweep. Composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability.

  19. Testing of a Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woike, Mark R.; Roeder, James W.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new active tip clearance control and structural health monitoring schemes in turbine engines and other types of rotating machinery requires sensors that are highly accurate and can operate in a high-temperature environment. The use of a microwave sensor to acquire blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave blade tip clearance sensor works on principles that are very similar to a short-range radar system. The sensor sends a continuous microwave signal towards a target and measures the reflected signal. The phase difference of the reflected signal is directly proportional to the distance between the sensor and the target being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in turbine engines. The use of microwave sensors for this application is a new concept. Techniques on calibrating the sensors along with installation effects are not well quantified as they are for other sensor technologies. Developing calibration techniques and evaluating installation effects are essential in using these sensors to make tip clearance and tip timing measurements. As a means of better understanding these issues, the microwave sensors were used on a benchtop calibration rig, a large axial vane fan, and a turbofan. Background on the microwave tip clearance sensor, an overview of their calibration, and the results from their use on the axial vane fan and the turbofan will be presented in this paper.

  20. Numerical Investigation of the Tip Vortex of a Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine with Double-Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhao Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind velocity distribution and the vortex around the wind turbine present a significant challenge in the development of straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs. This paper is intended to investigate influence of tip vortex on wind turbine wake by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations. In this study, the number of blades is two and the airfoil is a NACA0021 with chord length of c = 0.265 m. To capture the tip vortex characteristics, the velocity fields are investigated by the Q-criterion iso-surface (Q = 100 with shear-stress transport (SST k-ω turbulence model at different tip speed ratios (TSRs. Then, mean velocity, velocity deficit and torque coefficient acting on the blade in the different spanwise positions are compared. The wind velocities obtained by CFD simulations are also compared with the experimental data from wind tunnel experiments. As a result, we can state that the wind velocity curves calculated by CFD simulations are consistent with Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV measurements. The distribution of the vortex structure along the spanwise direction is more complex at a lower TSR and the tip vortex has a longer dissipation distance at a high TSR. In addition, the mean wind velocity shows a large value near the blade tip and a small value near the blade due to the vortex effect.

  1. KNOW-BLADE, task-3.2 report, tip shape study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, N.N.; Johansen, J.; Conway, S.; Voutsinas, S.; Hansen, M.O.L.; Stuermer, A.

    2005-01-01

    For modern rotor blades with their very large aspect ratio, the blade tip is a very limited part of the overall rotor, and as such of limited importance for the overall aerodynamics of the rotor. Even though they may not be very important for the overall power production, the tip noise can be very important for the acoustics of the rotor [15], and the blade tips can as well be important for the aerodynamic damping properties of the rotor blades [13]. Unfortunately, not many options exists for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of blade tips using computational methods. Experimentally it is dicult to perform detailed measurements in the form of pressure and velocity measurements in natural wind conditions on modern large scale turbines due to the inherent unsteadiness in the natural wind. The present study describes the application of four different Navier-Stokes solvers to tip shape studies, and shows that these codes are well suited to study the flow around different tip shape geometries, and can predict the pressure distributions at the blade tip quite accurately. (au)

  2. Numerical investigation of different tip shapes for wind turbine blades. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard Madsen, H.; Fuglsang, P.

    1996-12-01

    The aerodynamic optimization of the tip region is discussed and it is concluded that in principle there is no main difference to the optimization problem of the rest of the blade except that the performance of the aerodynamic models as, e.g., the blade element momentum theory (BEM) is more uncertain in this region due to the complex, three dimensional flow field. It is shown that an optimization of an entire blade in general leads to a slender tip with a chord decreasing to zero at the blade tip. Finally, the influence on the blade aerodynamics from minor changes of the planform in the tip region is illustrated. Two common aeroacoustic models are reviewed. The aerodynamic input parameters to both models are strength of the tip vortex and the length of the separated flow bubble formed by the tip vortex at the trailing edge. In the original aeroacoustic models these two parameters are calculated from empirical relations based on different experiments, e.g., using flow visualization. In the present work the two parameters was compared with the results of a CFD calculation of the flow around a rectangular shaped tip. The principal influence of sweep of the tip axis has also been investigated from detailed CFD simulations. It is found that sweeping the leading edge towards the trailing edge results in a stronger flow separation at moderate and high angles of attack compared to, when the trailing edge is swept towards the leading edge. This can have a considerable influence on the total loading on the blade. Similar tendencies have been found in full scale experiments. At the end of the report the application of the results from the present study are discussed for practical tip design. As the tip noise is linked to the strength of the tip vortex and the extension of the separation region these two parameters should be reduced in order to lower the tip noise. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Aeroelastic modeling of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the FEM are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction. These results illustrate the inherent potential for aeroelastic tailoring present in composite rotor blades with swept tips, which still remains to be exploited in the design process.

  4. Tips for Starting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legislative Information Advisory & Coordinating Committees Strategic Plans & Reports Research Areas FAQs ... Starting Physical Activity Related Topics Section Navigation Tips to Help You Get Active ...

  5. Axial compressor blade design for desensitization of aerodynamic performance and stability to tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Engin

    Tip clearance flow is the flow through the clearance between the rotor blade tip and the shroud of a turbomachine, such as compressors and turbines. This flow is driven by the pressure difference across the blade (aerodynamic loading) in the tip region and is a major source of loss in performance and aerodynamic stability in axial compressors of modern aircraft engines. An increase in tip clearance, either temporary due to differential radial expansion between the blade and the shroud during transient operation or permanent due to engine wear or manufacturing tolerances on small blades, increases tip clearance flow and results in higher fuel consumption and higher risk of engine surge. A compressor design that can reduce the sensitivity of its performance and aerodynamic stability to tip clearance increase would have a major impact on short and long-term engine performance and operating envelope. While much research has been carried out on improving nominal compressor performance, little had been done on desensitization to tip clearance increase beyond isolated observations that certain blade designs such as forward chordwise sweep, seem to be less sensitive to tip clearance size increase. The current project aims to identify through a computational study the flow features and associated mechanisms that reduces sensitivity of axial compressor rotors to tip clearance size and propose blade design strategies that can exploit these results. The methodology starts with the design of a reference conventional axial compressor rotor followed by a parametric study with variations of this reference design through modification of the camber line and of the stacking line of blade profiles along the span. It is noted that a simple desensitization method would be to reduce the aerodynamic loading of the blade tip which would reduce the tip clearance flow and its proportional contribution to performance loss. However, with the larger part of the work on the flow done in this

  6. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  7. A Non-Uniformly Under-Sampled Blade Tip-Timing Signal Reconstruction Method for Blade Vibration Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes.

  8. Numerical Study on the Effect of Swept Blade on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine at High Tip Speed Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, H M; Liu, C; Yang, H; Wang, F

    2016-01-01

    The current situation is that the development of high speed wind energy saturates gradually, therefore, it is highly necessary to develop low speed wind energy. This paper, based on a specific straight blade and by using Isight, a kind of multidiscipline optimization software, which integrates ICEM (Integrated Computer Engineering and Manufacturing) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software, optimizes the blade stacking line (the centers of airfoil from blade root to tip) and acquires the optimization swept blade shape. It is found that power coefficient C p of swept blade is 3.2% higher than that of straight blade at the tip speed ratio of 9.82, that the thrust of swept blade receives is obviously less than that of straight blade. Inflow angle of attack and steam line on the suction of the swept and straight blade are also made a comparison. (paper)

  9. Comparison of classical methods for blade design and the influence of tip correction on rotor performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Okulov, Valery; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The classical blade-element/momentum (BE/M) method, which is used together with different types of corrections (e.g. the Prandtl or Glauert tip correction), is today the most basic tool in the design of wind turbine rotors. However, there are other classical techniques based on a combination...

  10. Heat Transfer Characteristics on the Squealer Tip of gas turbine blade in a linear cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hyung Hee; Lee, Dong Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates local heat/mass transfer characteristics on blade tip surfaces with squealer rim in a linear cascade. A cascade experiment setup consists of three airfoils. The airfoil has variable tip clearance(1, 2, 3% of axial chord length) and rim height(3, 6, 9% of axial chord length). Main flow Reynolds number based on axial chord is 1.5 x 10 5 . The axial chord length and turning angle is 237mm and 126 .deg. respectively. Naphthalene sublimation method is used to measure detailed mass transfer coefficient on the blade. The results show that as the tip clearance increases, high heat transfer region moves from upstream to downstream. Also, as the rim height increases, high heat transfer region tends to move toward the suction side

  11. A simulation study of active feedback supression of dynamic response in helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, D. D.; Bessey, R. L.; Dodge, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    A parameter study is presented for active feedback control applied to a helicopter rotor blade during forward flight. The study was performed on an electromechanical apparatus which included a mechanical model rotor blade and electronic analog simulation of interaction between blade deflections and aerodynamic loading. Blade response parameters were obtained for simulated vortex impinging at the blade tip at one pulse per revolution, and for a pulse which traveled from the blade tip toward its root. Results show that the response in a 1 - 10-per-rev frequency band is diminished by the feedback action, but at the same time responses at frequencies above 10-per-rev become increasingly more prominent with increased feedback amplitude, and can even lead to instability at certain levels. It appears that the latter behavior results from limitations of the laboratory simulation apparatus, rather than genuine potential behavior for a prototype helicopter.

  12. Heat Transfer and Flow on the First Stage Blade Tip of a Power Generation Gas Turbine. Part 1; Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Ronald S.; Bailey, Jeremy C.; Ameri, Ali A.

    1999-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental study has been performed to investigate the detailed distribution of convective heat transfer coefficients on the first stage blade tip surface for a geometry typical of large power generation turbines(>100MW). This paper is concerned with the design and execution of the experimental portion of the study. A stationary blade cascade experiment has been run consisting of three airfoils, the center airfoil having a variable tip gap clearance. The airfoil models the aerodynamic tip section of a high pressure turbine blade with inlet Mach number of 0.30, exit Mach number of 0.75, pressure ratio of 1.45, exit Reynolds number based on axial chord of 2.57 x 10(exp 6), and total turning of about 110 degrees. A hue detection based liquid crystal method is used to obtain the detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on the blade tip surface for flat, smooth tip surfaces with both sharp and rounded edges. The cascade inlet turbulence intensity level took on values of either 5% or 9%. The cascade also models the casing recess in the shroud surface ahead of the blade. Experimental results are shown for the pressure distribution measurements on the airfoil near the tip gap, on the blade tip surface, and on the opposite shroud surface. Tip surface heat transfer coefficient distributions are shown for sharp-edge and rounded-edge tip geometries at each of the inlet turbulence intensity levels.

  13. Computational Investigation of Novel Tip Leakage Mitigation Methods for High Pressure Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Gupta, Abhinav; Shyam, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings on a possible approach to reducing tip leakage losses. In this paper a computational study was conducted on the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) High Pressure Turbine (HPT) rotor tip geometry using the commercial numerical solver ANSYS FLUENT. The flow solver was validated against aerodynamic data acquired in the NASA Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade facility. The scope of the ongoing study is to computationally investigate how the tip leakage and overall blade losses are affected by (1) injection from the tip near the pressure side, (2) injection from the tip surface at the camber line, and (3) injection from the tip surface into the tip separation bubble. The objective is to identify the locations on the tip surface at which to place appropriately configured blowing keeping in mind the film cooling application of tip blowing holes. The validation was conducted at Reynolds numbers of 85,000, 343,000, and 685,000 and at engine realistic flow conditions. The coolant injection simulations were conducted at a Reynolds number of 343,000 based on blade chord and inlet velocity and utilized the SST turbulence model in FLUENT. The key parameters examined are the number of jets, jet angle and jet location. A coolant to inlet pressure ratio of 1.0 was studied for angles of +30 deg, -30 deg, and 90 deg to the local free stream on the tip. For the 3 hole configuration, 3 holes spaced 3 hole diameters apart with length to diameter ratio of 1.5 were used. A simulation including 11 holes along the entire mean camber line is also presented (30 deg toward suction side). In addition, the effect of a single hole is also compared to a flat tip with no injection. The results provide insight into tip flow control methods and can be used to guide further investigation into tip flow control. As noted in past research it is concluded that reducing leakage flow is not necessarily synonymous with reducing losses due to leakage.

  14. Blade tip, finite aspect ratio, and dynamic stall effects on the Darrieus rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Desy, P.; Masson, C.

    1988-02-01

    The objective of the work described in this paper was to apply the Boeing-Vertol dynamic stall model in an asymmetric manner to account for the asymmetry of the flow between the left and right sides of the rotor. This phenomenon has been observed by the flow visualization of a two-straight-bladed Darrieus rotor in the IMST water tunnel. Also introduced into the aerodynamic model are the effects of the blade tip and finite aspect ratio on the aerodynamic performance of the Darrieus wind turbine. These improvements are compatible with the double-multiple-streamtube model and have been included in the CARDAAV computer code for predicting the aerodynamic performance. Very good agreement has been observed between the test data (Sandia 17 m) and theoretical predictions; a significant improvement over the previous dynamic stall model was obtained for the rotor power at low tip speed ratios, while the inclusion of the finite aspect ratio effects enhances the prediction of the rotor power for high tip speed ratios. The tip losses and finite aspect ratio effects were also calculated for a small-scale vertical-axis wind turbine, with a two-straight-bladed (NACA 0015) rotor.

  15. Variable Pitch Approach for Performance Improving of Straight-Bladed VAWT at Rated Tip Speed Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhou Zhao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new variable pitch (VP approach to increase the peak power coefficient of the straight-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT, by widening the azimuthal angle band of the blade with the highest aerodynamic torque, instead of increasing the highest torque. The new VP-approach provides a curve of pitch angle designed for the blade operating at the rated tip speed ratio (TSR corresponding to the peak power coefficient of the fixed pitch (FP-VAWT. The effects of the new approach are exploited by using the double multiple stream tubes (DMST model and Prandtl’s mathematics to evaluate the blade tip loss. The research describes the effects from six aspects, including the lift, drag, angle of attack (AoA, resultant velocity, torque, and power output, through a comparison between VP-VAWTs and FP-VAWTs working at four TSRs: 4, 4.5, 5, and 5.5. Compared with the FP-blade, the VP-blade has a wider azimuthal zone with the maximum AoA, lift, drag, and torque in the upwind half-cycle, and yields the two new larger maximum values in the downwind half-cycle. The power distribution in the swept area of the turbine changes from an arched shape of the FP-VAWT into the rectangular shape of the VP-VAWT. The new VP-approach markedly widens the highest-performance zone of the blade in a revolution, and ultimately achieves an 18.9% growth of the peak power coefficient of the VAWT at the optimum TSR. Besides achieving this growth, the new pitching method will enhance the performance at TSRs that are higher than current optimal values, and an increase of torque is also generated.

  16. Film cooling effects on the tip flow characteristics of a gas turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the tip flow characteristics between a gas turbine blade tip and the shroud was conducted by a pressure-test system and a particle image velocimetry (PIV system. A three-times scaled profile of the GE-E3 blade with five film cooling holes was used as specimen. The effects on flow characteristics by the rim width and the groove depth of the squealer tip were revealed. The rim widths were (a 0.9%, (b 2.1%, and (c 3.0% of the axial chord, and the groove depths were (a 2.8%, (b 4.8%, and (c 10% of the blade span. Several pressure taps on the top plate above the blades were connected to pressure gauges. By a CCD camera the PIV system recorded the velocity field around the leading edge zone including the five cooling holes. The flow distributions both in the tip clearance and in the passage were revealed, and the influence of the inlet velocity was determined. In this work, the tip flow characteristics with and without film cooling were investigated. The effects of different global blowing ratios of M=0.5, 1.0, 1.3 and 2.5 were established. It was found that decreasing the rim width resulted in a lower mass flow rate of the leakage flow, and the pressure distributions from the leading edge to the trailing edge showed a linearly increasing trend. It was also found that if the inlet velocity was less than 1.5 m/s, the flow field in the passage far away from the suction side appeared as a stagnation zone.

  17. Effect of Relative Movement between the Shroud and Blade on Tip Leakage Flow Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical investigation into the tip leakage flow of a turbine rotor is carried out using a particle image velocimetry (PIV system and the commercial software ANSYS CFX 14.0. The specimen used in this work is a typical GE-E3 model with a new squealer tip design. The experimental data are used to create a turbulence model and numerical strategy. Through the validated turbulence model and numerical strategy, simulations are carried out to compare the characteristics of the tip leakage flow in three cases: (1 the blade is rotating, but the shroud is stationary, which is the real status of turbine rotor operation; (2 the blade is stationary, but the shroud moves, to simulate their relative movement; (3 the blade is stationary, and the shroud is also stationary, this is a simplified case, but has been widely used in the experiments on rotor tip leakage flow. Detailed analysis of the flow phenomena shows that the second case is a reasonable alternative approach to simulate the real state. However, the flow patterns in the third case exhibit some evident differences from the real status. These differences are caused by the inaccurate viscous force arising from the stationary blade and shroud. In this work, a modification method for the experiments conducted in the third case is firstly proposed, which is realized through adding an imaginary roughness at the shroud wall to be close to the real viscous effect, and to thereby reduce the deviation of the experiment from the real case. According to the results calculated by ANSYS CFX, the flow structure in the modification case is very close to the real status. Besides, this modification case is an easy and cheap way to simulate the real tip leakage flow.

  18. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  19. Active Blade Pitch Control for Straight Bladed Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of New Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    in a previous publication. Further, it is well know that the variation of the blade pitch angle during the rotation improves the power efficiency. A blade pitch variation is implemented by active blade pitch control, which operates as per wind speed and position of the blade with respect to the rotor. A double...

  20. Navier-Stokes analysis of an oxidizer turbine blade with tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeling, Howard J.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1992-01-01

    The Gas Generator Oxidizer Turbine (GGOT) Blade is being analyzed by various investigators under the NASA MSFC sponsored Turbine Stage Technology Team design effort. The present work concentrates on the tip clearance region flow and associated losses; however, flow details for the passage region are also obtained in the simulations. The present calculations simulate the rotor blade row in a rotating reference frame with the appropriate coriolis and centrifugal acceleration terms included in the momentum equation. The upstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade leading edge. The boundary conditions at this location were determined by using a Euler analysis without the vanes to obtain approximately the same flow profiles at the rotor as were obtained with the Euler stage analysis including the vanes. Inflow boundary layer profiles are then constructed assuming the skin friction coefficient at both the hub and the casing. The downstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade trailing edge, and the circumferentially averaged static pressure at this location was also obtained from the Euler analysis. Results were obtained for the 3-D baseline GGOT geometry at the full scale design Reynolds number. Details of the clearance region flow behavior and blade pressure distributions were computed. The spanwise variation in blade loading distributions are shown, and circumferentially averaged spanwise distributions of total pressure, total temperature, Mach number, and flow angle are shown at several axial stations. The spanwise variation of relative total pressure loss shows a region of high loss in the region near the casing. Particle traces in the near tip region show vortical behavior of the fluid which passes through the clearance region and exits at the downstream edge of the gap.

  1. Study of the capacitance technique for measuring high-temperature blade tip clearance on ceramic rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranger, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Higher operating temperatures required for increased engine efficiency can be achieved by using ceramic materials for engine components. Ceramic turbine rotors are subject to the same limitations with regard to gas path efficiency as their superalloy predecessors. In this study, a modified frequency-modulation system is proposed for the measurement of blade tip clearance on ceramic rotors. It is expected to operate up to 1370 C (2500 F), the working temperature of present engines with ceramic turbine rotors. The design of the system addresses two special problems associated with nonmetallic blades: the capacitance is less than that of a metal blade and the effects of temperature may introduce uncertainty with regard to the blade tip material composition. To increase capacitance and stabilize the measurement, a small portion of the rotor is modified by the application of 5-micron-thick platinum films. The platinum surfaces on the probe electrodes and rotor that are exposed to the high-velocity gas stream are coated with an additional 10-micron-thick protective ceramic topcoat. A finite-element method is applied to calculate the capacitance as a function of clearance.

  2. Development of a structural optimization capability for the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Yuan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new structural optimization capability aimed at the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The primary objective is to reduce vibration levels in forward flight without diminishing the aeroelastic stability margins of the blade. In the course of this research activity a number of complicated tasks have been addressed: (1) development of a new, aeroelastic stability and response analysis; (2) formulation of a new comprehensive sensitive analysis, which facilitates the generation of the appropriate approximations for the objective and the constraints; (3) physical understanding of the new model and, in particular, determination of its potential for aeroelastic tailoring, and (4) combination of the newly developed analysis capability, the sensitivity derivatives and the optimizer into a comprehensive optimization capability. The first three tasks have been completed and the fourth task is in progress.

  3. A Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Effectiveness on Film Cooled Turbine Blade Tip Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to predict the distribution of convective heat transfer coefficient on a simulated blade tip with cooling holes. The purpose of the examination was to assess the ability of a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver to predict the rate of tip heat transfer and the distribution of cooling effectiveness. To this end, the simulation of tip clearance flow with blowing of Kim and Metzger was used. The agreement of the computed effectiveness with the data was quite good. The agreement with the heat transfer coefficient was not as good but improved away from the cooling holes. Numerical flow visualization showed that the uniformity of wetting of the surface by the film cooling jet is helped by the reverse flow due to edge separation of the main flow.

  4. Investigation and Optimization of Blade Tip Winglets Using an Implicit Free Wake Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Stephen; Crawford, Curran

    2014-06-01

    Novel outer-blade geometries such as tip winglets can increase the aerodynamic power that can be extracted from the wind by tailoring the relative position and strengths of trailed vorticity. This design space is explored using both parameter studies and gradient-based optimization, with the aerodynamic analysis carried out using LibAero, a free wake vortex-based code introduced in previous work. The starting design is the NREL 5MW reference turbine, which allows comparison of the aerodynamic simulation for the unmodified blade with other codes. The code uses a Prandtl-Weissinger lifting line model to represent the blade, and vortex filaments as the flow elements. A fast multipole method is implemented to accelerate the influence calculations and reduce the computational cost. This results in higher fidelity aerodynamic simulations that can capture the effects of novel geometries while maintaining sufficiently fast run-times (on the order of an hour) to allow the use of optimization. Gradients of the objective function with respect to design variables are calculated using the complex step method which is accurate and efficient. Since the vortex structure behind the rotor is being resolved in detail, insight is also gained into the mechanisms by which these new blade designs affect performance. It is found that adding winglets can increase the power extracted from the wind by around 2%, with a similar increase in thrust. It is also possible to create a winglet that slightly lowers the thrust while maintaining very similar power compared to the standard straight blade.

  5. Investigation and Optimization of Blade Tip Winglets Using an Implicit Free Wake Vortex Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Stephen; Crawford, Curran

    2014-01-01

    Novel outer-blade geometries such as tip winglets can increase the aerodynamic power that can be extracted from the wind by tailoring the relative position and strengths of trailed vorticity. This design space is explored using both parameter studies and gradient-based optimization, with the aerodynamic analysis carried out using LibAero, a free wake vortex-based code introduced in previous work. The starting design is the NREL 5MW reference turbine, which allows comparison of the aerodynamic simulation for the unmodified blade with other codes. The code uses a Prandtl-Weissinger lifting line model to represent the blade, and vortex filaments as the flow elements. A fast multipole method is implemented to accelerate the influence calculations and reduce the computational cost. This results in higher fidelity aerodynamic simulations that can capture the effects of novel geometries while maintaining sufficiently fast run-times (on the order of an hour) to allow the use of optimization. Gradients of the objective function with respect to design variables are calculated using the complex step method which is accurate and efficient. Since the vortex structure behind the rotor is being resolved in detail, insight is also gained into the mechanisms by which these new blade designs affect performance. It is found that adding winglets can increase the power extracted from the wind by around 2%, with a similar increase in thrust. It is also possible to create a winglet that slightly lowers the thrust while maintaining very similar power compared to the standard straight blade

  6. A new reference tip-timing test bench and simulator for blade synchronous and asynchronous vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnayeb, Ali; Nikpour, Masood; Moradi, Shapour; Rossi, Gianluca

    2018-02-01

    The blade tip-timing (BTT) measurement technique is at present the most promising technique for monitoring the blades of axial turbines and aircraft engines in operating conditions. It is generally used as an alternative to strain gauges in turbine testing. By conducting a comparison with the standard methods such as those based on strain gauges, one determines that the technique is not intrusive and does not require a complicated installation process. Despite its superiority to other methods, the experimental performance analysis of a new BTT method needs a test stand that includes a reference measurement system (e.g. strain gauges equipped with telemetry or other complex optical measurement systems, like rotating laser Doppler vibrometers). In this article, a new reliable, low-cost BTT test setup is proposed for simulating and analyzing blade vibrations based on kinematic inversion. In the proposed test bench, instead of the blades vibrating, it is the BTT sensor that vibrates. The vibration of the sensor is generated by a shaker and can therefore be easily controlled in terms of frequency, amplitude and waveform shape. The amplitude of vibration excitation is measured by a simple accelerometer. After introducing the components of the simulator, the proposed test bench is used in practice to simulate both synchronous and asynchronous vibration scenarios. Then two BTT methods are used to evaluate the quality of the acquired data. The results demonstrate that the proposed setup is able to generate simulated pulse sequences which are almost the same as those generated by the conventional BTT systems installed around a bladed disk. Moreover, the test setup enables its users to evaluate BTT methods by using a limited number of sensors. This significantly reduces the total costs of the experiments.

  7. Performance of Partial and Cavity Type Squealer Tip of a HP Turbine Blade in a Linear Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kavurmacioglu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional highly complex flow structure in tip gap between blade tip and casing leads to inefficient turbine performance due to aerothermal loss. Interaction between leakage vortex and secondary flow structures is the substantial source of that loss. Different types of squealer tip geometries were tried in the past, in order to improve turbine efficiency. The current research deals with comparison of partial and cavity type squealer tip concepts for higher aerothermal performance. Effects of squealer tip have been examined comprehensively for an unshrouded HP turbine blade tip geometry in a linear cascade. In the present paper, flow structure through the tip gap was comprehensively investigated by computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods. Numerical calculations were obtained by solving three-dimensional, incompressible, steady, and turbulent form of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations using a general purpose and three-dimensional viscous flow solver. The two-equation turbulence model, shear stress transport (SST, has been used. The tip profile belonging to the Pennsylvania State University Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF was used to create an extruded solid model of the axial turbine blade. For identifying optimal dimensions of squealer rim in terms of squealer height and squealer width, our previous studies about aerothermal investigation of cavity type squealer tip were utilized. In order to obtain the mesh, an effective parametric generation has been utilized using a multizone structured mesh. Numerical calculations indicate that partial and cavity squealer designs can be effective to reduce the aerodynamic loss and heat transfer to the blade tip. Future efforts will include novel squealer shapes for higher aerothermal performance.

  8. blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashishekara S. Talya

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  9. Local measurement and numerical modeling of mass/heat transfer from a turbine blade in a linear cascade with tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peitong

    2000-11-01

    Local mass/heat transfer measurements from the turbine blade near-tip and the tip surfaces are performed using the naphthalene sublimation technique. The experiments are conducted in a linear cascade consisting of five high-pressure blades with a central test-blade configuration. The incoming flow conditions are close to those of the gas turbine engine environment (boundary layer displacement thickness is about 0.01 of chord) with an exit Reynolds number of 6.2 x 105. The effects of tip clearance level (0.86%--6.90% of chord), mainstream Reynolds number and turbulence intensity (0.2 and 12.0%) are investigated. Two methods of flow visualization---oil and lampblack, laser light sheet smoke wire---as well as static pressure measurement on the blade surface are used to study the tip leakage flow and vortex in the cascade. In addition, numerical modeling of the flow and heat transfer processes in the linear cascade with different tip clearances is conducted using commercial software incorporating advanced turbulence models. The present study confirms many important results on the tip leakage flow and vortex from the literature, contributes to the current understanding in the effects of tip leakage flow and vortex on local heat transfer from the blade near-tip and the tip surfaces, and provides detailed local and average heat/mass transfer data applicable to turbine blade tip cooling design.

  10. 3D pressure imaging of an aircraft propeller blade-tip flow by phase-locked stereoscopic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragni, D.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2011-01-01

    The flow field at the tip region of a scaled DHC Beaver aircraft propeller, running at transonic speed, has been investigated by means of a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup. Velocity fields, phase-locked with the blade rotational motion, are acquired across several planes

  11. Tips to Help You Get Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Step in the Right Direction Tips to Help You Get Active View or Print All Sections ... and quality of life. Being more active may help you manage your weight. Starting Physical Activity Healthy ...

  12. 3D pressure imaging of an aircraft propeller blade-tip flow by phase-locked stereoscopic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragni, D.; Oudheusden, B.W. van; Scarano, F. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    The flow field at the tip region of a scaled DHC Beaver aircraft propeller, running at transonic speed, has been investigated by means of a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup. Velocity fields, phase-locked with the blade rotational motion, are acquired across several planes perpendicular to the blade axis and merged to form a 3D measurement volume. Transonic conditions have been reached at the tip region, with a revolution frequency of 19,800 rpm and a relative free-stream Mach number of 0.73 at the tip. The pressure field and the surface pressure distribution are inferred from the 3D velocity data through integration of the momentum Navier-Stokes equation in differential form, allowing for the simultaneous flow visualization and the aerodynamic loads computation, with respect to a reference frame moving with the blade. The momentum and pressure data are further integrated by means of a contour-approach to yield the aerodynamic sectional force components as well as the blade torsional moment. A steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulation of the entire propeller model has been used for comparison to the measurement data. (orig.)

  13. 3D pressure imaging of an aircraft propeller blade-tip flow by phase-locked stereoscopic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, D.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Scarano, F.

    2012-02-01

    The flow field at the tip region of a scaled DHC Beaver aircraft propeller, running at transonic speed, has been investigated by means of a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup. Velocity fields, phase-locked with the blade rotational motion, are acquired across several planes perpendicular to the blade axis and merged to form a 3D measurement volume. Transonic conditions have been reached at the tip region, with a revolution frequency of 19,800 rpm and a relative free-stream Mach number of 0.73 at the tip. The pressure field and the surface pressure distribution are inferred from the 3D velocity data through integration of the momentum Navier-Stokes equation in differential form, allowing for the simultaneous flow visualization and the aerodynamic loads computation, with respect to a reference frame moving with the blade. The momentum and pressure data are further integrated by means of a contour-approach to yield the aerodynamic sectional force components as well as the blade torsional moment. A steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulation of the entire propeller model has been used for comparison to the measurement data.

  14. Active control of the tip vortex: an experimental investigation on the performance characteristics of a model turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anik, E; Abdulrahim, A; Ostovan, Y; Mercan, B; Uzol, O

    2014-01-01

    This study is part of an on-going experimental research campaign that focuses on the active control of the tip leakage/vortex characteristics of a model horizontal axis wind turbine rotor using tip injection. This paper presents both baseline (no-injection) data as well as data with tip injection, concentrating on the effects of tip injection on power and thrust variations with the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR). The experiments are conducted by placing a specially designed 3-bladed model wind turbine rotor at the exit of a 1.7 m diameter open-jet wind tunnel. The rotor blades are non-linearly twisted and tapered with NREL S826 airfoil profile all along the span. The nacelle, hub and the blades are specifically designed to allow pressurized air to pass through and get injected from the blade tips while the rotor is rotating. Baseline results show that the general trends are as expected for a small wind turbine and the maximum power coefficient is reached at around TSR=4.5. Results with injection show that the tip injection has significant effect on the power and thrust coefficients in comparison to the baseline data, especially at TSR values higher than the max C P TSR value. Both coefficients seem to be significantly increased due to tip injection and the max C P TSR value also gets shifted to a slightly higher TSR value. Tip injection seems to have no significant effect for TSR values less than 3.5

  15. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  16. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  17. Experimental assessment of blade tip immersion depth from free surface on average power and thrust coefficients of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Flack, Karen; Luznik, Luksa

    2014-11-01

    Results from an experimental study on the effects of marine current turbine immersion depth from the free surface are presented. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D = 0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy. Thrust and torque are measured using a dynamometer, mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using a shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Two optical wave height sensors are used to measure the free surface elevation. The turbine is towed at 1.68 m/s, resulting in a 70% chord based Rec = 4 × 105. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is installed one turbine diameter upstream of the turbine rotation plane to characterize the inflow turbulence. Measurements are obtained at four relative blade tip immersion depths of z/D = 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.2 at a TSR value of 7 to identify the depth where free surface effects impact overall turbine performance. The overall average power and thrust coefficient are presented and compared to previously conducted baseline tests. The influence of wake expansion blockage on the turbine performance due to presence of the free surface at these immersion depths will also be discussed.

  18. Navier-Stokes analysis of an oxidizer turbine blade with tip clearance with and without a mini-shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony; Dejong, Frederik J.

    1993-01-01

    The Gas Generator Oxidizer Turbine (GGOT) Blade is being analyzed by various investigators under the NASA MSFC-sponsored Turbine Stage Technology Team design effort. The present work concentrates on the tip clearance region flow and associated losses; however, flow details for the passage region are also obtained in the simulations. The present calculations simulate the rotor blade row in a rotating reference frame with the appropriate coriolis and centrifugal acceleration term included in the momentum equations. The upstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade leading edge. The boundary conditions at this location have been determined by Pratt & Whitney using an Euler analysis without the vanes to obtain approximately the same flow profiles at the rotor as were obtained with the Euler stage analysis including the vanes. Inflow boundary layer profiles are then constructed assuming the skin friction coefficient at both the hub and the casing. The downstream computational boundary is located about one axial chord from the blade trailing edge, and the circumferentially averaged static pressure at this location was also obtained from the P&W Euler analysis. Results obtained for the 3-D baseline GGOT geometry at the full scale design Reynolds number show a region of high loss in the region near the casing. Particle traces in the near tip region show vortical flow behavior of the fluid which passes through the clearance region and exits at the downstream edge of the gap. In an effort to reduce clearance flow losses, the mini-shroud concept was proposed by the Pratt & Whitney design team. Calculations were performed on the GGO geometry with the mini-shroud. Results of these calculations indicate that the mini-shroud does not significantly affect the flow in the passage region, and although the tip clearance flow is different, the mini-shroud does not seem to prevent the above-mentioned vortical flow behavior. Since both flow distortion

  19. Distributed collaborative probabilistic design for turbine blade-tip radial running clearance using support vector machine of regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Cheng-Wei; Bai, Guang-Chen

    2014-12-01

    To improve the computational precision and efficiency of probabilistic design for mechanical dynamic assembly like the blade-tip radial running clearance (BTRRC) of gas turbine, a distribution collaborative probabilistic design method-based support vector machine of regression (SR)(called as DCSRM) is proposed by integrating distribution collaborative response surface method and support vector machine regression model. The mathematical model of DCSRM is established and the probabilistic design idea of DCSRM is introduced. The dynamic assembly probabilistic design of aeroengine high-pressure turbine (HPT) BTRRC is accomplished to verify the proposed DCSRM. The analysis results reveal that the optimal static blade-tip clearance of HPT is gained for designing BTRRC, and improving the performance and reliability of aeroengine. The comparison of methods shows that the DCSRM has high computational accuracy and high computational efficiency in BTRRC probabilistic analysis. The present research offers an effective way for the reliability design of mechanical dynamic assembly and enriches mechanical reliability theory and method.

  20. Experimental measurements of out-of-plane vibrations of a simple blisk design using Blade Tip Timing and Scanning LDV measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, D.; Ewins, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The study of dynamic properties of rotating structures, such as bladed discs, can be conveniently done using simple bladed discs where the blades do not have staggering angles. Simplified design, although not truly representative of real structures, can be easy and economic to manufacture and, still, very helpful for studying specific dynamic properties. An example of this can be called as mass mistune blisk study. Experimental measurements of vibrations of bladed discs under rotating conditions can be performed using Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) systems. However, in the aerospace industry, the vibrations of complex bladed discs must be measured under operating conditions which are more hostile than laboratory simulations. The Blade Tip Timing (BTT) measurement method is a measurement technique, which can be used to measure vibrations of bladed discs of an engine aircraft under operating conditions. However, the BTT technique is ineffective when used with a flat bladed disc whose blade vibrations cannot be measured. This can be detrimental when the use of controlled dynamic parameters, such as those obtained from a simple bladed disc design, can improve the confidence for the validation of post-processing software. This paper presents a work about experimental measurements of a simple bladed disc design whose vibrations were measured synchronously by Scanning LDV and BTT measurement systems. A rotating test rig and its mechanical modifications for the installation of the BTT probes are introduced. Implications of rotating a specimen inconsistently are presented so as solutions to obtained constant revolving speed. The experimental comparisons of forced response vibrations measured synchronously at one blade are presented and explained.

  1. Active Robust Control of Elastic Blade Element Containing Magnetorheological Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivrioglu, Selim; Cakmak Bolat, Fevzi

    2018-03-01

    This research study proposes a new active control structure to suppress vibrations of a small-scale wind turbine blade filled with magnetorheological (MR) fluid and actuated by an electromagnet. The aluminum blade structure is manufactured using the airfoil with SH3055 code number which is designed for use on small wind turbines. An interaction model between MR fluid and the electromagnetic actuator is derived. A norm based multi-objective H2/H∞ controller is designed using the model of the elastic blade element. The H2/H∞ controller is experimentally realized under the impact and steady state aerodynamic load conditions. The results of experiments show that the MR fluid is effective for suppressing vibrations of the blade structure.

  2. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  3. Comparing the outcomes of incisions made by colorado microdissection needle, electrosurgery tip, and surgical blade during periodontal surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rampalli Viswa Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Electrosurgery offers many unique advantages such as hemostasis and precise tissue cutting; however, there are a number of disadvantages including thermal injury and delayed wound healing. Aims: The aim of the present study was to compare the outcomes of incisions made by Colorado® microdissection needle, electrosurgery tip, and surgical blade during periodontal surgery. Settings and Design: Twenty-two individuals participated in this study. Three quadrants in each individual were randomly assigned into each of the following experimental groups: Colorado® microdissection needle (CMD, electrosurgery tip (EC and surgical blade (BP, in which, incisions were given with Colorado® microdissection needle, straight electrocautery tip, and a scalpel blade, respectively. Materials and Methods: Blood loss (BL was measured immediately after surgery, and changes in interdental papilla dimensions were recorded at baseline, 7, 30, 120, and 180 days after surgery. Measures of periodontal disease were recorded at baseline, 120, and 180 days after surgery. Postoperative pain and wound healing were recorded at 1, 7, and 15 days after surgery. Results: The use of CMD for periodontal surgery showed better results over EC in all parameters. CMD resulted in lesser bleeding and less postoperative pain and attained similar results to that of BP in clinical parameters of periodontal disease. Conclusions: Colorado® microdissection needle may be a better choice for incisions as it seems to show less tissue damage than cautery and offers tissue healing comparable to scalpel blade.

  4. An Architecture for On-Line Measurement of the Tip Clearance and Time of Arrival of a Bladed Disk of an Aircraft Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Gil-García

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety and performance of the turbo-engine in an aircraft is directly affected by the health of its blades. In recent years, several improvements to the sensors have taken place to monitor the blades in a non-intrusive way. The parameters that are usually measured are the distance between the blade tip and the casing, and the passing time at a given point. Simultaneously, several techniques have been developed that allow for the inference—from those parameters and under certain conditions—of the amplitude and frequency of the blade vibration. These measurements are carried out on engines set on a rig, before being installed in an airplane. In order to incorporate these methods during the regular operation of the engine, signal processing that allows for the monitoring of those parameters at all times should be developed. This article introduces an architecture, based on a trifurcated optic sensor and a hardware processor, that fulfills this need. The proposed architecture is scalable and allows several sensors to be simultaneously monitored at different points around a bladed disk. Furthermore, the results obtained by the electronic system will be compared with the results obtained by the validation of the optic sensor.

  5. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  6. [TIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzini, Augusto; Carrillo, Alvaro; Cantella, Raúl

    1998-01-01

    Esophageal hemorrage due to variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients represents a serious problem for the physician in charge, especially in this country where liver transplants are inexistent; and also, it is a drama for the patient and its familly. We propose here the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS). Twenty one patients were part of a study where 23 TIPS were placed, observing an immediate improval in 18 of them, a rebleeding in 2, within the first 24 and 48 hours. An embolization of the coronary veins was performed in the procedure in 15 patients, and a second intervention due to rebleeding in 2 of them. In the latter patients, the embolization of the coronary veins was rutinary.The survival of the patients has been outstanding.We conclude that this interventional procedure is a worldwide reality in the treatment of esophageal hemorrage by variceal bleeding due to portal hipertension, and it does not cut down the probability of liver transplant, unfortunately inexistent in our country. This procedure results in a low morbimortality with an adequate quality of life.

  7. Rapid tryptic mapping using enzymatically active mass spectrometer probe tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogruel, D.; Williams, P.; Nelson, R.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and accurate tryptic mapping of polypeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass analysis. The technique utilizes mass spectrometer probe tips which have been activated through the covalent immobilization of trypsin. The enzymatically active probe tips were used for the tryptic mapping of chicken egg lysozyme and the results compared with those obtained using either free trypsin or agarose-immobilized trypsin. A significant increase in the overall sensitivity of the process was observed using the active probe tips, as well as the production of more characteristic proteolytic fragments and the elimination of background signals due to the autolysis of the trypsin. Further, probe tip digestions were found to be rapid and convenient. 19 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A Parametric Study of Actuator Requirements for Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control of a Modern High Bypass Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jonathan L.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of aircraft gas turbine engines is sensitive to the distance between the tips of its turbine blades and its shroud, which serves as its containment structure. Maintaining tighter clearance between these components has been shown to increase turbine efficiency, increase fuel efficiency, and reduce the turbine inlet temperature, and this correlates to a longer time-on-wing for the engine. Therefore, there is a desire to maintain a tight clearance in the turbine, which requires fast response active clearance control. Fast response active tip clearance control will require an actuator to modify the physical or effective tip clearance in the turbine. This paper evaluates the requirements of a generic active turbine tip clearance actuator for a modern commercial aircraft engine using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software that has previously been integrated with a dynamic tip clearance model. A parametric study was performed in an attempt to evaluate requirements for control actuators in terms of bandwidth, rate limits, saturation limits, and deadband. Constraints on the weight of the actuation system and some considerations as to the force which the actuator must be capable of exerting and maintaining are also investigated. From the results, the relevant range of the evaluated actuator parameters can be extracted. Some additional discussion is provided on the challenges posed by the tip clearance control problem and the implications for future small core aircraft engines.

  9. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  10. Effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a small horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, A F; Freris, L L; Graham, J M.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An experiment into the effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a 5 kW, two bladed, teetered HAWT has been performed. It has been shown that control activity influences the distribution of strain in the blade but that in a high rotor speed, high cycle fatigue regime this has little influence on damage rate. The experiment was conducted on a small test turbine by implementing variable speed stall, pitch and yaw control strategies and measuring blade flapwise strain response at root and midspan locations. A full description of the investigation is provided. (au)

  11. Design of a 21 m blade with Risø-A1 airfoils for active stall controlled wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Peter; Sangill, O.; Hansen, P.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report, from the project, "Design of a Rotor/Airfoil Family for Active Stall-regulated Wind Turbines by Use of Multi-point Optimization". It describes the full scale testing of a 21 m wind turbine blade specially designed for active stallregulation. Design objectives were...... increased ratio of produced energy to turbine loads and more stable power control characteristics. Both were taken directly into account during the design of the blade using numerical optimization. The blade used theRisø-A1 airfoil family, which was specially designed for operation on wind turbine blades....... The new blade was designed to replace the LM 21.0P blade. A measurement campaign was carried out simultaneously on two identical adjacent wind turbines where onehad the new blades and the other had LM 21.0P blades. Power and loads including blade section moments for the new blades were measured to assess...

  12. Design, Fabrication, and Performance Test of a 100-W Helical-Blade Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine at Low Tip-Speed Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowon Han

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 100-W helical-blade vertical-axis wind turbine was designed, manufactured, and tested in a wind tunnel. A relatively low tip-speed ratio of 1.1 was targeted for usage in an urban environment at a rated wind speed of 9 m/s and a rotational speed of 170 rpm. The basic dimensions were determined through a momentum-based design method according to the IEC 61400-2 protocol. The power output was estimated by a mathematical model that takes into account the aerodynamic performance of the NACA0018 blade shape. The lift and drag of the blade with respect to the angle of attack during rotation were calculated using 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation to take into account stall region. The average power output calculated by the model was 108.34 W, which satisfies the target output of 100 W. The manufactured wind turbine was tested in a large closed-circuit wind tunnel, and the power outputs were measured for given wind speeds. At the design condition, the measured power output was 114.7 W, which is 5.9% higher than that of the mathematical model. This result validates the proposed design method and power estimation by the mathematical model.

  13. Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC-Requirements: Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge and Blade Tip Ejection under Rotating Turbine Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard; Han, Je-Chin

    2014-09-30

    This report deals with the specific aerodynamics and heat transfer problematic inherent to high pressure (HP) turbine sections of IGCC-gas turbines. Issues of primary relevance to a turbine stage operating in an IGCC-environment are: (1) decreasing the strength of the secondary flow vortices at the hub and tip regions to reduce (a), the secondary flow losses and (b), the potential for end wall deposition, erosion and corrosion due to secondary flow driven migration of gas flow particles to the hub and tip regions, (2) providing a robust film cooling technology at the hub and that sustains high cooling effectiveness less sensitive to deposition, (3) investigating the impact of blade tip geometry on film cooling effectiveness. The document includes numerical and experimental investigations of above issues. The experimental investigations were performed in the three-stage multi-purpose turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A&M University. For the numerical investigations a commercial Navier-Stokes solver was utilized.

  14. Methods for root effects, tip effects and extending the angle of attack range to {+-} 180 deg., with application to aerodynamics for blades on wind turbines and propellers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomerie, Bjoern

    2004-06-01

    For wind turbine and propeller performance calculations aerodynamic data, valid for several radial stations along the blade, are used. For wind turbines the data must be valid for the 360 degree angle of attack range. The reason is that all kinds of abnormal conditions must be analysed especially during the design of the turbine. Frequently aerodynamic data are available from wind tunnel tests where the angle of attack range is from say -5 to +20 degrees. This report describes a method to extend such data to be valid for {+-} 180 degrees. Previously the extension of data has been very approximate following the whim of the moment with the analyst. Furthermore, the Himmelskamp effect at the root and tip effects are treated in the complete method.

  15. 3D pin-by-pin power distributions in the vicinity of control blade tips in BWRs based on Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delto, Ralf; Winterholer, Benoit; Bender, Dieter [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany); Kierkegaard, Jesper [Vattenfall Nuclear Fuel AB, Vallingby (Sweden); Loberg, John [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Nuclear Physics

    2010-05-15

    For a deeper investigation of the pellet cladding interaction (PCI) phenomenon in BWRs a detailed knowledge of the pin power distribution in the vicinity of the control blade (CB) tip is required. The spatial resolution of nodal-core simulators like MICROBURN-B2 is normally not fine enough to give reliable information on the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) on a scaling of 1 cm and is not capable of describing the control rod handle precisely. Such fine-resolution LHGR calculations have been performed with MCNP in order to better understand the PCI phenomenon in BWRs. Two cases have been studied which correspond to two loading strategies in two different plants. These cases also have different CB geometry, different burnup of the fuel assemblies (FA) in the controlled cell and different void level. (orig.)

  16. 3D pin-by-pin power distributions in the vicinity of control blade tips in BWRs based on Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delto, Ralf; Winterholer, Benoit; Bender, Dieter; Kierkegaard, Jesper; Loberg, John

    2010-01-01

    For a deeper investigation of the pellet cladding interaction (PCI) phenomenon in BWRs a detailed knowledge of the pin power distribution in the vicinity of the control blade (CB) tip is required. The spatial resolution of nodal-core simulators like MICROBURN-B2 is normally not fine enough to give reliable information on the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) on a scaling of 1 cm and is not capable of describing the control rod handle precisely. Such fine-resolution LHGR calculations have been performed with MCNP in order to better understand the PCI phenomenon in BWRs. Two cases have been studied which correspond to two loading strategies in two different plants. These cases also have different CB geometry, different burnup of the fuel assemblies (FA) in the controlled cell and different void level. (orig.)

  17. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  18. Hover Testing of the NASA/Army/MIT Active Twist Rotor Prototype Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sangloon

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter rotor individual blade control promises to provide a mechanism for increased rotor performance and reduced rotorcraft vibrations and noise. Active material methods, such as piezoelectrically actuated trailing-edge flaps and strain-induced rotor blade twisting, provide a means of accomplishing individual blade control without the need for hydraulic power in the rotating system. Recent studies have indicated that controlled strain induced blade twisting can be attained using piezoelectric active fiber composite technology. In order to validate these findings experimentally, a cooperative effort between NASA Langley Research Center, the Army Research Laboratory, and the MIT Active Materials and Structures Laboratory has been developed. As a result of this collaboration an aeroelastically-scaled active-twist model rotor blade has been designed and fabricated for testing in the heavy gas environment of the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The results of hover tests of the active-twist prototype blade are presented in this paper. Comparisons with applicable analytical predictions of active-twist frequency response in hovering flight are also presented.

  19. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  20. Make Celebrations Fun, Healthy, and Active: 10 Tips to Creating Healthy, Active Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Department of Agriculture 10 tips Nutrition Education Series MyPlate MyWins Based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Make celebrations fun, healthy, and active Eating healthy and being physically active can be a ...

  1. Structural and mechanism design of an active trailing-edge flap blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Natarajan, Balakumaran; Eun, Won Jong

    2013-01-01

    , as the blade is able to withstand increased centrifugal force. The cross-section of the active blade is designed first. A stress/strain recovery analysis is then conducted to verify its structural integrity. A one-dimensional beam analysis is also carried out to assist with the construction of the fan diagram...... of the rotor through modification of unsteady aerodynamic loads. Piezoelectric actuators installed inside the blade manipulate the motion of the trailing edge flap. The proposed blade rotates at higher speed and additional structures are included to support the actuators and the flap. This improves the design....... To select the actuator and design the flap actuation region, the flap hinge moment is estimated via a CFD analysis. To obtain the desired flap deflection of ±4°, three actuators are required. The design of the flap actuation region is validated using a test bed with a skin hinge. However, because the skin...

  2. Active Tuned Mass Dampers for Control of In-Plane Vibrations of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, Biswajit; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2013-01-01

    matrices. The aim of this paper is to determine whether ATMDs could be used to reduce in-plane blade vibrations in wind turbines with better performance than compared with their passive counterparts. A Euler–Lagrangian wind turbine mathematical model based on energy formulation was developed......, centrifugal, and turbulent aerodynamic loadings. Investigations show promising results for the use of ATMDs in the vibration control of wind turbine blades.......This paper investigates the use of active tuned mass dampers (ATMDs) for the mitigation of in-plane vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The rotating wind turbine blades with tower interaction represent time-varying dynamical systems with periodically varying mass, stiffness, and damping...

  3. Optimal external laryngeal manipulation versus McCoy blade in active position in patients with poor view of glottis on direct laryngoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Vasudevan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful endotracheal intubation requires a clear view of glottis. Optimal external laryngeal manipulation may improve the view of glottis on direct laryngoscopy with Macintosh blade, but it requires another trained hand. Alternatively, McCoy laryngoscope with elevated tip may be useful. This study has been designed to compare the two techniques in patients with poor view of glottis. Two hundred patients with ′Grade 2 or more′ view of glottis on direct laryngoscopy with Macintosh blade are included in the study. Optimal external laryngeal manipulation was applied, followed by laryngoscopy with McCoy blade in activated position; and the view was noted in both situations. The two interventions were compared using Chi-square test. The overall changes, in the views, were analyzed with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Both the techniques improved the view of glottis significantly (P< 0.05. Optimal external laryngeal manipulation was significantly better than McCoy laryngoscope in active position, especially in patients with Grade 3 or 4 baseline view, poor oropharyngeal class, decreased head extension and decreased submandibular space (odds ratio = 2.36, 3.17, 3.22 and 26.48 respectively. To conclude, optimal external laryngeal manipulation is a better technique than McCoy laryngoscope in patients with poor view of glottis on direct laryngoscopy with Macintosh blade.

  4. Rhodium in car exhaust tips by total automatic activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.; Westphal, G.P.; Lemmel, H.; Sterba, J.

    2007-01-01

    Exhaust systems of modern cars contain catalysts for the reduction of CO, NO x and hydrocarbons. These catalysts are made of ceramic materials with a large surface on which platinum metals catalyse the oxidation. The catalysts contain approximately 2 g of platinum and 0.4 g of rhodium. Recently platinum is being replaced by palladium. During driving the platinum-group elements (PGEs) are expelled from the tip in fine particles and are deposited in the environment. For a projected study of emissions from cars driven on streets and highways it is important to know which elements can be measured by short time activation analysis without any chemical procedure. (author)

  5. The adipogenic acetyltransferase Tip60 targets activation function 1 of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beekum, Olivier; Brenkman, Arjan B; Grøntved, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism in adipocytes, by regulating their differentiation, maintenance, and function. The transcriptional activity of PPARgamma is dictated by the set...... in cells, and through use of chimeric proteins, we established that coactivation by Tip60 critically depends on the N-terminal activation function 1 of PPARgamma, a domain involved in isotype-specific gene expression and adipogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the endogenous Tip...... of proteins with which this nuclear receptor interacts under specific conditions. Here we identify the HIV-1 Tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60) as a novel positive regulator of PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we found that PPARgamma and the acetyltransferase Tip60 interact...

  6. Active Control of Parametric Vibrations in Coupled Rotor-Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    of modes. The designed control scheme is applied to a coupled rotor-blade system and dynamic responses are numerically evaluated. Such responses show that the vibrations are efficiently reduced. Frequency response diagrams demonstrate that both basis and parametric vibration modes are significantly...... the model becomes periodic-variant. In order to reduce basis as well as parametric vibrations by means of active control in such systems a time-variant control strategy has to be adopted. This paper presents a methodology for designing an active controller to reduce vibrations in a coupled rotor......-blade system. The main aim is to control blade as well as hub vibrations in such a system by means of active control with focus on reducing the parametric vibration. A periodic state feedback controller is designed by transforming the system into a linear time-invariant form. Using this a controller...

  7. Performance characterization of active fiber-composite actuators for helicopter rotor blade applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh K.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    2002-07-01

    The primary objective of this work was to characterize the performance of the Active Fiber Composite (AFC) actuator material system for the Boeing Active Material Rotor (AMR) blade application. The AFCs were a new structural actuator system consisting of piezoceramic fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes to orient the driving electric field in the fiber direction to use the primary piezoelectric effect. These actuators were integrated directly into the blade spar laminate as active plies within the composite structure to perform structural actuation for vibration control in helicopters. Therefore, it was necessary to conduct extensive electromechanical material characterization to evaluate AFCs both as actuators and as structural components of the rotor blade. The characterization tests designed to extract important electromechanical properties under simulated blade operating conditions included stress-strain tests, free strain tests and actuation under tensile load tests. This paper presents the test results as well as the comprehensive testing process developed to evaluate the relevant AFC material properties. The results from this comprehensive performance characterization of the AFC material system supported the design and operation of the Boeing AMR blade scheduled for hover and forward flight wind tunnel tests.

  8. Active twist of model rotor blades with D-spar design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kovalovs

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The design methodology based on the planning of experiments and response surface technique has been developed for an optimum placement of Macro Fiber Composite (MFC actuators in the helicopter rotor blades. The baseline helicopter rotor blade consists of D-spar made of UD GFRP, skin made of +45o/–45o GFRP, foam core, MFC actuators placement on the skin and balance weight. 3D finite element model of the rotor blade has been built by ANSYS, where the rotor blade skin and spar “moustaches” are modeled by the linear layered structural shell elements SHELL99, and the spar and foam - by 3D 20-node structural solid elements SOLID186. The thermal analyses of 3D finite element model have been developed to investigate an active twist of the helicopter rotor blade. Strain analogy between piezoelectric strains and thermally induced strains is used to model piezoelectric effects. The optimisation results have been obtained for design solutions, connected with the application of active materials, and checked by the finite element calculations.

  9. Structural and mechanism design of an active trailing-edge flap blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hwan [Samsung Techwin R and D Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Natarajan, Balakumaran; Eun, Won Jong; Shin, Sang Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); R, Viswamurthy S. [National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore (India); Park, Jae Sang [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Song [Technical University of Denmark, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-09-15

    A conventional rotor control system restricted at 1/rev frequency component is unable to vary the hub vibratory loads and the aero acoustic noise, which exist in high frequency components. Various active rotor control methodologies have been examined in the literature to alleviate the problem of excessive hub vibratory loads and noise. The active control device manipulates the blade pitch angle with arbitrary higher harmonic frequencies individually. In this paper, an active trailing-edge flap blade, which is one of the active control methods, is developed to reduce vibratory loads and noise of the rotor through modification of unsteady aerodynamic loads. Piezoelectric actuators installed inside the blade manipulate the motion of the trailing edge flap. The proposed blade rotates at higher speed and additional structures are included to support the actuators and the flap. This improves the design, as the blade is able to withstand increased centrifugal force. The cross-section of the active blade is designed first. A stress/strain recovery analysis is then conducted to verify its structural integrity. A one-dimensional beam analysis is also carried out to assist with the construction of the fan diagram. To select the actuator and design the flap actuation region, the flap hinge moment is estimated via a CFD analysis. To obtain the desired flap deflection of ±4 .deg. , three actuators are required. The design of the flap actuation region is validated using a test bed with a skin hinge. However, because the skin hinge induces additional flap hinge moment, it does not provide sufficient deflection angle. Therefore, the flap hinge is replaced by a pin-type hinge, and the results are evaluated.

  10. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  11. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  12. Numerical simulation of actuation behavior of active fiber composites in helicopter rotor blade application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Seung Hoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    Smart structures incorporating active materials have been designed and analyzed to improve aerospace vehicle performance and its vibration/noise characteristics. Helicopter integral blade actuation is one example of those efforts using embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuators. To design and analyze such integrally-actuated blades, beam approach based on homogenization methodology has been traditionally used. Using this approach, the global behavior of the structures is predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. For example, the failure analysis of the individual active fibers requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Microscopic approach for the analysis of integrally-actuated structures is established in this paper. Piezoelectric fibers and matrices are modeled individually and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements is adopted. Due to huge size of the resulting finite element meshes, high performance computing technology is required in its solution process. The present methodology is quoted as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the smart structure. As an initial validation effort, present analytical results are correlated with the experiments from a small-scaled integrally-actuated blade, Active Twist Rotor (ATR). Through DNS, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix can be analyzed.

  13. Numerical investigation of tip leakage vortex

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksen, Vegard

    2017-01-01

    The Kaplan turbine has a small clearance gap between the blade tip and casing to allow the blades to rotate freely. This clearance gap is the cause of an undesirable Tip Leakage Vortex (TLV). A TLV might reduce the turbine efficiency, erode the turbine blades or cause instabilities for the power output. A literature study indicated that the tip clearance gap was a critical parameter affecting the behavior of the TLV. A research gap was observed for an operating Kaplan turbine where the ...

  14. Numerical Simulation of the Aerodynamic Performance of the Blades of a Wind Turbine Based on the Blade-tip Losses%基于叶尖损失的风力机叶片气动性能数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭东; 王立存; 蒋仁科; 陈彬

    2012-01-01

    In the light of the influence of the blade tip losses on the load and output power of a wind turbine, contrasted and analyzed were Glarent and Shen blade tip loss correction model. With the traditional momentum blade element theory serving as the basis and based on the improved Shen blade tip loss correction model, the authors presented an aerodynamic correction calculation model for wind wheels. With the help of the model in question,a numerical simulation were performed of the axial and circumferential induction factors and output power of a small power test wind turbine. Through processing and analyzing the test data of the test wind wheel,the calculation results and test data of the model under discussion were compared at the wind speed of 10 m/s and 15 m/s respectively, verifying the reliability of the model. The research results can offer guidance for an in-depth study of the load and fatigue characteristics of the blades of a wind turbine and in the meantime, can lay a theoretical basis for enhancing the output power of a wind turbine and lower the cost of the wind power.%针对叶尖损失对风力机载荷和输出功率的影响,对比分析了Glarent叶尖损失修正模型及Shen叶尖损失修正模型.以传统动量叶素理论为基础,基于改进的Shen叶尖损失修正模型提出了风轮空气动力学修正计算模型.借助此模型,对某小功率实验风轮的轴向和周向诱导因子以及输出功率进行了数值模拟,通过对实验风轮的测试数据进行整理分析,分别将风速10与15 m/s条件下提出模型的计算结果和实验数据进行了比较,验证了提出模型的可靠性.研究结果对风力机叶片载荷及疲劳特性的深入研究具有指导意义,同时为提高风力机输出功率,降低风电成本奠定了理论基础.

  15. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part II: Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    . The remaining two sets of actuators are applied to act directly onto the hub, working as an active radial bearing controlling the rotor lateral movement. The rig is equipped with sensors measuring blade and rotor vibrations. Actuators and sensors are connected to a digital signal processor running the control......This is the second paper in a two-part study on active rotor-blade vibration control. This part presents an experimental contribution into the work of active controller design for rotor-blade systems. The primary aim is to give an experimental validation and show the applicability...... algorithm. Measurement signals and actuator control signals from the sensors and actuators fixed in the rotating disc are transmitted to the control unit through a slip-ring device. Various measured responses of both the controlled and the non-controlled system with identical blades and with deliberately...

  16. Antenna Gain Impact on UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Franek, Ondrej; Byskov, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Antenna gain impact on UWB wind turbine blade deflection sensing is studied in this paper. Simulations are applied with a 4.5-meter blade tip. The antennas with high gain (HG) and low gain (LG) in free space are simulated inside a blade. It is interesting to find that tip antennas with HG and LG...

  17. 3D pin-by-pin power density profiles with high spatial resolution in the vicinity of a BWR control blade tip simulated with coupled neutronics/burn-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Nünighoff, K.; Allelein, H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► High spatial resolution neutronic and burn-up calculations of quarter BWR fuel element section. ► Coupled MCNP(X)–ORIGEN2.2 simulation using VESTA. ► Control blade history effect was taken into account. ► Determining local power excursion after instantaneous control rod movement. ► Correlation between control blade geometry and occurrence of local power excursions. - Abstract: Pellet cladding interaction (PCI) as well as pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) are well-known fuel failures in light water reactors, especially in boiling water reactors (BWR). Whereas the thermo-mechanical processes of PCI effects have been intensively investigated in the last decades, only rare information is available on the role of neutron physics. However, each power transient is primary due to neutron physics effects and thus knowledge of the neutron physical background is mandatory to better understand the occurrence of PCI effects in BWRs. This paper will focus on a study of local power excursions in a typical BWR fuel assembly during control rod movements. Burn-up and energy deposition were simulated with high spatial granularity, especially in the vicinity of the control blade tip. It could be shown, that the design of the control blade plays a dominant role for the occurrence of local power peaks while instantaneously moving down the control rod. The main result is, that the largest power peak occurs at the interface between steel handle and absorber rods. A full width half maximum (FWHM) of ±2.5 cm was observed. This means, the local power excursion due to neutron physics phenomena involve approximately five pellets. With the VESTA code coupled MCNP(X)/ORIGEN2.2 calculations were performed with more than 3400 burn-up zones in order to take history effects into account.

  18. Green Compact Temperature Evolution during Current-Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS of Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Morsi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current-activated tip-based sintering (CATS is a novel process where spark plasma sintering conditions are applied through an electrically conducting tip on a locally controlled area on a green powder compact/bed. The localization of electric current in CATS allows for unique temporal and spatial current and temperature distributions within the tip and powder compact. In this paper, special experimental setups were used to monitor the temperature profiles in the tip and at multiple locations on the surface of nickel powder compacts. A variation in the initial green density was found to have a significant effect on the maximum temperature in the tip as well as the temperature distribution across the powder compact. In general, the lowest green density specimens displayed the best conditions for localized densification. The concept of effective current density is introduced and results are discussed in relation to the densification parameter.

  19. A Comparative Study of Conventional and Tip-Fin Propeller Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1997-01-01

    During more than a decade several attempts have been made to obtain higher propeller efficiencies by radically modifying the geometry in the tip region of the blade. In the tip-fin propeller a tip fin or winglet is attached to the blade tip and integrated into the blade in such a way that the bla...

  20. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, M R; Campos, E A; Rastelli, A N S; Andrade, M F; Caldas, S G F R; Calabrez-Filho, S; Bagnato, V S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek™ Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm −2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm −2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 2 °C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min −1 . The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhane’s test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p < 0.001) between the microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth. (paper)

  1. Vibration reduction methods and techniques for rotorcraft utilizing on-blade active control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotor blades adapted for vibration control have the added benefit of extended blade and rotor life, as well as improved passenger comfort. Approaches that have been...

  2. Control of the Water Transport Activity of Barley HvTIP3;1 Specifically Expressed in Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Shigeko; Shibasaka, Mineo; Maekawa, Masahiko; Katsuhara, Maki

    2015-09-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are involved in the transport and storage of water, and control intracellular osmotic pressure by transporting material related to the water potential of cells. In the present study, we focused on HvTIP3;1 during the periods of seed development and desiccation in barley. HvTIP3;1 was specifically expressed in seeds. An immunochemical analysis showed that HvTIP3;1 strongly accumulated in the aleurone layers and outer layers of barley seeds. The water transport activities of HvTIP3;1 and HvTIP1;2, which also accumulated in seeds, were measured in the heterologous expression system of Xenopus oocytes. When they were expressed individually, HvTIP1;2 transported water, whereas HvTIP3;1 did not. However, HvTIP3;1 exhibited water transport activity when co-expressed with HvTIP1;2 in oocytes, and this activity was higher than when HvTIP1;2 was expressed alone. This is the first report to demonstrate that the water permeability of a TIP aquaporin was activated when co-expressed with another TIP. The split-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) system in onion cells revealed that HvTIP3;1 interacted with HvTIP1;2 to form a heterotetramer in plants. These results suggest that HvTIP3;1 functions as an active water channel to regulate water movement through tissues during the periods of seed development and desiccation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Optimal Topology and Experimental Evaluation of Piezoelectric Materials for Actively Shunted General Electric Polymer Matrix Fiber Composite Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Duffy, Kirsten; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with GE Aviation, has begun the development of a smart adaptive structure system with piezoelectric (PE) transducers to improve composite fan blade damping at resonances. Traditional resonant damping approaches may not be realistic for rotating frame applications such as engine blades. The limited space in which the blades reside in the engine makes it impossible to accommodate the circuit size required to implement passive resonant damping. Thus, a novel digital shunt scheme has been developed to replace the conventional electric passive shunt circuits. The digital shunt dissipates strain energy through the load resistor on a power amplifier. General Electric (GE) designed and fabricated a variety of polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) test specimens. Investigating the optimal topology of PE sensors and actuators for each test specimen has revealed the best PE transducer location for each target mode. Also a variety of flexible patches, which can conform to the blade surface, have been tested to identify the best performing PE patch. The active damping control achieved significant performance at target modes. This work has been highlighted by successful spin testing up to 5000 rpm of subscale GEnx composite blades in Glenn s Dynamic Spin Rig.

  4. Active Vibration Reduction of Titanium Alloy Fan Blades (FAN1) Using Piezoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin; Kauffman, Jeffrey; Duffy, Kirsten; Provenza, Andrew; Morrison, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this paper, a digital resonant control technique emulating passive shunt circuits is used to demonstrate vibration reduction of FAN1 Ti real fan blade at the several target modes. Single-mode control and multi-mode control using one piezoelectric material are demonstrated. Also a conceptual study of how to implement this digital control system into the rotating fan blade is discussed.

  5. Active load reduction by means of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, Ian; Castaignet, Damien; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the blade fatigue load reduction achieved with a trailing edge flap during a full scale test on a Vestas V27 wind turbine. A frequency-weighted linear model predictive control (MPC) is tuned to decrease flapwise blade root fatigue loads at the frequencies where most of the blade...... damage occurs, i.e. the 1P and 2P frequencies (respectively 1 and 2 events per revolution). Frequency-weighted MPC is chosen for its ability to handle constraints on the trailing edge flap deflection and to optimise its actuation in order to decrease wear and tear of the actuator. The controller...... was first tested in aero-servo-elastic simulations, before being implemented on a Vestas V27 wind turbine. Consistent load reduction is achieved during the full-scale test. An average of 14% flapwise blade root fatigue load reduction is measured....

  6. Multipath Suppression with an Absorber for UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2017-01-01

    The deflection of a wind turbine blade can be monitored with an ultra-wideband (UWB) deflection sensing system which consists of one transmitting antenna at the blade tip and two receiving antennas at the blade root. The blade deflection is calculated by two estimated tip-root antenna distances...... verifications of the proposed method are carried out with different full-blade measurements. From all the results, it is found that the proposed technique can efficiently suppress multipath for the in-blade tip antenna, and improve the pulse wave front fidelity, so that the UWB sensing system can also...

  7. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  8. Turbo machine tip clearance and vibration measurements using a fibre optic laser Doppler position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, T.; Büttner, L.; Czarske, J.; Krain, H.; Schodl, R.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a novel fibre optic laser Doppler position sensor for single blade tip clearance and vibration measurements at turbo machines, which offers high temporal resolution and high position resolution simultaneously. The sensor principle is based on the generation of a measurement volume consisting of two superposed fan-like interference fringe systems with contrary fringe spacing gradients using wavelength division multiplexing. A flexible and robust measurement system with an all-passive fibre coupled measurement head has been realized employing diffractive and refractive optics. Measurements of tip clearance and rotor vibrations at a transonic centrifugal compressor performed during operation at up to 50 000 rpm (833 Hz) corresponding to 21.7 kHz blade frequency and 586 m s-1 blade tip velocity are presented. The results are in excellent agreement with those of capacitive probes. The mean uncertainty of the position measurement was around 20 µm and, thus, considerably better than for conventional tip clearance probes. Consequently, this sensor is capable of fulfilling the requirements for future active clearance control systems and has great potential for in situ and online tip clearance and vibration measurements at metallic and non-metallic turbine blades with high precision.

  9. Wind blade spar cap and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mansour H [Raleigh, NC

    2008-05-27

    A wind blade spar cap for strengthening a wind blade including an integral, unitary three-dimensional woven material having a first end and a second end, corresponding to a root end of the blade and a tip end of the blade, wherein the material tapers in width from the first to the second end while maintaining a constant thickness and decreasing weight therebetween, the cap being capable of being affixed to the blade for providing increased strength with controlled variation in weight from the root end to the tip end based upon the tapered width of the material thereof. The present inventions also include the method of making the wind blade spar cap and a wind blade including the wind blade spar cap.

  10. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached...

  11. Analysis of time domain active sensing data from CX-100 wind turbine blade fatigue tests for damage assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Jin [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and LANL-CBNU Engineering Institute, Chunbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hwee Kwon; Park, Gyu Hae [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Taylor, Stuart G.; Farinholt, Kevin M. [The Engineering Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the results obtained using time-series-based methods for structural damage assessment. The methods are applied to a wind turbine blade structure subjected to fatigue loads. A 9 m CX-100 (carbon experimental 100 kW) blade is harmonically excited at its first natural frequency to introduce a failure mode. Consequently, a through-thickness fatigue crack is visually identified at 8.5 million cycles. The time domain data from the piezoelectric active-sensing techniques are measured during the fatigue loadings and used to detect incipient damage. The damage-sensitive features, such as the first four moments and a normality indicator, are extracted from the time domain data. Time series autoregressive models with exogenous inputs are also implemented. These features could efficiently detect a fatigue crack and are less sensitive to operational variations than the other methods.

  12. Computational Modelling of Materials for Wind Turbine Blades: Selected DTUWind Energy Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Computational and analytical studies of degradation of wind turbine blade materials at the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale carried out by the modelling team of the Section Composites and Materials Mechanics, Department of Wind Energy, DTU, are reviewed. Examples of the analysis of the microstructural...... effects on the strength and fatigue life of composites are shown. Computational studies of degradation mechanisms of wind blade composites under tensile and compressive loading are presented. The effect of hybrid and nanoengineered structures on the performance of the composite was studied...

  13. Active load reduction using individual pitch, based on local blade flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben J.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Thomsen, K.

    2005-01-01

    -of-the-art load-reducing concepts. Since the new flow-based concept deviates significantly from previous published load-reducing strategies, a comparison of the performance based on aeroelastic simulations is included. Advantages and drawbacks of the systems are discussed. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.......A new load-reducing control strategy for individual blade control of large pitch-controlled wind turbines is presented This control concept is based on local blade inflow measurements and offers the possibility of larger load reductions, without loss of power production, than seen in other state...

  14. Computational Modelling of Materials for Wind Turbine Blades: Selected DTU Wind Energy Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2017-11-08

    Computational and analytical studies of degradation of wind turbine blade materials at the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale carried out by the modelling team of the Section Composites and Materials Mechanics, Department of Wind Energy, DTU, are reviewed. Examples of the analysis of the microstructural effects on the strength and fatigue life of composites are shown. Computational studies of degradation mechanisms of wind blade composites under tensile and compressive loading are presented. The effect of hybrid and nanoengineered structures on the performance of the composite was studied in computational experiments as well.

  15. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  16. Direct calculation of wind turbine tip loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, D.H.; Okulov, Valery; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    . We develop three methods for the direct calculation of the tip loss. The first is the computationally expensive calculation of the velocities induced by the helicoidal wake which requires the evaluation of infinite sums of products of Bessel functions. The second uses the asymptotic evaluation......The usual method to account for a finite number of blades in blade element calculations of wind turbine performance is through a tip loss factor. Most analyses use the tip loss approximation due to Prandtl which is easily and cheaply calculated but is known to be inaccurate at low tip speed ratio...

  17. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine Ware,; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Robbins, Charles T.; Joy Erlenbach,; Shannon Jensen,; Amy Cutting,; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey,; Amy Hash,; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen,

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  18. Effects of Mie tip-vane on pressure distribution of rotor blade and power augmentation of horizontal axis wind turbine; Yokutan shoyoku Mie ben ni yoru suiheijiku fusha yokumenjo no atsuryoku bunpu no kaizen to seino kojo tono kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.; Maeda, T.; Kamada, Y. [Mie Univ., Mie (Japan); Seto, H. [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    By recent developments of exclusive rotor blade, the efficiency of wind turbine is improved substantially. By measuring pressure on rotor blades of horizontal axis wind turbines rotating in wind tunnels, this report clarified relation between improvement of pressure distribution on main rotor blades by Mie vane and upgrade of wind turbine performance. The results under mentioned have been got by measuring pressure distribution on rotor blades, visualization by tuft, and measuring resistance of Mie vane. (1) The difference of pressure between suction surface and pressure surface on the end of rotor blade increase, and output power of wind turbine improves. (2) Vortex of blade end is inhibited by Mie vane. (3) The reason of reduction on wind turbine performance with Mie vane in aria of high rotating speed ratio is the increase of Mie vane flow resistance.(NEDO)

  19. Metallurgy of gas turbine blades with integral shroud and its influence on blades performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Marino, C.; Kubiak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the microstructure of the gas turbine blades with integral shroud on the blades performance is presented. The analysis of the solidification process of the gas turbine blades during conventionally casting process (equiaxed grains) with all elements which has influence on the mode of its solidification and variation of the microstructure is carried out. Also, the evaluation of the failure of the gas turbine blade is present. A detailed analysis of the blade tip shroud microstructure (presence of the equiaxed and columnar grains) and its influence on the failure initiation and propagation is carried out. Finally, conclusions and some necessary improvements of the blades casting process to prevent blades failures are presented. (Author) 2 refs

  20. Computational micromechanics of wind blade materials: recent activities at the Materials Research Division, Risoe DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky Jr., L.; Broendsted, P.; Qing, H.; Wang, H.; Soerensen, Bent F. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Riso National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Materials Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); OEstergaard, R.C. (LM Wind Power Blades, Composite Mechanics, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-10-22

    Recent research works in the area of 3D computational microstructural modelling, virtual testing and numerical optimization of wind blade materials, carried out at the Materials Research Division, Rise DTU (Programme Composites and Materials Mechanics) are summarized. The works presented here have been carried out in the framework of several research projects: EU FP6 Upwind, Danida project 'Development of wind energy technologies in Nepal' and SinoDanish project '3D Virtual Testing of composites for wind energy applications' as well as the Framework Program 'Interface design of composite materials' and recently established Danish Centre for Composite Structures and Materials for Wind Turbines. Different groups of materials, which are used or have a potential for use for the wind turbine blades, are modelled with the use of the methods of the computational micromechanics, in particular: (1) glass and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites used in the large wind turbine blades, (2) different sorts of timber, used in small wind turbines (first of all, in developing countries) and (3) nanoparticle reinforced polymer matrix composites (which have a potential to be used as components for future high strength wind blades). On the basis of the developed 3D microstructural finite element models of these materials, we analyzed the effect of their microstructures on damage resistance, strength and stiffness. The methods of the 3D model design and results of the simulations are discussed in this paper. (Author)

  1. Kupffer cells are activated in cirrhotic portal hypertension and not normalised by TIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland-Fischer, Peter; Grønbæk, Henning; Sandahl, Thomas Damgaard; Moestrup, Søren K; Riggio, Oliviero; Ridola, Lorenzo; Aagaard, Niels Kristian; Møller, Holger Jon; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells) undergo inflammatory activation during the development of portal hypertension in experimental cirrhosis; this activation may play a pathogenic role or be an epiphenomenon. Our objective was to study serum soluble CD163 (sCD163), a sensitive marker of macrophage activation, before and after reduction of portal venous pressure gradient by insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with cirrhosis. sCD163 was measured in 11 controls and 36 patients before and 1, 4 and 26 weeks after TIPS. We used lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) levels as a marker of endotoxinaemia. Liver function and clinical status of the patients were assessed by galactose elimination capacity and Model for End Stage Liver Disease score. The sCD163 concentration was more than threefold higher in the patients than in the controls (median 5.22 mg/l vs 1.45 mg/l, pportal venous pressure gradient (r(2)=0.24, pportal vein (pportal hypertension. The activation was not alleviated by the mechanical reduction of portal hypertension and the decreasing signs of endotoxinaemia. The findings suggest that Kupffer cell activation is a constitutive event that may play a pathogenic role for portal hypertension.

  2. Predicting mountain lion activity using radiocollars equipped with mercury tip-sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Michael W.; Clark, Joseph D.; Johnson, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Radiotelemetry collars with tip-sensors have long been used to monitor wildlife activity. However, comparatively few researchers have tested the reliability of the technique on the species being studied. To evaluate the efficacy of using tip-sensors to assess mountain lion (Puma concolor) activity, we radiocollared 2 hand-reared mountain lions and simultaneously recorded their behavior and the associated telemetry signal characteristics. We noted both the number of pulse-rate changes and the percentage of time the transmitter emitted a fast pulse rate (i.e., head up) within sampling intervals ranging from 1-5 minutes. Based on 27 hours of observations, we were able to correctly distinguish between active and inactive behaviors >93% of the time using a logistic regression model. We present several models to predict activity of mountain lions; the selection of which to us would depend on study objectives and logistics. Our results indicate that field protocols that use only pulse-rate changes to indicate activity can lead to significant classification errors.

  3. Bladed disc crack diagnostics using blade passage signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanachi, Houman; Liu, Jie; Banerjee, Avisekh; Koul, Ashok; Liang, Ming; Alavi, Elham

    2012-12-01

    One of the major potential faults in a turbo fan engine is the crack initiation and propagation in bladed discs under cyclic loads that could result in the breakdown of the engines if not detected at an early stage. Reliable fault detection techniques are therefore in demand to reduce maintenance cost and prevent catastrophic failures. Although a number of approaches have been reported in the literature, it remains very challenging to develop a reliable technique to accurately estimate the health condition of a rotating bladed disc. Correspondingly, this paper presents a novel technique for bladed disc crack detection through two sequential signal processing stages: (1) signal preprocessing that aims to eliminate the noises in the blade passage signals; (2) signal postprocessing that intends to identify the crack location. In the first stage, physics-based modeling and interpretation are established to help characterize the noises. The crack initiation can be determined based on the calculated health monitoring index derived from the sinusoidal effects. In the second stage, the crack is located through advanced detrended fluctuation analysis of the preprocessed data. The proposed technique is validated using a set of spin rig test data (i.e. tip clearance and time of arrival) that was acquired during a test conducted on a bladed military engine fan disc. The test results have demonstrated that the developed technique is an effective approach for identifying and locating the incipient crack that occurs at the root of a bladed disc.

  4. Antenna Gain Impact on UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Franek, Ondrej; Byskov, Claus

    2018-01-01

    effective (or equivalent) isotropic radiated power (EIRP), an HG tip antenna inside a blade gives stronger direct pulse amplitudes and better pulse waveforms for accurate and reliable distance estimations than the LG. Moreover, the direct pulse with the HG antenna is also closer to the blade surface, which...... in free space have similar realized gain when allocated inside blades, so that the emission power for the HG and LG antennas in blades can be the same. The antenna gain impacts on time-domain pulse waveforms and power distributions around a blade are carefully investigated (with the tip antenna inside...... a blade). Higher antenna gain enlarges both direct pulse and multipath but in different levels. To verify the simulations, time-domain measurements are performed with a full 37-meter blade. Pulse waveforms and power delay profiles are measured. From all the studies, it follows that: with the similar...

  5. Controlled deposition of palladium nanodendrites on the tips of gold nanorods and their enhanced catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gaoxing; Jiang, Huaqiao; Zhu, Hongyan; Lv, Jing-Jing; Yang, Guohai; Yan, Bing; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-08-31

    Plasmonic Au-Pd nanostructures have drawn significant attention for use in heterogeneous catalysis. In this study, palladium nanodendrite-tipped gold nanorods (PdND-T-AuNRs) were subjected to a facile fabrication under mild reaction conditions. The palladium amounts on the two tips were tunable. In the preparation of PdND-T-AuNRs, dense capped AuNRs, a low reaction temperature, and suitable stabilizing agents were identified as critical reaction parameters for controlling palladium nanodendrites deposited on both ends of AuNRs. After overgrowth with palladium nanodendrites, the longitudinal surface plasmonic resonance peaks of PdND-T-AuNRs were red-shifted from 810 nm to 980 nm. The electrocatalytic activity of PdND-T-AuNRs for ethanol oxidation was examined, which was a bit weaker than that of cuboid core-shell Au-Pd nanodendrites; however, PdND-T-AuNRs were more stable in ethanol electrooxidation. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity of PdND-T-AuNRs for Suzuki cross-coupling reactions was investigated. At room temperature, nearly 100% yield was obtained under laser irradiation. The results can further enhance our capability of fine-tuning the optical, electronic, and catalytic properties of the bimetallic Au-Pd nanostructures.

  6. Effects of 5-fluorouracil on the mitotic activity of onion root tips apical meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Lechowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various concentrations of 5-FU on the mitotic activity of onion root tips apical meristem were investigated during 24-hour incubation in 5-FU and postincubation in water. The incubation in 5-FU caused a reversible inhibition of mitotic activity, and waves of the partially synchronised mitoses were observed during the period of postincubation. The most pronounced synchronisation of mitoses was obtained after incubation in 100 mg/l. 5-FU but the mitotic index of the resumed mitotic activity amounted to only one half of the control value. 5-FU was found to cause some cytological changes in meristematic cells such as enlargement of the nucleoli, change in the interphasic nuclei structure, appearance of subchromatid and chromatid aberrations and micronuclei. The effects of 5-FU on nucleic acids and the cell division cycle ace discussed and compared with the effects of 5-FUdR.

  7. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  8. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.

  9. Aerodynamic investigation of winglets on wind turbine blades using CFD

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2006-01-01

    The present report describes the numerical investigation of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets were investigated with different twist distribution and camber. Four of themwere pointing towards the pressure side (upstream) and one was pointing towards the suction side (downstream). Additionally, a rectangular modification of the original blade tip was designed with the same planform area as the blades with winglets...

  10. High Sensitive Methods for Health Monitoring of Compressor Blades and Fatigue Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoś, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic and research aspects of compressor blade fatigue detection have been elaborated in the paper. The real maintenance and overhaul problems and characteristic of different modes of metal blade fatigue (LCF, HCF, and VHCF) have been presented. The polycrystalline defects and impurities influencing the fatigue, along with their related surface finish techniques, are taken into account. The three experimental methods of structural health assessment are considered. The metal magnetic memory (MMM), experimental modal analysis (EMA) and tip timing (TTM) methods provide information on the damage of diagnosed objects, for example, compressor blades. Early damage symptoms, that is, magnetic and modal properties of material strengthening and weakening phases (change of local dislocation density and grain diameter, increase of structural and magnetic anisotropy), have been described. It has been proven that the shape of resonance characteristic gives abilities to determine if fatigue or a blade crack is concerned. The capabilities of the methods for steel and titanium alloy blades have been illustrated in examples from active and passive experiments. In the conclusion, the MMM, EMA, and TTM have been verified, and the potential for reliable diagnosis of the compressor blades using this method has been confirmed. PMID:24191135

  11. High Sensitive Methods for Health Monitoring of Compressor Blades and Fatigue Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Witoś

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic and research aspects of compressor blade fatigue detection have been elaborated in the paper. The real maintenance and overhaul problems and characteristic of different modes of metal blade fatigue (LCF, HCF, and VHCF have been presented. The polycrystalline defects and impurities influencing the fatigue, along with their related surface finish techniques, are taken into account. The three experimental methods of structural health assessment are considered. The metal magnetic memory (MMM, experimental modal analysis (EMA and tip timing (TTM methods provide information on the damage of diagnosed objects, for example, compressor blades. Early damage symptoms, that is, magnetic and modal properties of material strengthening and weakening phases (change of local dislocation density and grain diameter, increase of structural and magnetic anisotropy, have been described. It has been proven that the shape of resonance characteristic gives abilities to determine if fatigue or a blade crack is concerned. The capabilities of the methods for steel and titanium alloy blades have been illustrated in examples from active and passive experiments. In the conclusion, the MMM, EMA, and TTM have been verified, and the potential for reliable diagnosis of the compressor blades using this method has been confirmed.

  12. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-08-12

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally.

  13. Centrifugal compressor tip clearance and impeller flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaatinen-Varri, Ahti; Tiainen, Jonna; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Gronman, Aki; Ameli, Alireza; Backman, Jari [Laboratory of Fluid Dynamics, LUT School of Energy Systems, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Engeda, Abraham [Turbomachinery Laboratory, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Compressors consume a considerable portion of the electricity used in the industrial sector. Hence, improvements in compressor efficiency lead to energy savings and reduce environmental impacts. The efficiency of an unshrouded centrifugal compressor suffers from leakage flow over the blade tips. The effect of tip leakage flow on the passage flow differs between the full and splitter blade passages. In this study, the differences in the flow fields between the full and splitter blade passages were studied numerically in detail. An industrial high-speed compressor with a design pressure ratio of 1.78 was modelled. Numerical studies were conducted with six different tip clearances and three different diffuser widths. The results show that increasing tip clearance considerably increases the reversed flow into the impeller with an unpinched diffuser. The reversed flow then partly mixes into the flow in the same blade passage it entered the impeller and the rest migrates over the blade, mixing with the tip clearance flow. Furthermore, as the reversed and clearance flow mix into the wake, the wake is weakened. As pinch reduces both the reversed flow and clearance flow, the passage wakes are stronger with pinches. However, the pinch is beneficial as the losses at the impeller outlet decrease.

  14. Centrifugal compressor tip clearance and impeller flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaatinen-Varri, Ahti; Tiainen, Jonna; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Gronman, Aki; Ameli, Alireza; Backman, Jari; Engeda, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Compressors consume a considerable portion of the electricity used in the industrial sector. Hence, improvements in compressor efficiency lead to energy savings and reduce environmental impacts. The efficiency of an unshrouded centrifugal compressor suffers from leakage flow over the blade tips. The effect of tip leakage flow on the passage flow differs between the full and splitter blade passages. In this study, the differences in the flow fields between the full and splitter blade passages were studied numerically in detail. An industrial high-speed compressor with a design pressure ratio of 1.78 was modelled. Numerical studies were conducted with six different tip clearances and three different diffuser widths. The results show that increasing tip clearance considerably increases the reversed flow into the impeller with an unpinched diffuser. The reversed flow then partly mixes into the flow in the same blade passage it entered the impeller and the rest migrates over the blade, mixing with the tip clearance flow. Furthermore, as the reversed and clearance flow mix into the wake, the wake is weakened. As pinch reduces both the reversed flow and clearance flow, the passage wakes are stronger with pinches. However, the pinch is beneficial as the losses at the impeller outlet decrease

  15. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ... tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A ...

  16. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA USFoodandDrugAdmin Loading... Unsubscribe from USFoodandDrugAdmin? ... apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from ...

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture ... 50 lb. TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of ...

  18. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ... about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a ...

  19. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  20. Research on the nonintrusive measurement of the turbine blade vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi hai; Li, Lu-ping; Rao, Hong-de

    2008-11-01

    It's one of the important ways to monitor the change of dynamic characteristic of turbine blades for ensuring safety operation of turbine unit. Traditional measurement systems for monitoring blade vibration generally use strain gauges attached to the surface of turbine blades, each strain gauge gives out an analogue signal related to blade deformation, it's maximal defect is only a few blades could be monitored which are attached by strain gauge. But the noncontact vibration measurement will be discussed would solve this problem. This paper deals with noncontact vibration measurement on the rotor blades of turbine through experiments. In this paper, the noncontact vibration measurement - Tip Timing Measurement will be presented, and will be improved. The statistics and DFT will be used in the improved measurement. The main advantage of the improved measurement is that only two sensors over the top of blades and one synchronous sensor of the rotor are used to get the exact vibration characteristics of the each blade in a row. In our experiment, we adopt NI Company's DAQ equipment: SCXI1001 and PCI 6221, three optical sensors, base on the graphics program soft LabVIEW to develop the turbine blade monitor system. At the different rotational speed of the rotor (1000r/m and 1200r/m) we do several experiments on the bench of the Turbine characteristic. Its results indicated that the vibration of turbine blade could be real-time monitored and accurately measured by the improved Tip Timing Measurement.

  1. An Optical Fiber Bundle Sensor for Tip Clearance and Tip Timing Measurements in a Turbine Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Asunción Illarramendi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to measuring blade-tip clearance or blade-tip timing in turbines, reflective intensity-modulated optical fiber sensors overcome several traditional limitations of capacitive, inductive or discharging probe sensors. This paper presents the signals and results corresponding to the third stage of a multistage turbine rig, obtained from a transonic wind-tunnel test. The probe is based on a trifurcated bundle of optical fibers that is mounted on the turbine casing. To eliminate the influence of light source intensity variations and blade surface reflectivity, the sensing principle is based on the quotient of the voltages obtained from the two receiving bundle legs. A discrepancy lower than 3% with respect to a commercial sensor was observed in tip clearance measurements. Regarding tip timing measurements, the travel wave spectrum was obtained, which provides the average vibration amplitude for all blades at a particular nodal diameter. With this approach, both blade-tip timing and tip clearance measurements can be carried out simultaneously. The results obtained on the test turbine rig demonstrate the suitability and reliability of the type of sensor used, and suggest the possibility of performing these measurements in real turbines under real working conditions.

  2. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part I: Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    actuators fixed directly in the blades. However, due to the impracticability and problems by fixing actuators in the rotating blades, it is for practical application of great interest to study whether the vibrations can be controlled using shaft-based actuators, i.e. electro-magnetic bearings...

  3. The effect of forward skewed rotor blades on aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance of axial-flow fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Zhong, Fangyuan

    Based on comparative experiment, this paper deals with using tangentially skewed rotor blades in axial-flow fan. It is seen from the comparison of the overall performance of the fan with skewed bladed rotor and radial bladed rotor that the skewed blades operate more efficiently than the radial blades, especially at low volume flows. Meanwhile, decrease in pressure rise and flow rate of axial-flow fan with skewed rotor blades is found. The rotor-stator interaction noise and broadband noise of axial-flow fan are reduced with skewed rotor blades. Forward skewed blades tend to reduce the accumulation of the blade boundary layer in the tip region resulting from the effect of centrifugal forces. The turning of streamlines from the outer radius region into inner radius region in blade passages due to the radial component of blade forces of skewed blades is the main reason for the decrease in pressure rise and flow rate.

  4. Improved mechanical properties of Ni-rich Ni3Al coatings produced by EB-PVD for repairing single crystal blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Yong Sun; Yan-Ling Pei; Shu-Suo Li; Hu Zhang; Sheng-Kai Gong

    2017-01-01

    Active control of turbine blade tip clearance for aircraft engine continues to be a concern in engine operation,because turbine blades are subjected to wear and therefore cause an increasing tip clearance between the rotating blades and the shroud and also reduce the engine efficiency.In this work,a Ni-rich Ni3Al coating with γ'/γtwo-phase microstructure was deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD),which worked as repairing the worn blade tips of single crystal blades.Nb molten pool was used to increase the molten pool temperature and thus to enhance the deposition rate.The microstructures and mechanical properties can be modified by the deposition temperatures and the following heat treatments.All coatings consist of γ'and γ phases.At deposition temperature of 600 ℃,a dense microstructure can be achieved to produce a coating with grain size of ~ 1 μm and microhardness of ~HV 477.After being heated for 4 h at a temperature of 1,100 ℃,the coatings have a more uniform microstructure,and microhardness maintains at a high level of ~ HV 292.Effect of Hf and Zr on EB-PVD Ni3Al repair coating will be further investigated.

  5. Inverse gradients in leaf wax δD and δ13C values along grass blades of Miscanthus sinensis: implications for leaf wax reproduction and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Huang, Yongsong

    2013-06-01

    Compound specific hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of higher plant leaf waxes have been extensively used in paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, studies so far have focused on the comparison of leaf wax isotopic differences in bulk leaf samples between different plant species. We sampled three different varieties of tall grasses (Miscanthus sinensis) in six segments from base to tip and determined hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of leaf waxes, as well as hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios of leaf water samples. We found an increasing, base-to-tip hydrogen isotopic gradient along the grass blades that can probably be attributed to active leaf wax regeneration over the growth season. Carbon isotopic ratios, on the other hand, show opposite trends to hydrogen isotopic ratios along the grass blades, which may reflect different photosynthetic efficiencies at different blade locales.

  6. Tip60 degradation by adenovirus relieves transcriptional repression of viral transcriptional activator EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Jha, S; Engel, D A; Ornelles, D A; Dutta, A

    2013-10-17

    Adenoviruses are linear double-stranded DNA viruses that infect human and rodent cell lines, occasionally transform them and cause tumors in animal models. The host cell challenges the virus in multifaceted ways to restrain viral gene expression and DNA replication, and sometimes even eliminates the infected cells by programmed cell death. To combat these challenges, adenoviruses abrogate the cellular DNA damage response pathway. Tip60 is a lysine acetyltransferase that acetylates histones and other proteins to regulate gene expression, DNA damage response, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. Tip60 is a bona fide tumor suppressor as mice that are haploid for Tip60 are predisposed to tumors. We have discovered that Tip60 is degraded by adenovirus oncoproteins EIB55K and E4orf6 by a proteasome-mediated pathway. Tip60 binds to the immediate early adenovirus promoter and suppresses adenovirus EIA gene expression, which is a master regulator of adenovirus transcription, at least partly through retention of the virally encoded repressor pVII on this promoter. Thus, degradation of Tip60 by the adenoviral early proteins is important for efficient viral early gene transcription and for changes in expression of cellular genes.

  7. Development of tooling suitable for stall regulated blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, M.

    2001-07-01

    The objectives of the project were to make significant improvements in the production of stall regulated blades in the areas of (a) the tip box, its housing, its mechanism and small GRP parts; (b) mould technology; (c) resins and glues and (d) root tooling. Although wood composite had been identified as a competitive technology for blades, compared with GRP blades, production volumes had been lower; reasons are given. The way in which the four areas identified for investigation were tackled are discussed. The study showed that the mould cycle time can be reduced to two days for a stall regulated blade and the blade quality can be improved by using the composite tip box and new resins. The time required for replication of moulds can be reduced by 40%.

  8. A molecular model for the differential activation of STAT3 and STAT6 by the herpesviral oncoprotein tip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Dey Mazumder

    Full Text Available Constitutive STAT signaling provides growth promoting signals in many forms of malignancy. We performed molecular modeling and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction between the regulatory Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of STAT3 and 6 with phosphorylated peptides of the herpesviral oncoprotein Tip, which facilitates Src kinase mediated STAT-activation and T cell proliferation. The studies give insight into the ligand binding specificity of the STAT SH2 domains and provide the first model for the differential activation of STAT3 or STAT6 by two distinct regions of the viral Tip protein. The biological relevance of the modeled interactions was then confirmed by activation studies using corresponding recombinant oncoproteins, and finally by respective recombinant viruses. The functional data give experimental validation of the molecular dynamics study, and provide evidence for the involvement of STAT6 in the herpesvirus induced T cell proliferation.

  9. Effect of linear and non-linear blade modelling techniques on simulated fatigue and extreme loads using Bladed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsell, Alec; Collier, William; Han, Tao

    2016-09-01

    There is a trend in the wind industry towards ever larger and more flexible turbine blades. Blade tip deflections in modern blades now commonly exceed 10% of blade length. Historically, the dynamic response of wind turbine blades has been analysed using linear models of blade deflection which include the assumption of small deflections. For modern flexible blades, this assumption is becoming less valid. In order to continue to simulate dynamic turbine performance accurately, routine use of non-linear models of blade deflection may be required. This can be achieved by representing the blade as a connected series of individual flexible linear bodies - referred to in this paper as the multi-part approach. In this paper, Bladed is used to compare load predictions using single-part and multi-part blade models for several turbines. The study examines the impact on fatigue and extreme loads and blade deflection through reduced sets of load calculations based on IEC 61400-1 ed. 3. Damage equivalent load changes of up to 16% and extreme load changes of up to 29% are observed at some turbine load locations. It is found that there is no general pattern in the loading differences observed between single-part and multi-part blade models. Rather, changes in fatigue and extreme loads with a multi-part blade model depend on the characteristics of the individual turbine and blade. Key underlying causes of damage equivalent load change are identified as differences in edgewise- torsional coupling between the multi-part and single-part models, and increased edgewise rotor mode damping in the multi-part model. Similarly, a causal link is identified between torsional blade dynamics and changes in ultimate load results.

  10. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists...... is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics...

  11. The active control devices of the size of products based on sapphire measuring tips with three degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leun, E. V.; Leun, V. I.; Sysoev, V. K.; Zanin, K. A.; Shulepov, A. V.; Vyatlev, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    The article presents the results of the calculation of the load capacity of the active control devices (ACD) sapphire tip, which showed nearly 30-fold margin of safety to shock loads and experimental researches in mechanical contact with 5 cogs cutter 15 mm in diameter rotating with a frequency of 1000 rpm, which confirmed the calculations, determined the surface roughness Rz of the contact area of no more than 0.15 μm. Conditions have been created for recording without distortion of the image through a sapphire tip in contact with the processed article. A ACD design with new functionality is proposed: with one, two and three degrees of freedom of the sapphire tip and allows measuring the taper of the article and measurements on the chord. It is shown that with the implementation of their fixed head like the frame of the gyroscope with the rotations around the axes OY and OZ. It is shown that the rotation of the tip around the axis OX can be replaced more convenient for the implementation of the angular offset of the transferred image due to rotation of the output end of the flexible optical waveguide relative to the input. This makes it possible to reduce the "blurring of the image" during registration of the fast moving product profile when the slope of the recorder lines coincides with the slope of the edges of the image elements of the selected moving elements of the article.

  12. A novel folding blade of wind turbine rotor for effective power control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wei; Zeng, Pan; Lei, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel folding blade for wind turbine power control is proposed. • Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to analyze folding blade validity. • Folding blade is valid to control wind turbine power output. • Compared to pitch control, thrust was reduced by fold control in power regulation. • Optimum fold angles were found for wind turbine start up and aerodynamic brake. - Abstract: A concept of novel folding blade of horizontal axis wind turbine is proposed in current study. The folding blade comprises a stall regulated root blade section and a folding tip blade section with the fold axis inclined relative to blade span. By folding blade, lift force generated on the tip blade section changes and the moment arm also shortens, which leads to variations of power output. The blade folding actuation mechanism with servo motor and worm-gear reducer was designed. Wind turbine rotor control scheme and servo system with double feedback loops for blade fold angle control were proposed. In this study, a small folding blade model was tested in a wind tunnel to analyze its performance. The blade model performance was estimated in terms of rotation torque coefficient and thrust coefficient. Wind tunnel experiments were also conducted for pitch control using the same blade model in order to make a direct comparison. The power control, start up and aerodynamic brake performance of the folding blade were analyzed. According to the wind tunnel experiment results, fold angle magnitude significantly affected blade aerodynamic performance and the thrust characteristic together with the rotation torque characteristic of folding blade were revealed. The experiment results demonstrated that the folding blade was valid to control power output and had advantages in reducing thrust with maximum reduction of 51.1% compared to pitch control. Optimum fold angles of 55° and 90° were also found for start up and aerodynamic brake, respectively

  13. Kaplan turbine tip vortex cavitation – analysis and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motycak, L; Skotak, A; Kupcik, R

    2012-01-01

    The work is focused on one type of Kaplan turbine runner cavitation – a tip vortex cavitation. For detailed description of the tip vortex, the CFD analysis is used. On the basis of this analysis it is possible to estimate the intensity of cavitating vortex core, danger of possible blade surface and runner chamber cavitation pitting. In the paper, the ways how to avoid the pitting effect of the tip vortex are described. In order to prevent the blade surface against pitting, the following possibilities as the change of geometry of the runner blade, dimension of tip clearance and finally the installation of the anti-cavitation lips are discussed. The knowledge of the shape and intensity of the tip vortex helps to design the anti-cavitation lips more sophistically. After all, the results of the model tests of the Kaplan runner with or without anti-cavitation lips and the results of the CFD analysis are compared.

  14. Kaplan turbine tip vortex cavitation - analysis and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motycak, L.; Skotak, A.; Kupcik, R.

    2012-11-01

    The work is focused on one type of Kaplan turbine runner cavitation - a tip vortex cavitation. For detailed description of the tip vortex, the CFD analysis is used. On the basis of this analysis it is possible to estimate the intensity of cavitating vortex core, danger of possible blade surface and runner chamber cavitation pitting. In the paper, the ways how to avoid the pitting effect of the tip vortex are described. In order to prevent the blade surface against pitting, the following possibilities as the change of geometry of the runner blade, dimension of tip clearance and finally the installation of the anti-cavitation lips are discussed. The knowledge of the shape and intensity of the tip vortex helps to design the anti-cavitation lips more sophistically. After all, the results of the model tests of the Kaplan runner with or without anti-cavitation lips and the results of the CFD analysis are compared.

  15. Flow characteristics in nuclear steam turbine blade passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, H.J.; Yoon, W.H.; Kwon, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid expansion of condensable gas such as moist air or steam gives rise to nonequilibrium condensation. As a result of irreversibility of condensation process in the nuclear steam turbine blade passage, the entropy of the flow increases, and the efficiency of the turbine decreases. In the present study, in order to investigate the flow characteristics of moist air in two-dimensional turbine blade passage which is made from the configuration of the last stage tip section of the actual nuclear steam turbine moving blade, the static pressures along both pressure and suction sides of blade are measured by static pressure taps and the distribution of Mach number on both sides of the blade are obtained by using the measured static pressure. Also, the flow field is visualized by a Schlieren system. From the experimental results, the effects of the stagnation temperature and specific humidity on the flow properties in the two dimensional steam turbine blade passage are clearly identified

  16. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA USFoodandDrugAdmin Loading... Unsubscribe from USFoodandDrugAdmin? ... apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from ...

  17. Technology Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some inexpensive or free ways that enable to capture and use images in work are mentioned. The first tip demonstrates the methods of using some of the built-in capabilities of the Macintosh and Windows-based PC operating systems, and the second tip describes methods to capture and create images using SnagIt.

  18. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  19. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  20. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  1. Further dual purpose evolutionary optimization of small wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton-Smith, M J; Wood, D H

    2007-01-01

    Much work has been done to maximise the power extraction of wind turbine blades. However, small wind turbines are also required to be self starting and whilst blades designed for maximum power extraction can be optimised analytically, these blades often have poor starting performance. The numeric method of Differential Evolution is used here to maximise for both power and starting performance. Standard blade element theory is used to calculate the power coefficient, and a modified blade element method for starting time. The chord and twist of each blade element make up the genes for evolution. Starting times can be improved by a factor of 20 with only a small reduction in power coefficient. With the introduction of the tip speed ratio as an additional gene, up to 10% improvement in power coefficient was achieved. A second study was done in another case where analytical optimisation is not possible; the inclusion of tip losses. The inclusion resulted in only a small increase in the optimum chord in the tip region which becomes less noticeable at lower tip speed ratios

  2. Application of Piezofilms for Excitation and Active Damping of Blade Flexural Vibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Luděk; Půst, Ladislav; Bula, Vítězslav; Cibulka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2015), s. 59-69 ISSN 0137-5075 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : vibration suppression * parametric antiresonance * active damping * PVDF films Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.661, year: 2015

  3. Aeroelastic Optimization of a 10 MW Wind Turbine Blade with Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Athanasios; Tibaldi, Carlo; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the aeroelastic optimization of a 10MW wind turbine ‘smart blade’ equipped with active trailing edge flaps. The multi-disciplinary wind turbine analysis and optimization tool HawtOpt2 is utilized, which is based on the open-source framework Open-MDAO. The tool interfaces...... to several state-of-the art simulation codes, allowing for a wide variety of problem formulations and combinations of models. A simultaneous aerodynamic and structural optimization of a 10 MW wind turbine rotor is carried out with respect to material layups and outer shape. Active trailing edge flaps...

  4. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost ... accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television ...

  5. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A 50 lb. TV falls with ... story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. About ...

  6. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  7. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ...

  8. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opinion count. Sign in ... and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ...

  9. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  10. Observations of dynamic stall on Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, N.; Shibuya, S. [Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2, 950-2181 Niigata (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Flow field around a Darrieus wind turbine blade in dynamic stall is studied by flow visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement in stationary and rotating frames of reference. The experiment is carried out using the small-scale Darrieus wind turbine in a water tunnel. The unsteady nature of the dynamic stall observed by the flow visualization is quantitatively reproduced in the instantaneous velocity distributions by PIV measurement, which describes the successive shedding of two pairs of stall vortices from the blade moving upstream. The mechanism of dynamic stall is due to the successive generation of separation on the inner surface of the blade followed by the formation of roll-up vortices from the outer surface. Although the qualitative nature of the dynamic stall is independent of the tip-speed ratios, the blade angle for stall appearance and the growth rate of the stall vortices are influenced by the change in tip-speed ratios.

  11. Study of tip loss corrections using CFD rotor computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    Tip loss correction is known to play an important role for engineering prediction of wind turbine performance. There are two different types of tip loss corrections: tip corrections on momentum theory and tip corrections on airfoil data. In this paper, we study the latter using detailed CFD...... computations for wind turbines with sharp tip. Using the technique of determination of angle of attack and the CFD results for a NordTank 500 kW rotor, airfoil data are extracted and a new tip loss function on airfoil data is derived. To validate, BEM computations with the new tip loss function are carried out...... and compared with CFD results for the NordTank 500 kW turbine and the NREL 5 MW turbine. Comparisons show that BEM with the new tip loss function can predict correctly the loading near the blade tip....

  12. The blade element momentum (BEM) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The current chapter presents the blade element momentum (BEM) method. The BEM method for a steady uniform inflow is presented in a first section. Some of the ad-hoc corrections that are usually added to the algorithm are discussed in a second section. An exception is made to the tip-loss correction...... which is introduced early in the algorithm formulation for practical reasons. The ad-hoc corrections presented are: the tip-loss correction, the high-thrust correction (momentum breakdown) and the correction for wake rotation. The formulation of an unsteady BEM code is given in a third section...

  13. Turbomachine blade reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system having a turbomachine blade segment including a blade and a mounting segment coupled to the blade, wherein the mounting segment has a plurality of reinforcement pins laterally extending at least partially through a neck of the mounting segment.

  14. Wind Turbine Blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a blade for a wind turbine, particularly to a blade that may be produced by an advanced manufacturing process for producing a blade with high quality structural components. Particularly, the structural components, which are preferably manufactured from fibre reinforced...

  15. Structural optimization procedure of a composite wind turbine blade for reducing both material cost and blade weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weifei; Park, Dohyun; Choi, DongHoon

    2013-12-01

    A composite blade structure for a 2 MW horizontal axis wind turbine is optimally designed. Design requirements are simultaneously minimizing material cost and blade weight while satisfying the constraints on stress ratio, tip deflection, fatigue life and laminate layup requirements. The stress ratio and tip deflection under extreme gust loads and the fatigue life under a stochastic normal wind load are evaluated. A blade element wind load model is proposed to explain the wind pressure difference due to blade height change during rotor rotation. For fatigue life evaluation, the stress result of an implicit nonlinear dynamic analysis under a time-varying fluctuating wind is converted to the histograms of mean and amplitude of maximum stress ratio using the rainflow counting algorithm Miner's rule is employed to predict the fatigue life. After integrating and automating the whole analysis procedure an evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the discrete optimization problem.

  16. Health State Monitoring of Bladed Machinery with Crack Growth Detection in BFG Power Plant Using an Active Frequency Shift Spectral Correction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifang Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Power generation using waste-gas is an effective and green way to reduce the emission of the harmful blast furnace gas (BFG in pig-iron producing industry. Condition monitoring of mechanical structures in the BFG power plant is of vital importance to guarantee their safety and efficient operations. In this paper, we describe the detection of crack growth of bladed machinery in the BFG power plant via vibration measurement combined with an enhanced spectral correction technique. This technique enables high-precision identification of amplitude, frequency, and phase information (the harmonic information belonging to deterministic harmonic components within the vibration signals. Rather than deriving all harmonic information using neighboring spectral bins in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, this proposed active frequency shift spectral correction method makes use of some interpolated Fourier spectral bins and has a better noise-resisting capacity. We demonstrate that the identified harmonic information via the proposed method is of suppressed numerical error when the same level of noises is presented in the vibration signal, even in comparison with a Hanning-window-based correction method. With the proposed method, we investigated vibration signals collected from a centrifugal compressor. Spectral information of harmonic tones, related to the fundamental working frequency of the centrifugal compressor, is corrected. The extracted spectral information indicates the ongoing development of an impeller blade crack that occurred in the centrifugal compressor. This method proves to be a promising alternative to identify blade cracks at early stages.

  17. Health State Monitoring of Bladed Machinery with Crack Growth Detection in BFG Power Plant Using an Active Frequency Shift Spectral Correction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weifang; Yao, Bin; He, Yuchao; Chen, Binqiang; Zeng, Nianyin; He, Wangpeng

    2017-08-09

    Power generation using waste-gas is an effective and green way to reduce the emission of the harmful blast furnace gas (BFG) in pig-iron producing industry. Condition monitoring of mechanical structures in the BFG power plant is of vital importance to guarantee their safety and efficient operations. In this paper, we describe the detection of crack growth of bladed machinery in the BFG power plant via vibration measurement combined with an enhanced spectral correction technique. This technique enables high-precision identification of amplitude, frequency, and phase information (the harmonic information) belonging to deterministic harmonic components within the vibration signals. Rather than deriving all harmonic information using neighboring spectral bins in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, this proposed active frequency shift spectral correction method makes use of some interpolated Fourier spectral bins and has a better noise-resisting capacity. We demonstrate that the identified harmonic information via the proposed method is of suppressed numerical error when the same level of noises is presented in the vibration signal, even in comparison with a Hanning-window-based correction method. With the proposed method, we investigated vibration signals collected from a centrifugal compressor. Spectral information of harmonic tones, related to the fundamental working frequency of the centrifugal compressor, is corrected. The extracted spectral information indicates the ongoing development of an impeller blade crack that occurred in the centrifugal compressor. This method proves to be a promising alternative to identify blade cracks at early stages.

  18. Preliminary Aerodynamic Investigation of Fan Rotor Blade Morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Various new technologies currently under development may enable controlled blade shape variability, or so-called blade morphing, to be practically employed in aircraft engine fans and compressors in the foreseeable future. The current study is a relatively brief, preliminary computational fluid dynamics investigation aimed at partially demonstrating and quantifying the aerodynamic potential of fan rotor blade morphing. The investigation is intended to provide information useful for near-term planning, as well as aerodynamic solution data sets that can be subsequently analyzed using advanced acoustic diagnostic tools, for the purpose of making fan noise comparisons. Two existing fan system models serve as baselines for the investigation: the Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan with a design tip speed of 806 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.294, and the Source Diagnostic Test fan with a design tip speed of 1215 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.470. Both are 22-in. sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle models that have undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study, restricted to fan rotor blade morphing only, involves a fairly simple blade morphing technique. Specifically, spanwise-linear variations in rotor blade-section setting angle are applied to alter the blade shape; that is, the blade is linearly retwisted from hub to tip. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are made between morphed-blade and corresponding baseline configurations on the basis of equal fan system thrust, where rotor rotational speed for the morphed-blade fan is varied to change the thrust level for that configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that rotor blade morphing could be a useful technology, with the potential to enable significant improvements in fan aerodynamic performance. Even though the study is very limited in scope and confined to simple geometric perturbations of two existing fan

  19. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  20. CFD computations of wind turbine blade loads during standstill operation KNOW-BLADE, Task 3.1 report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe; Conway, S.

    2004-01-01

    Two rotors blades are computed during standstill conditions, using two different Navier-Stokes solvers EDGE and EllipSys3D. Both steady and transient linear k-? RANS turbulence models are applied, along with steady non-linear RANS and transient DESsimulations. The STORK 5.0 WPX blade is computed...... be explained by the difference in the applied turbulence models and the fact that the results from one of the solvers are presented as instantaneous valuesinstead of averaged values. The comparison of steady and transient RANS results show that the gain of using time true computations are very limited...... a three different tip pitch angles, 0, 26 and 50 degrees tip pitch angle, while the NREL Phase-VI blade is computed at 90 degrees tip pitch angle. Generally the CFD codes reproduce the measured trends quitewell and the two involved CFD codes give very similar results. The discrepancies observed can...

  1. Direct Numerical Simulations of a Full Stationary Wind-Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Adnan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of flow past a full stationary wind-turbine blade is carried out at Reynolds number, Re = 10,000 placed at 0 and 5 (degree) angle of attack. The study is targeted to create a DNS database for verification of solvers and turbulent models that are utilized in wind-turbine modeling applications. The full blade comprises of a circular cylinder base that is attached to a spanwise varying airfoil cross-section profile (without twist). An overlapping composite grid technique is utilized to perform these DNS computations, which permits block structure in the mapped computational space. Different flow shedding regimes are observed along the blade length. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the cylinder shaft region of the turbine blade. Along the airfoil cross-section of the blade, near body shear layer breakdown is observed. A long tip vortex originates from the blade tip region, which exits the computational plane without being perturbed. Laminar to turbulent flow transition is observed along the blade length. The turbulent fluctuations amplitude decreases along the blade length and the flow remains laminar regime in the vicinity of the blade tip. The Strouhal number is found to decrease monotonously along the blade length. Average lift and drag coefficients are also reported for the cases investigated. Supported by funding under a KAUST OCRF-CRG grant.

  2. Mechanisms and actuators for rotorcraft blade morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocke, Robert D., III

    this work is a conformal variable diameter rotor system suitable for implementation on a modern tilt-rotor aircraft, which can reduce power requirements in both cruise and hover configurations. An initial prototype variable span airfoil was constructed using a silicone elastomer matrix composite skin and a plastic rapid prototyped morphing substructure. Benchtop and wind tunnel tests verified the ability of this system to increase active wing area by 100%. The prototype technology was then matured for use in the harsh rotor blade environment, with a much stiffer polyurethane skin and a titanium substructure. Coupon testing verified the efficacy of this approach, and a final conceptual design was completed using the stiffness-tuning characteristics of the morphing substructure to create a self-actuating morphing blade tip.

  3. Contactless Diagnostics of Turbine Blade Vibration and Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, Pavel; Vanek, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    The study deals with the contactless diagnostic method used for the identification of steam turbine blade strain, vibration and damage. The tip-timing method based on the evaluation of time differences of blade passages in different rotor revolutions has been modified and improved to provide more precise and reliable results. A new approach to the analysis of the amplitude and time differences of impulse signals generated by a blade passage has been applied. Amplitudes and frequencies of vibrations and static position of blades ascertained by the diagnostic process are used to establish the state of blade damage. A contactless diagnostic system VDS-UT based on magneto-resistive sensors was developed in the Institute of Thermomechanics Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The system provides on-line monitoring of vibration amplitudes and frequencies of all blades and notification of possible blade damage. Evaluation of the axial and circumferential components of the deflections by measuring the amplitude of blade impulse signals results in an overall improvement of the method. Using magneto-resistive sensors, blade elongation and untwisting can be determined as well.

  4. Methodology for Structural Integrity Analysis of Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago de Oliveira Vale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major sources of stress arising in turbomachinery blades are the centrifugal loads acting at any section of the airfoil. Accounting for this phenomenon stress evaluation of the blade attachment region in the disc has to be performed in order to avoid blade failure. Turbomachinery blades are generally twisted, and the cross section area varies from the root of the blade to the tip. The blade root shape at the attachment region is of great concern. Stress concentrations are predictable at this contact region. In this paper, a finite element model has been created for the purpose of assessing stress at the joint region connecting the blade to the disc slot. Particular attention was paid to the geometric modeling of the "fir-tree" fixing, which is now used in the majority of gas turbine engines. This study has been performed using the commercial software ANSYS 13.0. The disc and blade assembly are forced to move with a certain rotational velocity. Contact connections are predicted on the common faces of the blade and on the disc at the root. Solutions can be obtained to allow the evaluation of stresses. Results can be compared with the mechanical properties of the adopted material.

  5. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  6. An Innovative Approach To Making Ultra Light Weight Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Zaki Farooqui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An innovative mould free method for the fabrication of ultimate light weight small wind turbine blades made out of composites has been suggested in this paper. The method has been practically applied with very satisfactory results. The method is low cost and is specifically suitable for individual small wind turbine makers. The airfoils used are simple to shape and possess good Cl/Cd characteristics. The blades are crafted using galvanized iron sheets, aluminum pipes, hard paper and fiberglass. A computer program is included with tip correction features to design the blades at the required power rating, wind speed, tip speed ratio and the chosen constant angle of attack. Results of the program run for designing 250 and 500 watt wind turbine blades at 8 m/s wind speed and tip speed ratios of 5.5 are tabulated. Performance results of the blades thus produced are also discussed.

  7. Improved blade element momentum theory for wind turbine aerodynamic computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance predictions and design applications for wind turbines. However, the classic BEM method is not quite accurate which often tends to under-predict the aerodynamic forces near root and over-predict its performance near tip....... for the MEXICO rotor. Results show that the improved BEM theory gives a better prediction than the classic BEM method, especially in the blade tip region, when comparing to the MEXICO measurements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. Analysis of Different Blade Architectures on small VAWT Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L.; Brighenti, A.; Benini, E.; Raciti Castelli, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper aims at describing and comparing different small Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) architectures, in terms of performance and loads. These characteristics can be highlighted by resorting to the Blade Element-Momentum (BE-M) model, commonly adopted for rotor pre-design and controller assessment. After validating the model with experimental data, the paper focuses on the analysis of VAWT loads depending on some relevant rotor features: blade number (2 and 3), airfoil camber line (comparing symmetrical and asymmetrical profiles) and blade inclination (straight versus helical blade). The effect of such characteristics on both power and thrusts (in the streamwise direction and in the crosswise one) as a function of both the blades azimuthal position and their Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) are presented and widely discussed.

  9. Compressor blade setting angle accuracy study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic test of a small, single stage, highly loaded, axial flow transonic compressor is covered. The stage was modified by fabricating a 24 blade rotor with mis-set blades in a repeating pattern - two degrees closed from nominal, two degrees open from nominal and nominal. The unit was instrumented to determine overall performance and average blade element data. High-response, dynamic pressure probes were installed to record pressure patterns at selected points in the flowpath. Testing was conducted at speeds from 70 to 94% of design equivalent speed with a conventional casing and also with circumferential grooves over the rotor tip. Testing indicated severe performance penalties were incurred as a result of the mis-set blading. Lower flow, pressure ratio, and efficiency were observed for the stage with or without casing treatment. Periodic pressure variations were detected at every location where high response pressure sensors were located and were directly related to blading geometry.

  10. Quantifying uncertainties in the structural response of SSME blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Vinod K.

    1987-01-01

    To quantify the uncertainties associated with the geometry and material properties of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blade, a computer code known as STAEBL was used. A finite element model of the blade used 80 triangular shell elements with 55 nodes and five degrees of freedom per node. The whole study was simulated on the computer and no real experiments were conducted. The structural response has been evaluated in terms of three variables which are natural frequencies, root (maximum) stress, and blade tip displacements. The results of the study indicate that only the geometric uncertainties have significant effects on the response. Uncertainties in material properties have insignificant effects.

  11. Research overview on vibration damping of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bladed disk assemblies are very important parts in auto engine and gas turbine, and is widely used in practical engineering. The mistuning existing commonly in the bladed disk assemblies can destroy the vibration characteristics of the bladed disk assemblies, which is one of the reasons for the high cycle fatigue failure of bladed disk assemblies, so it is necessary to research how to reduce the vibration of the bladed disk assemblies. On the basis of the review of relevant research at home and abroad, the mistuning vibration mechanism of the bladed disk assemblies is introduced, and the main technical methods of the vibration damping of bladed disk assemblies are reviewed, such as artificially active mistuning, collision damping, friction damping and optimization of the blade position. Some future research directions are presented.

  12. Deflection estimation of a wind turbine blade using FBG sensors embedded in the blade bonding line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Woo-Ram; Jeong, Min-Soo; Lee, In; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the deflection of flexible composite wind turbine blades is very important to prevent the blades from hitting the tower. Several researchers have used fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors—a type of optical fiber sensor (OFS)—to monitor the structural behavior of the blades. They can be installed on the surface and/or embedded in the interior of composites. However, the typical installation positions of OFSs present several problems, including delamination of sensing probes and a higher risk of fiber breakage during installation. In this study, we proposed using the bonding line between the shear web and spar cap as a new installation position of embedded OFSs for estimating the deflection of the blades. Laboratory coupon tests were undertaken preliminarily to confirm the strain measuring capability of embedded FBG sensors in adhesive layers, and the obtained values were verified by comparison with results obtained by electrical strain gauges and finite element analysis. We performed static loading tests on a 100 kW composite wind turbine blade to evaluate its deflections using embedded FBG sensors positioned in the bonding line. The deflections were estimated by classical beam theory considering a rigid body rotation near the tip of the blade. The evaluated tip deflections closely matched those measured by a linear variable differential transformer. Therefore, we verified the capability of embedded FBG sensors for evaluating the deflections of wind turbine blades. In addition, we confirmed that the bonding line between the shear web and spar cap is a practical location to embed the FBG sensors. (paper)

  13. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA ... safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  14. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit other Web Sites Maintained by CPSC: cpsc.gov| poolsafely.gov| recalls.gov| saferproducts.gov Privacy, Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ ...

  15. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with ... ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from ...

  16. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category ... Ambulance Service 21,588 views 4:34 Obstructive Sleep Apnea ...

  17. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ... Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add ...

  18. Development of a Novel Erosion Resistant Coating System for Use on Rotorcraft Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and Sikorsky utilizes a two part metal/ cermet coating system on the leading edge of the blades to provide unmatched...ARL, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and Sikorsky utilizes a two part metal/ cermet coating system on the leading edge of the blades to...Rotor Blade Tip Fairing A study by Ely et.al. evaluated dozens of coating technologies and down-selected a two-part metal/ceramic coating system on

  19. Characterization of blade throw from a 2.3MW horizontal axis wind turbine upon failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak, Hamid; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    The present work concerns aerodynamics of thrown objects from a 2.3 MW Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT), as a consequence of blade failure. The governing set of ordinary differential equations for the flying objects are derived and numerically solved using a 4th order Runge-Kutta time advancing...... on their size. Thereafter, throw distance picks up exponentially with the tip speed. By comparing the throw distance calculations with and without dynamic stall model being active, it is concluded that dynamic stall does not play a major role in throw distances....

  20. Rsr1 Focuses Cdc42 Activity at Hyphal Tips and Promotes Maintenance of Hyphal Development in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Rebecca; Heisel, Timothy; Gonia, Sara; Robins, Robert; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The extremely elongated morphology of fungal hyphae is dependent on the cell's ability to assemble and maintain polarized growth machinery over multiple cell cycles. The different morphologies of the fungus Candida albicans make it an excellent model organism in which to study the spatiotemporal requirements for constitutive polarized growth and the generation of different cell shapes. In C. albicans, deletion of the landmark protein Rsr1 causes defects in morphogenesis that are not predicted from study of the orthologous protein in the related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus suggesting that Rsr1 has expanded functions during polarized growth in C. albicans. Here, we show that Rsr1 activity localizes to hyphal tips by the differential localization of the Rsr1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), Bud2, and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Bud5. In addition, we find that Rsr1 is needed to maintain the focused localization of hyphal polarity structures and proteins, including Bem1, a marker of the active GTP-bound form of the Rho GTPase, Cdc42. Further, our results indicate that tip-localized Cdc42 clusters are associated with the cell's ability to express a hyphal transcriptional program and that the ability to generate a focused Cdc42 cluster in early hyphae (germ tubes) is needed to maintain hyphal morphogenesis over time. We propose that in C. albicans, Rsr1 “fine-tunes” the distribution of Cdc42 activity and that self-organizing (Rsr1-independent) mechanisms of polarized growth are not sufficient to generate narrow cell shapes or to provide feedback to the transcriptional program during hyphal morphogenesis. PMID:23223038

  1. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Vibrating Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama N. Alshroof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI modelling of a vibrating turbine blade using the commercial software ANSYS-12.1. The study has two major aims: (i discussion of the current state of the art of modelling FSI in gas turbine engines and (ii development of a “tuned” one-way FSI model of a vibrating turbine blade to investigate the correlation between the pressure at the turbine casing surface and the vibrating blade motion. Firstly, the feasibility of the complete FSI coupled two-way, three-dimensional modelling of a turbine blade undergoing vibration using current commercial software is discussed. Various modelling simplifications, which reduce the full coupling between the fluid and structural domains, are then presented. The one-way FSI model of the vibrating turbine blade is introduced, which has the computational efficiency of a moving boundary CFD model. This one-way FSI model includes the corrected motion of the vibrating turbine blade under given engine flow conditions. This one-way FSI model is used to interrogate the pressure around a vibrating gas turbine blade. The results obtained show that the pressure distribution at the casing surface does not differ significantly, in its general form, from the pressure at the vibrating rotor blade tip.

  3. Numerical simulation on a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine with auxiliary blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, Y. F.; Feng, F.; He, Q. B.; Wang, N. X.

    2016-08-01

    To improve the starting performance of the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT) at low wind speed, and the output characteristics at high wind speed, a flexible, scalable auxiliary vane mechanism was designed and installed into the rotor of SB-VAWT in this study. This new vertical axis wind turbine is a kind of lift-to-drag combination wind turbine. The flexible blade expanded, and the driving force of the wind turbines comes mainly from drag at low rotational speed. On the other hand, the flexible blade is retracted at higher speed, and the driving force is primarily from a lift. To research the effects of the flexible, scalable auxiliary module on the performance of SB-VAWT and to find its best parameters, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical calculation was carried out. The calculation result shows that the flexible, scalable blades can automatic expand and retract with the rotational speed. The moment coefficient at low tip speed ratio increased substantially. Meanwhile, the moment coefficient has also been improved at high tip speed ratios in certain ranges.

  4. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  5. Numerical investigations on axial and radial blade rubs in turbo-machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrhman, Ahmed M.; Tang, Eric Sang Sung; Salman Leong, M.; Al-Qrimli, Haidar F.; Rajamohan, G.

    2017-07-01

    In the recent years, the clearance between the rotor blades and stator/casing had been getting smaller and smaller prior improving the aerodynamic efficiency of the turbomachines as demand in the engineering field. Due to the clearance reduction between the blade tip and the rotor casing and between rotor blades and stator blades, axial and radial blade rubbing could be occurred, especially at high speed resulting into complex nonlinear vibrations. The primary aim of this study is to address the blade axial rubbing phenomenon using numerical analysis of rotor system. A comparison between rubbing caused impacts of axial and radial blade rubbing and rubbing forces are also aims of this study. Tow rotor models (rotor-stator and rotor casing models) has been designed and sketched using SOILDSWORKS software. ANSYS software has been used for the simulation and the numerical analysis. The rubbing conditions were simulated at speed range of 1000rpm, 1500rpm and 2000rpm. Analysis results for axial blade rubbing showed the appearance of blade passing frequency and its multiple frequencies (lx, 2x 3x etc.) and these frequencies will more excited with increasing the rotational speed. Also, it has been observed that when the rotating speed increased, the rubbing force and the harmonics frequencies in x, y and z-direction become higher and severe. The comparison study showed that axial blade rub is more dangerous and would generate a higher vibration impacts and higher blade rubbing force than radial blade rub.

  6. Numerical investigation on aerodynamic performance of a novel vertical axis wind turbine with adaptive blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying; Sun, Xiaojing; Dong, Xiaohua; Zhu, Bing; Huang, Diangui; Zheng, Zhongquan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel vertical axis wind turbine with deformed blades is designed. • The universal tendency of power characteristics for simulated turbine is found. • The whole flow field of different turbines from the aspect of vortex is analyzed. • The tracking analysis of vortex at different positions for a blade is conducted. • The aerodynamic performance of turbine with three deformed blades is analyzed. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine was designed whose blade can be deformed automatically into a desired geometry and thus achieve a better aerodynamic performance. A series of numerical simulations were conducted by utilizing the United Computational Fluid Dynamics code. Firstly, analysis and comparison of the performance of undeformed and deformed blades for the rotors having different blades were conducted. Then, the power characteristics of each simulated turbine were summarized and a universal tendency was found. Secondly, investigation on the effect of blade number and solidity on the power performance of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine with deformable and undeformable blades was carried out. The results indicated that compared to conventional turbines with same solidity, the maximum percentage increase in power coefficient that the low solidity turbine with three deformable blades can achieve is about 14.56%. When solidity is high and also turbine operates at low tip speed ratio of less than the optimum value, the maximum power coefficient increase for the turbines with two and four deformable blades are 7.51% and 8.07%, respectively. However, beyond the optimal tip speed ratio, the power improvement of the turbine using the deformable blades seems not significant and even slightly worse than the conventional turbines. The last section studied the transient behavior of vortex and turbulent flow structures around the deformable rotor blade to explore the physical mechanism of improving aerodynamic

  7. CFD computations of wind turbine blade loads during standstill operation KNOW-BLADE, Task 3.1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, N.N.; Johansen, J.; Conway, S.

    2004-06-01

    Two rotors blades are computed during standstill conditions, using two different Navier-Stokes solvers EDGE and EllipSys3D. Both steady and transient linear {kappa} - {omega} RANS turbulence models are applied, along with steady non-linear RANS and transient DES simulations. The STORK 5.0 WPX blade is computed a three different tip pitch angles, 0, 26 and 50 degrees tip pitch angle, while the NREL Phase-VI blade is computed at 90 degrees tip pitch angle. Generally the CFD codes reproduce the measured trends quite well and the two involved CFD codes give very similar results. The discrepancies observed can be explained by the difference in the applied turbulence models and the fact that the results from one of the solvers are presented as instantaneous values instead of averaged values. The comparison of steady and transient RANS results show that the gain of using time true computations are very limited for this case, with respect to mean quantities. The same can be said for the RANS/DES comparison performed for the NREL rotor, even though the DES computation shows improved agreement at the tip and root sections. Finally, it is shown that the DES methodology provides a much more physical representation of the heavily stalled part of the flow over blades at high angles of attack. (au)

  8. Kupffer cells are activated in cirrhotic portal hypertension and not normalised by TIPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland-Fischer, Peter; Grønbæk, Henning; Sandahl, Thomas Damgaard

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells) undergo inflammatory activation during the development of portal hypertension in experimental cirrhosis; this activation may play a pathogenic role or be an epiphenomenon. Our objective was to study serum soluble CD163 (sCD163), a sensitive marker...... in the patients (52.2 vs 30.4 μg/l, pportal hypertension. The activation was not alleviated by the mechanical...... reduction of portal hypertension and the decreasing signs of endotoxinaemia. The findings suggest that Kupffer cell activation is a constitutive event that may play a pathogenic role for portal hypertension....

  9. Optimization design of blade shapes for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2010-01-01

    For the optimization design of wind turbines, the new normal and tangential induced factors of wind turbines are given considering the tip loss of the normal and tangential forces based on the blade element momentum theory and traditional aerodynamic model. The cost model of the wind turbines...... and the optimization design model are developed. In the optimization model, the objective is the minimum cost of energy and the design variables are the chord length, twist angle and the relative thickness. Finally, the optimization is carried out for a 2 MW blade by using this optimization design model....... The performance of blades is validated through the comparison and analysis of the results. The reduced cost shows that the optimization model is good enough for the design of wind turbines. The results give a proof for the design and research on the blades of large scale wind turbines and also establish...

  10. Nonlinear modeling of tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) in rotating wind turbine blades for damping edgewise vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zili; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2015-01-01

    Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g. This facilit......Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g...... free-surface elevation equally well, the one-mode model can still be utilized for the design of TLD. Parametric optimization of the TLD is carried out based on the one-mode model, and the optimized damper effectively improves the dynamic response of wind turbine blades....

  11. Noise from propellers with symmetrical sections at zero blade angle, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, A F

    1938-01-01

    In a previous paper (Technical Note No. 605), a theory was developed that required an empirical relation to calculate sound pressures for the higher harmonics. Further investigation indicated that the modified theory agrees with experiment and that the empirical relation was due to an interference phenomenon peculiar to the test arrangement used. Comparison is made between the test results for a two-blade arrangement and the theory. The comparison is made for sound pressures in the plane of the revolving blades for varying values of tip velocity. Comparison is also made at constant tip velocity for all values of azimuth angle B. A further check is made between the theory and the experimental results for the fundamental of a four-blade arrangement with blades of the same dimensions as those used in the two-blade arrangement.

  12. Souvenir knife: a retained transcranial knife blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Neil L; Kahana, Tzipi; Hiss, Jehuda

    2004-09-01

    Upon necroscopic examination of a homeless male found comatose in the street and pronounced dead at a medical center 12 hours later, a sharp tip of a knife lodged in the right parietal region of his skull was incidentally discovered. The blade transected the diploe and penetrated the cerebral cortex. Subsequent police investigation revealed that this was the remnant of a stabbing attempt on his life several months prior to his death. The cause of death was determined to be unrelated to the metallic blade fragment, thus making it a truly incidental and rare finding of a "souvenir knife." Nevertheless, since the injury sustained in the stabbing was potentially life threatening, the investigation into that assault was reopened.A case report is presented, along with a brief review of the literature on "souvenir objects."

  13. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  14. Tipping Points? Curvilinear Associations between Activity Level and Mental Development in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Megan; Cohen, Madeleine; Saudino, Kimberly J.

    2017-01-01

    The Theory of Optimal Stimulation (Zentall & Zentall, "Psychological Bulletin," 94, 1983, 446) posits that the relation between activity level (AL) and cognitive performance follows an inverted U shape where midrange AL predicts better cognitive performance than AL at the extremes. We explored this by fitting linear and quadratic…

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Steady Micro-Tip Injection on a Subsonic Axial-Flow Compressor Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingen Lu

    2006-01-01

    tip-clearance flow manipulation. The repositioning of the tip-clearance vortex further towards the trailing edge of the blade passage and delaying the movement of incoming/tip-clearance flow interface to the leading edge plane are the physical mechanisms responsible for extending the compressor stall margin.

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy. 47. Imaging electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction in an acidic medium by the tip generation-substrate collection mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José L; Bard, Allen J

    2003-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium was studied on different electrode materials by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) operating in a new variation of the tip generation-substrate collection mode. An ultramicroelectrode tip placed close to the substrate electrode oxidizes water to oxygen at a constant current. The substrate is held at a potential where the tip-generated oxygen is reduced and the resulting substrate current is measured. By changing the substrate potential, it is possible to obtain a polarization (current-potential) curve, which depends on the electrocatalytic activity of the substrate material. The main difference between this mode and the classical feedback SECM mode of operation is that the feedback diffusion process is not required for the measurement, allowing its application for studying the ORR in acidic solutions. Activity-sensitive images of heterogeneous surfaces, e.g., with Pt and Au electrodes, were obtained from the substrate current when the x-y plane was scanned with the tip. The usefulness of this technique for imaging electrocatalytic activity of smooth metallic electrodes and of highly dispersed fuel cell-type electrocatalysts was demonstrated. The application of this method to the combinatorial chemical analysis of electrode materials and electrocatalysts is discussed.

  17. Administered activity optimization of the MDP labeled with Tc-99 m in bone tip studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, Marlen; Esteves Aparicio, Eric; Dopico Hernandez, Rolando; Gorrin, Orlando Cabrera

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the optimum activity of the Cuban MDP labeled with Tc-99 m, for establishing a compromise relation between image quality and patient radiological protection in Nuclear Medicine studies. The used statistical technique was the discriminant analysis to arrive at the optimization criterion. Three samples of 18 patients each were selected. Each sample was undergone to a different acquisition protocol. Each sample was divided into three groups of 6 patients each. The administered activities were: 293 MBq, 430 MBq or 598 MBq. Images of hands and femurs were graded for each study. The ratios Signal /Background and Signal/ Noise were processed. The value of 430 MBq was enough to obtain good image quality using a protocol of 10 minutes of acquisition for the used technical conditions. (author)

  18. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  19. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  20. Resonant vibration control of three-bladed wind turbine rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Svendsen, Martin Nymann; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2012-01-01

    Rotors with blades, as in wind turbines, are prone to vibrations due to the flexibility of the blades and the support. In the present paper a theory is developed for active control of a combined set of vibration modes in three-bladed rotors. The control system consists of identical collocated...... to influence of other nonresonant modes. The efficiency of the method isdemonstrated byapplication to a rotor with 42 m blades, where the sensor/actuator system is implemented in the form of an axial extensible strut near the root of each blade. The load is provided by a simple but fully threedimensional...... correlated wind velocity field. It is shown by numerical simulations that the active damping system can provide a significant reduction in the response amplitude of the targeted modes, while applying control moments to the blades that are about 1 order of magnitude smaller than the moments from the external...

  1. The heat transfer analysis of the first stage blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Choi, Bum Seog; Park, Byung Gyu; Yoon, Eui Soo

    2001-01-01

    To get higher efficiency of gas turbine, the designer should have more higher Turbine Inlet Temperature(TIT). Today, modern gas turbine having sophisticated cooling scheme has TIT above 1,700 .deg. C. In the Korea, many gas turbine having TIT above 1,300 .deg. C was imported and being operated, but the gas with high TIT above 1,300 .deg. C in the turbine will give damage to liner of combustor, and blade of turbine and etc. So frequently maintenance for parts enduring high temperature was performed. In this study, the heat transfer analysis of cooling air in the internal cooling channel (network analysis) and temperature analysis of the blade (Finite Element Analysis) in the first stage rotor was conducted for development of the optimal cooling passage design procedure. The results of network analysis and FEM analysis of blade show that the high temperature spot are occurred at the leading edge, trailing edge near tip, and platform. So to get more reliable performance of gas turbine, the more efficient cooling method should be applied at the leading edge and tip section and the thermal barrier coating on the blade surface has important role in cooling blade

  2. Effect of Blade Pitch Angle on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Straight-bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Based on Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhao Yang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The blade pitch angle has a significant influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines. However, few research results have revealed its impact on the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (Sb-VAWT. In this paper, wind tunnel experiments and CFD simulations were performed at the Sb-VAWT to investigate the effect of different blade pitch angles on the pressure distribution on the blade surface, the torque coefficient, and the power coefficient. In this study, the airfoil type was NACA0021 with two blades. The Sb-VAWT had a rotor radius of 1.0 m with a spanwise length of 1.2 m. The simulations were based on the k-ω Shear Stress Transport (SST turbulence model and the wind tunnel experiments were carried out using a high-speed multiport pressure device. As a result, it was found that the maximum pressure difference on the blade surface was obtained at the blade pitch angle of β = 6° in the upstream region. However, the maximum pressure coefficient was shown at the blade pitch angle of β = 8° in the downstream region. The torque coefficient acting on a single blade reached its maximum value at the blade pitch angle of β = 6°. As the tip speed ratio increased, the power coefficient became higher and reached the optimum level. Subsequently, further increase of the tip speed ratio only led to a quick reversion of the power coefficient. In addition, the results from CFD simulations had also a good agreement with the results from the wind tunnel experiments. As a result, the blade pitch angle did not have a significant influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the Sb-VAWT.

  3. Computational analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide flow around a turbine and compressor BLADE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Nam H.; Suh, Kune Y.; Kim, Seung O.

    2007-01-01

    The turbine and compressor isentropic efficiencies are one of the major parameters affecting the overall Brayton cycle efficiency. Thus, the optimal turbine and compressor design should contribute to the economics of future nuclear fission and fusion energy systems. A computation analysis was performed utilizing CFX for the supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO 2 ) flow around a turbine and compressor blade to check on the potential efficiency of the turbine and compressor which determine such basic design values as the blade (or impeller) and nozzle (or diffuser) types, blade height, and minimum and maximum radii of the hub and tip. Basic design values of the turbine and compressor blades based on the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) design code was generated by ANSYS BladeGen TM . The boundary conditions were based on the KALIMER-600 secondary loop. Optimal SCO 2 turbine and compressor blades were developed for high efficiency of 90% by the computational analysis. (author)

  4. The Performance Test of Three Different Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT Blade Shapes Using Experimental and Numerical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tong Chong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Three different horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT blade geometries with the same diameter of 0.72 m using the same NACA4418 airfoil profile have been investigated both experimentally and numerically. The first is an optimum (OPT blade shape, obtained using improved blade element momentum (BEM theory. A detailed description of the blade geometry is also given. The second is an untapered and optimum twist (UOT blade with the same twist distributions as the OPT blade. The third blade is untapered and untwisted (UUT. Wind tunnel experiments were used to measure the power coefficients of these blades, and the results indicate that both the OPT and UOT blades perform with the same maximum power coefficient, Cp = 0.428, but it is located at different tip speed ratio, λ = 4.92 for the OPT blade and λ = 4.32 for the UOT blade. The UUT blade has a maximum power coefficient of Cp = 0.210 at λ = 3.86. After the tests, numerical simulations were performed using a full three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD method using the k-ω SST turbulence model. It has been found that CFD predictions reproduce the most accurate model power coefficients. The good agreement between the measured and computed power coefficients of the three models strongly suggest that accurate predictions of HAWT blade performance at full-scale conditions are also possible using the CFD method.

  5. Investigation of Blade-row Flow Distributions in Axial-flow-compressor Stage Consisting of Guide Vanes and Rotor-blade Row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, John J; Dugan, Paul D; Budinger, Raymond E; Goelzer, H Fred

    1950-01-01

    A 30-inch tip-diameter axial-flow compressor stage was investigated with and without rotor to determine individual blade-row performance, interblade-row effects, and outer-wall boundary-layer conditions. Velocity gradients at guide-vane outlet without rotor approximated design assumptions, when the measured variation of leaving angle was considered. With rotor in operation, Mach number and rotor-blade effects changed flow distribution leaving guide vanes and invalidated design assumption of radial equilibrium. Rotor-blade performance correlated interpolated two-dimensional results within 2 degrees, although tip stall was indicated in experimental and not two-dimensional results. Boundary-displacement thickness was less than 1.0 and 1.5 percent of passage height after guide vanes and after rotor, respectively, but increased rapidly after rotor when tip stall occurred.

  6. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account

  7. Comparison of the effects of 23-gauge and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy blade designs on incision architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Inoue,1 Dina Joy K Abulon,2 Akito Hirakata1 1Kyorin Eye Center, School of Medicine, Kyorin University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Alcon Research, Ltd., Irvine, CA, USA Purpose: To compare the effects of different 23- and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy trocar cannula entry systems on incision architecture.Methods: We tested one ridged microvitreoretinal (MVR, one non-ridged MVR, one pointed beveled, and one round-tipped beveled blade (n=10 per blade design per incision type. Each blade’s straight and oblique incision architecture was assessed in a silicone disc simulating the sclera. Wound leakage under pressure and endoscopic observations were conducted on sclerotomy sites of isolated porcine eyes (n=4 per blade design after simulated vitrectomy.Results: Differences in blade design created distinct incision architecture. Incisions were linear with the ridged MVR blade, flattened “M-shaped” with the non-ridged MVR blade, asymmetrical chevron-shaped with the pointed beveled blade, and curved with the round-tipped beveled blade. With the exception of oblique entry incision thickness, both MVR blade designs created thinner incisions than the beveled blades at entry and exit sites. Only the ridged MVR blade created incisions with no leakage. Vitreous incarceration was observed with all trocar cannula systems.Conclusion: Wound closure in porcine eyes was similar with all blades despite differences in incision architecture. Wound leakage occurred at low to moderate infusion pressures with most blades; no wound leakage was observed with ridged MVR blades. Keywords: entry system, incision closure, leakage, pars plana incision, sclerotomy, trocar blade 

  8. Tiltrotor research aircraft composite blade repairs: Lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Paul S.; Groepler, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The XV-15, N703NA Tiltrotor Research Aircraft located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, currently uses a set of composite rotor blades of complex shape known as the advanced technology blades (ATBs). The main structural element of the blades is a D-spar constructed of unidirectional, angled fiberglass/graphite, with the aft fairing portion of the blades constructed of a fiberglass cross-ply skin bonded to a Nomex honeycomb core. The blade tip is a removable laminate shell that fits over the outboard section of the spar structure, which contains a cavity to retain balance weights. Two types of tip shells are used for research. One is highly twisted (more than a conventional helicopter blade) and has a hollow core constructed of a thin Nomex-honeycomb-and-fiberglass-skin sandwich; the other is untwisted with a solid Nomex honeycomb core and a fiberglass cross-ply skin. During initial flight testing of the blades, a number of problems in the composite structure were encountered. These problems included debonding between the fiberglass skin and the honeycomb core, failure of the honeycomb core, failures in fiberglass splices, cracks in fiberglass blocks, misalignment of mated composite parts, and failures of retention of metal fasteners. Substantial time was spent in identifying and repairing these problems. Discussed here are the types of problems encountered, the inspection procedures used to identify each problem, the repairs performed on the damaged or flawed areas, the level of criticality of the problems, and the monitoring of repaired areas. It is hoped that this discussion will help designers, analysts, and experimenters in the future as the use of composites becomes more prevalent.

  9. Tiltrotor Research Aircraft composite blade repairs - Lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Paul S.; Groepler, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The XV-15, N703NA Tiltrotor Research Aircraft located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, currently uses a set of composite rotor blades of complex shape known as the advanced technology blades (ATBs). The main structural element of the blades is a D-spar constructed of unidirectional, angled fiberglass/graphite, with the aft fairing portion of the blades constructed of a fiberglass cross-ply skin bonded to a Nomex honeycomb core. The blade tip is a removable laminate shell that fits over the outboard section of the spar structure, which contains a cavity to retain balance weights. Two types of tip shells are used for research. One is highly twisted (more than a conventional helicopter blade) and has a hollow core constructed of a thin Nomex-honeycomb-and-fiberglass-skin sandwich; the other is untwisted with a solid Nomex honeycomb core and a fiberglass cross-ply skin. During initial flight testing of the blades, a number of problems in the composite structure were encountered. These problems included debonding between the fiberglass skin and the honeycomb core, failure of the honeycomb core, failures in fiberglass splices, cracks in fiberglass blocks, misalignment of mated composite parts, and failures of retention of metal fasteners. Substantial time was spent in identifying and repairing these problems. Discussed here are the types of problems encountered, the inspection procedures used to identify each problem, the repairs performed on the damaged or flawed areas, the level of criticality of the problems, and the monitoring of repaired areas. It is hoped that this discussion will help designers, analysts, and experimenters in the future as the use of composites becomes more prevalent.

  10. Prediction of tip vortex cavitation for ship propellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oprea, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    An open propeller is the conventional device providing thrust for ships. Due to its working principles, regions with low pressure are formed on its blades specifically at the leading edge and in the tip region. If this pressure is becoming lower than the vapor pressure, the cavitation phenomenon is

  11. Vortex methods to answer the need for improved understanding and modelling of tip-loss factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel; Dixon, Kristian; Gaunaa, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Standard blade element momentum (BEM) codes use Prandtl¿s tip-loss correction which relies on simplified vortex theory under the assumption of optimal operating condition and no wake expansion. The various tip-loss functions found in the literature are listed. A simple comparison between them shows...

  12. Numerical investigation of tip clearance cavitation in Kaplan runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforova, K.; Semenov, G.; Kuznetsov, I.; Spiridonov, E.

    2016-11-01

    There is a gap between the Kaplan runner blade and the shroud that makes for a special kind of cavitation: cavitation in the tip leakage flow. Two types of cavitation caused by the presence of clearance gap are known: tip vortex cavitation that appears at the core of the rolled up vortex on the blade suction side and tip clearance cavitation that appears precisely in the gap between the blade tip edge and the shroud. In the context of this work numerical investigation of the model Kaplan runner has been performed taking into account variable tip clearance for several cavitation regimes. The focus is put on investigation of structure and origination of mechanism of cavitation in the tip leakage flow. Calculations have been performed with the help of 3-D unsteady numerical model for two-phase medium. Modeling of turbulent flow in this work has been carried out using full equations of Navier-Stokes averaged by Reynolds with correction for streamline curvature and system rotation. For description of this medium (liquid-vapor) simplification of Euler approach is used; it is based on the model of interpenetrating continuums, within the bounds of this two- phase medium considered as a quasi-homogeneous mixture with the common velocity field and continuous distribution of density for both phases. As a result, engineering techniques for calculation of cavitation conditioned by existence of tip clearance in model turbine runner have been developed. The detailed visualization of the flow was carried out and vortex structure on the suction side of the blade was reproduced. The range of frequency with maximum value of pulsation was assigned and maximum energy frequency was defined; it is based on spectral analysis of the obtained data. Comparison between numerical computation results and experimental data has been also performed. The location of cavitation zone has a good agreement with experiment for all analyzed regimes.

  13. Ceramic blade attachment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

    1996-12-03

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

  14. Blade dynamic stress analysis of rotating bladed disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellner J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling of steady forced bladed disk vibrations and with dynamic stress calculation of the blades. The blades are considered as 1D kontinuum elastic coupled with three-dimensional elastic disk centrally clamped into rotor rotating with constant angular speed. The steady forced vibrations are generated by the aerodynamic forces acting along the blade length. By using modal synthesis method the mathematical model of the rotating bladed disk is condensed to calculate steady vibrations. Dynamic stress analysis of the blades is based on calculation of the time dependent reduced stress in blade cross-sections by using Hubert-Misses-Hencky stress hypothesis. The presented method is applied to real turbomachinery rotor with blades connected on the top with shroud.

  15. Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy: comparing the arthrotomy knife to the Bovie blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Priscilla G; Sharp, Nicole E; St Peter, Shawn D

    2014-07-01

    Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed at our institution using an arthrotomy knife until it became unavailable in 2010. Thus, we adapted the use of the blunt Bovie tip, which can be used with or without electrocautery to perform the myotomy. This study compared the outcomes between using the arthrotomy knife versus the Bovie blade in laparoscopic pyloromyotomies. Retrospective review was performed on all laparoscopic pyloromyotomy patients from October 2007 to September 2012. Arthrotomy knife pyloromyotomy patients were compared with those performed with the Bovie blade. Patient demographics, diagnostic measurements, electrolyte levels, length of stay, operative time, and complications were compared. A total of 381 patients were included, with 191 in the arthrotomy group and 190 in the Bovie blade group. No significant differences existed between groups in age, weight, gender, pyloric dimensions, electrolyte levels, or length of stay. Mean operative times were 15.8±5.6 min with knife and 16.4±5.3 min for Bovie blade (P=0.24). In the arthrotomy knife group, there was one incomplete pyloromyotomy and one omental herniation. There was one wound infection in each group. Readmission rate was greater in the arthrotomy knife group (5.7%) versus the Bovie blade group (3.1%). The Bovie blade appears to offer no objective disadvantages compared with the arthrotomy knife when performing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inductive sensors for blade tip-timing in gas turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przysowa Radosław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews features and applications of the upgraded inductive sensor for BTT, which is able to operate in contact with exhaust gases of temperature even as high as 1200 K. The new design includes metal-ceramic housing ensuring proper heat transfer, magnetic circuit containing set of permanent magnets with various magnetic field values and Curie temperatures, completely redesigned windings and current/voltage converter used instead of an electromotive force amplifier. Its principle of operation is based on electro-dynamical interaction and therefore it may be referred as a passive eddy-current sensor. The sensor technique has been demonstrated on four stages of a surplus military turbofan including the high pressure turbine as part of the engine health monitoring system. We present signal samples and review methods used for online processing of time-of-arrival signals when only a limited number of sensors is available.

  17. Changes in hormonal balance and meristematic activity in primary root tips on the slowly rotating clinostat and their effect on the development of the rapeseed root system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarrouf, J; Schoevaert, D; Maldiney, R; Perbal, G

    1999-04-01

    The morphometry of the root system, the meristematic activity and the level of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin in the primary root tips of rapeseed seedlings were analyzed as functions of time on a slowly rotating clinostat (1 rpm) or in the vertical controls (1 rpm). The fresh weight of the root system was 30% higher throughout the growth period (25 days) in clinorotated seedlings. Morphometric analysis showed that the increase in biomass on the clinostat was due to greater primary root growth, earlier initiation and greater elongation of the secondary roots, which could be observed even in 5-day-old seedlings. However, after 15 days, the growth of the primary root slowed on the clinostat, whereas secondary roots still grew faster in clinorotated plants than in the controls. At this time, the secondary roots began to be initiated closer to the root tip on the clinostat than in the control. Analysis of the meristematic activity and determination of the levels in IAA, ABA and zeatin in the primary root tips demonstrated that after 5 days on the clinostat, the increased length of the primary root could be the consequence of higher meristematic activity and coincided with an increase in both IAA and ABA concentrations. After 15 days on the clinostat, a marked increase in IAA, ABA and zeatin, which probably reached supraoptimal levels, seems to cause a progressive disturbance of the meristematic cells, during a decrease of primary root growth between 15 and 25 days. These modifications in the hormonal balance and the perturbation of the meristematic activity on the clinostat were followed by a loss of apical dominance, which was responsible for the early initiation of secondary roots, the greater elongation of the root system and the emergence of the lateral roots near the tip of the primary root.

  18. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  19. 2D simulation of active species and ozone production in a multi-tip DC air corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, M.; Eichwald, O.; Sarrette, J. P.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2011-11-01

    The present paper shows for the first time in the literature a complete 2D simulation of the ozone production in a DC positive multi-tip to plane corona discharge reactor crossed by a dry air flow at atmospheric pressure. The simulation is undertaken until 1 ms and involves tens of successive discharge and post-discharge phases. The air flow is stressed by several monofilament corona discharges generated by a maximum of four anodic tips distributed along the reactor. The nonstationary hydrodynamics model for reactive gas mixture is solved using the commercial FLUENT software. During each discharge phase, thermal and vibrational energies as well as densities of radical and metastable excited species are locally injected as source terms in the gas medium surrounding each tip. The chosen chemical model involves 10 neutral species reacting following 24 reactions. The obtained results allow us to follow the cartography of the temperature and the ozone production inside the corona reactor as a function of the number of high voltage anodic tips.

  20. Individual blade pitch for yaw control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navalkar, S T; Van Wingerden, J W; Van Kuik, G A M

    2014-01-01

    Individual pitch control (IPC) for reducing blade loads has been investigated and proven successful in recent literature. For IPC, the multi-blade co-ordinate (MBC) transformation is used to process the blade load signals from the rotating to a stationary frame of reference. In the stationary frame of reference, the yaw error of a turbine can be appended to generate IPC actions that are able to achieve turbine yaw control for a turbine in free yaw. In this paper, IPC for yaw control is tested on a high-fidelity numerical model of a commercially produced wind turbine in free yaw. The tests show that yaw control using IPC has the distinct advantage that the yaw system loads and support structure loading are substantially reduced. However, IPC for yaw control also shows a reduction in IPC blade load reduction potential and causes a slight increase in pitch activity. Thus, the key contribution of this paper is the concept demonstration of IPC for yaw control. Further, using IPC for yaw as a tuning parameter, it is shown how the best trade-off between blade loading, pitch activity and support structure loading can be achieved for wind turbine design

  1. New morphing blade section designs and structural solutions for smart blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakalas, Anargyros A.; Machairas, Theodore; Solomou, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    Within INNWIND.EU new concepts are investigated having the ultimate goal to reduce the cost per kilowatt-hour of the produced energy. With increasing size of wind turbines, new approaches to load control are required to reduce the stresses in blades. Experimental and numerical studies in the fields...... of helicopter and wind turbine blade research have shown the potential of shape morphing in reducing blade loads. Morphing technologies, along with other control concepts, are investigated under Task 2.3 of WP “Lightweight Rotor”, against aerodynamic compliance and requirements of the complete wind turbine...... the efforts performed within Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design” of INNWIND.Eu work-package WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” regarding the structural solutions necessary to accommodate the requirements of smart blades developed within work-package WP2 Task 2.3 “Active and passive loads control and alleviation...

  2. The use of an optical data acquisition system for bladed disk vibration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C.; Meyn, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new concept in instrumentation was developed by engineers at NASA Lewis Research Center to collect vibration data from multi-bladed rotors. This new concept, known as the optical data acquisition system, uses optical transducers to measure bladed tip deflections by reflection of light beams off the tips of the blades as they pass in front of the optical transducer. By using an array of transducers around the perimeter of the rotor, detailed vibration signals can be obtained. In this study, resonant frequencies and mode shapes were determined for a 56 bladed rotor using the optical system. Frequency data from the optical system was also compared to data obtained from strain gauge measurements and finite element analysis and was found to be in good agreement.

  3. Numerical Analysis of the Influence of Tip Devices on the Power Coefficient of a VAWT

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Amato; Gabriele Bedon; Marco Raciti Castelli; Ernesto Benini

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic performances of vertical axis wind turbines are highly affected by tip vortexes. In the present work, different tip devices are considered and simulated against a baseline rotor configuration, with the aim of identifying the best tip architecture. Three different configurations are tested: winglets, an elliptic termination and an aerodynamic bulkhead. A comparative analysis on the most promising architectures is conducted, focusing also on blade torque evo...

  4. Tip Vortex and Wake Characteristics of a Counterrotating Open Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary noise sources for Open Rotor systems is the interaction of the forward rotor tip vortex and blade wake with the aft rotor. NASA has collaborated with General Electric on the testing of a new generation of low noise, counterrotating Open Rotor systems. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired in the intra-rotor gap of the Historical Baseline blade set. The velocity measurements are of sufficient resolution to characterize the tip vortex size and trajectory as well as the rotor wake decay and turbulence character. The tip clearance vortex trajectory is compared to results from previously developed models. Forward rotor wake velocity profiles are shown. Results are presented in a form as to assist numerical modeling of Open Rotor system aerodynamics and acoustics.

  5. NOTCH1 Inhibits Activation of ATM by Impairing the Formation of an ATM-FOXO3a-KAT5/Tip60 Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Marek; Vermezovic, Jelena; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-08-23

    The DNA damage response (DDR) signal transduction pathway is responsible for sensing DNA damage and further relaying this signal into the cell. ATM is an apical DDR kinase that orchestrates the activation and the recruitment of downstream DDR factors to induce cell-cycle arrest and repair. We have previously shown that NOTCH1 inhibits ATM activation upon DNA damage, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that NOTCH1 does not impair ATM recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Rather, NOTCH1 prevents binding of FOXO3a and KAT5/Tip60 to ATM through a mechanism in which NOTCH1 competes with FOXO3a for ATM binding. Lack of FOXO3a binding to ATM leads to the loss of KAT5/Tip60 association with ATM. Moreover, expression of NOTCH1 or depletion of ATM impairs the formation of the FOXO3a-KAT5/Tip60 protein complex. Finally, we show that pharmacological induction of FOXO3a nuclear localization sensitizes NOTCH1-driven cancers to DNA-damage-induced cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental and numerical study of the British Experimental Rotor Programme blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Alan; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1990-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests on the British Experimental Rotor Programme (BERP) tip are described, and the results are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results. The test model was molded using the Lynx-BERP blade tooling to provide a semispan, cantilever wing comprising the outboard 30 percent of the rotor blade. The tests included both surface-pressure measurements and flow visualization to obtain detailed information of the flow over the BERP tip for a range of angles of attack. It was observed that, outboard of the notch, favorable pressure gradients exist which ensure attached flow, and that the tip vortex also remains stable to large angles of attack. On the rotor, these features yield a very gradual break in control loads when the retreating-blade limit is eventually reached. Computational and experimental results were generally found to be in good agreement.

  7. A blade deflection monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A wind turbine blade comprising a system for monitoring the deflection of a wind turbine blade is described. The system comprises a wireless range-measurement system, having at least one wireless communication device located towards the root end of the blade and at least one wireless communication...

  8. Influence of Icing on the Modal Behavior of Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Gantasala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines installed in cold climate sites accumulate ice on their structures. Icing of the rotor blades reduces turbine power output and increases loads, vibrations, noise, and safety risks due to the potential ice throw. Ice accumulation increases the mass distribution of the blade, while changes in the aerofoil shapes affect its aerodynamic behavior. Thus, the structural and aerodynamic changes due to icing affect the modal behavior of wind turbine blades. In this study, aeroelastic equations of the wind turbine blade vibrations are derived to analyze modal behavior of the Tjaereborg 2 MW wind turbine blade with ice. Structural vibrations of the blade are coupled with a Beddoes-Leishman unsteady attached flow aerodynamics model and the resulting aeroelastic equations are analyzed using the finite element method (FEM. A linearly increasing ice mass distribution is considered from the blade root to half-length and thereafter constant ice mass distribution to the blade tip, as defined by Germanischer Lloyd (GL for the certification of wind turbines. Both structural and aerodynamic properties of the iced blades are evaluated and used to determine their influence on aeroelastic natural frequencies and damping factors. Blade natural frequencies reduce with ice mass and the amount of reduction in frequencies depends on how the ice mass is distributed along the blade length; but the reduction in damping factors depends on the ice shape. The variations in the natural frequencies of the iced blades with wind velocities are negligible; however, the damping factors change with wind velocity and become negative at some wind velocities. This study shows that the aerodynamic changes in the iced blade can cause violent vibrations within the operating wind velocity range of this turbine.

  9. Toward a dynamic perspective on explorative and exploitative innovation activities: a longitudinal study of innovation in the wind blade industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Innovation requires a combination of explorative and exploitative innovation activities. Previous studies have provided valuable insights in the antecedents of investing in explorative and exploitative activities, the structural governance of exploration and exploitation and the performance

  10. Toward a dynamic perspective on explorative and exploitative innovation activities: A longitudinal study of innovation in the wind blade industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Matthias; Faems, D.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Innovation requires a combination of explorative and exploitative innovation activities. Previous studies have provided valuable insights in the antecedents of investing in explorative and exploitative activities, the structural governance of exploration and exploitation and the performance

  11. Database about blade faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Ghadirian, Amin

    This report deals with the importance of measuring the reliability of the rotor blades and describing how they can fail. The Challenge is that very little non-confidential data is available and that the quality and detail in the data is limited....

  12. Contactless Diagnostics of Turbine Blade Vibration and Damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Pavel; Vaněk, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 305, č. 1 (2011), s. 1-11 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2011) /9./. Oxford, 11.07.2011-13.07.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : steam turbine * blade damage assessment * tip-timing method Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/305/1/012116

  13. Numerical Analysis of Flow in Kaplan Turbine Runner Blades Anticavitation Lip with Modified Hydro-dynamic Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cojocaru

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the lifetime of runner blades of Kaplan turbines damaged by cavitation erosion, an anticavitation lip is attached to the periphery of the runner blades on the suction side. The anticavitation lip overtakes the cavitation pitting which appears between the runner blades and the runner chamber. A blade with the original anticavitation lip was modeled using CAE. The numerical simulations showed the tip vortex position and the source of the cavitation erosion. Using these data, a modified profile of the anticavitation lip was designed.

  14. Blade pitch optimization methods for vertical-axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Peter

    Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) offer an inherently simpler design than horizontal-axis machines, while their lower blade speed mitigates safety and noise concerns, potentially allowing for installation closer to populated and ecologically sensitive areas. While VAWTs do offer significant operational advantages, development has been hampered by the difficulty of modeling the aerodynamics involved, further complicated by their rotating geometry. This thesis presents results from a simulation of a baseline VAWT computed using Star-CCM+, a commercial finite-volume (FVM) code. VAWT aerodynamics are shown to be dominated at low tip-speed ratios by dynamic stall phenomena and at high tip-speed ratios by wake-blade interactions. Several optimization techniques have been developed for the adjustment of blade pitch based on finite-volume simulations and streamtube models. The effectiveness of the optimization procedure is evaluated and the basic architecture for a feedback control system is proposed. Implementation of variable blade pitch is shown to increase a baseline turbine's power output between 40%-100%, depending on the optimization technique, improving the turbine's competitiveness when compared with a commercially-available horizontal-axis turbine.

  15. Remembering tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mind, such as crossword puzzles or board games. This helps keep the nerve cells in the brain active, which is very important as you get older. If you live alone, make an effort to talk with friends and ... you enjoy video games, try playing one that was developed to challenge ...

  16. Comprehensive Structural Dynamic Analysis of the SSME/AT Fuel Pump First-Stage Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed structural dynamic analysis of the Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel pump first-stage turbine blades has been performed to identify the cause of the tip cracking found in the turbomachinery in November 1997. The analysis was also used to help evaluate potential fixes for the problem. Many of the methods available in structural dynamics were applied, including modal displacement and stress analysis, frequency and transient response to tip loading from the first-stage Blade Outer Gas Seals (BOGS), fourier analysis, and shock spectra analysis of the transient response. The primary findings were that the BOGS tip loading is impulsive in nature, thereby exciting many modes of the blade that exhibit high stress at the tip cracking location. Therefore, a proposed BOGS count change would not help the situation because a clearly identifiable resonance situation does not exist. The recommendations for the resolution of the problem are to maintain the existing BOGS count, eliminate the stress concentration in the blade due to its geometric design, and reduce the applied load on the blade by adding shiplaps in the BOGS.

  17. Flow separation on wind turbines blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    In the year 2000, 15GW of wind power was installed throughout the world, producing 100PJ of energy annually. This contributes to the total electricity demand by only 0.2%. Both the installed power and the generated energy are increasing by 30% per year world-wide. If the airflow over wind turbine blades could be controlled fully, the generation efficiency and thus the energy production would increase by 9%. Power Control To avoid damage to wind turbines, they are cut out above 10 Beaufort (25 m/s) on the wind speed scale. A turbine could be designed in such a way that it converts as much power as possible in all wind speeds, but then it would have to be to heavy. The high costs of such a design would not be compensated by the extra production in high winds, since such winds are rare. Therefore turbines usually reach maximum power at a much lower wind speed: the rated wind speed, which occurs at about 6 Beaufort (12.5 m/s). Above this rated speed, the power intake is kept constant by a control mechanism. Two different mechanisms are commonly used. Active pitch control, where the blades pitch to vane if the turbine maximum is exceeded or, passive stall control, where the power control is an implicit property of the rotor. Stall Control The flow over airfoils is called "attached" when it flows over the surface from the leading edge to the trailing edge. However, when the angle of attack of the flow exceeds a certain critical angle, the flow does not reach the trailing edge, but leaves the surface at the separation line. Beyond this line the flow direction is reversed, i.e. it flows from the trailing edge backward to the separation line. A blade section extracts much less energy from the flow when it separates. This property is used for stall control. Stall controlled rotors always operate at a constant rotation speed. The angle of attack of the flow incident to the blades is determined by the blade speed and the wind speed. Since the latter is variable, it determines

  18. Investigation of the Hydrodynamics of Sweep Blade in Hi-Speed Axial Fuel Pump Impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel pump is a crucial component in aircraft engine ignition system. For the hi-speed axial fuel pumps, rotating stall triggers vortex and affects the operation stability and security. Sweep blade is widely used to solve the stability problems in aerodynamics field. Investigation on the hydrodynamics was conducted in this study. Based on the typical straight blade pump, positive and negative sweep blade pumps were modeled. With the large eddy simulation method, CFD simulations were conducted to calculate and analyze the flow characteristics in the pump models. To verify the simulation, experiments were also launched on the hydraulic test rig. Results show that the vortex occurs at the suction surface of blade and gathers near the blade tip region. Positive sweep blade is effective to reduce the hydraulic losses by driving the stalled fluid into the mid-part of blade. By applying the positive sweep blade on the axial fuel pump, the instability operating region will be diminished. Adopting sweep blade provides an effective means for stability and security of axial fuel pumps.

  19. An innovative medium speed wind turbine rotor blade design for low wind regime (electrical power generation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abas Abd Wahab; Chong Wen Tong

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary study of a small-scale wind turbine rotor blade (a low wind speed region turbine). A new wind turbine rotor blade (AE2 blade) for stand alone system has been conceptualized, designed, constructed and tested. The system is a reduced size prototype (half-scaled) to develop an efficient (adapted to Malaysian wind conditions)and cost effective wind energy conversion system (WECS) with local design and production technique. The blades were constructed from aluminium sheet with metal blending technique. The layout and design of rotor blade, its innovative features and test results are presented. Results from indoor test showed that the advantages of AE2 blade in low speed, with the potential of further improvements. The best rotor efficiency, C P attained with simple AE2 blades rotor (number of blade = 3) was 37.3% (Betz efficiency = 63%) at tip speed ratio (TSR) = 3.6. From the fabrication works and indoor testing, the AE2 blade rotor has demonstrated its structural integrity (ease of assembly and transportation), simplicity, acceptable performance and low noise level. (Author)

  20. Design of a Tapered and Twisted Blade for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A tapered/twisted blade was designed to operate on the Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) of the National Renewable Energy Lab., which is a stall-regulated downwind wind turbine having a rated power of 20 kilowatt. The geometry of the new blade set was optimized based on annual energy production subject to the constraints imposed on the design. These constraints were mainly related to scientific needs for fundamental research in rotor aerodynamics. A trade-off study was conducted to determine the effect of the different design constraints. Based on the results of this study, which considered nonlinear twist and taper distributions as well as the NREL S809, S814, S822 and S823 airfoils, a blade having a linear taper and a nonlinear twist distribution that uses the S809 airfoil from root to tip was selected. This blade configuration is the logical continuation of the previous constant-chord twisted and untwisted blade sets and will facilitate comparison with those earlier blades. Despite th e design constraints based on scientific needs, the new blade is more representative of commercial blades than the previous blade sets

  1. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  2. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  3. Noncontact measurement of rotating blade vibrations. Doyoku shindo no hisesshoku keisokuho no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Yukio; Endo, Masanori; Sugiyama, Nanahisa; Koshinuma, Takeshi

    1989-08-01

    The noncontact measurement method of rotating blade vibrations was developed for fans, compressors and turbines, and applied to turbofan engines and industrial gas turbines. The method required no machining of blades and rotor except sensors attached to a casing to detect blade-tips. The method allowed to measure simultaneously the vibration of all blades, by measuring elapsed times of blade-tips rotating from a measuring start point to a detecting point, and detecting the time differences between a vibration and non-vibration condition. The measuring system was composed of the detectors and subsystems for signal processing, control, calculation and display. The vibration wave forms of a few blades and the maximum vibration amplitudes of all the blades were displayed on a realtime basis in an on-line monitoring mode, and an off-line data processing mode was also available for subsequent analyses and reviews. The results of application to existing engines favorably agreed with those of strain gage measurements. 16 refs., 75 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. A laser-optical sensor system for blade vibration detection of high-speed compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Mathias; Dreier, Florian; Günther, Philipp; Wilke, Ulrich; Fischer, Andreas; Büttner, Lars; Holzinger, Felix; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Improved efficiency as well as increased lifetime of turbines and compressors are important goals in turbomachinery development. A significant enhancement to accomplish these aims can be seen in online monitoring of the operating parameters of the machines. During the operation of compressors it is of high interest to predict critical events like flutter or stall which can be achieved by observing blade deformations and vibrations. We have developed a laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is capable of simultaneously measuring the radial blade expansions, the circumferential blade deflections as well as the circumferential velocities of the rotor blade tips. As a result, an increase of blade vibrations is measured before stall at characteristic frequencies. While the detected vibration frequencies and the vibration increase are in agreement with the measurement results of a commercial capacitive blade tip timing system, the measured values of the vibration amplitudes differ by a factor of three. This difference can be mainly attributed to the different measurement locations and to the different measurement approaches. Since the LDDS is applicable to metal as well as ceramic, carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composite blades, a universally applicable sensor system for stall prediction and status monitoring is presented.

  5. Influence of Thermodynamic Effect on Blade Load in a Cavitating Inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Kikuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the blade load is one of the design parameters for a cavitating inducer. For experimental investigation of the thermodynamic effect on the blade load, we conducted experiments in both cold water and liquid nitrogen. The thermodynamic effect on cavitation notably appears in this cryogenic fluid although it can be disregarded in cold water. In these experiments, the pressure rise along the blade tip was measured. In water, the pressure increased almost linearly from the leading edge to the trailing edge at higher cavitation number. After that, with a decrease of cavitation number, pressure rise occurred only near the trailing edge. On the other hand, in liquid nitrogen, the pressure distribution was similar to that in water at a higher cavitation number, even if the cavitation number as a cavitation parameter decreased. Because the cavitation growth is suppressed by the thermodynamic effect, the distribution of the blade load does not change even at lower cavitation number. By contrast, the pressure distribution in liquid nitrogen has the same tendency as that in water if the cavity length at the blade tip is taken as a cavitation indication. From these results, it was found that the shift of the blade load to the trailing edge depended on the increase of cavity length, and that the distribution of blade load was indicated only by the cavity length independent of the thermodynamic effect.

  6. Energy Performance and Radial Force of a Mixed-Flow Pump with Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Tip Clearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy performance and radial force of a mixed flow pump with symmetrical and unsymmetrical tip clearance are investigated in this paper. As the tip clearance increases, the pump head and efficiency both decrease. The center of the radial force on the principal axis is located at the coordinate origin when the tip clearance is symmetrical, and moves to the third quadrant when the tip clearance is unsymmetrical. Analysis results show that the total radial force on the principal axis is closely related to the fluctuation of mass flow rate in each single flow channel. Unsteady simulations show that the dominant frequencies of radial force on the hub and blade correspond to the blade number, vane number, or double blade number because of the rotor stator interaction. The radial force on the blade pressure side decreases with the tip clearance increase because of leakage flow. The unsymmetrical tip clearances in an impeller induce uneven leakage flow rate and then result in unsymmetrical work ability of each blade and flow pattern in each channel. Thus, the energy performance decreases and the total radial force increases for a mixed flow pump with unsymmetrical tip clearance.

  7. Aerodynamic investigation of winglets on wind turbine blades using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Soerensen, Niels N.

    2006-02-15

    The present report describes the numerical investigation of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets were investigated with different twist distribution and camber. Four of them were pointing towards the pressure side (upstream) and one was pointing towards the suction side (downstream). Additionally, a rectangular modification of the original blade tip was designed with the same planform area as the blades with winglets. Results show that adding a winglet to the existing blade increase the force distribution on the outer approx 14 % of the blade leading to increased produced power of around 0.6% to 1.4% for wind speeds larger than 6 m/s. This has to be compared to the increase in thrust of around 1.0% to 1.6%. Pointing the winglet downstream increases the power production even further. The effect of sweep and cant angles is not accounted for in the present investigation and could improve the winglets even more. (au)

  8. Tips on Blood Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Pain, Discomfort and Anxiety Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Footer Menu Home About ...

  9. Graphene in turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  10. Subsonic Swept Fan Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rogers, Thomas H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be driven at a at a design speed by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool. Rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades includes an airfoil body. The leading edge of the airfoil body has a swept profile such that, at the design speed, a component of a relative velocity vector of a working gas that is normal to the leading edge is subsonic along the entire radial span.

  11. Performance of Savonius Blade Waterwheel with Variation of Blade Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, L.; Rompas, P. T. D.

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of water energy source is mainly used as a provider of electrical energy through hydroelectric power. The potential utilization of water flow energy is relatively small. The objective of this study is to know the best blade of Savonius waterwheel with various variables such as water discharge, blade number, and loading. The data used the efficiency of waterwheel, variation of blade number, variable water discharge, and loading in the shaft. The test results have shown that the performances of a top-water mill with the semicircular curve where the variation in the number of blades are 4, 6, and 8 at discharge and loading of 0.01587 m3/s and 1000 grams respectively were 9.945%, 13.929%, and 17.056% respectively. The blades number of 8 obtained the greatest performance. The more number of blades the greater the efficiency of the waterwheel Savonius.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana rlp mutations revert the ectopic leaf blade formation conferred by activation tagging of the LEP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Nussbaumer, C; Keller, Bente

    2003-01-01

    -type (non-transgenic) background. This indicates that LEP regulates a subset of the genes involved in the process of leaf blade outgrowth, and that genetic and/or functional redundancy in this process compensates for the loss of RLP function during the formation of the wild-type leaf blade. More detailed...... gene. Therefore, these lines are potentially mutated in genes for interacting partners of LEP or in downstream regulatory genes. In contrast, the recessive rlp lines exhibit a specific reversion of the leafy petiole phenotype. Thus, these lines are most probably mutated in genes specific...

  13. Active sources in the cutoff of centrifugal fans to reduce the blade tones at higher-order duct mode frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neise, W.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    A previously developed (e.g., Neise and Koopmann, 1984; Koopmann et al., 1988) active noise control technique in which the unwanted acoustic signals from centrifugal fans are suppressed by placing two externally driven sources near the cutoff of the casing was applied to the frequency region where not only plane sound waves are propagational in the fan ducts but also higher-order acoustic modes. Using a specially designed fan noise testing facility, the performance of two fans (280-mm impeller diam and 508 mm diam) was monitored with static pressure taps mounted peripherally around the inlet nozzle. Experimental results show that the aerodynamically generated source pressure field around the cutoff is too complex to be successfully counterimaged by only two active sources introduced in this region. It is suggested that, for an efficient application of this noise control technique in the higher-order mode frequency regime, it is neccessary to use an active source involving larger number of individually driven loudspeakers.

  14. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, lik...

  15. TIP48/Reptin and H2A.Z requirement for initiating chromatin remodeling in estrogen-activated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone variants, including histone H2A.Z, are incorporated into specific genomic sites and participate in transcription regulation. The role of H2A.Z at these sites remains poorly characterized. Our study investigates changes in the chromatin environment at the Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 during transcriptional initiation in response to estradiol in estrogen receptor positive mammary tumour cells. We show that H2A.Z is present at the transcription start-site and downstream enhancer sequences of CCND1 when the gene is poorly transcribed. Stimulation of CCND1 expression required release of H2A.Z concomitantly from both these DNA elements. The AAA+ family members TIP48/reptin and the histone variant H2A.Z are required to remodel the chromatin environment at CCND1 as a prerequisite for binding of the estrogen receptor (ERα in the presence of hormone. TIP48 promotes acetylation and exchange of H2A.Z, which triggers a dissociation of the CCND1 3' enhancer from the promoter, thereby releasing a repressive intragenic loop. This release then enables the estrogen receptor to bind to the CCND1 promoter. Our findings provide new insight into the priming of chromatin required for transcription factor access to their target sequence. Dynamic release of gene loops could be a rapid means to remodel chromatin and to stimulate transcription in response to hormones.

  16. Analysis of Unsteady Tip and Endwall Heat Transfer in a Highly Loaded Transonic Turbine Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, vane-rotor shock interactions and heat transfer on the rotor blade of a highly loaded transonic turbine stage were simulated. The geometry consists of a high pressure turbine vane and downstream rotor blade. This study focuses on the physics of flow and heat transfer in the rotor tip, casing and hub regions. The simulation was performed using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code MSU-TURBO. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon model was utilized to model turbulence. The rotor blade in question has a tip gap height of 2.1 percent of the blade height. The Reynolds number of the flow is approximately 3x10(exp 6) per meter. Unsteadiness was observed at the tip surface that results in intermittent "hot spots". It is demonstrated that unsteadiness in the tip gap is governed by inviscid effects due to high speed flow and is not strongly dependent on pressure ratio across the tip gap contrary to published observations that have primarily dealt with subsonic tip flows. The high relative Mach numbers in the tip gap lead to a choking of the leakage flow that translates to a relative attenuation of losses at higher loading. The efficacy of new tip geometry is discussed to minimize heat flux at the tip while maintaining choked conditions. In addition, an explanation is provided that shows the mechanism behind the rise in stagnation temperature on the casing to values above the absolute total temperature at the inlet. It is concluded that even in steady mode, work transfer to the near tip fluid occurs due to relative shearing by the casing. This is believed to be the first such explanation of the work transfer phenomenon in the open literature. The difference in pattern between steady and time-averaged heat flux at the hub is also explained.

  17. Investigation of Turbulent Tip Leakage Vortex in an Axial Water Jet Pump with Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Katz, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Detailed steady and unsteady numerical studies were performed to investigate tip clearance flow in an axial water jet pump. The primary objective is to understand physics of unsteady tip clearance flow, unsteady tip leakage vortex, and cavitation inception in an axial water jet pump. Steady pressure field and resulting steady tip leakage vortex from a steady flow analysis do not seem to explain measured cavitation inception correctly. The measured flow field near the tip is unsteady and measured cavitation inception is highly transient. Flow visualization with cavitation bubbles shows that the leakage vortex is oscillating significantly and many intermittent vortex ropes are present between the suction side of the blade and the tip leakage core vortex. Although the flow field is highly transient, the overall flow structure is stable and a characteristic frequency seems to exist. To capture relevant flow physics as much as possible, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculation and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were applied for the current investigation. The present study reveals that several vortices from the tip leakage vortex system cross the tip gap of the adjacent blade periodically. Sudden changes in local pressure field inside tip gap due to these vortices create vortex ropes. The instantaneous pressure filed inside the tip gap is drastically different from that of the steady flow simulation. Unsteady flow simulation which can calculate unsteady vortex motion is necessary to calculate cavitation inception accurately even at design flow condition in such a water jet pump.

  18. Active vibration-based structural health monitoring system for wind turbine blade: Demonstration on an operating Vestas V27 wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri; Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti

    2017-01-01

    enough to be able to propagate the entire blade length. This article demonstrates the system on a Vestas V27 wind turbine. One blade of the wind turbine was equipped with the system, and a 3.5-month monitoring campaign was conducted while the turbine was operating normally. During the campaign, a defect......—a trailing-edge opening—was artificially introduced into the blade and its size was gradually increased from the original 15 to 45 cm. Using a semi-supervised learning algorithm, the system was able to detect even the smallest amount of damage while the wind turbine was operating under different weather......This study presents a structural health monitoring system that is able to detect structural defects of wind turbine blade such as cracks, leading/trailing-edge opening, or delamination. It is shown that even small defects of at least 15 cm size can be detected remotely without stopping the wind...

  19. Sub-scale Inverse Wind Turbine Blade Design Using Bound Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christopher; Berg, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    A goal of the National Rotor Testbed project at Sandia is to design a sub-scale wind turbine blade that has similitude to a modern, commercial size blade. However, a smaller diameter wind turbine operating at the same tip-speed-ratio exhibits a different range of operating Reynolds numbers across the blade span, thus changing the local lift and drag coefficients. Differences to load distribution also affect the wake dynamics and stability. An inverse wind turbine blade design tool has been implemented which uses a target, dimensionless circulation distribution from a full-scale blade to find the chord and twist along a sub-scale blade. In addition, airfoil polar data are interpolated from a few specified span stations leading to a smooth, manufacturable blade. The iterative process perturbs chord and twist, after running a blade element momentum theory code, to reduce the residual sum of the squares between the modeled sub-scale circulation and the target full-scale circulation. It is shown that the converged sub-scale design also leads to performance similarity in thrust and power coefficients. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. LDV measurement of boundary layer on rotating blade surface in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Murata, Junsuke; Suzuki, Daiki; Kaga, Norimitsu; Kagisaki, Yosuke

    2014-12-01

    Wind turbines generate electricity due to extracting energy from the wind. The rotor aerodynamics strongly depends on the flow around blade. The surface flow on the rotating blade affects the sectional performance. The wind turbine surface flow has span-wise component due to span-wise change of airfoil section, chord length, twisted angle of blade and centrifugal force on the flow. These span-wise flow changes the boundary layer on the rotating blade and the sectional performance. Hence, the thorough understanding of blade surface flow is important to improve the rotor performance. For the purpose of clarification of the flow behaviour around the rotor blade, the velocity in the boundary layer on rotating blade surface of an experimental HAWT was measured in a wind tunnel. The velocity measurement on the blade surface was carried out by a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). As the results of the measurement, characteristics of surface flow are clarified. In optimum tip speed operation, the surface flow on leading edge and r/R=0.3 have large span-wise velocity which reaches 20% of sectional inflow velocity. The surface flow inboard have three dimensional flow patterns. On the other hand, the flow outboard is almost two dimensional in cross sectional plane.

  1. Gardening Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or who take certain medications (i.e. for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation). Eat healthy foods to help keep you energized. Extreme Heat Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather Tips for persons with disabilities and physical activity. Talk to your health care provider if you have physical, mental, or ...

  2. Numerical study on tip clearance effect on performance of a centrifugal compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eum, Hark Jin; Kang, Shin Kyoung

    2003-01-01

    Effect of tip leakage flow on through flow and performance of a centrifugal compressor impeller was numerically studied using CFX-TASCflow. Seven different tip clearances were used to consider the influence of tip clearance on performance. Secondary flow and loss factor were evaluated to understand the loss mechanism inside the impeller due to tip leakage flow. The calculated results were circumferentially averaged along the passage and at the impeller exit for quantitative discussion. Tip clearance effect on performance could be decomposed into inviscid and viscous components using one dimensional equation. The inviscid component is related with the specific work reduction and the viscous component is related with the additional entropy generation. Two components affected performance equally, while efficiency drop was mainly influenced by viscous loss. Performance and efficiency drop due to tip clearance were proportional to the ratio of tip clearance to exit blade height. A simple model suggested in the present study predict performance and efficiency drop quite successfully

  3. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  4. Mind the gap - tip leakage vortex in axial turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, M; Farhat, M; Decaix, J; Münch-Alligné, C

    2014-01-01

    The tendency of designing large Kaplan turbines with a continuous increase of output power is bringing to the front the cavitation erosion issue. Due to the flow in the gap between the runner and the discharge ring, axial turbine blades may develop the so called tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavitation with negative consequences. Such vortices may interact strongly with the wake of guide vanes leading to their multiple collapses and rebounds. If the vortex trajectory remains close to the blade tip, these collapses may lead to severe erosion. One is still unable today to predict its occurrence and development in axial turbines with acceptable accuracy. Numerical flow simulations as well as the actual scale-up rules from small to large scales are unreliable. The present work addresses this problematic in a simplified case study representing TLV cavitation to better understand its sensitivity to the gap width. A Naca0009 hydrofoil is used as a generic blade in the test section of EPFL cavitation tunnel. A sliding mounting support allowing an adjustable gap between the blade tip and wall was manufactured. The vortex trajectory is visualized with a high speed camera and appropriate lighting. The three dimensional velocity field induced by the TLV is investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry. We have taken into account the vortex wandering in the image processing to obtain accurate measurements of the vortex properties. The measurements were performed in three planes located downstream of the hydrofoil for different values of the flow velocity, the incidence angle and the gap width. The results clearly reveal a strong influence of the gap width on both trajectory and intensity of the tip leakage vortex

  5. Mind the gap - tip leakage vortex in axial turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, M.; Decaix, J.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of designing large Kaplan turbines with a continuous increase of output power is bringing to the front the cavitation erosion issue. Due to the flow in the gap between the runner and the discharge ring, axial turbine blades may develop the so called tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavitation with negative consequences. Such vortices may interact strongly with the wake of guide vanes leading to their multiple collapses and rebounds. If the vortex trajectory remains close to the blade tip, these collapses may lead to severe erosion. One is still unable today to predict its occurrence and development in axial turbines with acceptable accuracy. Numerical flow simulations as well as the actual scale-up rules from small to large scales are unreliable. The present work addresses this problematic in a simplified case study representing TLV cavitation to better understand its sensitivity to the gap width. A Naca0009 hydrofoil is used as a generic blade in the test section of EPFL cavitation tunnel. A sliding mounting support allowing an adjustable gap between the blade tip and wall was manufactured. The vortex trajectory is visualized with a high speed camera and appropriate lighting. The three dimensional velocity field induced by the TLV is investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry. We have taken into account the vortex wandering in the image processing to obtain accurate measurements of the vortex properties. The measurements were performed in three planes located downstream of the hydrofoil for different values of the flow velocity, the incidence angle and the gap width. The results clearly reveal a strong influence of the gap width on both trajectory and intensity of the tip leakage vortex.

  6. Smart actuation mechanisms for helicopter blades: design case for a mach-scaled model blade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of the European project “Clean Sky”, which aims at improving the efficiency and the global transport quality of aircraft. The research, in this project, is currently focussing on active flap systems for helicopters to adapt the blade aerodynamic properties to local aerodynamic

  7. Numerical Simulation of Wind Turbine Blade-Tower Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of wind turbine blade-tower interaction by using the open source OpenFOAM tools coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method were presented.The governing equations were the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) which were solved by the pimpleDyMFoam solver,and the AMI method was employed to handle mesh movements.The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase Ⅵ wind turbine in upwind configuration was selected for numerical tests with different incoming wind speeds (5,10,15,and 25 m/s) at a fixed blade pitch and constant rotational speed.Detailed numerical results of vortex structure,time histories of thrust,and pressure distribution on the blade and tower were presented.The findings show that the wind turbine tower has little effect on the whole aerodynamic performance of an upwind wind turbine,while the rotating rotor will induce an obvious cyclic drop in the front pressure of the tower.Also,strong interaction of blade tip vortices with separation from the tower was observed.

  8. Drag prediction for blades at high angle of attack using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Michelsen, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper it is first demonstrated that state of the art 3D CFD codes are. capable of predicting the correct dependency of the integrated drag of a flat plate placed perpendicular to the flow. This is in strong contrast to previous 2D investigations of infinite plates, where computations...... are known to severely overpredict drag. We then demonstrate that the computed drag distribution along the plate span deviate from the general expectation of 2D behavior at the central part of the plate, an important finding in connection with the theoretical estimation of drag behavior on wind turbine...... blades. The computations additionally indicate that a tip effect is present that produces increased drag near the end of the plate, which is opposite of the assumptions generally used in drag estimation for blades. Following this several wind turbine blades are analyzed, ranging from older blades...

  9. Effect of blades number to performance of Savonius water turbine in water pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Imron; Prasetyo, Ari; Tjahjana, D. D. D. Prija; Hadi, Syamsul

    2018-02-01

    Savonius is usually known as a wind turbine that works efficiently at low wind speed. In this research, the Savonius turbine is proposed for a pico hydro power plant that is installed straightly on the 3-inch vertical pipeline of rainwater and household waste. The Savonius water turbine was designed with blade curvature angle of 70°, the aspect ratio of 1, turbine diameter of 82 mm, and endplate ratio of 1,1. The experimental study investigated the effect of blades number to the performance of Savonius turbine on various volume flow rate of water. Savonius turbine with three blades number generated the highest coefficient of performance of 0.23 on tip speed ratio of 1.7 compared to turbines with the number of other blades.

  10. Anisotropic piezoelectric twist actuation of helicopter rotor blades: Aeroelastic analysis and design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, William Keats

    1997-12-01

    An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain a soluti An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain amited additional piezoelectric material mass, it is shown that blade twist actuation approaches which exploit in-plane piezoelectric free-stain anisotropies are capable of producing amplitudes of oscillatory blade twisting sufficient for rotor vibration reduction applications. The second study examines the effectiveness of using embedded piezoelectric actuator laminae to alleviate vibratory loads due to retreating blade stall. A 10 to 15 percent improvement in dynamic stall limited forward flight speed, and a 5 percent improvement in stall limited rotor thrust were numerically demonstrated for the active twist rotor blade relative to a conventional blade design. The active twist blades are also demonstrated to be more susceptible than the conventional blades to dynamic stall induced vibratory loads when not operating with twist actuation. This is the result of designing the active twist blades with low torsional stiffness in order to maximize piezoelectric twist authority

  11. Modeling of Unsteady Sheet Cavitation on Marine Propeller Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A. Kinnas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady sheet cavitation is very common on marine propulsor blades. The authors summarize a lifting-surface and a surface-panel model to solve for the unsteady cavitating flow around a propeller that is subject to nonaxisymmetric inflow. The time-dependent extent and thickness of the cavity were determined by using an iterative method. The cavity detachment was determined by applying the smooth detachment criterion in an iterative manner. A nonzeroradius developed vortex cavity model was utilized at the tip of the blade, and the trailing wake geometry was determined using a fully unsteady wake-alignment process. Comparisons of predictions by the two models and measurements from several experiments are given.

  12. Slotted Blades Savonius Wind Turbine Analysis by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alaimo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new bucket configuration for a Savonius wind generator is proposed. Numerical analyses are performed to estimate the performances of the proposed configuration by means of the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics® with respect to Savonius wind turbine with overlap only. Parametric analyses are performed, for a fixed overlap ratio, by varying the slot position; the results show that for slot positioned near the blade root, the Savonius rotor improves performances at low tip speed ratio, evidencing a better starting torque. This circumstance is confirmed by static analyses performed on the slotted blades in order to investigate the starting characteristic of the proposed Savonius wind generator configuration.

  13. Deterministic blade row interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Beach, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow in a low speed centrifugal compressor stage is simulated using an average passage Navier-Stokes analysis. The impeller discharge flow is of the jet/wake type with low momentum fluid in the shroud-pressure side corner coincident with the tip leakage vortex. This nonuniformity introduces periodic unsteadiness in the vane frame of reference. The effect of such deterministic unsteadiness on the time-mean is included in the analysis through the average passage stress, which allows the analysis of blade row interactions. The magnitude of the divergence of the deterministic unsteady stress is of the order of the divergence of the Reynolds stress over most of the span, from the impeller trailing edge to the vane throat. Although the potential effects on the blade trailing edge from the diffuser vane are small, strong secondary flows generated by the impeller degrade the performance of the diffuser vanes.

  14. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and tip speed ratio, the optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with an objective of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on the previous in-house airfoil family which were optimized at a Reynolds number of 3...... million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry on the existing airfoils and thus simplify the design procedure. The viscos/inviscid code Xfoil is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization where the Reynolds number is set at 16 million with a free...

  15. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...... of 3 million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry based on the existing airfoils which simplifies the design procedure. The viscous/inviscid interactive code XFOIL is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization at a Reynolds number of 16 million...

  16. Active site-targeted covalent irreversible inhibitors of USP7 impair the functions of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells by promoting ubiquitination of Tip60.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Foxp3+ T-regulatory (Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment is associated with tumor immune evasion and poor patient outcome in the case of many solid tumors. Current therapeutic strategies for blocking Treg functions are not Treg-specific, and display only modest and transient efficacy. Recent studies revealed that ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7 is essential for Treg functions by stabilizing expression of Tip60 and Foxp3, which together are central to the development and maintenance of the Treg cell lineage. Pharmacological inhibition of USP7 is therefore a promising strategy for suppressing Treg functions and promoting anti-tumor immunity. Previously, we reported the P5091 series of small molecule USP7 inhibitors and demonstrated their direct anti-tumor activity in vivo using xenograft models. However, the precise mechanism of action of these compounds was not well defined. In this study, we report the development and characterization of P217564, a second-generation USP7 inhibitor with improved potency and selectivity. P217564 selectively targets the catalytic cleft of USP7 and modifies its active site cysteine (C223 by forming a covalent adduct. Irreversible inhibition of USP7 results in durable downstream biological responses in cells, including down-regulation of Tip60 and consequent impairment of Treg suppressive function. In addition, we demonstrate that both USP7 and various USP7 substrates are subjected to Lys48-mediated ubiquitin modification, consistent with increased proteasomal degradation of these proteins because of USP7 inhibition.

  17. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  18. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  19. Tip Cells in Angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dallinga (Marchien); S.E.M. Boas (Sonja); I. Klaassen (Ingeborg); R.M.H. Merks (Roeland); C.J.F. van Noorden; R.O. Schlingemann (Reinier)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn angiogenesis, the process in which blood vessel sprouts grow out from a pre-existing vascular network, the so-called endothelial tip cells play an essential role. Tip cells are the leading cells of the sprouts; they guide following endothelial cells and sense their environment for

  20. Performance analysis of wind turbines at low tip-speed ratio using the Betz-Goldstein model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Jerson R.P.; Wood, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • General formulations for power and thrust at any tip-speed ratio are developed. • The Joukowsky model for the blades is modified with specific vortex distributions. • Betz-Goldstein model is shown to be the most consistent at low tip-speed ratio. • The effects of finite blade number are assessed using tip loss factors. • Tip loss for finite blade number may complicate the vortex breakdown. - Abstract: Analyzing wind turbine performance at low tip-speed ratio is challenging due to the relatively high level of swirl in the wake. This work presents a new approach to wind turbine analysis including swirl for any tip-speed ratio. The methodology uses the induced velocity field from vortex theory in the general momentum theory, in the form of the turbine thrust and torque equations. Using the constant bound circulation model of Joukowsky, the swirl velocity becomes infinite on the wake centreline even at high tip-speed ratio. Rankine, Vatistas and Delery vortices were used to regularize the Joukowsky model near the centreline. The new formulation prevents the power coefficient from exceeding the Betz-Joukowsky limit. An alternative calculation, based on the varying circulation for Betz-Goldstein optimized rotors is shown to have the best general behavior. Prandtl’s approximation for the tip loss and a recent alternative were employed to account for the effects of a finite number of blades. The Betz-Goldstein model appears to be the only one resistant to vortex breakdown immediately behind the rotor for an infinite number of blades. Furthermore, the dependence of the induced velocity on radius in the Betz-Goldstein model allows the power coefficient to remain below Betz-Joukowsky limit which does not occur for the Joukowsky model at low tip-speed ratio.

  1. Study of Tip-loss Using an Inverse 3D Navier-Stokes Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Robert; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2003-01-01

    the 3D Navier-Stokes equations combined with the actuator line technique where blade loading is applied using an inverse method. The numerical simulations shows that the method captures the tip-correction when comparing with the theories of Prandtl and Goldstein, however, the accuracy of the obtained...... results reveal that further refinements still is needed. Keywords: Tip-loss; Actuator line; 3D Navier-Stokes methods....

  2. Effect of the number of blades and solidity on the performance of a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafin, PL; Nishino, T.; Wang, L.; Kolios, A.

    2016-09-01

    Two, three and four bladed ϕ-shape Vertical Axis Wind Turbines are simulated using a free-wake vortex model. Two versions of the three and four bladed turbines are considered, one having the same chord length as the two-bladed turbine and the other having the same solidity as the two-bladed turbine. Results of the two-bladed turbine are validated against published experimental data of power coefficient and instantaneous torque. The effect of solidity on the power coefficient is presented and the instantaneous torque, thrust and lateral force of the two-, three- and four-bladed turbines are compared for the same solidity. It is found that increasing the number of blades from two to three significantly reduces the torque, thrust and lateral force ripples. Adding a fourth blade further reduces the ripples except for the torque at low tip speed ratio. This work aims to help choosing the number of blades during the design phase of a vertical axis wind turbine.

  3. Computational investigation of flow control by means of tubercles on Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinç, K.; Özdamar, G.; Şentürk, U.; Özdamar, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the current status of the computational study of the boundary layer control of a vertical axis wind turbine blade by modifying the blade geometry for use in wind energy conversion. The control method is a passive method which comprises the implementation of the tubercle geometry of a humpback whale flipper onto the leading edge of the blades. The baseline design is an H-type, three-bladed Darrieus turbine with a NACA 0015 cross-section. Finite-volume based software ANSYS Fluent was used in the simulations. Using the optimum control parameters for a NACA 634-021 profile given by Johari et al. (2006), turbine blades were modified. Three dimensional, unsteady, turbulent simulations for the blade were conducted to look for a possible improvement on the performance. The flow structure on the blades was investigated and flow phenomena such as separation and stall were examined to understand their impact on the overall performance. For a tip speed ratio of 2.12, good agreement was obtained in the validation of the baseline model with a relative error in time- averaged power coefficient of 1.05%. Modified turbine simulations with a less expensive but less accurate turbulence model yielded a decrease in power coefficient. Results are shown comparatively.

  4. Axial Fan Blade Vibration Assessment under Inlet Cross-Flow Conditions Using Laser Scanning Vibrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Heinemann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In thermal power plants equipped with air-cooled condensers (ACCs, axial cooling fans operate under the influence of ambient flow fields. Under inlet cross-flow conditions, the resultant asymmetric flow field is known to introduce additional harmonic forces to the fan blades. This effect has previously only been studied numerically or by using blade-mounted strain gauges. For this study, laser scanning vibrometry (LSV was used to assess fan blade vibration under inlet cross-flow conditions in an adapted fan test rig inside a wind tunnel test section. Two co-rotating laser beams scanned a low-pressure axial fan, resulting in spectral, phase-resolved surface vibration patterns of the fan blades. Two distinct operating points with flow coefficients of 0.17 and 0.28 were examined, with and without inlet cross-flow influence. While almost identical fan vibration patterns were found for both reference operating points, the overall blade vibration increased by 100% at the low fan flow rate as a result of cross-flow, and by 20% at the high fan flow rate. While numerically predicted natural frequency modes could be confirmed from experimental data as minor peaks in the vibration amplitude spectrum, they were not excited significantly by cross-flow. Instead, primarily higher rotation-rate harmonics were amplified; that is, a synchronous blade-tip flapping was strongly excited at the blade-pass frequency.

  5. Failure analysis of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two 20 MW gas turbines suffered damage in blades belonging to the 2nd. stage of the turbine after 24,000 hours of duty. From research it arises that the fuel used is not quite adequate to guarantee the blade's operating life due to the excess of SO 3 , C and Na existing in combustion gases which cause pitting to the former. Later, the corrosion phenomenon is presented under tension produced by working stress enhanced by pitting where Pb is its main agent. A change of fuel is recommended thus considering the blades will reach the operational life they were designed for. (Author) [es

  6. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from work stress and family responsibilities to unexpected ...

  7. Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips for Taking Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. There are many benefits to regular physical activity. ... if diabetes testing is appropriate for you. The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening if: You're age ...

  8. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research Vol.8 No.1 September 2013 ..... Number of blades. 5. Taylor's wake friction (w). The speed of ship (Vs), the number of propeller revolution (n), the blade number (Z) and the blade area ratio.... .... moment of inertia of a blade, the approximate.

  9. Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Safety Tips: Basketball KidsHealth / For Parents / Safety Tips: Basketball ... make sure they follow these tips. Why Basketball Safety Is Important Fortunately, very few basketball injuries are ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  11. Experimental study of dynamic stall on Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, G.; Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1985-12-01

    An experimental study of periodic vortex phenomena was performed on a model of a two straight-bladed Darrieus wind turbine under controlled-rotation conditions in the IMST water tunnel. The main focus of interest was the tip-speed ratios at which dynamic stall appears. Observations of this phenomenon from dye emission and the formation of hydrogen bubbles were made in the form of photographs, film and video recordings. Velocity measurements were obtained using the Laser-Doppler Velocimeter and components of velocity fluctuations could be determined quantitatively.

  12. New blades shape up for dozers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-05-01

    This article discusses the design of blades used on dozers for the reclamation work following surface mining. Two blades are described which have led to a 50% reduction in reclamation costs and a 20% reduction in fuel requirements over conventional equipment. These results are from work carried out at the Kayenta mine in Arizona, USA. Design considerations in the development of the blades are described. Descriptions of both the centre flow blades and the universal blades are given.

  13. Lightning Safety Tips and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Careers Contact Us Glossary Safety National Program Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Weather.gov > Safety > Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Lightning Resources Lightning strikes ...

  14. Investigation of Unsteady Tip Clearance Flow in a Low-Speed One and Half Stage Axial Compressor with LES And PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph; Tan, David

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate how a rotor's unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor when the rotor tip gap size is increased from 0.5 mm (0.49% of rotor tip blade chord, 2% of blade span) to 2.4 mm (2.34% chord, 4% span) at the design condition are investigated. The changes in unsteady tip clearance flow with the 0.62 % tip gap as the flow rate is reduced to near stall condition are also investigated. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at these three flow conditions. Detailed Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) measurements of the current flow fields were also performed at the Johns Hopkins University in a refractive index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. Unsteady tip clearance flow fields from LES are compared with the PIV measurements and both LES and PIV results are used to study changes in tip clearance flow structures. The current study shows that the tip clearance vortex is not a single structure as traditionally perceived. The tip clearance vortex is formed by multiple interlaced vorticities. Therefore, the tip clearance vortex is inherently unsteady. The multiple interlaced vortices never roll up to form a single structure. When phased-averaged, the tip clearance vortex appears as a single structure. When flow rate is reduced with the same tip gap, the tip clearance vortex rolls further upstream and the tip clearance vortex moves further radially inward and away from the suction side of the blade. When the tip gap size is increased at the design flow condition, the overall tip clearance vortex becomes stronger and it stays closer to the blade suction side and the vortex core extends all the way to the exit of the blade passage. Measured and calculated unsteady flow

  15. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Archimedes Spiral Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Chun Kim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new type of horizontal axis wind turbine adopting the Archimedes spiral blade is introduced for urban-use. Based on the angular momentum conservation law, the design formula for the blade was derived using a variety of shape factors. The aerodynamic characteristics and performance of the designed Archimedes wind turbine were examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. The CFD simulations showed that the new type of wind turbine produced a power coefficient (Cp of approximately 0.25, which is relatively high compared to other types of urban-usage wind turbines. To validate the CFD results, experimental studies were carried out using a scaled-down model. The instantaneous velocity fields were measured using the two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV method in the near field of the blade. The PIV measurements revealed the presence of dominant vortical structures downstream the hub and near the blade tip. The interaction between the wake flow at the rotor downstream and the induced velocity due to the tip vortices were strongly affected by the wind speed and resulting rotational speed of the blade. The mean velocity profiles were compared with those predicted by the steady state and unsteady state CFD simulations. The unsteady CFD simulation agreed better with those of the PIV experiments than the steady state CFD simulations.

  16. Development of advanced blade pitching kinematics for cycloturbines and cyclorotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary Howard

    to achieve optimum performance. A novel inverse method was developed implementing a new semi-empirical curvilinear flow blade aerodynamic coefficient model to predict optimum cycloturbine blade pitch waveforms from the ideal fluid deceleration. These improved blade pitch waveforms were evaluated on a 1.37m diameter by 1.37m span cycloturbine to definitively characterize their improvement over existing blade pitch motions and demonstrate the practicality of a variable blade pitch system. The Fluxline Optimal pitching kinematics outperformed sinusoidal and fixed pitching kinematics. The turbine achieved a mean gross aerodynamic power coefficient of 0.44 (95% confidence interval: [0.388,0.490]) and 0.52 (95% confidence interval: [0.426,0.614]) at tip speed ratios (TSRs) of 1.5 and 2.25 respectively which exceeds all other low TSR vertical axis wind turbines. Two-dimensional incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to characterize higher order effects of the blade interaction with the fluid. These simulations suggest Fluxline Optimal pitch kinematics achieve high power coefficients by evenly extracting energy from the flow without blade stall or detached turbine wakes. Fluxline Theory was adapted to inform the design of high efficiency cyclorotors by incorporating the concept of rotor angle of attack as well as a power and drag loss model for blade support structure. A blade element version of this theory predicts rotor performance. For hovering, a simplified variation of the theory instructs that cyclorotors will achieve the greatest power loading at low disk loadings with high solidity blades pitched to maximum lift coefficient. Increasing lift coefficients in the upstream portion of the rotor disproportionately increases performance compared to magnifying lift in the downstream portion. This suggests airfoil sections that counter curvilinear flow effects could improve hovering efficiency. Additionally, the

  17. Low Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/lowvision.html MedlinePlus: Low Vision Tips We are sorry. MedlinePlus no longer maintains the For Low Vision Users page. You will still find health resources ...

  18. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  19. Incontinence Treatment: Dietary Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax-deductible donation. Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  20. The impact of inertial forces on morphing wind turbine blade in vertical axis configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butbul, Jonathan; MacPhee, David; Beyene, Asfaw

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel flexible VAWT has been experimentally tested alongside numerically simulations. • Using FEA and CFD, direction of blade bending was predicted from inertial and aerodynamic forces. • High-speed camera footage has been used to validate the model. • The flexible VAWT was found to self-start in the majority of tests, while the rigid one did not. • It is suggested that flexible VAWTs can have improved performance in part-load applications. - Abstract: A novel flexible blade concept with the ability to morph and geometrically adapt to changing flow conditions has been proposed to improve part-load performance of horizontal-axis wind turbines. The extension of these benefits to a vertical axis wind turbine would make wind technology a more competitive player in the energy market. Both flexible and rigid wind turbine rotor blades for vertical axis application were modeled, designed, manufactured and tested. Their performances were tested in a low speed wind tunnel. The predicted magnitude and direction of blade morph was validated using a high speed camera as well as finite element analysis. The comparative results of straight rigid and straight morphing blades show that the coefficient of performance greatly depends on the tip speed ratio. Overall, the morphing blade has better performance at low RPMs, but the rigid blade performed better at high RPMs. It was observed that the flexible blade self-started in the majority of the experiments. At high RPM, the centrifugal force overwhelmed the lift force, bending the flexible blade out of phase in an undesired direction increasing drag and therefore reducing the coefficient of performance

  1. Effect of tip clearance on wall shear stress of an axial LVAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, S.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    Wall shear stress is a crucial parameter used for blood damage analysis, and typically a value of 400 Pa is set as a limit. Tip clearance is a major factor contributing to hemolysis and pump efficiency. In this study, different tip gap configurations are used to analyse the wall shear stress developed on the blade surface of a constant thickness blade design, and a varying thickness blade design using CFD analysis. It was found that, for a particular geometry, as the clearance gap reduces, flow rate over the high wall shear stress area decreases even though the high wall shear stress span is found to extend. For each design, the optimum clearance gap is iteratively attained, keeping the maximum WSS as a limiting factor. Thus a better pump designs is obtained, whose leakage flow patterns are lower than that of the initial design, hence also leading to higher pump efficiency.

  2. Design of Single Stage Axial Turbine with Constant Nozzle Angle Blading for Small Turbojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Adnan, F.; Hartono, Firman

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an aerodynamic design of a single stage gas generator axial turbine for small turbojet engine is explained. As per design requirement, the turbine should be able to deliver power output of 155 kW at 0.8139 kg/s gas mass flow, inlet total temperature of 1200 K and inlet total pressure of 335330 Pa. The design phase consist of several steps, i.e.: determination of velocity triangles in 2D plane, 2D blading design and 3D flow analysis at design point using Computational Fluid Dynamics method. In the determination of velocity triangles, two conditions are applied: zero inlet swirl (i.e. the gas flow enter the turbine at axial direction) and constant nozzle angle design (i.e. the inlet and outlet angle of the nozzle blade are constant from root to tip). The 2D approach in cascade plane is used to specify airfoil type at root, mean and tip of the blade based on inlet and outlet flow conditions. The 3D approach is done by simulating the turbine in full configuration to evaluate the overall performance of the turbine. The observed parameters including axial gap, stagger angle, and tip clearance affect its output power. Based on analysis results, axial gap and stagger angle are positively correlated with output power up to a certain point at which the power decreases. Tip clearance, however, gives inversely correlation with output power.

  3. Work activity in food service: The significance of customer relations, tipping practices and gender for preventing musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperrière, Ève; Messing, Karen; Bourbonnais, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Some evidence shows that food servers are exposed to an elevated risk of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and that their work activity varies by gender. Interviews of servers and observations of food service in Québec, Canada, were carried out in three restaurants and a questionnaire was administered to 64 workers from 44 other restaurants. The relationship with the customer has specific effects on work activity and transforms the physical, emotional and cognitive work. Strategies intended to speed service or otherwise related to the customer relationship can involve health risks. Women reported more direct food service (p work per week (p < 0.01). Women workers reported experiencing more sites of pain (p < 0.003). This exploratory study suggests that managing the server-customer relationship could be important in preventing musculoskeletal disorders in this population and that women are at particular risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Output characteristics of torsion arc blade type horizontal axis windmill; Nejire enko yokugata suiheijiku fusha no shutsuryoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, N; Kishimura, K [Meiji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    The previous paper theoretically analyzes characteristics of a torsion arc blade type (TABT) horizontal axis windmill to derive the theoretical equations, which give the results in good agreement with the observed ones, when multiplied by a blade shape factor. This paper discusses that the theoretical and observed results are in good agreement with each other by taking into consideration shape-related solidity and number of blades. The following findings are obtained, when parameters related to a 6-blade TABT horizontal axis wind mill are introduced and hysteresis brake is used as the load resistance for torque measurement. Shape factor can be represented by two factors of blade number and solidity. The same equation for shape factor is applicable to both elliptical and rectangular blades. These blades need different theoretical equations to give the results in agreement with the observed ones, when operated at a tip speed ratio (TSR) of 1.77 and 1.58, respectively. Rotational force is affected by the rear blade shape when they are operated at a respective TSR below the above level, but unaffected at beyond the above level. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimental study of the wake characteristics of a two-blade horizontal axis wind turbine by time-resolved PIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LiRu; CEN KeFa; XING JiangKuan; WANG JianWen; YUAN RenYu; DONG XueQing; MA JianLong; LUO Kun; QIU KunZan; NI MingJiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments of the wake characteristics of a two-blade wind turbine,in the downstream region of 0<x/R< 10,have been carried out.With the help of the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TRPIV),flow properties such as the vortex structure,average velocity,fluctuations velocities and Reynolds stresses are obtained at different tip speed ratios (TSR).It is found that the wind turbine wake flow can be divided into velocity deficit region,velocity remained region and velocity increased region,with generally higher velocity deficit compared with a three-blade wind turbine wake.Once a blade rotates to the reference 0° plane,the tip vortices generate,shed and move downstream with the intensity gradually decreased.The leapfrogging phenomenon of tip vortices caused by the force interaction of adjacent vortices is found and more apparent in the far wake region.The axial fluctuation velocity is larger than radial fluctuation velocity at the blade root region,and the turbulent kinetic energy shares the similar trend as the axial fluctuation velocity.The axial normalized Reynolds normal stress is much larger than the radial normalized Reynolds normal stress and Reynolds shear stress at the blade root region.As the TSR increases,the radial location where the peak axial normalized Reynolds normal stress u u / U2 and axial fluctuation velocity appear descends in the radial direction.

  6. Damage detection of engine bladed-disks using multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Tang, J.

    2006-03-01

    The timely detection of damage in aero-engine bladed-disks is an extremely important and challenging research topic. Bladed-disks have high modal density and, particularly, their vibration responses are subject to significant uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerance (blade-to-blade difference or mistuning), operating condition change and sensor noise. In this study, we present a new methodology for the on-line damage detection of engine bladed-disks using their vibratory responses during spin-up or spin-down operations which can be measured by blade-tip-timing sensing technique. We apply a principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach for data compression, feature extraction, and denoising. The non-model based damage detection is achieved by analyzing the change between response features of the healthy structure and of the damaged one. We facilitate such comparison by incorporating the Hotelling's statistic T2 analysis, which yields damage declaration with a given confidence level. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by case studies.

  7. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  8. Robust design optimization method for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yaping; Zhang, Chuhua

    2016-03-01

    Blade fouling has been proved to be a great threat to compressor performance in operating stage. The current researches on fouling-induced performance degradations of centrifugal compressors are based mainly on simplified roughness models without taking into account the realistic factors such as spatial non-uniformity and randomness of the fouling-induced surface roughness. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the robust design optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers with considerations of blade fouling. In this paper, a multi-objective robust design optimization method is developed for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling. A three-dimensional surface roughness map is proposed to describe the nonuniformity and randomness of realistic fouling accumulations on blades. To lower computational cost in robust design optimization, the support vector regression (SVR) metamodel is combined with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method to conduct the uncertainty analysis of fouled impeller performance. The analyzed results show that the critical fouled region associated with impeller performance degradations lies at the leading edge of blade tip. The SVR metamodel has been proved to be an efficient and accurate means in the detection of impeller performance variations caused by roughness uncertainties. After design optimization, the robust optimal design is found to be more efficient and less sensitive to fouling uncertainties while maintaining good impeller performance in the clean condition. This research proposes a systematic design optimization method for centrifugal compressors with considerations of blade fouling, providing a practical guidance to the design of advanced centrifugal compressors.

  9. The effect of blade pitch in the rotor hydrodynamics of a cross-flow turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Miguel; Huera-Huarte, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    In this work we will show how the hydrodynamics of the rotor of a straight-bladed Cross-Flow Turbine (CFT) are affected by the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR), and the blade pitch angle imposed to the rotor. The CFT model used in experiments consists of a three-bladed (NACA-0015) vertical axis turbine with a chord (c) to rotor diameter (D) ratio of 0.16. Planar Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used, with the laser sheet aiming at the mid-span of the blades, illuminating the inner part of the rotor and the near wake of the turbine. Tests were made by forcing the rotation of the turbine with a DC motor, which provided precise control of the TSR, while being towed in a still-water tank at a constant Reynolds number of 61000. A range of TSRs from 0.7 to 2.3 were covered for different blade pitches, ranging from 8° toe-in to 16° toe-out. The interaction between the blades in the rotor will be discussed by examining dimensionless phase-averaged vorticity fields in the inner part of the rotor and mean velocity fields in the near wake of the turbine. Supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Grant BES-2013-065366 and project DPI2015-71645-P.

  10. Study on unsteady tip leakage vortex cavitation in an axial-flow pump using an improved filter-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Desheng; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Ruijie; Shi, Weidong; Pan, Qiang [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China); Esch, B. P. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    The aim of the present investigation is to simulate and analyze the tip leakage flow structure and instantaneous evolution of tip vortex cavitation in a scaled axial-flow pump model. The improved filter-based turbulence model based on the density correction and a homogeneous cavitation model were used for implementing this work. The results show that when entering into the tip clearance, the backward flow separates from the blade tip near the pressure side, resulting in the generation of a corner vortex with high magnitude of turbulence kinetic energy. Then, at the exit of the tip clearance, the leakage jets would re-attach on the blade tip wall. Moreover, the maximum swirling strength method was employed in identifying the TLV core and a counter-rotating induced vortex near the end-wall successfully. The three dimensional cavitation patterns and in-plain cavitation structures obtained by the improved numerical method agree well with the experimental results. At the sheet cavitation trailing edge in the tip region, the perpendicular cavitation cloud induced by TLV sheds and migrates toward the pressure side of the neighboring blade. During its migration, it breaks down abruptly and generates a large number of smallscale cavities, leading to severe degradation of the pump performance, which is similar with the phenomenon observed by Tan et al.

  11. High tsunami risk at northern tip of Sumatra as a result of the activity of the Sumatra Fault Zone (SFZ) combined with coastal landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Huang, B. S.; Wen, K. L.; Mirza, A.; Rizal, S.; Purnawan, S.; Fajri, I.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Liu, C. S.; Lee, C. S.; Wilson, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    The lesson learned from the 12 January 2010, Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake has shown that an earthquake with strike-slip faulting can produce a significant tsunami. This occasion is rare since in the fact of the fault consist predominantly of lateral motion, which is rarely associated with significant uplift or tsunami generation. Yet, another hint from this event, that this earthquake was accompanied by a coastal landslide. Again, there were only few records of a submarine slides as a primary source that generate a tsunami. Hence, the Haiti Mw 7.0 earthquake was generated by these combined mechanisms, i.e. strike-slip faulting earthquake and coastal landslide. In reflecting this event, the Sumatra region exhibit almost identical situation, where the right lateral strike-slip faulting of Sumatra Fault Zone (SFZ) is located. In this study, we are focusing at the northern tip of SFZ at Aceh Province. The reason we focused our study at its northern tip is that, since the Sumatra-Andaman mega earthquake and tsunami on 26 December 2004, which occurred at the subduction zone, there were no records of significant earthquake along the SFZ, where at this location the SFZ is divided into two faults, i.e. Aceh and Seulimeum faults. This study aimed as a mitigation effort, if an earthquake happened at these faults, do we observe a similar result as that happened at Haiti or not. To do so, we access the high-resolution shallow bathymetry data that acquired through a Community-Based Bathymetric Survey (CBBS), examines five scanned Single Channel Seismic (SCS) reflections data, perform the slope stability analysis and that simulate the tsunami using Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model (COMCOT) model with a combined source of fault activity and submarine landslide. The result shows that, by these combined mechanisms, if the earthquake as large as 7 Mw or larger, it could produce a tsunami as high as 6 meters along the coast. The detailed shallow bathymetric and the slope stability

  12. Probabilistic SSME blades structural response under random pulse loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Michael; Rubinstein, Robert; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to develop models of random impacts on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blade and to predict the probabilistic structural response of the blade to these impacts. The random loading is caused by the impact of debris. The probabilistic structural response is characterized by distribution functions for stress and displacements as functions of the loading parameters which determine the random pulse model. These parameters include pulse arrival, amplitude, and location. The analysis can be extended to predict level crossing rates. This requires knowledge of the joint distribution of the response and its derivative. The model of random impacts chosen allows the pulse arrivals, pulse amplitudes, and pulse locations to be random. Specifically, the pulse arrivals are assumed to be governed by a Poisson process, which is characterized by a mean arrival rate. The pulse intensity is modelled as a normally distributed random variable with a zero mean chosen independently at each arrival. The standard deviation of the distribution is a measure of pulse intensity. Several different models were used for the pulse locations. For example, three points near the blade tip were chosen at which pulses were allowed to arrive with equal probability. Again, the locations were chosen independently at each arrival. The structural response was analyzed both by direct Monte Carlo simulation and by a semi-analytical method.

  13. Wing Tip Drag Reduction at Nominal Take-Off Mach Number: An Approach to Local Active Flow Control with a Highly Robust Actuator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses wind tunnel test results aimed at advancing active flow control technology to increase the aerodynamic efficiency of an aircraft during take-off. A model of the outer section of a representative civil airliner wing was equipped with two-stage fluidic actuators between the slat edge and wing tip, where mechanical high-lift devices fail to integrate. The experiments were conducted at a nominal take-off Mach number of M = 0.2. At this incidence velocity, separation on the wing section, accompanied by increased drag, is triggered by the strong slat edge vortex at high angles of attack. On the basis of global force measurements and local static pressure data, the effect of pulsed blowing on the complex flow is evaluated, considering various momentum coefficients and spanwise distributions of the actuation effort. It is shown that through local intensification of forcing, a momentum coefficient of less than c μ = 0.6 % suffices to offset the stall by 2.4°, increase the maximum lift by more than 10% and reduce the drag by 37% compared to the uncontrolled flow.

  14. Fan Efficiency Improvement via Changing Guide Blade Shape Under Various Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Zamolodchikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the influence of sweep and tangential blade lean the guide vanes (GV on the pressure losses in the blade row, and development of an approach to creating the GV with a rationally-shaped blades to ensure increased efficiency in the partial operating conditions.A numerical simulation method was used for research. As an object to be studied, was used an axial fan comprising an impeller and a GV, which were profiled to have constant circulation of velocity in radius. Verification of numerical simulation was based on the experimental data of fan. It comprised a GV with a straight blade and a circular-arc blade, with an impeller remained stationary in both cases. Among the turbulence models under consideration, preference is given to k-ω, as under operating conditions close to design ones, its result falls within the confidence span of the experimental characteristics, and at much higher and lower discharge coefficients a discrepancy is 4% at most.  In addition to the characteristics, the fields of pressure losses in GV have been analyzed. Numerical modeling allowed us to have a well-reproduced structure of losses in the stationary blade row.Analysis of pressure loss fields has shown that in the original GV near the hub, on the blade back, under design conditions a flow breakdown takes off. In view of the research, was designed a new GV with a modified blade geometry. The GV blade axis near the hub was bent in the circumferential direction by 0.1 length of the blade. In the near-hub cross-sections the blade chord was increased by 10%.The results of numerical simulation have shown that, with the flow less than the designed one, a change of just the GV blade tip sections leads to reduced break-down zone near the hub by about 40% under both operating conditions without raising profile losses and to improved fan efficiency, which reduces fan drive power consumption under typical operating conditions in the propulsion

  15. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schepers, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has often been involved in industrial projects, in which blade geometries are created automatic by means of numerical optimisation. Usually, these projects aim at the determination of the aerodynamic optimal wind turbine blade, i.e. the goal is to design a blade which is optimal with regard to energy yield. In other cases, blades have been designed which are optimal with regard to cost of generated energy. However, it is obvious that the wind turbine blade designs which result from these optimisations, are not necessarily optimal with regard to noise emission. In this paper an example is shown of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the ECN-program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. 11 figs., 8 refs

  16. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  17. Improved flare tip design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogolek, P. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the testing procedures and development of an improved flare tip design. Design objectives included performance equal to or better than utility flares at low wind speed; conversion efficiency; fuel slip; smoking; significant improvement at high wind speed; and no increase in trace emissions. A description of the testing facility of the flare tip was provided, with reference to the fact that the facility allowed for realistic near full scale gas flares in a single-pass flare test facility. Other details of the facility included: an adjustable ceiling; high capacity variable speed fan; sampling ports along working section in stack; windows along working section; and air cooled walls, floor, and ceiling. The fuels used in the flare tip included natural gas, propane, gasoline and inert gases. Details of wind speed, appurtenances and turbulence generating grids were presented, with reference to continuous gas emission measurements. A list of design constraints was provided. Flare performance included wind speed, turbulence and fuel composition. A chart of conversion inefficiencies with a correlation of wind speed and turbulence, fuel flow and pipe size was also presented. Several new tip designs were fabricated for testing, with screening tests for comparison to basic pipe and ranking designs. Significant improvements were found in one of the new designs, including results with 30 per cent propane in fuel. Emissions reduction from 10 to 35 per cent were noted. It was concluded that future work should focus on evaluating improved tip for stability at low wind speeds. Fuel slips are the primary source of emissions, and it was recommended that further research is necessary to improve existing flare tips. tabs, figs.

  18. Atmospheric Plasma Blade for Surgical Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Lutfi; Yurdabak Karaca, Gozde; Özkaptan, Emir; Uygun, Emre; Uygun Oksuz, Aysegul

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric plasma cut is a process at the minimum level due to the ions, radicals and free electrons generated by the active electrode and target tissue. Atmospheric plasma cutting devices provide significant advantages as a non-contact electrocautery system that can operate in isotonic environment. During operations where plasma cutting is applied, bleeding is controlled and the side effects that would create the isotonic environment are eliminated. In this study in vivo and in vitro studies will be carried out by producing and optimizing the atmospheric plasma blade. Once the optimum parameters of the instrument are determined, in vivo studies will be performed and the pathology results will be evaluated.

  19. Productivity tips for developers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    I like to read about productivity tools and techniques, but the problem is - most of them are completely overrated, the tips are not that useful or they are too difficult to implement. But, sometimes I can find some stuff that really makes me think "damn, how could I live without this before?!". Today, I would like to share some of them and hopefully hear about the tips and tricks that you use. Maybe we can find a way to share them somehow (github repo/forum)?

  20. Axial compressor gas path design for desensitization of aerodynamic performance and stability to tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Mert

    Tip clearance is the necessary small gap left between the moving rotor tip and stationary shroud of a turbomachine. In a compressor, the pressure driven flow through this gap, called tip clearance flow, has a major and generally detrimental impact on compressor performance (pressure ratio and efficiency) and aerodynamic stability (stall margin). The increase in tip clearance, either temporary during transient engine operations or permanent from wear, leads to a drop in compressor performance and aerodynamic stability which results in a fuel consumption increase and a reduced operating envelope for a gas turbine engine. While much research has looked into increasing compressor performance and stall margin at the design (minimum or nominal) tip clearance, very little attention has been paid for reducing the sensitivity of these parameters to tip clearance size increase. The development of technologies that address this issue will lead to aircraft engines whose performance and operating envelope are more robust to operational demands and wear. The current research is the second phase of a research programme to develop design strategies to reduce the sensitivity of axial compressor performance and aerodynamic stability to tip clearance. The first phase had focused on blade design strategies and had led to the discovery and explanation of two flow features that reduces tip sensitivity, namely increased incoming meridional momentum in the rotor tip region and reduction/elimination of double leakage. Double leakage is the flow that exits one tip clearance and enters the tip clearance of the adjacent blade instead of convecting downstream out of the rotor passage. This flow was shown to be very detrimental to compressor performance and stall margin. Two rotor design strategies involving sweep and tip stagger reduction were proposed and shown by CFD simulations to exploit these features to reduce sensitivity. As the second phase, the objectives of the current research

  1. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, G. D.; Lee, D.; Snow, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single stage compressor was designed with the intent of demonstrating that, for a tip speed and hub-tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage, the use of low aspect ratio can permit high levels of blade loading to be achieved at an acceptable level of efficiency. The design pressure ratio is 1.8 at an adiabatic efficiency of 88.5 percent. Both rotor and stator have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections. Variable IGV and stator vanes permit low speed matching adjustments. The design incorporates an inlet duct representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressor.

  2. Wind Turbine Blade with Angled Girders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reinforced blade for a wind turbine, particularly to a blade having a new arrangement of two or more girders in the blade, wherein each of the girders is connected to the upper part and the lower part of the shell and forms an angle with another girder thereby...

  3. A fracture- mechanics calculation of crack growth rate for a gas turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, M.; Karimi, R.

    2002-01-01

    The existence of thermo-mechanical stresses, due to the frequent start-ups and shutdowns of gas turbines. Combined with high working temperatures may cause creep and fatigue failure of the blades. This paper describes a fracture-mechanics life assessment of a gas turbine blade. Initially, the distributions of thermal and mechanical stresses were obtained by using the finite element method. Accordingly; the crack modeling was performed in a high stress region at the suction side surface of the blade. Several crack growth increments were observed and the related crack tip parameters were calculated. Finally; the creep-fatigue crack growth in each cycle was calculated and the total number of start-stop cycles was determined

  4. Composite blade damaging under impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menouillard, T.; Réthoré, J.; Bung, H.; Suffis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Composites materials are now being used in primary aircraft structures, and other domains because of numerous advantages. A part of a continuous in-flight operating costs, gas turbine engine manufacturers are always looking for ways to decrease engine weight. This is the case of compressor blades

  5. Advanced LP turbine blade design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, M.; Pfeiffer, R.; Termuehlen, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the 1960's and early 1970's, the development of steam turbines for the utility industry was mainly influenced by the demand for increasing unit sizes. Nuclear plants in particular, required the design of LP turbines with large annulus areas for substantial mass and volumetric steam flows. Since then the development of more efficient LP turbines became an ongoing challenge. Extensive R and D work was performed in order to build efficient and reliable LP turbines often exposed to severe corrosion, erosion and dynamic excitation conditions. This task led to the introduction of an advanced disk-type rotor design for 1800 rpm LP turbines and the application of a more efficient, reaction-type blading for all steam turbine sections including the first stages of LP turbines. The most recent developments have resulted in an advanced design of large LP turbine blading, typically used in the last three stages of each LP turbine flow section. Development of such blading required detailed knowledge of the three dimensional, largely transonic, flow conditions of saturated steam. Also the precise assessment of blade stressing from dynamic conditions, such as speed and torsional resonance, as well as stochastic and aerodynamic excitation is of extreme importance

  6. Design of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGugan, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    In this section the research program framework for European PhD network MARE-WINT is presented, particularly the technology development work focussing on reliability/maintenance and the models describing multi-body fluid structure interaction for the Rotor Blade structure. In order to give...

  7. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  8. Integral Twist Actuation of Helicopter Rotor Blades for Vibration Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, SangJoon; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2001-01-01

    Active integral twist control for vibration reduction of helicopter rotors during forward flight is investigated. The twist deformation is obtained using embedded anisotropic piezocomposite actuators. An analytical framework is developed to examine integrally-twisted blades and their aeroelastic response during different flight conditions: frequency domain analysis for hover, and time domain analysis for forward flight. Both stem from the same three-dimensional electroelastic beam formulation with geometrical-exactness, and axe coupled with a finite-state dynamic inflow aerodynamics model. A prototype Active Twist Rotor blade was designed with this framework using Active Fiber Composites as the actuator. The ATR prototype blade was successfully tested under non-rotating conditions. Hover testing was conducted to evaluate structural integrity and dynamic response. In both conditions, a very good correlation was obtained against the analysis. Finally, a four-bladed ATR system is built and tested to demonstrate its concept in forward flight. This experiment was conducted at NASA Langley Tansonic Dynamics Tunnel and represents the first-of-a-kind Mach-scaled fully-active-twist rotor system to undergo forward flight test. In parallel, the impact upon the fixed- and rotating-system loads is estimated by the analysis. While discrepancies are found in the amplitude of the loads under actuation, the predicted trend of load variation with respect to its control phase correlates well. It was also shown, both experimentally and numerically, that the ATR blade design has the potential for hub vibratory load reduction of up to 90% using individual blade control actuation. Using the numerical framework, system identification is performed to estimate the harmonic transfer functions. The linear time-periodic system can be represented by a linear time-invariant system under the three modes of blade actuation: collective, longitudinal cyclic, and lateral cyclic. A vibration

  9. Composite ceramic blade for a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, A; Hoffmueller, W; Krueger, W

    1980-06-26

    The gas turbine blade consists of a supporting metal core which has at its lower end a modelled root and a profile blade made of ceramics enclosing it at some distance. The invention deals with a reliable connection between these two parts of the rotor blade: from the top end of the blade core a head protrudes supporting the thin-walled profile blade from below with a projection each pointing into the interior. The design of the projections and supporting surfaces is described and illustrated by drawings.

  10. Tip Induced Motion of Adatoms on Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuerpick, U.; Rahman, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    From total energy calculations we show that for certain tip-adatom separations the activation barrier for the adatom to move towards the tip disappears and the adatom experiences an attractive force in the direction of the tip. For a Cu adatom at a (100) microfaceted step on Cu(111) this happens at a lateral separation of about one lattice constant, in agreement with recent experimental findings. Simultaneously, the activation barrier in the direction away from the tip increases significantly. The details of the changes in the potential energy surface induced by the tip are found to depend on the characteristics of the tip apex and its height above the adatom. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the esophagus and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the ... diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and ...

  16. Tips for Living with Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Tips for Living Tips for Living with Scleroderma Ways to help manage your symptoms The Scleroderma ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on ...

  19. Innovation in Vertical Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine – Straight Blade Cascaded (VAHT-SBC) design and testing for low current speed power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantoro, R.; Utama, I. K. A. P.; Arief, I. S.; Ismail, A.; Manggala, S. W.

    2018-05-01

    This study examines an innovative turbine with the addition of the number and arrangement of straight blade cascaded (SBC). SBC is a combination of passive variable-pitch and fixed pitch of each turbine arm. This study was conducted in an open channel flow that has a current velocity (V-m/s) of 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. RPM and torque ware measured for coefficient of performance (Cp) and tip speed ratio (TSR) calculation. Without changing the turbine dimension, the employment of cascaded blade (three blades in each arm) contributes to improve energy extraction significantly. A significant increase in Cp value is seen when 9 blades (3 cascaded blades per arm) are used with a Cp 0.42 value at TSR 2.19. This value has reached 93% of the maximum theoritical Cp value.

  20. Tip off the HAT- Epigenetic control of learning and memory by Drosophila Tip60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songjun; Elefant, Felice

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of epigenetic gene control mechanisms involving histone acetylation in the brain causes cognitive impairment, a debilitating hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders. Histone acetylation regulates cognitive gene expression via chromatin packaging control in neurons. Unfortunately, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that generate such neural epigenetic signatures and their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our recent findings provide insight into this question by demonstrating that Tip60 HAT action is critical for morphology and function of the mushroom body (MB), the learning and memory center in the Drosophila brain. We show that Tip60 is robustly produced in MB Kenyon cells and extending axonal lobes and that targeted MB Tip60 HAT loss results in axonal outgrowth disruption. Functional consequences of loss and gain of Tip60 HAT levels in the MB are evidenced by defects in memory. Tip60 ChIP-Seq analysis reveals enrichment for genes that function in cognitive processes and accordingly, key genes representing these pathways are misregulated in the Tip60 HAT mutant fly brain. Remarkably, increasing levels of Tip60 in the MB rescues learning and memory deficits resulting from Alzheimer's disease associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) induced neurodegeneration. Our studies highlight the potential of HAT activators as a therapeutic option for cognitive disorders.

  1. Investigation of the Shear Flow Effect and Tip Clearance on a Low Speed Axial Flow Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Varpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of inlet shear flow on the tip leakage flow in an axial flow compressor cascade. A flow with a high shear rate is generated in the test section of an open circuit cascade wind tunnel by using a combination of screens with a prescribed solidity. It is observed that a stable shear flow of shear rate 1.33 is possible and has a gradual decay rate until 15 times the height of the shear flow generator downstream. The computational results obtained agree well with the available experimental data on the baseline configuration. The detailed numerical analysis shows that the tip clearance improves the blade loading near the tip through the promotion of favorable incidence by the tip leakage flow. The tip clearance shifts the centre of pressure on the blade surface towards the tip. It, however, has no effect on the distribution of end wall loss and deviation angle along the span up to 60% from the hub. In the presence of a shear inflow, the end wall effects are considerable. On the other hand, with a shear inflow, the effects of tip leakage flow are observed to be partly suppressed. The shear flow reduces the tip leakage losses substantially in terms of kinetic energy associated with it.

  2. Characterization of metal-coated fiber tip for NSOM lithography by tip-to-tip scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubicova, I.; Pudis, D.; Suslik, L.; Skriniarova, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the optical field characterization, a tip-to-tip scan of two metal-coated fiber tips with circular aperture at the apex was performed. The optical field irradiated from the fiber probe in illumination mode was analyzed by NSOM represented by fiber probe in collection mode. The near-field intensity profile of the source fiber tip in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the tip was taken. Experimental stage requires high resolution 3D motion system controlled by computer (Fig. 1). The source and the detector fiber tip were placed on the moving and static part of the 3D nanoposition system, respectively. As a light source, a modulated 473 nm DPSS laser was used. After the source fiber tip characterization, the NSOM lithography was performed. In the experimental setup from Fig. 1, the detector fiber tip was replaced by a sample fixed in a vacuum holder. As a sample, a 600 nm positive photoresist AZ 5214E was spin-coated on a GaAs substrate. Exposure was carried out by irradiation of the sample at desired positions through the fiber tip aperture. The sample was developed in AZ 400K developer for 30 s and rinsed in DI water. A promising tip-to-tip scanning technique for characterization of metal-coated fiber tips with aperture at the apex was presented. Nearly-circular aperture shapes were documented from NSOM measurements with diameter estimated to be less than 460 nm. By knowing the source-detector distance and the FWHM of the near-field intensity profile, the tip-to-tip scan proves an easy and fast method to analyze the fiber tip aperture properties. The fiber tip resolution was confirmed by preparation of 2D planar structures in thin photoresist layer, where the NSOM lithography uses the metal-coated fiber tip characterized in previous section. (authors)

  3. Observations of tip vortex cavitation inception from a model marine propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, R. K.; Arakeri, V. H.

    1984-01-01

    Cavitation inception characteristics of a model marine propeller having three blades, developed area ratio of 0.34 and at three different pitch to diameter ratios of 0.62, 0.83 and 1.0 are reported. The dominant type of cavitation observed at inception was the tip vortex type. The measured magnitude of inception index is found to agree well with a proposed correlation due to Strasberg. Performance calculations of the propeller based on combined vortex and blade element theory are also presented.

  4. Capillary Phenomena: Investigations in Compressed Bubble Migration, Geometric Wetting, and Blade-Bound Droplet Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, William Henry

    . Lastly, the stability of drops on surfaces is important in a variety of natural and industrial processes. So called 'wall-edge-vertex bound drops' (a.k.a. drops on blade tips or drops on leaf tips which they resemble) are explored using a numerical approach which applies the Surface Evolver algorithm through implementation of a new file layer and a multi-parameter sweep function. As part of a recently open sourced SE-FIT software, thousands of critical drop configurations are efficiently computed as functions of contact angle, blade edge vertex half-angle, and g-orientation. With the support of other graduate students, simple experiments are performed to benchmark the computations which are then correlated for ease of application. It is shown that sessile, pendant, and wall-edge bound drops are only limiting cases of the more generalized blade-bound drops, and that a ubiquitous 'dry leaf tip' is observed for a range of the critical geometric and wetting parameters.

  5. Intubation of prehospital patients with curved laryngoscope blade is more successful than with straight blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Scott M; Haim, Eithan D; Sullivan, Alex H; Clayton, Lisa M

    2018-02-17

    Direct laryngoscopy can be performed using curved or straight blades, and providers usually choose the blade they are most comfortable with. However, curved blades are anecdotally thought of as easier to use than straight blades. We seek to compare intubation success rates of paramedics using curved versus straight blades. Design: retrospective chart review. hospital-based suburban ALS service with 20,000 annual calls. prehospital patients with any direct laryngoscopy intubation attempt over almost 9years. First attempt and overall success rates were calculated for attempts with curved and straight blades. Differences between the groups were calculated. 2299 patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy. 1865 had attempts with a curved blade, 367 had attempts with a straight blade, and 67 had attempts with both. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. First attempt success was 86% with a curved blade and 73% with a straight blade: a difference of 13% (95% CI: 9-17). Overall success was 96% with a curved blade and 81% with a straight blade: a difference of 15% (95% CI: 12-18). There was an average of 1.11 intubation attempts per patient with a curved blade and 1.13 attempts per patient with a straight blade (2% difference, 95% CI: -3-7). Our study found a significant difference in intubation success rates between laryngoscope blade types. Curved blades had higher first attempt and overall success rates when compared to straight blades. Paramedics should consider selecting a curved blade as their tool of choice to potentially improve intubation success. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  7. Comparative Study on Uni- and Bi-Directional Fluid Structure Coupling of Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Belayneh Ageze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current trends of wind turbine blade designs are geared towards a longer and slender blade with high flexibility, exhibiting complex aeroelastic loadings and instability issues, including flutter; in this regard, fluid-structure interaction (FSI plays a significant role. The present article will conduct a comparative study between uni-directional and bi-directional fluid-structural coupling models for a horizontal axis wind turbine. A full-scale, geometric copy of the NREL 5MW blade with simplified material distribution is considered for simulation. Analytical formulations of the governing relations with appropriate approximation are highlighted, including turbulence model, i.e., Shear Stress Transport (SST k-ω. These analytical relations are implemented using Multiphysics package ANSYS employing Fluent module (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-based solver for the fluid domain and Transient Structural module (Finite Element Analysis-based solver for the structural domain. ANSYS system coupling module also is configured to model the two fluid-structure coupling methods. The rated operational condition of the blade for a full cycle rotation is considered as a comparison domain. In the bi-directional coupling model, the structural deformation alters the angle of attack from the designed values, and by extension the flow pattern along the blade span; furthermore, the tip deflection keeps fluctuating whilst it tends to stabilize in the uni-directional coupling model.

  8. Enhancement to Non-Contacting Stress Measurement of Blade Vibration Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael; Jagodnik, John

    2011-01-01

    A system for turbo machinery blade vibration has been developed that combines time-of-arrival sensors for blade vibration amplitude measurement and radar sensors for vibration frequency and mode identification. The enabling technology for this continuous blade monitoring system is the radar sensor, which provides a continuous time series of blade displacement over a portion of a revolution. This allows the data reduction algorithms to directly calculate the blade vibration frequency and to correctly identify the active modes of vibration. The work in this project represents a significant enhancement in the mode identification and stress calculation accuracy in non-contacting stress measurement system (NSMS) technology when compared to time-of-arrival measurements alone.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation on compressor cascade flows with tip clearance at a low Reynolds number condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Taniguchi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazunari; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Dai; Pallot, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    High flow rate aeroengines typically employ axial flow compressors, where aerodynamic loss is predominantly due to secondary flow features such as tip leakage and corner vortices. In very high altitude missions, turbomachinery operates at low density ambient atmosphere, and the recent trend toward more compact engine core inevitably leads to the reduction of blade size, which in turn increases the relative height of the blade tip clearance. Low Reynolds number flowfield as a result of these two factors amplifies the relative importance of secondary flow effects. This paper focuses on the behavior of tip leakage flow, investigating by use of both experimental and numerical approaches. In order to understand the complex secondary flow behavior, cascade tests are usually conducted using intrusive probes to determine the loss. However relatively few experimental studies are published on tip leakage flows which take into account the interaction between a rotating blade row and its casing wall. Hence a new linear cascade facility has been designed with a moving belt casing in order to reproduce more realistic flowfield as encountered by a rotating compressor row. Numerical simulations were also performed to aid in the understanding of the complex flow features. The experimental results indicate a significant difference in the flowfield when the moving belt casing is present. The numerical simulations reveal that the leakage vortex is pulled by the shearing motion of the endwall toward the pressure side of the adjacent blade. The results highlight the importance of casing wall relative motion in analyzing leakage flow effects.

  10. Aerodynamical calculation of turbomachinery bladings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruehauf, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    Various flow models are presented in comparison to one another, these flow models being obtained from the basic equations of turbomachinery aerodynamics by means of a series of simplifying assumptions on the spatial distribution of the flow quantities. The simplifying assumptions are analysed precisely. With their knowledge it is possible to construct more accurate simplified flow models, which are necessary for the efficient aerodynamical development of highperformance turbomachinery bladings by means of numerical methods. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  11. Blade-element/momentum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    Although there exists a large variety of methods for predicting performance and loadings of wind turbines, the only approach used today by wind turbine manufacturers is based on the blade-element/momentum (BEM) theory by Glauert (Aerodynamic theory. Springer, Berlin, pp. 169-360, 1935). A basic...... assumption in the BEM theory is that the flow takes place in independent stream tubes and that the loading is determined from two-dimensional sectional airfoil characteristics....

  12. Rotating coherent flow structures as a source for narrowband tip clearance noise from axial fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Lallier-Daniels, Dominic; Sanjosé, Marlène; Moreau, Stéphane; Carolus, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Noise from axial fans typically increases significantly as the tip clearance is increased. In addition to the broadband tip clearance noise at the design flow rate, narrowband humps also associated with the tip flow are observed in the far-field acoustic spectra at lower flow rate. In this study, both experimental and numerical methods are used to shed more light on the noise generation mechanism of this narrowband tip clearance noise and provide a unified description of this source. Unsteady aeroacoustic predictions with the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) are successfully compared with experiment. Such a validation allows using LBM data to conduct a detailed modal analysis of the pressure field for detecting rotating coherent flow structures which might be considered as noise sources. As previously found in ring fans the narrowband humps in the far-field noise spectra are found to be related to the tip clearance noise that is generated by an interaction of coherent flow structures present in the tip region with the leading edge of the impeller blades. The visualization of the coherent structures shows that they are indeed part of the unsteady tip clearance vortex structures. They are hidden in a complex, spatially and temporally inhomogeneous flow field, but can be recovered by means of appropriate filtering techniques. Their pressure trace corresponds to the so-called rotational instability identified in previous turbomachinery studies, which brings a unified picture of this tip-noise phenomenon for the first time.

  13. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  14. A New Method for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT Blade Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Mohammadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iran has a great potential for wind energy. This paper introduces optimization of 7 wind turbine blades for small and medium scales in a determined wind condition of Zabol site, Iran, where the average wind speed is considered 7 m /s. Considered wind turbines are 3 bladed and radius of 7 case study turbine blades are 4.5 m, 6.5 m, 8 m, 9 m, 10 m, 15.5 m and 20 m. As the first step, an initial design is performed using one airfoil (NACA 63-215 across the blade. In the next step, every blade is divided into three sections, while the 20 % of first part of the blade is considered as root, the 5% of last the part is considered as tip and the rest of the blade as mid part. Providing necessary input data, suitable airfoils for wind turbines including 43 airfoils are extracted and their experimental data are entered in optimization process. Three variables in this optimization problem would be airfoil type, attack angle and chord, where the objective function is maximum output torque. A MATLAB code was written for design and optimization of the blade, which was validated with a previous experimental work. In addition, a comparison was made to show the effect of optimization with two variables (airfoil type and attack angle versus optimization with three variables (airfoil type, attack angle and chord on output torque increase. Results of this research shows a dramatic increase in comparison to initial designed blade with one airfoil where two variable optimization causes 7.7% to 22.27 % enhancement and three variable optimization causes 17.91% up to 24.48% rise in output torque .Article History: Received Oct 15, 2015; Received in revised form January 2, 2016; Accepted January 14, 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Mohammadi, M., Mohammadi, A. and Farahat, S. (2016 A New Method for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT Blade Optimization. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(1,1-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.1.1-8

  15. Damage Identification of Wind Turbine Blades Using Piezoelectric Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Won Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results of active-sensing structural health monitoring (SHM techniques, which utilize piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators, for determining the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations and frequency response functions at high frequency ranges are used to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1 m section of a CX-100 blade is used. The goal of this study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage with a consideration given to field deployability. Overall, these methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of a 9 m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active sensors. This paper outlines considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and additional issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  16. Korean experience with steam turbine blade inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Park, D.Y.; Park, Hyung Jin; Chung, Min Hwa

    1990-01-01

    Several turbine blade accidents in Korea have emphasized the importance of their adequate periodic inspection. As a typical example, a broken blade was found in the Low Pressure (LP) turbine at the 950 MWe KORI unit 3 during the 1986 overhaul after one year commercial operation. Since then the Manufacturer and the Utility company (KEPCO) have been concerned about the need of blade root inspection. The ultrasonic testing was applied to detect cracks in the blade roots without removing the blades from rotor. Due to the complex geometry of the roots, the test results could not be evaluated easily. We feel that the currently applied UT technique seems to be less reliable and more effective method of inspection must be developed in the near future. This paper describes the following items: The causes and analysis of blade damage The inspection techniques and results The remedial action to be taken (Repair and Replacement) The future plan

  17. Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

  18. Multi-objective shape optimization of runner blade for Kaplan turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power machines LMZ, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation))" data-affiliation=" (OJSC Power machines LMZ, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation))" >Semenova, A; Power machines LMZ, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation))" data-affiliation=" (OJSC Power machines LMZ, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation))" >Pylev, I; Chirkov, D; Lyutov, A; Chemy, S; Skorospelov, V

    2014-01-01

    Automatic runner shape optimization based on extensive CFD analysis proved to be a useful design tool in hydraulic turbomachinery. Previously the authors developed an efficient method for Francis runner optimization. It was successfully applied to the design of several runners with different specific speeds. In present work this method is extended to the task of a Kaplan runner optimization. Despite of relatively simpler blade shape, Kaplan turbines have several features, complicating the optimization problem. First, Kaplan turbines normally operate in a wide range of discharges, thus CFD analysis of each variant of the runner should be carried out for several operation points. Next, due to a high specific speed, draft tube losses have a great impact on the overall turbine efficiency, and thus should be accurately evaluated. Then, the flow in blade tip and hub clearances significantly affects the velocity profile behind the runner and draft tube behavior. All these features are accounted in the present optimization technique. Parameterization of runner blade surface using 24 geometrical parameters is described in details. For each variant of runner geometry steady state three-dimensional turbulent flow computations are carried out in the domain, including wicket gate, runner, draft tube, blade tip and hub clearances. The objectives are maximization of efficiency in best efficiency and high discharge operation points, with simultaneous minimization of cavitation area on the suction side of the blade. Multiobjective genetic algorithm is used for the solution of optimization problem, requiring the analysis of several thousands of runner variants. The method is applied to optimization of runner shape for several Kaplan turbines with different heads

  19. Multi-objective shape optimization of runner blade for Kaplan turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, A.; Chirkov, D.; Lyutov, A.; Chemy, S.; Skorospelov, V.; Pylev, I.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic runner shape optimization based on extensive CFD analysis proved to be a useful design tool in hydraulic turbomachinery. Previously the authors developed an efficient method for Francis runner optimization. It was successfully applied to the design of several runners with different specific speeds. In present work this method is extended to the task of a Kaplan runner optimization. Despite of relatively simpler blade shape, Kaplan turbines have several features, complicating the optimization problem. First, Kaplan turbines normally operate in a wide range of discharges, thus CFD analysis of each variant of the runner should be carried out for several operation points. Next, due to a high specific speed, draft tube losses have a great impact on the overall turbine efficiency, and thus should be accurately evaluated. Then, the flow in blade tip and hub clearances significantly affects the velocity profile behind the runner and draft tube behavior. All these features are accounted in the present optimization technique. Parameterization of runner blade surface using 24 geometrical parameters is described in details. For each variant of runner geometry steady state three-dimensional turbulent flow computations are carried out in the domain, including wicket gate, runner, draft tube, blade tip and hub clearances. The objectives are maximization of efficiency in best efficiency and high discharge operation points, with simultaneous minimization of cavitation area on the suction side of the blade. Multiobjective genetic algorithm is used for the solution of optimization problem, requiring the analysis of several thousands of runner variants. The method is applied to optimization of runner shape for several Kaplan turbines with different heads.

  20. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, O; Seume, J R; Montgomery, M; Mittelbach, M

    2014-01-01

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  1. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  2. A study on tip leakage vortex dynamics and cavitation in axial-flow pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Desheng; Jin, Yongxin; Shi, Weidong [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Esch, B P M van, E-mail: zds@ujs.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    The tip leakage flows and related cavitation in the tip region of an axial-flow pump were investigated in detail using the numerical and experimental methods. The numerical results of the pump model performance were in good agreement with experimental data. The flow structures in the tip clearance were clarified clearly with detailed data involving the axial velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. When depicting the feature of vortex core, the advanced vortex identification method λ {sub 2}-criterion was used. Simultaneously, the minimum tension criterion was also applied to predict the cavitation inception for different flow rates and it is consistent with the distributions of vorticity and pressure in the vortex core. The roll-up process of TLV is highly three-dimensional and the entrainment would follow different paths. Then, both the numerical and experimental approaches show the cavitation patterns for different cavitation conditions, and it also finds that slight cavitation would promote the development of tip leakage vortex (TLV) while the TLV seems to be eliminated for a low cavitation number, especially before a specific location of blade tip due to the blade loading change induced by cavitation possibly. (paper)

  3. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  4. Mutual inductance instability of the tip vortices behind a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarmast, Sasan; Dadfar, Reza; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Two modal decomposition techniques are employed to analyse the stability of wind turbine wakes. A numerical study on a single wind turbine wake is carried out focusing on the instability onset of the trailing tip vortices shed from the turbine blades. The numerical model is based on large......-eddy simulations (LES) of the Navier–Stokes equations using the actuator line (ACL) method to simulate the wake behind the Tjæreborg wind turbine. The wake is perturbed by low-amplitude excitation sources located in the neighbourhood of the tip spirals. The amplification of the waves travelling along the spiral...

  5. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  6. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hughes, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paquette, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  7. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  8. Influence of tip clearance on flow behavior and noise generation of centrifugal compressors in near-surge conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, J.; Tiseira, A.; Navarro, R.; López, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Centrifugal compressor aeroacoustics sensitivity to tip clearance is investigated. • 3 different clearance ratios are set in accordance to expected operating values. • Pressure spectra do not depend on tip clearance ratio in near-surge conditions. • DES performs better than URANS in predicting compressor acoustic signature. • Flow field observation reveals that tip clearance is immersed in rotating backflow. - Abstract: CFD has become an essential tool for researchers to analyze centrifugal compressors. Tip leakage flow is usually considered one of the main mechanisms that dictate compressor flow field and stability. However, it is a common practice to rely on CAD tip clearance, even though the gap between blades and shroud changes when compressor is running. In this paper, sensitivity of centrifugal compressor flow field and noise prediction to tip clearance ratio is investigated. 3D CFD simulations are performed with three different tip clearance ratios in accordance to expected operating values, extracted from shaft motion measurements and FEM predictions of temperature and rotational deformation. Near-surge operating conditions are simulated with URANS and DES. DES shows superior performance for acoustic predictions. Cases with reduced tip clearance present higher pressure ratio and isentropic efficiency, but no significant changes in compressor acoustic signature are found when varying clearance. In this working point, tip clearance is immersed in a region of strongly swirling backflow. Therefore, tip leakage cannot establish any coherent noise source mechanism

  9. "Fan-Tip-Drive" High-Power-Density, Permanent Magnet Electric Motor and Test Rig Designed for a Nonpolluting Aircraft Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.

    2004-01-01

    A scaled blade-tip-drive test rig was designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig is a scaled version of a direct-current brushless motor that would be located in the shroud of a thrust fan. This geometry is very attractive since the allowable speed of the armature is approximately the speed of the blade tips (Mach 1 or 1100 ft/s). The magnetic pressure generated in the motor acts over a large area and, thus, produces a large force or torque. This large force multiplied by the large velocity results in a high-power-density motor.

  10. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Agarwal, Ramesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a function of the number of blades, the tip speed ratio (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity) and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD) of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD) for a given blade and ratio and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given blade and ratio and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  11. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  12. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cortés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP. The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER. The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case

  13. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; Madramany, Borja

    2017-01-01

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares

  14. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating-Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; O'Carroll, Anthony; Madramany, Borja; Hardiman, Mark; Young, Trevor M

    2017-09-28

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating-laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling-adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares two

  15. Photosynthate partitioning in basal zones of tall fescue leaf blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, G.; Nelson, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Elongating grass leaves have successive zones of cell division, cell elongation, and cell maturation in the basal portion of the blade and are a strong sink for photosynthate. Our objective was to determine dry matter (DM) deposition and partitioning in basal zones of elongating tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) leaf blades. Vegetative tall fescue plants were grown in continuous light (350 micromoles per square meter per second photosynthetic photon flux density) to obtain a constant spatial distribution of elongation growth with time. Content and net deposition rates of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and DM along elongating leaf blades were determined. These data were compared with accumulation of 14 C in the basal zones following leaf-labeling with 14 CO 2 . Net deposition of DM was highest in the active cell elongation zone, due mainly to deposition of WSC. The maturation zone, just distal to the elongation zone, accounted for 22% of total net deposition of DM in elongating leaves. However, the spatial profile of 14 C accumulation suggested that the elongation zone and the maturation zone were sinks of equal strength. WSC-free DM accounted for 55% of the total net DM deposition in elongating leaf blades, but only 10% of incoming 14 C-photosynthate accumulated in the water-insoluble fraction (WIF ∼ WSC-free DM) after 2 hours. In the maturation zone, more WSC was used for synthesis of WSC-free DM than was imported as recent photosynthate

  16. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  17. Diagnostics of erosive phenomena in the blades of a turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Massimi, A.; Imperiali, F.

    1986-01-01

    The factors examined are those considered to be of interest with regard to the possibility applying the technique of thin layer activation for the survey and on-line monitoring of erosive phenomena in the blades of a power turbine. The technique is described with its characteristics, the typical fields in which it is used and its developments; in particular, the main parameters that characterize it and the connections that exist between these and the kind of applications to be carried out are shown. The general characteristics of the turbine are presented; the study is aimed mainly at gathering the special data necessary to apply the technique. In particular, to verify the applicability of the method of analysis in turbines, the following objectives are considered: 1) Identification of suitable radioisotopes and of their level of activity; 2) Dimensioning of the area to activate and its location on the blades; 3) Necessary instrumentation; 4) Protectionist problems

  18. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  19. Mitigation of tip vortex cavitation by means of air injection on a Kaplan turbine scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivetti, A; Angulo, M; Lucino, C; Liscia, S

    2014-01-01

    Kaplan turbines operating at full-load conditions may undergo excessive vibration, noise and cavitation. In such cases, damage by erosion associated to tip vortex cavitation can be observed at the discharge ring. This phenomenon involves design features such as (1) overhang of guide vanes; (2) blade profile; (3) gap increasing size with blade opening; (4) suction head; (5) operation point; and (6) discharge ring stiffness, among others. Tip vortex cavitation may cause erosion at the discharge ring and draft tube inlet following a wavy pattern, in which the number of vanes can be clearly identified. Injection of pressurized air above the runner blade centerline was tested as a mean to mitigate discharge ring cavitation damage on a scale model. Air entrance was observed by means of a high-speed camera in order to track the air trajectory toward its mergence with the tip vortex cavitation core. Post-processing of acceleration signals shows that the level of vibration and the RSI frequency amplitude decrease proportionally with air flow rate injected. These findings reveal the potential mitigating effect of air injection in preventing cavitation damage and will be useful in further tests to be performed on prototype, aiming at determining the optimum air flow rate, size and distribution of the injectors

  20. Mitigation of tip vortex cavitation by means of air injection on a Kaplan turbine scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Angulo, M.; Lucino, C.; Liscia, S.

    2014-03-01

    Kaplan turbines operating at full-load conditions may undergo excessive vibration, noise and cavitation. In such cases, damage by erosion associated to tip vortex cavitation can be observed at the discharge ring. This phenomenon involves design features such as (1) overhang of guide vanes; (2) blade profile; (3) gap increasing size with blade opening; (4) suction head; (5) operation point; and (6) discharge ring stiffness, among others. Tip vortex cavitation may cause erosion at the discharge ring and draft tube inlet following a wavy pattern, in which the number of vanes can be clearly identified. Injection of pressurized air above the runner blade centerline was tested as a mean to mitigate discharge ring cavitation damage on a scale model. Air entrance was observed by means of a high-speed camera in order to track the air trajectory toward its mergence with the tip vortex cavitation core. Post-processing of acceleration signals shows that the level of vibration and the RSI frequency amplitude decrease proportionally with air flow rate injected. These findings reveal the potential mitigating effect of air injection in preventing cavitation damage and will be useful in further tests to be performed on prototype, aiming at determining the optimum air flow rate, size and distribution of the injectors.

  1. Flutter of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, N. D.

    1978-01-01

    The testing of Darrieus wind turbines has indicated that under certain conditions, serious vibrations of the blades can occur, involving flatwise bending, torsion, and chordwise bending. A theoretical method of predicting the aeroelastic stability of the coupled bending and torsional motion of such blades with a view to determining the cause of these vibrations, and a means of suppressing them was developed.

  2. Estimation of gas turbine blades cooling efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskalenko, A.B.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of the evaluation of the most thermally stressed gas turbine elements, first stage power turbine blades, cooling efficiency. The calculations were implemented using a numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method. The volume average temperature of the blade

  3. 49 CFR 236.707 - Blade, semaphore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blade, semaphore. 236.707 Section 236.707 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Blade, semaphore. The extended part of a semaphore arm which shows the position of the arm. ...

  4. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  5. Composite hub/metal blade compressor rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S.

    1978-01-01

    A low cost compressor rotor was designed and fabricated for a small jet engine. The rotor hub and blade keepers were compression molded with graphite epoxy. Each pair of metallic blades was held in the hub by a keeper. All keepers were locked in the hub with circumferential windings. Feasibility of fabrication was demonstrated in this program.

  6. A zero torsional stiffness twist morphing blade as a wind turbine load alleviation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachenal, X; Daynes, S; Weaver, P M

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design, analysis and realization of a zero stiffness twist morphing wind turbine blade. The morphing blade is designed to actively twist as a means of alleviating the gust loads which reduce the fatigue life of wind turbine blades. The morphing structure exploits an elastic strain energy balance within the blade to enable large twisting deformations with modest actuation requirements. While twist is introduced using the warping of the blade skin, internal pre-stressed members ensure that a constant strain energy balance is achieved throughout the deformation, resulting in a zero torsional stiffness structure. The torsional stability of the morphing blade is characterized by analysing the elastic strain energy in the device. Analytical models of the skin, the pre-stressed components and the complete blade are compared to their respective finite element models as well as experimental results. The load alleviation potential of the adaptive structure is quantified using a two-dimensional steady flow aerodynamic model which is experimentally validated with wind tunnel measurements. (paper)

  7. A zero torsional stiffness twist morphing blade as a wind turbine load alleviation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenal, X.; Daynes, S.; Weaver, P. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design, analysis and realization of a zero stiffness twist morphing wind turbine blade. The morphing blade is designed to actively twist as a means of alleviating the gust loads which reduce the fatigue life of wind turbine blades. The morphing structure exploits an elastic strain energy balance within the blade to enable large twisting deformations with modest actuation requirements. While twist is introduced using the warping of the blade skin, internal pre-stressed members ensure that a constant strain energy balance is achieved throughout the deformation, resulting in a zero torsional stiffness structure. The torsional stability of the morphing blade is characterized by analysing the elastic strain energy in the device. Analytical models of the skin, the pre-stressed components and the complete blade are compared to their respective finite element models as well as experimental results. The load alleviation potential of the adaptive structure is quantified using a two-dimensional steady flow aerodynamic model which is experimentally validated with wind tunnel measurements.

  8. Wind Turbine Blade Life-Time Assessment Model for Preventive Planning of Operation and Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Florian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Out of the total wind turbine failure events, blade damage accounts for a substantial part, with some studies estimating it at around 23%. Current operation and maintenance (O&M practices typically make use of corrective type maintenance as the basic approach, implying high costs for repair and replacement activities as well as large revenue losses, mainly in the case of offshore wind farms. The recent development and evolution of condition monitoring techniques, as well as the fact that an increasing number of installed turbines are equipped with online monitoring systems, offers a large amount of information on the blades structural health to the decision maker. Further, inspections of the blades are often performed in connection with service. In light of the obtained information, a preventive type of maintenance becomes feasible, with the potential of predicting the blades remaining life to support O&M decisions for avoiding major failure events. The present paper presents a fracture mechanics based model for estimating the remaining life of a wind turbine blade, focusing on the crack propagation in the blades adhesive joints. A generic crack propagation model is built in Matlab based on a Paris law approach. The model is used within a risk-based maintenance decision framework to optimize maintenance planning for the blades lifetime.

  9. High bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Hussein; Zahar, Akos; Lausmann, Christian; Gehrke, Thorsten; Fickenscher, Helmut; Suero, Eduardo M; Gebauer, Matthias; Citak, Mustafa

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during primary total joint replacement (TJR), as well as during aseptic and septic revision TJR. A total of 150 electrocautery tips were collected between April and July 2017. TJR surgeries were divided into three groups: (1) primary, (2) aseptic and (3) septic revisions. In each group, a total of 50 electrocautery tips were collected. A monopolar electrocautery with a reusable stainless-steel blade tip was used in all cases. The rate of bacterial contamination was determined for all groups. Correlation of exposure time and type of surgery was analyzed. The overall bacterial contamination rate was 14.7% (95% CI 9.4 to 21.4%). The highest contamination rate occurred in the septic revision group (30.0%; 95% CI 17.9 to 44.6%), followed by the primary cases group (10.0%; 95% CI 3.3 to 21.8%) and the aseptic revision group (4.0%; 95% CI 0.5 to 13.7%). Exposure time did not affect the bacterial contamination rate. In 12 out of 15 (80%) contaminations identified in the septic group, we found the same causative microorganism of the prosthetic joint infection on the electrocautery tip. The bacterial contamination of the electrocautery tips is relatively high, especially during septic hip revision arthroplasty. Electrocautery tips should be changed after debridement of infected tissue.

  10. Lightning transient analysis in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2013-01-01

    The transient behavior of lightning surges in the lightning protection system of wind turbine blades has been investigated in this paper. The study is based on PSCAD models consisting of electric equivalent circuits with lumped and distributed parameters involving different lightning current...... waveforms. The aim of the PSCAD simulations is to study the voltages induced by the lightning current in the blade that may cause internal arcing. With this purpose, the phenomenon of current reflections in the lightning down conductor of the blade and the electromagnetic coupling between the down conductor...... and other internal conductive elements of the blade is studied. Finally, several methods to prevent internal arcing are discussed in order to improve the lightning protection of the blade....

  11. The SNL100-01 blade :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    A series of design studies to investigate the effect of carbon on blade weight and performance for large blades was performed using the Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Blade design as a starting point. This document provides a description of the final carbon blade design, which is termed as SNL100-01. This report includes a summary of the design modifications applied to the baseline all-glass 100-meter design and a description of the NuMAD model files that are made publicly available. This document is intended primarily to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-01.

  12. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  13. Applied modal analysis of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H.B.; Kristensen, O.J.D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project modal analysis has been used to determine the natural frequencies, damping and the mode shapes for wind turbine blades. Different methods to measure the position and adjust the direction of the measuring points are discussed. Differentequipment for mounting the accelerometers...... is investigated by repeated measurement on the same wind turbine blade. Furthermore the flexibility of the test set-up is investigated, by use ofaccelerometers mounted on the flexible adapter plate during the measurement campaign. One experimental campaign investigated the results obtained from a loaded...... and unloaded wind turbine blade. During this campaign the modal analysis are performed on ablade mounted in a horizontal and a vertical position respectively. Finally the results obtained from modal analysis carried out on a wind turbine blade are compared with results obtained from the Stig Øyes blade_EV1...

  14. Tips for Good Electronic Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    Describes library uses of presentation graphics software and offers tips for creating electronic presentations. Tips include: audience retention; visual aid options; software package options; presentation planning; presentation showing; and use of text, colors, and graphics. Sidebars note common presentation errors and popular presentation…

  15. Properties variation according to heat treatment for gas turbine blade(bucket) material of GTD-111DS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Young; Park, Sang Yeal; Yang, Sung Ho

    2006-01-01

    The gas turbine components is used on high temperature conditions which under severely circumstance with start-up and stop several times. Therefore, it is used nickel-base superalloys like and GTD-111DS. Damaged buckets on the blade tip during operating are repaired per 24,000 hr to three times according to repair specification of manufacture. It is applied pre-heat, HIP(Hot Isostatic Pressing) and post-heat treatment to support welding repair on blade tip effectively. On this study, it is utilize of WRAP TM (Welding Repair Advanced Process) method to make tension test specimens for this study. And then, material strength and characteristic for GTD-111DS was analyzed

  16. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez, B; Munduate, X; Miguel, U San

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  17. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  18. Effect of technological deviation on aerodynamic efficiency of reaction blades of steam and gas turbines at high Mach nos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, Z.

    1991-01-01

    During manufacture and assembly of steam and gas turbine blades there are always some technological deviation and is meant local increase or decrease in dimension at certain sections of the profile improper stagger angle of long blades during assembly etc. In this paper the effect of oversize in dimensions at certain important places along a reaction profile has been studied. The technological deviation has been made by sticking thin aluminium foils of 0.3 mm thickness and 15 mm width at inlet and exit tips of reactive profiles and its effect on aerodynamic efficiency at mach. nos ranging from 0.7 to 1.1. The object of performing these tests was to obtain comprehensive data based on which information suitable tolerances could be recommended during manufacture of these blades

  19. Numerical Validation of a Vortex Model against ExperimentalData on a Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Dyachuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic blade motion during operation of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs imposes challenges on the simulations models of the aerodynamics of VAWTs. A two-dimensional vortex model is validated against the new experimental data on a 12-kW straight-bladed VAWT, which is operated at an open site. The results on the normal force on one blade are analyzed. The model is assessed against the measured data in the wide range of tip speed ratios: from 1.8 to 4.6. The predicted results within one revolution have a similar shape and magnitude as the measured data, though the model does not reproduce every detail of the experimental data. The present model can be used when dimensioning the turbine for maximum loads.

  20. Derivation of airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade based on 3D CFD rotor calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C; Soerensen, N N; Madsen, H A [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade are derived from 3D CFD computations on a full-scale 41-m rotor. Based on 3D CFD the force distributions on the blades are determined, from which airfoil characteristics are derived using the momentum theory. The final airfoil characteristics are constructed using both wind tunnel measurements and 3D CFD. Compared to 2D wind tunnel measurements they show a low lift in stall for the airfoil sections at the tip. At the airfoil sections at the inner part of the blade, they show a high lift in stall. At about 60% radius the lift agrees well to 2D wind tunnel measurements. Aero-elastic calculations using the final airfoil characteristics show good agreement to measured power and flap moments. Furthermore, a fatigue load analysis shows a reduction of up to 15% of the load compared to commonly used data. (au)

  1. Condition monitoring of rotor blades of modern wind power systems; Ueberwachung mit Hertz. Condition Monitoring von Rotorblaettern moderner Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, Nikolaus

    2010-06-15

    With seven wind turbines, the Austrian wind farm ''Sternwald'' is the biggest wind farm in Upper Austria. It is the only wind farm in a forest, and all turbines are therefore equipped with automatic fire fighting equipment. The mountain range on which the wind farm is located is about 1000 m high, with strong wind and much ice and snow in the winter season. For this reason, the owner decided to instal a condition monitoring system with ice detectors. The piezoelectric sensors are mounted directly on the rotor blades as measurements on the nacelle will always be incorrect. Installation on the rotor blades, on the other hand, makes high demands on the fastenings and sensors as the velocity of the blade tips may be up to 250 km per hour. (orig.)

  2. Crack of a first stage blade in a steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nurbanasari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The failure of the first stage blade in a steam turbine of 55 MW was investigated. The blade was made of 17-4 PH stainless steel and has been used for 12 years before failure. The current work aims to find out the main cause of the first stage blade failure. The methods for investigation were metallurgical analysis, chemical composition test, and hardness measurement. The result showed that there was no evidence the blade failure was due to material. The damage found on the blade namely crack on the blade root. Two locations of the crack observed at the blade root, which was at the tang and the fillet, with different failure modes. In general, the damage of the blade was started by the corrosion occurred on the blade root. The crack at the blade root tang was due to corrosion fatigue and the crack occurred at the blade root fillet owing to stress corrosion cracking.

  3. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic Design of a Rotor Blade for an Optimum Rotor Speed Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Xie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic design of rotor blades is challenging, and is crucial for the development of helicopter technology. Previous aerodynamic optimizations that focused only on limited design points find it difficult to balance flight performance across the entire flight envelope. This study develops a global optimum envelope (GOE method for determining blade parameters—blade twist, taper ratio, tip sweep—for optimum rotor speed helicopters (ORS-helicopters, balancing performance improvements in hover and various freestream velocities. The GOE method implements aerodynamic blade design by a bi-level optimization, composed of a global optimization step and a secondary optimization step. Power loss as a measure of rotor performance is chosen as the objective function, referred to as direct power loss (DPL in this study. A rotorcraft comprehensive code for trim simulation with a prescribed wake method is developed. With the application of the GOE method, a DPL reduction of as high as 16.7% can be achieved in hover, and 24% at high freestream velocity.

  4. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project.

  5. Numerical study on a single bladed vertical axis wind turbine under dynamic stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangga, Galih [Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Hutomo, Go; Sasongko, Herman [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya (Indonesia); Wiranegara, Raditya [School of Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the flow development of a single bladed vertical axis wind turbine using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The blade is constructed using the NACA 0012 profile and is operating under stalled conditions at tip speed ratio of 2. Two dimensional simulations are performed using a commercial CFD package, ANSYS Fluent 15.0, employing the Menter-SST turbulence model. For the preliminary study, simulations of the NACA 0012 airfoil under static conditions are carried out and compared with available measurement data and calculations using the boundary layer code XFOIL. The CFD results under the dynamic case are presented and the resulting aerodynamic forces are evaluated. The turbine is observed to generate negative power at certain azimuth angles which can be divided into three main zones. The blade vortex interaction is observed to strongly influence the flow behavior near the blade and contributes to the power production loss. However, the impact is considered small since it covers only 6.4 % of the azimuth angle range where the power is negative compared to the dynamic stall impact which covers almost 22 % of the azimuth angle range.

  6. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (C Popt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger C Popt or AEP (C Popt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same C Popt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum C popt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and C popt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  7. A concept study of a carbon spar cap design for a 80m wind turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemeier, M; Bätge, M

    2014-01-01

    The buckling resistance is a key design driver for large wind turbine blades with a significant influence on the material costs. During the structural design process the choice was made for carbon spar caps and two shear webs, which were set relatively far apart in order to stabilize the panels. This design presented a major challenge for the stability of the spar caps. The topology of these spar caps has been modified with regard to stability, comparing a continuous spar cap with split spar cap concepts and considering both lay-ups with hybrid carbon glass spar caps or sandwich concepts. Within those concepts, parametric studies were conducted varying different geometrical parameters of the spar caps and its layups. In order to determine the buckling resistance of the spar cap, an analytical model considering a 2D cross section discretized blade model was utilized to select the basic concept, after which a 3D numerical finite element model taking the whole blade into account was used to evaluate the chosen design concepts. The stability limit state analysis was conducted according to the certification scheme of GL guideline 2012. The various concepts were evaluated based on the blade's mass, tip deflection and modal properties. The results of this design process of the spar caps and the evaluation of the used analysis tools are presented within the paper

  8. Tip cells: master regulators of tubulogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2014-07-01

    The normal development of an organ depends on the coordinated regulation of multiple cell activities. Focusing on tubulogenesis, we review the role of specialised cells or groups of cells that are selected from within tissue primordia and differentiate at the outgrowing tips or leading edge of developing tubules. Tip or leading cells develop distinctive patterns of gene expression that enable them to act both as sensors and transmitters of intercellular signalling. This enables them to explore the environment, respond to both tissue intrinsic signals and extrinsic cues from surrounding tissues and to regulate the behaviour of their neighbours, including the setting of cell fate, patterning cell division, inducing polarity and promoting cell movement and cell rearrangements by neighbour exchange. Tip cells are also able to transmit mechanical tension to promote tissue remodelling and, by interacting with the extracellular matrix, they can dictate migratory pathways and organ shape. Where separate tubular structures fuse to form networks, as in the airways of insects or the vascular system of vertebrates, specialised fusion tip cells act to interconnect disparate elements of the developing network. Finally, we consider their importance in the maturation of mature physiological function and in the development of disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. (au)

  10. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  12. The SNL100-02 blade :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A series of design studies are performed to investigate the effects of advanced core materials and a new core material strategy on blade weight and performance for large blades using the Sandia 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. The initial core material design studies were based on the SNL100-01 100- meter carbon spar design. Advanced core material with improved performance to weight was investigated with the goal to reduce core material content in the design and reduce blade weight. A secondary element of the core study was to evaluate the suitability of core materials from natural, regrowable sources such as balsa and recyclable foam materials. The new core strategy for the SNL100-02 design resulted in a design mass of 59 tons, which is a 20% reduction from the most recent SNL100-01 carbon spar design and over 48% reduction from the initial SNL100-00 all-glass baseline blade. This document provides a description of the final SNL100-02 design, includes a description of the major design modifications, and summarizes the pertinent blade design information. This document is also intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-02 that are made publicly available.

  13. At the Tipping Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  14. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  15. Should the tip-apex distance (TAD) rule be modified for the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA)? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoloski, Andrej N; Osbrough, Anthony L; Yates, Piers J

    2013-10-17

    Unstable proximal femoral fractures are common and challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon. Often, these are treated with intramedullary nails. The most common mode of failure of any device to treat these fractures is cut-out. The Synthes proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) is unique because it is the only proximal femoral intramedullary nail which employs a helical blade in lieu of a lag screw. The optimal tip-apex distance is 25 mm or less for a dynamic hip screw. The optimal blade tip placement is not known for the PFNA. The aim of this study is to determine if the traditional tip-apex distance rule (TAD) less than 20 mm. There was no cut-out in cases where the TAD was from 20-30 mm. There were three implant-related failures (nail fracture, missed nail and loose locking screw), four implant-related femoral fractures, two non-unions, two delayed unions and one loss of reduction. The PFNA is a suitable fixation device for the treatment of unstable proximal femoral fractures. There were still a relatively large number of cut-outs, and the tip-apex distance in the failures showed a bimodal distribution, not like previously demonstrated with dynamic hip screw. We propose that the helical blade behaves differently to a screw, and placement too close to the subchondral bone may lead to penetration through the head.

  16. An Experimental Characterization of Tip Leakage Flows and Corresponding Effects on Multistage Compressor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid Adam

    The effect of rotor tip clearances in turbomachinery applications has been a primary research interest for nearly 80 years. Over that time, studies have shown increased tip clearance in axial flow compressors typically has a detrimental effect on overall pressure rise capability, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin. With modern engine designs trending toward decreased core sizes to increase propulsive efficiency (by increasing bypass ratio) or additional compression stages to increase thermal efficiency by increasing the overall pressure ratio, blade heights in the rear stages of the high pressure compressor are expected to decrease. These rear stages typically feature smaller blade aspect ratios, for which endwall flows are more important, and the rotor tip clearance height represents a larger fraction of blade span. As a result, data sets collected with large relative rotor tip clearance heights are necessary to facilitate these future small core design goals. This research seeks to characterize rotor tip leakage flows for three tip clearance heights in the Purdue three-stage axial compressor facility (1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% as a percentage of overall annulus height). The multistage environment of this compressor provides the unique opportunity to examine tip leakage flow effects due to stage matching, stator-rotor interactions, and rotor-rotor interactions. The important tip leakage flow effects which develop as a result of these interactions are absent for previous studies which have been conducted using single-stage machines or isolated rotors. A series of compressor performance maps comprise points at four corrected speeds for each of the three rotor tip clearance heights. Steady total pressure and total temperature measurements highlight the effects of tip leakage flows on radial profiles and wake shapes throughout the compressor. These data also evaluate tip clearance effects on efficiency, stall margin, and peak pressure rise capability. An emphasis of

  17. Methodology for wind turbine blade geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfiliev, D.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the upwind three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine is the leading player on the market. It has been found to be the best industrial compromise in the range of different turbine constructions. The current wind industry innovation is conducted in the development of individual turbine components. The blade constitutes 20-25% of the overall turbine budget. Its optimal operation in particular local economic and wind conditions is worth investigating. The blade geometry, namely the chord, twist and airfoil type distributions along the span, responds to the output measures of the blade performance. Therefore, the optimal wind blade geometry can improve the overall turbine performance. The objectives of the dissertation are focused on the development of a methodology and specific tool for the investigation of possible existing wind blade geometry adjustments. The novelty of the methodology presented in the thesis is the multiobjective perspective on wind blade geometry optimization, particularly taking simultaneously into account the local wind conditions and the issue of aerodynamic noise emissions. The presented optimization objective approach has not been investigated previously for the implementation in wind blade design. The possibilities to use different theories for the analysis and search procedures are investigated and sufficient arguments derived for the usage of proposed theories. The tool is used for the test optimization of a particular wind turbine blade. The sensitivity analysis shows the dependence of the outputs on the provided inputs, as well as its relative and absolute divergences and instabilities. The pros and cons of the proposed technique are seen from the practical implementation, which is documented in the results, analysis and conclusion sections. (orig.)

  18. Wind turbine blade waste in 2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Barlow, Claire Y

    2017-04-01

    Wind energy has developed rapidly over the last two decades to become one of the most promising and economically viable sources of renewable energy. Although wind energy is claimed to provide clean renewable energy without any emissions during operation, but it is only one side of the coin. The blades, one of the most important components in the wind turbines, made with composite, are currently regarded as unrecyclable. With the first wave of early commercial wind turbine installations now approaching their end of life, the problem of blade disposal is just beginning to emerge as a significant factor for the future. This paper is aimed at discovering the magnitude of the wind turbine blade waste problem, looking not only at disposal but at all stages of a blade's lifecycle. The first stage of the research, the subject of this paper, is to accurately estimate present and future wind turbine blade waste inventory using the most recent and most accurate data available. The result will provide a solid reference point to help the industry and policy makers to understand the size of potential environmental problem and to help to manage it better. This study starts by estimating the annual blade material usage with wind energy installed capacity and average blade weight. The effect of other waste contributing factors in the full lifecycle of wind turbine blades is then included, using industrial data from the manufacturing, testing and in-service stages. The research indicates that there will be 43 million tonnes of blade waste worldwide by 2050 with China possessing 40% of the waste, Europe 25%, the United States 16% and the rest of the world 19%. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip......We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...

  20. Aerodynamic effect of a honeycomb rotor tip shroud on a 50.8-centimeter-tip-diameter core turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Whitney, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 50.8-cm-tip-diameter turbine equipped with a rotor tip shroud of hexagonal cell (or honeycomb) cross section has been tested in warm air (416 K) for a range of shroud coolant to primary flow rates. Test results were also obtained for the same turbine operated with a solid shroud for comparison. The results showed that the combined effect of the honeycomb shroud and the coolant flow was to cause a reduction of 2.8 points in efficiency at design speed, pressure ratio, and coolant flow rate. With the coolant system inactivated, the honeycomb shroud caused a decrease in efficiency of 2.3 points. These results and those obtained from a small reference turbine indicate that the dominant factor governing honeycomb tip shroud loss is the ratio of honeycomb depth to blade span. The loss results of the two shrouds could be correlated on this basis. The same honeycomb and coolant effects are expected to occur for the hot (2200 K) version of this turbine.

  1. Structural Analysis of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Plastic Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengal Ali Nawaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Basalt fiber reinforced plastic (BFRP wind turbine blade was analyzed and compared with Glass fiber reinforced plastic blade (GFRP. Finite element analysis (FEA of blade was carried out using ANSYS. Data for FEA was obtained by using rule of mixture. The shell element in ANSYS was used to simulate the wind turbine blade and to conduct its strength analysis. The structural analysis and comparison of blade deformations proved that BFRP wind turbine blade has better strength compared to GFRP wind turbine blade.

  2. Sources of fatigue damage to passive yaw wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laino, D.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Using an integrated computer analysis approach developed at the University of Utah, fatigue damage sources to passive yaw wind turbine blades have been investigated. Models of a rigid hub and teetering hub machine reveal the parameters important to the fatigue design of each type. The teetering hub proved much less susceptible to fatigue damage from normal operation loads. As a result, extreme events were critical to the teetering hub fatigue life. The rigid hub blades experienced extremely large gyroscopic load cycles induced by rapid yaw rates during normal operation. These yaw rates stem from turbulence activity which is shown to be dependent upon atmospheric stability. Investigation revealed that increasing yaw damping is an effective way of significantly reducing these gyroscopic fatigue loads.

  3. The use of wood for wind turbine blade construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.

    1979-01-01

    The interrelationships between moisture and wood, conditions for dry rot spore activity, the protection of wood fibers from moisture, wood resin composites, wood laminating, quality control, and the mechanical properties of wood are discussed. The laminated veneer and the bonded sawn stock fabrication techniques, used in the construction of a turbine blade with a monocoque 'D' section forming the leading edge and a built up trailing edge section, are described. A 20 foot root end sample complete with 24 bonded-in studs was successfully subjected to large onetime loads in both the flatwise and edgewise directions, and to fatigue tests. Results indicate that wood is both a viable and advantageous material for use in wind turbine blades. The basic material is reasonably priced, domestically available, ecologically sound, and easily fabricated with low energy consumption.

  4. SOIL ALGAE OF BLADE OF COIL IN DONETSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltseva I.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available On territory of Donbass for more than 200 years the underground coal mining has produced, accompanied by the formation of the mine dumps. Finding ways to reduce their negative impact on the environment should be based on their comprehensive study. The soil algae are active participants in the syngenetic processes in industrial dumps of different origin. The purpose of this paper is to identify the species composition and dominant algae groups in dump mine SH/U5 “Western” in the western part of Donetsk.The test blade is covered with vegetation to the middle from all sides, and on the north side of 20-25 m to the top. The vegetation cover of the lower and middle tiers of all the exposures range in 70-80%. Projective vegetation cover of upper tiers of the northern, north-eastern and north-western exposures are in the range of 20-40%, other – 5-10%. We revealed some 38 algae species as a result of our research in southern, northern, western, and eastern slopes of the blade “Western”. The highest species diversity has Chlorophyta - 14 species (36.8% of the total number of species, then Cyanophyta - 9 (23,7%, Bacillariophyta - 7 (18,4%, Xantophyta - 5 (13.2%, and Eustigmatophyta - 3 (7.9%. The dominants are represented by Hantzschia amphyoxys (Ehrenberg Grunow in Cleve et Grunow, Bracteacoccus aerius, Klebsormidium flaccidum (Kützing Silva et al., Phormidium autumnale, Pinnularia borealis Ehrenberg, Planothidium lanceolatum (Brebisson in Kützing Bukhtiyarova, Xanthonema exile (Klebs Silva.It should be noted that the species composition of algae groups in different slopes of the blade was significantly different. Jacquard coefficient was calculated for algae communities varied in the range of 15,4-39,1%. The smallest number of algae species was observed on the southern slope of the blade (14 species, maximum was registered in the areas of north and west slopes. Differences in the species composition of algae were also observed in three

  5. Composite Thickness Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbine Blade with Fixed outer Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølund, Jonas Heidemann; Lund, Erik

    2017-01-01

    With the objective of mass minimization, a 73-m offshore wind turbine blade is optimized using a gradient based approach on a Finite Element (FE) model. Constant loads and a fixed outer geometry are assumed. Plies of the same material and same orientation are grouped together in plygroups. The th....... The thicknesses of the plygroups are chosen as design variables. Manufacturing constraints such as ply-drops are taken into account using linear constraints. Structural constraints include buckling, tip displacement and max. strain failure indices....

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in children is their tremendous ...

  7. Fitness: Tips for Staying Motivated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Fitness is for life. Motivate yourself with these practical tips. By Mayo Clinic Staff Have ... 27, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/fitness/art-20047624 . Mayo Clinic ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deeply you are sedated. When the needle is advanced through the liver and the pathway is expanded ... are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to determine the severity of the condition. To help plan for the placement of the TIPS stent, ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in the chest or abdomen. This condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result ... minimally invasive procedures such as a TIPS are most often performed by a specially trained interventional radiologist ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  13. Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  15. Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Women? Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Health Equity Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Having friends is an important part of life. Celebrate female friendship and support your girlfriends by ...

  16. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You ... with ascites or variceal bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in ...

  18. Computerized automatic tip scanning operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Fukushima, T.; Nakai, H.; Yanagisawa, A.

    1984-01-01

    In BWR nuclear power stations the Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) system is one of the most important components in reactor monitoring and control. In previous TIP systems, however, operators have suffered from the complexity of operation and long operation time required. The system presented in this paper realizes the automatic operation of the TIP system by monitoring and driving it with a process computer. This system significantly reduces the burden on customer operators and improves plant efficiency by simplifying the operating procedure, augmenting the accuracy of the measured data, and shortening operating time. The process computer is one of the PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information Automation) systems. This computer transfers control signals to the TIP control panel, which in turn drives equipment by microprocessor control. The process computer contains such components as the CRT/KB unit, the printer plotter, the hard copier, and the message typers required for efficient man-machine communications. Its operation and interface properties are described

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on future liver transplantation ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... is completed. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the same ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein into ... TIPS procedure to make sure that it remains open and functions properly. top of page Who interprets ...

  5. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discourage mosquitoes, ticks and other biting insects from landing on you. Here are tips for other preventive ... CDC Mosquito Control Methods - NPIC Exit Top of Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients ... site. Using ultrasound, the doctor will identify your internal jugular vein , which is situated above your collarbone, ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... and medical diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size ... X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... observed. This procedure is usually completed in an hour or two but may take up to several ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the portal system using a TIPS needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  13. (Allium cepa) root tip mitosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    their chemical composition and genotoxic effects on cell reproduction. Two petrochemicals, air ... the chromosomes of the individual cells of the root tip could be a pointer to their ..... Chromosome technique: Theory and. Practice. Butterworths ...

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... of bleeding that can occur can sometimes be life threatening and those patients are monitored in intensive ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... blood draining from the bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce ... blood away from the liver back to the heart). A stent is then placed in this tunnel ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... portal vein to the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is ... bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the liver. A small metal device called a stent is placed to keep the connection open and ... a small, tubular metal device commonly called a stent . During a TIPS procedure, interventional radiologists use image ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal vein ... the local anesthetic is injected. Most of the sensation is at the skin incision site, which is ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the ... skin that does not have to be stitched. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... above your collarbone, and guide a catheter, a long, thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ...

  7. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-25

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

  8. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Shashishekara S. Talya; J. N. Rajadas; A. Chattopadhyay

    1999-01-01

    Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with ...

  9. Development of Standard Approach for Sickle Blade Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Noordin, M. N. A; Hudzari, R. M; Azuan, H. N; Zainon, M. S; Mohamed, S. B; Wafi, S. A

    2016-01-01

    The sickle blade used in the motorised palm cutter known as “CANTAS” provides fast, easy and safe pruning and harvesting for those hard to reach applications. Jariz Technologies Company is experiencing problem in the consistency of sickle blade which was supplied by various blade manufacturers. Identifying the proper blade material with a certain hardness value would produce a consistent as well as long lasting sickle blade. A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) in the manufacturing of the sic...

  10. Fatigue strength ofcomposite wind turbine blade structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardila, Oscar Gerardo Castro

    Wind turbines are normally designed to withstand 20-30 years of life. During this period, the blades, which are the main rotating structures of a wind turbine, are subjected to high fluctuating load conditions as a result of a combination of gravity, inertia, and aeroelastic forces. For this reason......, fatigue is one of the foremost concerns during the design of these structures. However, current standard fatigue methods used for designing wind turbine blades seem not to be completely appropriate for these structures because they are still based on methods developed for metals and not for composite...... materials from which the blades are made. In this sense, the aim of this work is to develop more accurate and reliable fatigue-life prediction models for composite wind turbine blades. In this project, two types of fatigue models are implemented: fatigue-life models and damage mechanics models. In the first...

  11. Aircraft rotor blade with passive tuned tab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T. G. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A structure for reducing vibratory airloading in a rotor blade with a leading edge and a trailing edge includes a cut out portion at the trailing edge. A substantially wedge shaped cross section, inertially deflectable tab, also with a leading edge and a trailing edge is pivotally mounted in the cut out portion. The trailing edge of the tab may move above and below the rotor blade. A torsion strap applies force against the tab when the trailing edge of the tab is above and below the rotor blade. A restraining member is slidably movable along the torsion strap to vary torsional biasing force supplied by the torsion bar to the tab. A plurality of movable weights positioned between plates vary a center of gravity of the tab. Skin of the tab is formed from unidirectional graphite and fiberglass layers. Sliders coupled with a pinned degree of freedom at rod eliminate bending of tab under edgewise blade deflection.

  12. Blade Vibration Measurement System for Unducted Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marscher, William

    2014-01-01

    With propulsion research programs focused on new levels of efficiency and noise reduction, two avenues for advanced gas turbine technology are emerging: the geared turbofan and ultrahigh bypass ratio fan engines. Both of these candidates are being pursued as collaborative research projects between NASA and the engine manufacturers. The high bypass concept from GE Aviation is an unducted fan that features a bypass ratio of over 30 along with the accompanying benefits in fuel efficiency. This project improved the test and measurement capabilities of the unducted fan blade dynamic response. In the course of this project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) collaborated with GE Aviation to (1) define the requirements for fan blade measurements; (2) leverage MSI's radar-based system for compressor and turbine blade monitoring; and (3) develop, validate, and deliver a noncontacting blade vibration measurement system for unducted fans.

  13. Doctor Blade-Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2016-10-25

    In this work, we report polymer solar cells based on blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM and PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction photoactive layers. Enhanced power conversion efficiency of 2.75 (conventional structure) and 3.03% (inverted structure) with improved reproducibility was obtained from blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM solar cells, compared to spin-coated ones. Furthermore, by demonstrating 3.10% efficiency flexible solar cells using blade-coated PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM films on the plastic substrates, we suggest the potential applicability of blade coating technique to the high throughput roll-to-roll fabrication systems.

  14. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  15. High efficiency turbine blade coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, Dennis L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallis, Michail A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600°C and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the

  16. Diet and Exercise Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gradual weight loss and good health include developing healthy eating habits and increasing daily physical activity. Self-Help Guidelines for Healthy Activity: •Consult a physician – men over age 40; ...

  17. Eddy current inspection of stationary blade rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzywosz, K.J.; Hastings, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary turbine blade rings in a US power plant have experienced chloride-induced cracking. Failure analysis determined two types of cracking mechanisms: corrosion fatigue cracking confined to the leading edge of the outer shroud; and stress corrosion cracking present all over the blade surface. Fluorescent dye penetrant is typically used to detect and size cracks. However, it requires cleaning the blade rings by sandblasting to obtain reliable inspection results. Sand blasting in turn requires sealing the lower half of the turbine housing to prevent sand from contaminating the rest of the power plant components. Furthermore, both the penetrant examination and the removal of the sand are time consuming and costly. An alternative NDE technique is desirable which requires no pre-cleaning of the blade and a quick go/no-go inspection with the capability of estimating the crack length. This paper presents an innovative eddy current technique which meets the desired objectives by incorporating the use of specially designed contoured scanners equipped with an array of pancake coils. A set of eddy current pancake coils housed in three different scanners is used to manually scan and inspect the convex side of the stationary blade rings. The pancake coils are operated in a transmit/receive mode using two separate eddy current instruments. This paper presents the inspection concept, including scanner and probe designs, and test results from the various stages of multiple blade rings

  18. Applied modal analysis of wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broen Pedersen, H.; Dahl Kristensen, O.J.

    2003-02-01

    In this project modal analysis has been used to determine the natural frequencies, damping and the mode shapes for wind turbine blades. Different methods to measure the position and adjust the direction of the measuring points are discussed. Different equipment for mounting the accelerometers are investigated and the most suitable are chosen. Different excitation techniques are tried during experimental campaigns. After a discussion the pendulum hammer were chosen, and a new improved hammer was manufactured. Some measurement errors are investigated. The ability to repeat the measured results is investigated by repeated measurement on the same wind turbine blade. Furthermore the flexibility of the test set-up is investigated, by use of accelerometers mounted on the flexible adapter plate during the measurement campaign. One experimental campaign investigated the results obtained from a loaded and unloaded wind turbine blade. During this campaign the modal analysis are performed on a blade mounted in a horizontal and a vertical position respectively. Finally the results obtained from modal analysis carried out on a wind turbine blade are compared with results obtained from the Stig Oeyes blade{sub E}V1 program. (au)

  19. Super titanium blades for advanced steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    In 1986, the Alsthom Steam Turbines Department launched the manufacture of large titanium alloy blades: airfoil length of 1360 mm and overall length of 1520 mm. These blades are designed for the last-stage low pressure blading of advanced steam turbines operating at full speed (3000 rpm) and rating between 300 and 800 MW. Using titanium alloys for steam turbine exhaust stages as substitutes for chrome steels, due to their high strength/density ratio and their almost complete resistance to corrosion, makes it possible to increase the length of blades significantly and correspondingly that steam passage section (by up to 50%) with a still conservative stresses level in the rotor. Alsthom relies on 8 years of experience in the field of titanium, since as early as 1979 large titanium blades (airfoil length of 1240 mm, overall length of 1430 mm) were erected for experimental purposes on the last stage of a 900 MW unit of the Dampierre-sur-Loire power plant and now totals 45,000 operating hours without problems. The paper summarizes the main properties (chemical, mechanical and structural) recorded on very large blades and is based in particular on numerous fatigue corrosion test results to justify the use of the Ti 6 Al 4 V alloy in a specific context of micrographic structure

  20. Wakes behind wind turbines. Studies on tip vortex evolution and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odemark, Ylva

    2012-07-01

    The increased fatigue loads and decreased power output of a wind turbine placed in the wake of another turbine is a well-known problem when building new wind power farms. In order to better estimate the total power output of a wind power farm, knowledge about the development and stability of wind turbine wakes is crucial. In the present thesis, the wake behind a small-scale model turbine was investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. The velocity in the wake was measured with hot-wire anemometry, for different free stream velocities and tip speed ratios. To characterize the behaviour of the model turbine, the power output, thrust force and rotational frequency of the model were also measured. These results were then compared to calculations using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method. New turbine blades for the model was constructed using the same method, in order to get an estimate of the distribution of the lift and drag forces along the blades. This information is needed for comparisons with certain numerical simulations, which however remains to be performed.By placing the turbine at different heights in a turbulent boundary layer, the effects of forest turbulence on wind turbine outputs (power and thrust) could also be investigated.The evolution of the tip vortices shed from the turbine blades was studied by performing velocity measurements around the location of the tip vortex breakdown. The vortices' receptivity to disturbances was then studied by introducing a disturbance in the form of two pulsed jets, located in the rear part of the nacelle. In order to introduce a well-defined disturbance and perform phase-locked measurements, a new experimental setup was constructed and successfully tested for two different disturbance frequencies. The mean stream wise velocity and the stream wise turbulence intensity was found to scale well with the free stream velocity and the spreading of the wake was found to be proportional to the square root of the