WorldWideScience

Sample records for active andean volcanism

  1. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean Back-arc of Western Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernando, I.R.; Aragón, E.; Frei, R.; González, P.D.; Spakman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field (Pleistocene–Holocene) is located in the Andean back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, western Argentina, and is contemporaneous with the Andean volcanic arc at the same latitude. It includes two polygenetic, mostly trachytic volcanoes: Payún Matrú (with a summit cald

  2. The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP): 40Ar/ 39Ar dating on Mesozoic volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Coastal Cordillera, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Féraud, Gilbert; Aguirre, Luis; Fornari, Michel; Morata, Diego

    2006-10-01

    The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP), consists of about 150 000 km 3 of volcanic and plutonic units in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru and represents a major magmatic Mesozoic event in the world, for which the precise age of the thick volcanic series was unknown. Thirty 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses were carried out on primary mineral phases of volcanic and plutonic rocks from northern Chile (18°30'-24°S). Reliable plateau and "mini plateau" ages were obtained on plagioclase, amphibole and biotite from volcanic and plutonic rocks, despite widespread strong alteration degree. In the Arica, Tocopilla and Antofagasta (700 km apart) regions, the ages obtained on lava flows constrain the volcanic activity between 164 and 150 Ma and no N-S migration of volcanism is observed. The uppermost lava flows of the volcanic sequence at the type locality of the La Negra Formation extruded at ca. 153-150 Ma, suggesting the end of the volcanic activity of the arc at that time. The oldest volcanic activity occurred probably at ca. 175-170 Ma in the Iquique area, although no plateau age could be obtained. The plutonic bodies of the same regions were dated between ca. 160 and 142 Ma, indicating that they were partly contemporaneous with the volcanic activity. At least one volcanic pulse around 160 Ma is evidenced over the entire investigated reach of the EAMP, according to the ages found in Arica, Tocopilla, Michilla and Mantos Blancos regions. The episodic emplacement of huge amounts of subduction related volcanism is observed throughout the whole Andean history and particularly during the Jurassic (southern Peru, northern Chile and southern Argentina). These events probably correspond to periodic extensional geodynamic episodes, as a consequence of particular subduction conditions, such as change of obliquity of the convergence, change in the subduction angle, slab roll back effect or lower convergence rate, that remain to be precisely defined.

  3. Erratum - Assessing the effects of climate and volcanism on diatom and chironomid assemblages in an Andean lake near Quito, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This corrects the article entitled “Assessing the effects of climate and volcanism on diatom and chironomid assemblages in an Andean lake near Quito, Ecuador” by the authors Neal Michelutti, Jillian L. Lemmen, Colin A. Cooke, William O. Hobbs, Alexander P. Wolfe, Joshua Kurek, John P. Smol, published with DOI 10.4081/jlimnol.2015.1323. The map in Fig. 1 was incorrectly labelled and the correct version of Fig. 1 is presented below.

  4. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  5. Temporal and geochemical evolution of Miocene volcanism in the Andean back-arc between 36°S and 38°S and U-series analyses of young volcanic centers in the arc and back-arc, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup

    New 40Ar/39Ar, major and trace element, and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic data for the c. 24-7 Ma volcanic rocks from the Andean back-arc (35°S – 38°S) in the Mendoza and Neuquén (Argentina) regions shed light on the Miocene evolution of the back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone. Incipient shallowing...

  6. Assessing the effects of climate and volcanism on diatom and chironomid assemblages in an Andean lake near Quito, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical Andes are undergoing climate changes that rival those occurring anywhere else on the planet, and are likely to have profound consequences for ecosystems. Paleolimnological investigations of remote mountain lakes can provide details of past environmental change, especially where monitoring data are absent. Here, we reconstruct fossil diatom and chironomid communities spanning the last several hundred years from an Andean lake located in an ecological reserve near Quito, Ecuador. Both diatoms and chironomids recorded assemblage shifts reflective of changing climate conditions. The diatoms are likely responding primarily to temperature-related limnological changes, recording an increase in the number of planktonic taxa in the most recent sediments. This change is consistent with warmer conditions that result in enhanced periods of thermal stratification, allowing planktonic species to proliferate. The chironomids appear to respond mainly to a change in precipitation regime, recording a greater number of terrestrial and semi-terrestrial taxa that have been transported to the lake. A thick tephra deposit at the base of the sediment core affected both diatom and chironomid assemblages. The diatoms registered a change in species composition highlighting the ability of certain taxa to rapidly colonize new environments. In contrast, the chironomids showed a marked drop in abundance immediately following the tephra, but no change in species composition. In both cases the ecological response was short-lived, illustrating the resiliency of the lake to return to baseline conditions following volcanic inputs.

  7. Amazonian volcanic activity at the Syrtis volcanic province, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Jodlowski, Piotr; Fawdon, Peter; Michael, Greg; Tanaka, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    The Syrtis Major volcanic province, including the entire Syrtis Major Planum, is located near the Martian highland/lowland transitional zone west of Isidis Planitia. It covers ≡7.4×105 km2 and contains two low-shield volcanic edifices with N-S elongated calderas named Nili and Meroe Paterae. The estimated thickness of erupted material in the province ranges from approximately 0.5 km to 1.0 km with a total volume of about 1.6-3.2×105 km3 [1]. The timing of volcanic activity in the Syrtis Major volcanic province has been suggested to be restricted to the Hesperian Period [1-4]. In the geological map of Greeley and Guest [2], volcanic material of Syrtis Major was assigned an Hesperian age based on the density of observed craters larger than 5 km in diameter. Using the same crater density range, recent studies of Hiesinger et al. [1] and Tanaka et al. [3] and Tanaka et al. [4] assigned an Early Hesperian and Early to Late Hesperian age, respectively, for the entire province. In this study we mapped lava flows, lava channels, and major lava-flow margins and report model ages for lava-flow formation and caldera segments of Nili and Meroe Paterae. The objective of this ongoing survey is to better understand the eruption frequency of this volcanic province. In total, we mapped 67 lava flows, caldera segments, and intra-crater fillings of which 55 were dated. Crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) were mapped on HRSC and CTX imagery using CraterTools [5]. CSFDs were analyzed and model ages determined in Craterstats [6] using the production and chronology functions of Ivanov [7] and Hartmann and Neukum [8], respectively. A detailed description of the utilization of the crater-counting technique and its limitations with respect to small-scale mapping is given in Platz et al. [9]. Model ages range between 838 Ma (Middle Amazonian) to 3.6 Ga (Late Hesperian). In our survey, a broad age peak occurs between 2 to 2.6 Ga, continuously declining thereafter. We note that

  8. Developing tools to evaluate the environmental status of Andean basins with mining activities

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub López, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The water quality status of an Andean river basin was characterised and the pressures from anthropogenic activities were evaluated to enhance the available knowledge of the environment within an ecosystem in Peru. This investigation was conducted to assess the environmental status of the basin as a first step to introducing river management plans and specific water quality programmes. A continuous simulation model and an environmental monitoring program were developed, taking into account the...

  9. Geochemical and Tectonic Evidence for the Role of Crustal Thickening and Forearc Subduction Erosion in Miocene to Recent Andean Southern Volcanic Zone Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, S. M.; Godoy, E.

    2002-12-01

    Key to understanding temporal and spatial variations in Andean-type margin magmas is identifying their mantle and crustal sources in well constrained tectonic settings. A study of Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) Early Miocene to Recent magmas in an west to east transect near 34° S points to a linked role for crustal thickening and forearc subduction erosion. The whole rock and isotopic chemistry of these magmas show a trend from Early Miocene tholeiitic sequences with low pressure pyroxene-bearing residual mineral assemblages and more depleted isotopic signatures (87Sr/^{86}Sr ~ 0.7036; ɛ Nd ~ +6 to +4; 206Pb/^{204}Pb ~ 18.5) to Pliocene/Recent high-K calc-alkaline sequences with high pressure garnet-bearing residual mineral assemblages and enriched isotopic signatures (87Sr/^{86}Sr ~ 0.7042; ɛ Nd ~ +1 to 0; 206Pb/^{204}Pb ~ 18.6). Relatively abrupt breaks in this sequence at ~ 19 to 15 Ma and ~ 7 to 4 Ma coincide with an early Miocene extensional to compressional deformational switch and major Late Miocene out-of-sequence thrusting that accompany eastward shifts of ~ 35 and ~ 50 km of the arc front and peaks in uplift history. These changes are consistent with peaks in forearc subduction erosion that introduce continental crust into subcrustal magma sources and in backarc shortening that enhance MASH processes in a thickening crust. Shifts to higher pressure chemical signatures and isotopic enrichment as frontal arc magmatism wanes in the west and migrates eastward fit with continental crust entering subcrustal magma sources. The projections of extinct arc fronts near 34° S into chemically equivalent units to the south indicate an ~ 35 km shift of the arc front north of 36.5° S at ~ 19 to 15 Ma and another ~ 50 km shift north of 34.5° S between ~ 7 to 4 Ma. These SVZ shifts coincide with major tectonic changes along the Andean margin that are best related to variations in plate convergence parameters.

  10. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  11. Influence of volcanic activity and anthropic impact in the trace element contents of fishes from the North Patagonia in a global context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubach, D F; Macchi, P J; Pérez Catán, S

    2015-11-01

    The elemental contents in salmonid muscle and liver tissues from different lakes around the world were investigated. Fish from pristine areas were compared with those fishes from impacted environments, both by volcanic and anthropogenic activities. Within the data, special attention was given to fishes from the Andean Patagonian lakes in two contexts: local and global. The local evaluation includes geological and limnological parameters and diet composition which were obtained through a data search from published works. The volcanic influence in Andean Patagonian lakes was mainly observed by an increase of cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) concentrations in fishes, influenced by calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) water contents. Zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), iron (Fe), silver (Ag), and mercury (Hg) contents in fishes showed the effect of the geological substratum, and some limnological parameters. The diet composition was another factor which affects the elemental concentration in fishes. The analyzed data showed that the fishes from Andean Patagonian lakes had elemental content patterns corresponding to those of pristine regions with volcanic influence. Selenium and Ag contents from Andean Patagonian fishes were the highest reported.

  12. Late Cenozoic calc-alkaline volcanism over the Payenia shallow subduction zone, South-Central Andean back-arc (34°30‧-37°S), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Vanesa D.; Spagnuolo, Mauro G.; Folguera, Andrés; Poma, Stella; Jones, Rosemary E.; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2015-12-01

    A series of mesosilicic volcanic centers have been studied on the San Rafael Block (SRB), 300 km to the east of the present-day volcanic arc. K-Ar ages indicate that this magmatic activity was developed in at least two stages: the older volcanic centers (˜15-10 Ma) are located in the central and westernmost part of the SRB (around 36°S and 69°W) and the younger centers (8-3.5 Ma) are located in an eastern position (around 36°S and 69°30‧W) with respect to the older group. These volcanic rocks have andesitic to dacitic compositions and correspond to a high-K calc-alkaline sequence as shown by their SiO2, K2O and FeO/MgO contents. Elevated Ba/La, Ba/Ta and La/Ta ratios show an arc-like signature, and primitive mantle normalized trace element diagrams show typical depletions of high field strength elements (HFSE) relative to large ion lithophile elements (LILE). Rare earth element (REE) patterns suggest pyroxene and amphibole crystallization. Geochemical data obtained for SRB volcanic rocks support the proposal for a shallow subduction zone for the latest Miocene between 34°30″-37°S. Regionally, SRB volcanism is associated with a mid-Miocene to early Pliocene eastward arc migration caused by the shallowing of the subducting slab in the South-Central Andes at these latitudes, which represents the evolution of the Payenia shallow subduction segment. Overall, middle Miocene to early Pliocene volcanism located in the Payenia back-arc shows evidence for the influence of slab-related components. The younger (8-3.5 Ma) San Rafael volcanic rocks indicate the maximum slab shallowing and the easternmost extent of slab influence in the back-arc.

  13. Phenolic compound contents and antioxidant activity in plants with nutritional and/or medicinal properties form the Peruvian Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinos, R.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.; Rogez, H.

    2013-01-01

    Total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant activities using different assays (DPPH, ABTS and ORAC) in fruits, grains, leaves, seeds, roots and tubers from 27 different Peruvian Andean plants used in folk medicine or/and as food by the native population were evaluated in order to use these as nat

  14. Basaltic rocks from the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone: Insights from the comparison of along-strike and small-scale geochemical variations and their sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary; Holbik, Sven; Tormey, Daniel; Frey, Frederick A.; Moreno Roa, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The origin of spatial variations in the geochemical characteristics of volcanic rocks erupted in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) has been studied by numerous researchers over the past 40 years. Diverse interpretations for along-strike, across-strike, and small-scale variations have been proposed. In this paper, we review geochemical data showing along-strike geochemical variations and address the processes causing such trends. We compare large- and small-scale changes of the same geochemical parameters in basaltic rocks in order to use spatial scale as a tool for isolating processes that may have the same result. Along-strike geochemical variations in the SVZ are expected, due to 1) greater thickness or age of the sub-arc continental crust and mantle lithosphere in the Northern SVZ (NSVZ; 33°S-34°30‧S) and Transitional SVZ (TSVZ; 34°30‧S-37°S) compared with the Central SVZ (CSVZ; 37°S-41.5°S) and Southern SVZ (SSVZ: 41.5°S-46°S); and 2) along-strike changes of the subducting Nazca plate and overlying asthenosphere. Basalts and basaltic andesites erupted at volcanic front stratovolcanoes define several along-strike geochemical trends: 1) higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the NSVZ compared with the TSVZ, CSVZ, and SSVZ; 2) higher and more variable La/Yb at volcanoes in the NSVZ and TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; 3) lower 87Sr/86Sr for a given 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; and 4) large values for time-sensitive subduction tracers such as 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) at some volcanoes in the CSVZ, but not in the NSVZ and TSVZ. Geochemical parameters that distinguish the TSVZ from the CSVZ and SSVZ are also found within the CSVZ at small basaltic eruptive centers (SEC) aligned with the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), which extends from 38°S to the southernmost SVZ. Our interpretation is that CSVZ magmas with strong time-sensitive subduction tracers represent the ambient subduction

  15. Geoprospective study of a nuclear waste repository: volcanic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of the prospective study of disposal site evolution consists of analysing the various factors which may influence the repository, for instance the volcanic phenomena. The paper tries to estimate the potential for volcanic activity in France. Hypotheses on the geodynamics of volcanism lead to the conclusion that only the zones of the Chaine des Puys, Vivarais and Mont-Dore can be subject to volcanic activity in the considered time-span. This study was performed under cost-sharing contract with the European Atomic Energy Community in the framework of its R and D programme on ''Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste''

  16. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  17. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA mainly from Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. Two clones with lipolytic activity in tributyrin as a substrate were recovered. Clone BAA3G2 (pSK-estGX1) was selected and the entire 4.6 Kb insert sequence was determined. The sequence had a GC content of 70.6% and could be derived from an undescribed Actinobacteria genome. One open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (gene estGX1) with a molecular mass of 22.4 kDa that contained the pentapeptide G-P-S-G-G near the N-terminus essential for lipase activity and the putative catalytic triad was identified, also a putative ribosomal binding site located 18 bp upstream the estGX1 ATG start codon was identified. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein belonged to a new lipase family. The secreted enzyme showed a preference for short length fatty acids, with specific activity against p-nitrophenyl-butyrate (0.142 U/mg of total protein), it was cold active with relative activity of 30% at 10°C and moderately thermo active with relative activity of 80% at 50°C and had a pH optimum of 8.0 at 40°C. PMID:22806812

  18. The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2015-09-23

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth\\'s natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet\\'s energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.

  19. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA main

  20. The Physics of a Volcanic System: What is the Actual Role Played by Tectonic Setting in Controlling Volcanic Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Modern text-books commonly explain volcanic activity as a direct consequence of plate tectonics, overlooking the different scales characteristic of both types of processes. By acknowledging such differences, however, it is possible to envisage a model of a volcanic system that is based in the same principles of hydrostatics established by Blaise Pascal over 300 yrs ago. Such principles allow us to estimate the local conditions required for the occurrence of volcanism at a given location highlighting the importance of the rock strength and the density difference between melt and its surroundings. This model shows that the minimum thickness of the zone of partial melting in the mantle (or seismically defined Low Velocity Zone) that is required to feed volcanic activity might range from 5 to over 100 km, but also that under certain circumstances a rock strength 600 MPa will not suffice to stop magma ascent resulting in volcanic activity at the surface. Consequently, the model of volcanism developed here explains why is that a given LVZ may lead to volcanic activity in some places whereas a completely identical LVZ may not result in volcanic activity in a different location. Consequently, this model provides a general framework that allows us to better understand the actual role played by tectonic setting in controlling volcanism at a planetary scale.

  1. Classifying Volcanic Activity Using an Empirical Decision Making Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junek, W. N.; Jones, W. L.; Woods, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Detection and classification of developing volcanic activity is vital to eruption forecasting. Timely information regarding an impending eruption would aid civil authorities in determining the proper response to a developing crisis. In this presentation, volcanic activity is characterized using an event tree classifier and a suite of empirical statistical models derived through logistic regression. Forecasts are reported in terms of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano alert level system. The algorithm employs multidisciplinary data (e.g., seismic, GPS, InSAR) acquired by various volcano monitoring systems and source modeling information to forecast the likelihood that an eruption, with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) > 1, will occur within a quantitatively constrained area. Logistic models are constructed from a sparse and geographically diverse dataset assembled from a collection of historic volcanic unrest episodes. Bootstrapping techniques are applied to the training data to allow for the estimation of robust logistic model coefficients. Cross validation produced a series of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves with areas ranging between 0.78-0.81, which indicates the algorithm has good predictive capabilities. The ROC curves also allowed for the determination of a false positive rate and optimum detection for each stage of the algorithm. Forecasts for historic volcanic unrest episodes in North America and Iceland were computed and are consistent with the actual outcome of the events.

  2. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  3. Glass shards, pumice fragments and volcanic aerosol particles - diagenesis a recorder of volcanic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.

    2003-04-01

    Detailed SEM/EDS studies of Triassic (Southern Alps, A, I, Sl) and Miocene (Mixteca Alta, Mexico) tuffs revealed that volcanic glass shards can be replaced by zeolites (analcite), chlorites and smectites preserving the shape of primary shards (1). The Triassic pyroclastic deposits have been incorporated in the pre-Alpine burial diagenesis, the Miocene pyroclastic deposits are bentonites. The volcanologist is impressed by the circumstances that million years old pyroclast relict textures can be sized. Shape parameters obtained by image analysis can be compared with much younger pyroclastic deposits (2). Both deposits have not been effected by shearing. The alteration of pumice fragments of Triassic age is not a simple replacement process. Intergrowth of different illites and chlorites and probably vesicle filling by SiO2 and subsequent overgrowth make a reconstruction sometimes difficult. These processes are accompanied by the formation of REE-, Y- and Zr-bearing minerals as well as with the alteration of zircons. Studies of recently erupted ash from Popocatepetl volcano reveal the presence of a variety of µm-sized contact-metamorphosed clasts being a part of the volcanic ash (3). Such clasts should be present in many older pyroclastic deposits, especially where volcanoes had been situated on massive sedimentary units providing contact metamorphism in the realm of a magma chamber or during magma ascent. Volcanic aerosol particles collected in 1997 from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano revealed in FESEM/EDS analysis (H. Schroettner and P. Poelt) a wide spectrum of fluffy, spherical and coagulated spherical particles (µm-sized). Under pre-vacuum conditions they remained stable for ca. 3 years (3). In nature the fate of these particles in the atmosphere is unknown. Are there relicts in marine, lacustrine sediments and ice cores, which could be used as proxies of volcanic activity? (1) Obenholzner &Heiken,1999. Ann.Naturhist.Mus.Wien, 100 A, 13

  4. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  5. New evidence for a volcanically, tectonically, and climatically active Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez González, Álvaro; Fernández Caliani, J.C.; Anguita, Francisco; Farelo, Agustín-Felipe; Anguita, Jorge; Casa, Miguel Ángel de la

    2004-01-01

    Geological analysis of Mars imagery supports the hypothesis that the planet has been the site of recent (< 10 Ma) volcanic and tectonic processes and glacier flow, and makes most likely previous suggestions of continuing endogenic and exogenic activity. Tectonic structures which deform very slightly cratered (at MOC scales) surfaces of Tharsis Montes and surrounding regions seem to attest to active tectonism (both extensional and transcurrent) on Mars. Exogenic processes in this regi...

  6. The 42-kDa coat protein of Andean potato mottle virus acts as a transcriptional activator in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of viral proteins play an important role in the virus life cycle, especially in capsid assembly. Andean potato mottle comovirus (APMoV is a plant RNA virus with a virion formed by two coat proteins (CP42 and CP22. Both APMoV coat protein open reading frames were cloned into pGBT9 and pGAD10, two-hybrid system vectors. HF7c yeast cells transformed with the p9CP42 construct grew on yeast dropout selection media lacking tryptophan and histidine. Clones also exhibited ß-galactosidase activity in both qualitative and quantitative assays. These results suggest that CP42 protein contains an amino acid motif able to activate transcription of His3 and lacZ reporter genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several deletions of the CP42 gene were cloned into the pGBT9 vector to locate the region involved in this activation. CP42 constructions lacking 12 residues from the C-terminal region and another one with 267 residues deleted from the N-terminus are still able to activate transcription of reporter genes. However, transcription activation was not observed with construction p9CP42deltaC57, which does not contain the last 57 amino acid residues. These results demonstrate that a transcription activation domain is present at the C-terminus of CP42 between residues 267 and 374.

  7. Sedimentary response to volcanic activity in the Okinawa Trough since the last deglaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋富清; 李安春; 李铁刚

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between volcanic activity and sediment record on regional and temporal scales,158 surface sediment samples were collected from the East China Sea Shelf to the northern Okinawa Trough (OT),and two cores recovered in the northern and southern OT,respectively.Mineralogy,grain-size,and geochemical analyses of those samples show that:1) volcanic glass,volcanic-type pyroxene,hypersthenes,and magnetite increase in sediment influenced by volcanic activity;2) sediment grain sizes (and...

  8. Evidence of persistent seismo-volcanic activity at Marsili seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino D'Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Marsili submarine volcano is the largest European volcano, and it can be considered as the key to our understanding of the dynamics of the spreading and back-arc lithosphere formation in the Tyrrhenian sector [Marani et al. 2004, and references therein]. Despite its size, it is very difficult to monitor due to its geographical position [D'Alessandro et al. 2011], and it still remains little known. In 2006, the Centro Nazionale Terremoti (National Earthquake Centre of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV deployed a broadband ocean-bottom seismometer with hydrophone (OBS/H [Mangano et al. 2011] on the flat top of Marsili volcano, at a depth of ca. 790 m. In only nine days, the instrument recorded ca. 800 seismo-volcanic events [D'Alessandro et al. 2009]. This revealed the intense seismo-volcanic activity of Marsili volcano for the first time. […] 

  9. Architecture of the Northwest Andean Microplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, L. V.; Hernandez, O.; von Frese, R. R.; Schmidt, M.

    2005-05-01

    Recently revised models on global plate boundary zones show that the North Andes microplate includes a wide distribution of seismicity, volcanic events, active faulting and extreme topography. The current description of the north Andean microplate boundaries is interpreted from a variety of geological and geophysical models including volcanism and seismicity with variable confidence levels. The poorly understood complex structure and geometry of plate boundaries limits the ability of current physical models to predict neotectonic and other effects including intra-plate lithospheric stresses and strain. Together with local surface gravity and topography data, a variety of available space geodetic sensors have substantially improved the modeling of the lithosphere for analyzing subsurface mass dynamics. They include the GPS-derived 3-D crustal velocities, high resolution (90-m) topography, seismic surveys and high resolution gravity models derived from integrated satellite (e.g., CHAMP and GRACE, 200-km resolution) and terrestrial observations (up to ~5 km resolution). Spherical wavelets is a modern tool for a multi-resolution representation of spatially heterogenously distributed gravity (consistent with the generalized boundary value problem) and for topography datasets with the distinct ability to enhance localized signals. Analysis of multi-resolution gravity and topography models combined with GPS velocities provide a unique opportunity to characterize the structure, isostatic conditions, mass dynamics, and intra-plate deformations of the North Andes microplate.

  10. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA

  12. Data on polyphenols and biological activity analyses of an Andean tomato collection and their relationships with tomato traits and geographical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola Naranjo, Romina D; Otaiza, Santiago; Saragusti, Alejandra C; Baroni, Veronica; Carranza, A V; Peralta, Iris E; Valle, Estela M; Carrari, Fernando; Asis, Ramón

    2016-06-01

    Data provide information about a tomato collection composed of accessions from the Andean Valley, commercial accessions and wild species. Antioxidant metabolites were measured in mature fruits of this collection, and their biological activities were assessed by both in vitro and in vivo methods. In this work, the parameters used to identify and quantify polyphenols compounds in tomato fruit by liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector and quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer are described. Moreover, data supporting a procedure to characterize the properties of tomato fruits to revert death by thermal stress in Caenorhabditis elegans are explained in detail. Lastly, principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of metabolites composition, antioxidant activities (in vivo and in vitro), tomato traits and geographical origin of the tomatoes collection are shown. The data presented here are related to the research article entitled "Hydrophilic antioxidants from Andean Tomato Landraces assessed by their bioactivities in vitro and in vivo" [1]. PMID:27222844

  13. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean back-arc of western Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernadno, I R; Aragón, E; Frei, Robert;

    2014-01-01

    basalt (La/Nb = 0·8–1·5, La/Ba = 0·05–0·08). The Sr–Nd isotopic compositions of the basaltic to trachytic rocks range between 0·703813 and 0·703841 (87Sr/86Sr) and 0·512743 and 0·512834 (143Nd/144Nd). Mass-balance and Rayleigh fractionation models support the proposed origin of the trachytes...... that the basaltic lavas originated in the asthenospheric mantle, probably within the spinel stability field and beneath an attenuated continental lithosphere in the back-arc area. The lack of a slab-fluid signature in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field rocks, along with unpublished and published geophysical results...

  14. Impact of tephra falls on Andean communities: The influences of eruption size and weather conditions during the 1999-2001 activity of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Ruiz, Gorki A.; Ramón, Patricio; Palacios, Enrique; Mothes, Patricia; Yepes, Hugo

    2012-03-01

    conditions on the impact of volcanic activity in a tropical setting and puts emphasis on the necessity to merge volcanological and meteorological monitoring duties for hazard assessment and alert level definition, in order to mitigate the effect of ash falls in the Andes and elsewhere.

  15. The origin of an unusual tuff ring of perlitic rhyolite pyroclasts: The last explosive phase of the Ramadas Volcanic Centre, Andean Puna, Salta, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, M. A.; Cas, R. A. F.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    A thick sequence of bedded pyroclastic deposits, comprised largely of crystal poor, partially flow-banded perlite fragments defines the remains of a tuff ring around the eastern margin of the Miocene Ramadas Volcanic Centre (RVC), Central Andes, NW Argentina. In numerous quarry exposures, planar bed-forms dominate, but low-angle cross-stratification, lensoidal truncations and lateral pinching and swelling of cm-dm scale bed-forms occur, consistent with pyroclastic surge as the dominant transport and depositional mechanism. Intercalated are mantling, very fine grained, well-sorted, mm-cm scale planar ash layers that represent deposition from pyroclastic fall out and are most likely the products of co-surge ash clouds. Also observed are thick m-scale, laterally continuous, poorly-sorted horizons that are interpreted as pyroclastic flow deposits. Grainsize variations within the > 70 m thick succession range from fine ash to coarse lapilli, with occasional large blocks reaching 20 cm. Clast vesicularities are typically very low. The sequence constitutes a rhyolitic tuff ring around the proximal margins of the RVC. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that the tuff ring was developed following cessation of the major plinian eruption phase of the RVC. A series of pyroclastic density currents and associated ash clouds is inferred to have resulted in the construction of the rhyolitic tuff ring, with deposition focussed on the eastern and southern margins of the central vent. The fine-grained nature of the deposits and low clast vesicularity are consistent with some degree of magma:water interaction during fragmentation. Pervasive perlitic fracturing of clasts found within the tuff deposits also indicates hydration and an extended, post-depositional hydration of the pyroclastic sequence, due to the influence of meteoric water, is likely to have occurred, with deposit permeability, clast specific surface and climate influential in facilitating additional textural

  16. Galileo SSI Observations of Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthely, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; Turtle, E. P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on the analysis of the Galileo SSI's observations of the volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io as discussed by Milazzo et al. Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena (63 deg N, 120 deg W) four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at the distinctive high latitude volcanism on Io. The November 1999 observation spatially resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption. The brightness temperature of the lavas at the November 1999 fissure eruption was 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (approx. 500 sq km) region with many, small spots of hot, active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with a Cassini observation in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like plume deposition ring, while the Cassini images revealed a 400 km high Pele-type plume above the Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar was acquired in October 2001, and all obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. We have concentrated on analyzing the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of "simple" advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping (in time and space) eruptions.

  17. A Preliminary Study of the Types of Volcanic Earthquakes and Volcanic Activity at the Changbaishan Tianchi Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yuehong; Su Wei; Fang Lihua

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, a significant increase in seismicity, obvious ground deformation and geochemical anomalies have been observed in the Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic area. A series felt earthquakes occur near the caldera, causing great influence to society. In this paper, the types of volcanic earthquakes recorded by the temporal seismic network since 2002 have been classified by analyzing the spectrum, time-frequency characteristics and seismic waveforms at different stations. The risk of volcano eruptions was also estimated. Our results show that almost all earthquakes occurring in Tianchi volcano are volcanic-tectonic earthquakes. The low frequency seismic waveforms observed at a few stations may be caused by local mediums, and have no relation with long-period events. Although the level of seismicity increased obviously and earthquake swarms occurred more frequently than before, we considered that the magma activity is still in its early stage and the eruption risk of Changbaishan Tianchi volcano is still iow in the near future.

  18. GRID based Thermal Images Processing for volcanic activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiagli, S.; Coco, S.; Drago, L.; Laudani, A.,; Lodato, L.; Pollicino, G.; Torrisi, O.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Catania Section of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) has been running the video stations recording the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, Stromboli and the Fossa Crater of Vulcano island. The video signals of 11 video cameras (seven operating in the visible band and four in infrared) are sent in real time to INGV Control Centre where they are visualized on monitors and archived on a dedicated NAS storage. The video surveillance of the Sicilian volcanoes, situated near to densely populated areas, helps the volcanologists providing the Civil Protection authorities with updates in real time on the on-going volcanic activity. In particular, five video cameras are operating on Mt. Etna and they record the volcano from the south and east sides 24 hours a day. During emergencies, mobile video stations may also be used to better film the most important phases of the activity. Single shots are published on the Catania Section intranet and internet websites. On June 2006 a A 40 thermal camera was installed in Vulcano La Fossa Crater. The location was in the internal and opposite crater flank (S1), 400 m distant from the fumarole field. The first two-year of data on temperature distribution frequency were recorded with this new methodology of acquisition, and automatically elaborated by software at INGV Catania Section. In fact a dedicated software developed in IDL, denominated Volcano Thermo Analysis (VTA), was appositely developed in order to extract a set of important features, able to characterize with a good approssimation the volcanic activity. In particular the program first load and opportunely convert the thermal images, then according to the Region Of Interest (ROI) and the temperature ranges defined by the user provide to automatic spatial and statistic analysis. In addition the VTA is able to analysis all the temporal series of images available in order to achieve the time-event analysis and the dynamic of the volcanic

  19. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  20. The volcanism of the western part of the Los Frailes Meseta (Bolivia): a representative example of the Andean volcanism since the Upper Oligocene; Le volcanisme de la bordure occidentale de la Meseta de Los Frailes (Bolivie): un jalon representatif du volcanisme andin depuis l`Oligocene superieur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, L. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France); Jimenez, N.

    1996-12-31

    The Los Frailes Meseta (Bolivia) is one of the large tertiary ignimbritic fields of the inner volcanic arc from Central Andes (Central Volcanic Zone. CVZ), in contact zone between the Altiplano to the west and the Eastern Cordillera to the east. Field observations and mineralogical and geochemical studies (major and trace elements) lead to distinguish two types of volcanism in the western border to the Meseta. During the Middle Miocene and Pliocene, the volcanic activity can be subdivided into three pyroclastic emission cycles, the Larco, Coroma and Pliocene ignimbrites, the first two being separated by the Quechua 2 orogeny. All these ignimbrites are very similar and correspond to peraluminous rhyolites to rhyodacites. In the studies area, the Coroma cycle is the only one where an ignimbrite-less evolved resurgent dome association can be observed. Beside these ignimbrites, isolated small lava flows and domes overlay and/or intrude all the other formations. They are meta-aluminous lavas with a shoshonitic affinity. A quaternary age can be attributed to his second volcanism. These two volcanic types are well-known in the CVZ and are related to the different deformation stages, either compressional or extensional, which occur alternately in the Cordillera since 26 Ma. (authors). 61 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  2. Io's Diverse Styles of Volcanic Activity: Results from Galileo NIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Doute, S.; Carlson, R.; McEwen, A.; Geissler, P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer were used to map the thermal structure of several of Io's hot spots, revealing different styles of volcanism Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  3. Characterization and interpretation of volcanic activity at Redoubt, Bezymianny and Karymsky volcanoes through direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Taryn M.

    Surface measurements of volcanic emissions can provide critical insight into subsurface processes at active volcanoes such as the influx or ascent of magma, changes in conduit permeability, and relative eruption size. In this dissertation I employ direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions to characterize activity and elucidate subsurface processes at three active volcanoes around the North Pacific. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, produced elevated SO2 emissions that were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor for over three months. This provided a rare opportunity to characterize Redoubt's daily SO2 emissions and to validate the OMI measurements. Order of magnitude variations in daily SO2 mass were observed, with over half of the cumulative SO2 emissions released during the explosive phase of the eruption. Correlations among OMI daily SO2 mass, tephra mass and acoustic energies during the explosive phase suggest that OMI data may be used to infer eruption size and explosivity. From 2007 through 2010 direct and remote measurements of volcanic gas composition and flux were measured at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. During this period Bezymianny underwent five explosive eruptions. Estimates of passive and eruptive SO2 emissions suggest that the majority of SO2 is released passively. Order of magnitude variations in total volatile flux observed throughout the study period were attributed to changes in the depth of gas exsolution and separation from the melt at the time of sample collection. These findings suggest that exsolved gas composition may be used to detect magma ascent prior to eruption at Bezymianny Volcano. Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, is a dynamic volcano which exhibited four end-member activity types during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012, including: discrete ash explosions, pulsatory degassing, gas jetting, and explosive eruption. These activity types were characterized quantitatively

  4. Evidences of active and ancient Volcanism on Mars. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVÂRI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Since t h e end of t h e last Century some observations concerning
    flare-phenomena on Mars were reported by different explorers. According
    to the opinion of Heuseler ( u . 1 2 . 1 3 , Katterfeld (", Saheki (16,
    Sato (16 and other authors, t h e respective light-phenomena might have been
    t h e signs of active volcanoes on t h e planet. Grey clouds, observed b y Japanese
    explorers as well as by Capen (3, may be also a t t r i b u t e d to volcanic
    o u t b u r s t s . There are some observations, carried out by Dollfus (10, which
    revealed the existence of relatively small, white, persistent clouds over cert
    a i n Martian regions which can be i n t e r p r e t e d as w h i t e vapour-clouds emitted
    by Martian volcanoes.
    The author of the present s t u d y has investigated the distribution of
    t h e s e phenomena over t h e Martian surface and found t h a t t h e distribution
    is not random. The events occurred — in t h e overwhelming m a j o r i t y of the
    cases — 011 a r e a s which are lying along t h e t r a n s i t i o n a l region between dark
    and bright territories. It is i m p o r t a n t to note t h a t many of t h e lunar transient
    events (probably postvolcanic phenomena have a similar position 011
    t h e lunar surface, t h a t is t h e y can be found mostly at t h e border of lunar
    c o n t i n e n t s or basins respectively. On the other hand the most important
    volcanic zones of t h e E a r t h are also t o be found along t h e edges of t h e Pacific
    basin.

  5. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O.; Bell, James F.; Paige, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Oppenheimer crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  6. Diffuse CO2 degassing and volcanic activity at Cape Verde islands, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionis, Samara M.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Melián, Gladys; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Sumino, Hirochika; Barrrancos, Jose; Padilla, Germán D.; Fernandes, Paulo; Bandomo, Zuleyka; Silva, Sónia; Pereira, Jose M.; Semedo, Hélio; Cabral, Jeremias

    2015-04-01

    Diffuse CO2 emission surveys were carried out at São Vicente, Brava, and Fogo islands, Cape Verde, archipelago to investigate the relationship between diffuse CO2 degassing and volcanic activity. Total amounts of diffuse CO2 discharged through the surface environment of the islands of São Vicente, Brava, and Fogo were estimated in 226, 50, and 828 t d-1, respectively. The highest CO2 efflux values of the three volcanic islands systems were observed at the summit crater of Pico do Fogo (up to 15.7 kg m-2 d-1). Statistical graphical analysis of the data suggests two geochemical populations for the diffuse CO2 emission surveys. The geometric mean of the peak population, expressed as a multiple of the geometric mean of the background population, seems to be the best diffuse CO2 emission geochemical parameter to correlate with the volcanic activity (age of the volcanism) for these three island volcanic systems at Cape Verde. This observation is also supported by helium isotopic signature observed in the Cape Verde's fluids, fumaroles, and ground waters. This study provides useful information about the relationship between diffuse CO2 degassing and volcanic activity at Cape Verde enhancing the use of diffuse CO2 emission as a good geochemical tool, for volcanic monitoring at Cape Verde as well as other similar volcanic systems.

  7. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  8. [Chemical characterization and quantification of fructooligosaccharides, phenolic compounds and antiradical activity of Andean roots and tubers grown in Northwest of Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, María Eugenia; Sammán, Norma

    2014-06-01

    There is great interest in consuming foods that can provide the nutrients for a good nutrition and other health beneficial compounds. The aim of this work was to determine the chemical composition of native foods of the Andean region and to quantify some functional com-ponents. Proximal composition, vitamin C, total phenolic compounds, antiradical activity (DPPH) in peel and pulp, dietary fiber soluble and insoluble, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), total and resistant starch (in tubers and raw roots, boiled and boiled and stored) of 6 varieties of Oca (Oxalis tuberosa), 4 clones of manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius were determined. The results showed greater amount of bioactive compounds and antiradical activity in the skin of these products. The highest content was found in the oca peel. In all cases, the content of insoluble fiber was greater than the soluble. The manioc had higher total starch than Andean roots and tubers. The boiling process decreased the resistant starch content of ocas and maniocs, but when these are stored for 48 h at 5 ° C, the resistant starch content increased. The FOS content of the ocas was similar for all varieties (7%). The main component of yacon carbohydrates were FOS (8.89%). The maniocs did not contain FOS. It can be concluded that the roots and tubers studied, in addition to provide nutrients, contain functional compounds that confer additional helpful value for preventing no communicable diseases. PMID:25799690

  9. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  10. Effect of volatiles erupted from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the determination of composition of volcanic volatiles and petrologic estimation of the total mass of volatiles erupted,we showed important advances in the study of the impact of Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China.The volcanic activities include western Liaoning and Zhangjiakou Mesozoic intermediate-acidic explosive eruptions,southern Tibet and Shanwang Cenozoic volcanism,and Mt.Changbai volcanic eruption around one thousand years ago.The paper predominantly discusses the earth's surface temperature changes,ozone depletion,acidic rain formation and mass mortalities of vertebrate induced by the Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanism in China.

  11. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  12. Parameterization of northern hemisphere volcanic activity since 1500 AD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenwiese, C.-D.

    1986-08-01

    In order to analyse the volcanic impact on climate it is necessary to use parameterizations of volcanism which are as reliable as possible. Based on the historical volcanoe chronology of the Smithsonian Institution therefore, a new volcanism parameter, the Smithsonian volcanism index (SVI), has been evaluated and this parameter is compared with ''dust veil index DVI'' and the Crete ice core measurements (Greenland). Thereby, a moving correlation analysis of these parameters indicates some abrupt differences. Since c. 1700 AD the northern hemisphere air temperature near the ground (yearly averages) is correlated with (SVI) and the ice core data at a similar level whereas DVI possibly overestimates this forcing. The consideration of the recent c. 100 years where in general a stronger volcanic forcing of the temperature variations is indicated confirms this finding because the increase of the correlation coefficient with time in case of (SVI) is not so pronounced as in case of the other two parameters. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  14. G-EVER Activities and the Next-generation Volcanic Hazard Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) is a consortium of Asia-Pacific geohazard research institutes that was established in 2012. G-EVER aims to formulate strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. G-EVER is working on enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information on the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The 1st G-EVER International Symposium was held in Tsukuba, Japan in March 11, 2013. The 2nd Symposium is scheduled in Sendai, Tohoku Japan, in Oct. 19-20, 2013. Currently, 4 working groups were proposed in the G-EVER Consortium. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment WG is developing a useful system for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is based on volcanic eruption history datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Volcanic eruption histories including precursor phenomena leading to major eruptions of active volcanoes are very important for future prediction of volcanic eruptions. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and types, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. Proposing international standards on how to estimate the volume of volcanic products is important to make a high quality volcanic eruption database. Spatial distribution database of volcanic products (e.g. tephra and pyroclastic flow distributions), encoded into a GIS based database is necessary for more precise area and volume estimation and risk assessments. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represents a subset of possible future scenarios. Therefore, numerical simulations with controlled parameters are needed for more precise volcanic eruption

  15. Volcanic tremor associated with erupted activity at Bromo volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschaemmer, E. [Karlsruhe Univ., Karlsruhe (Germany). Geophysical Inst.

    1999-06-01

    Three broadband stations were deployed on Bromo volcano, Indonesia, from September to December 1995. The present paper shows the analysis of the seismograms, whose signals produced by volcanic sources cover the frequency range at least Hz down to periods of several minutes. The importance of broadband recordings is discussed.

  16. Forests of the tropical eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Cárdenas; W.D. Gosling; R.T. Pennington; I. Poole; S.C. Sherlock; P. Mothes

    2014-01-01

    Inter-bedded volcanic and organic sediments from Erazo (Ecuador) indicate the presence of four different forest assemblages on the eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene. Radiometric dates (40Ar-39Ar) obtained from the volcanic ash indicate that deposition occurred between 620,000 and 19

  17. FRAME DESIGN OF REMOTE SENSING MONITORING FOR VOLCANIC ACTIVITIES IN CHANGBAI MOUNTAINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Li-qun; ZHAO Yun-ping; HUA Ren-kui

    2003-01-01

    Volcanic eruption is one of the most serious geological disasters, however, a host of facts have proven that the Changbai Mountains volcano is a modem dormant one and has ever erupted disastrously. With the rapid development of remote sensing technology, space monitoring of volcanic activities has already become possible, particularly in the application of thermal infrared remote sensing. The paper, through the detailed analysis of geothermal anomaly factors such as heat radiation, heat conduction and convection, depicts the monitoring principles by which volcano activities would be monitored efficiently and effectively. Reasons for abrupt geothermal anomaly are mainly analyzed, and transmission mechanism of geothermal anomaly in the volcanic regions is explained. Also, a variety of noises disturbing the transmission of normal geothermal anomaly are presented. Finally, some clues are given based on discussing thermal infrared remote sensing monitoring mechanism toward the volcanic areas.

  18. Activity regimes inferred from automatic classification of volcanic tremor at Mt. Etna, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Masotti, Matteo; Falsaperla, Susanna; Langer, Horst; Spampinato, Salvatore; Campanini, Renato

    2007-01-01

    A renewal of eruptive activity at Mt Etna started from the Southeast Crater on 14 July 2006, about 16 months after the end of the last effusive episode. This new eruption reiterated the importance of continuous volcanic monitoring as well as the need of automatic processing and classification of those signals which might be used to disclose such impending eruptive stages. Among seismic signals, volcanic tremor - the persistent background radiation continuously recorded on open ...

  19. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  20. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  1. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10-9/km2/y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10-7/y

  2. Quaternary Volcanic Activities in Shandong Peninsula and Northern Parts of Jiangsu and Anhui Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洪汉; 高维明; 等

    1990-01-01

    Quaternary volcanic rocks often coexist with loess,as observed in the same geologic sections in the Shandong Peninsula and northern parts of Jiangsu and Anhui provinces.The development age of Shandong loess in close to that in the middle reaches of the Yellow River.Loess strata are of synchronous implication in the loess belt of North China.So the ages of volcanic activities can be es-timated approximately from the stratigraphic relations between loess layers and volcanic rocks.The re-sults of dating of the Quaternary volcanic rocks,baked layers and the TL dates of loess samples sug-gest that the Quaternary volcanic activity can be divided into 4 stages in the region studied,with the ages being 1.15-1.03,0.86-0.72,0.55-0.33 and 0.02 Ma B.P.respectively .The occurrence of tephra in the Shandong loess sections is possible due to multiple episodes of volcanism during the Quaternary time.

  3. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  4. Volcanic tremor associated with eruptive activity at Bromo volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gottschämmer

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Three broadband stations were deployed on Bromo volcano, Indonesia, from September to December 1995. The analysis of the seismograms shows that the signals produced by the volcanic sources cover the frequency range from at least 25 Hz down to periods of several minutes and underlines, therefore, the importance of broadband recordings. Frequency analysis reveals that the signal can be divided into four domains. In the traditional frequency range of volcanic tremor (1-10 Hz sharp transitions between two distinct values of the tremor amplitude can be observed. Additional tremor signal including frequencies from 10 to 20 Hz could be found during late November and early December. Throughout the whole experiment signals with periods of some hundred seconds were observed which are interpreted as ground tilts. For these long-period signals a particle motion analysis was performed in order to estimate the source location. Depth and radius can be estimated when the source is modeled as a sudden pressure change in a sphere. The fourth frequency range lies between 0.1 and 1 Hz and is dominated by two spectral peaks which are due to marine microseism. The phase velocity and the direction of wave propagation of these signals could be determined using the tripartite-method.

  5. Qochas on Andean highlands

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    On the Andean highlands, the "qochas" are lakes or ponds of natural or artificial origin. An ancient agricultural technique is based on their use. Linked together by a network of canals, qochas form a system of water and soil management, alternately used for crops or pasture. The concave structure of qochas controls the strong evaporation produced by solar radiation and wind blowing. Qochas can be observed in the satellite imagery of Google Maps.

  6. Central Andean crustal structure from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jamie; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernado

    2016-07-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (15°-27°S) is a high plateau in excess of 3 km elevation, associated with thickened crust along the western edge of the South America plate, in the convergent margin between the subducting Nazca plate and the Brazilian craton. We have calculated receiver functions using seismic data from a recent portable deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-21°S) region and combined them with waveforms from 38 other stations in the region to investigate crustal thickness and crust and mantle structures. Results from the receiver functions provide a more detailed map of crustal thickness than previously existed, and highlight mid-crustal features that match well with prior studies. The active volcanic arc and Altiplano have thick crust with Moho depths increasing from the central Altiplano (65 km) to the northern Altiplano (75 km). The Eastern Cordillera shows large along strike variations in crustal thickness. Along a densely sampled SW-NE profile through the Bolivian orocline there is a small region of thin crust beneath the high peaks of the Cordillera Real where the average elevations are near 4 km, and the Moho depth varies from 55 to 60 km, implying the crust is undercompensated by ~ 5 km. In comparison, a broader region of high elevations in the Eastern Cordillera to the southeast near ~ 20°S has a deeper Moho at ~ 65-70 km and appears close to isostatic equilibrium at the Moho. Assuming the modern-day pattern of high precipitation on the flanks of the Andean plateau has existed since the late Miocene, we suggest that climate induced exhumation can explain some of the variations in present day crustal structure across the Bolivian orocline. We also suggest that south of the orocline at ~ 20°S, the thicker and isostatically compensated crust is due to the absence of erosional exhumation and the occurrence of lithospheric delamination.

  7. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  8. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  9. The influence of volcanic activity on suspended sediment yield of rivers (Kamchatka, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksina, Ludmila

    2014-05-01

    Kamchatka is specific region of suspended sediment yield formation. This fact is particularly connected with active volcanism in the territory. The influence of volcanism on suspended sediment yield characteristics was studied in various time scales - into-diurnal, seasonal and long-term ones. The study of spatial variability of these characteristics reveals the maximum values characterize river basins in zones of strong impact of volcanic eruptions, especially, rivers draining slopes and flanks of active volcanoes. Into-diurnal fluctuations were studied for rivers in volcanic areas. They are characterized by synchronous changes of water flow and turbidity. It's determined by weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits and big slopes of channels (2.5 - 6.0 %). The maximum of water flow and turbidity is observed at the period between 12 and 6 pm. The air temperature reaches its maximum by that time, and consequently, the intensity of snow melting is also maximum one. The maximum of turbidity advances diurnal maximum of water flow a little, and it's connected with the features of flood wave moving and consecutive maximums of slopes, turbidity, velocity, water flow, and capacity of stream during flush. Into-diurnal fluctuations are determined by complicated and little-studied processes of mass transfer between stream and channel deposits. These processes are connected with into-diurnal changes of stream capacity and water transfer between channel and underflow. As the result water regime is pulsating. Rivers under the influence of volcanic eruptions transport the main amount of sediments during floods which usually occur in summer-autumn period (in the absence of extreme floods in winter-spring period during volcanic eruptions). Combination of maximum snow supply, significant precipitation in warm part of the year and weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits on volcanoes slopes is the reason of the most intense erosion in this

  10. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Gagliano; W. D'Alessandro; M. Tagliavia; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10–40 Tg of CH4 a−1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the...

  11. The new Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Farid; Forero-Romero, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    The Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD) is a new effort in South America to serve several goals in astronomical development. Six countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Perú and Venezuela) will work together, representing a common language block in the Andean region and focusing on develop strategies to strengthen the professional research, education and popularization of astronomy. Our current Working Structure comprises a ROAD Coordinator and Coordinators per Task Force, as well as Organizing Committees, Collaborators and Volunteers.The participating institutions of this new ROAD have been involved in many projects involving each of the current OAD’s Task Forces: research, schools and children and public, exploring educational activities/material to be shared among the Andean countries, standardizing the knowledge and creating inspirational experiences. We expect to generate many efforts in order to bring a more homogeneous activity in each Andean country, taking into account the special role of Chile in global astronomy, due to its great conditions for astronomy and the involvement of many professional observatories, universities and astronomy institutions.Our current (and upcoming) most relevant activities includes: Andean Schools on Astronomy, Andean Graduate Program and Massive Open Online Courses (TF1); Virtual Training Sessions and Teaching material for the visually impaired students; Annual TF2 meeting to gather all the collaborators (TF2); Development for planetariums and Communicating Astronomy with the Public (TF3). The Andean region, in the other hand, will also be involved in at least two important events: the CAP Meeting in May 2016 and the XV LARIM in October 2016 (both in Colombia); and Chile will bid to host the XXXI IAU GA in 2021, with the aim of show the great advances in astronomical development from the Andean region and South America.

  12. Search for possible relationship between volcanic ash particles and thunderstorm lightning activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Explosive volcanic eruptions that eject columns of ash from the crater often generate lightning discharges strong enough to be remotely located by very low frequency radio waves. A fraction of volcanic ash particles can stay and disperse long enough to have an effect on weather phenomena days later such as thunderstorms and lightnings. In this work we report on lightning activity analysis over Europe following two recent series of volcanic eruptions in order to identify possible correlations between ash release and subsequent thunderstorm flash frequency. Our attempts gave negative results which can be related to the fact that we have limited information on local atmospheric variables of high enough resolution, however lightning frequency is apparently determined by very local circumstances.

  13. Mercury as a proxy for volcanic activity during extreme environmental turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sial, A.N.; Lacerda, L.D.; Ferreira, V.P.;

    2013-01-01

    The usually low geological background concentrations of Hg makes this trace element suitable for identifying accumulation pulses in sediments that can be tentatively related to weathering processes and thus to climatic changes. Intense volcanism has witnessed the Cretaceous–Paleogene transition...... (KTB) and was, perhaps, responsible for dramatic climatic changes and decrease in biodiversity and mass extinction. We have used Hg concentrations as a proxy for volcanic activity and atmospheric Hg and CO2 buildup across the KTB at three localities. In the Salta Basin, Argentina, Hg contents display......, suggesting that Hg is probably adsorbed onto clays. Thermo-desorption experiments in selected samples from the Yacoraite Formation showed Hg+ 2 as the major species present, which is in agreement with a volcanic origin. Combined Hg and C-isotope chemostratigraphy may become a powerful tool for the eventual...

  14. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  15. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  16. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  17. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  18. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  19. The influence of volcanic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal depositional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Crescenzo; Esposito, Eliana; Molisso, Flavia; Porfido, Sabina; Sacchi, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei coastal area includes the bay of Pozzuoli, Procida and Ischia islands, characterized by active tectonics and volcanism since the Pleistocene. Numerous monogenic volcanoes occur close to the shoreline and volcanic debris interpreted as submarine counterpart of subaerial flows and surges, have been detected offshore. In the Pozzuoli area the most recent eruptive volcanic activity occurred from 10.0 to 8.0 ky B.P and 4.5 to 3.7 ky B.P. followed by the September 1538 Monte Nuovo eruption. Here magma-related activity is testified by extensive hydrothermalism, and recent episodes (1970-71 and 1982-84 on Pozzuoli coast) of shallow seismicity and ground deformation, exceeding rates of 100 cm/year in the years 1983-1984. The most recent volcanic activity on Ischia island starts around 10.0 ky B.P. to which associates several eruptive centres mostly located in the western sector. The last eruption dates back to Arso flow in 1302. Nevertheless the landscape of Ischia is dominated by Mount Epomeo in the central part of the island, which is the highest peak (788 m). It is a volcano-tectonic structure that raised above sea level between 33 and 28 ka BP, due to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth. Procida island is composed of five monogenic Volcanoes (Vivara, Terra Murata, Pozzo Vecchio, Fiumicello and Solchiaro) that have been active over the last 80 ky producing pyroclastic deposits and a lava dome. A sixth volcanic structure has been reported recently off P.ta Serra by marine investigations and confirmed by airborne magnetic surveys. The emplacement of large amount of volcanoclastic material from volcanic and volcano-tectonic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal area produced extensive avalanche deposits off Ischia island, seafloor instabilities in the form of creep/slump, channelled sediment flow and deep sedimentary fans, and is largely responsible for aggradation/progradation of the coastal area during the Quaternary. Moreover, numerous volcanic bank

  20. Exploratory Data Analysis Using a Dedicated Visualization App: Looking for Patterns in Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, S. M.; Chen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Here we present an App designed to visualize and identify patterns in volcanic activity during the last ten years. It visualizes VEI (volcanic explosivity index) levels, population size, frequency of activity, and geographic region, and is designed to address the issue of oversampling of data. Often times, it is difficult to access a large set of data that can be scattered at first glance and hard to digest without visual aid. This App serves as a model that solves this issue and can be applied to other data. To enable users to quickly assess the large data set it breaks down the apparently chaotic abundance of information into categories and graphic indicators: color is used to indicate the VEI level, size for population size within 5 km of a volcano, line thickness for frequency of activity, and a grid to pinpoint a volcano's latitude. The categories and layers within them can be turned on and off by the user, enabling them to scroll through and compare different layers of data. By visualising the data this way, patterns began to emerge. For example, certain geographic regions had more explosive eruptions than others. Another good example was that low frequency larger impact volcanic eruptions occurred more irregularly than smaller impact volcanic eruptions, which had a more stable frequencies. Although these findings are not unexpected, the easy to navigate App does showcase the potential of data visualization for the rapid appraisal of complex and abundant multi-dimensional geoscience data.

  1. The Volcanic Ash Strategic Initiative Team (VAST) - operational testing activities and exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Arnold, Delia; Eckhardt, Sabine; Kristiansen, Nina; Maurer, Christian; Prata, Fred; Stohl, Andreas; Zehner, Claus

    2013-04-01

    The project VAST performs its activities within an ESA (European Space Agency) initiative to enhance the use of Earth Observation (EO) data in volcanic ash monitoring and forecasting. The VAST project aims at further exploring the suitability of EO data for such activities and to improve volcanic ash atmospheric transport forecasting services through exercises and demonstration activities in operational environments. Previous to the in-house deployment of the demonstration service, several exercises on operations and communication exchange are needed and first results are presented here. These exercises include technical in-house settings and conceptual planning of the operations with procedure development, volcanic eruptions drills that trigger the acquiring of data and dispersion/forecasting calculations with preliminary estimates of source terms and finally, an international exercise that provides a test case volcanic event to evaluate response times and the usefulness of the different products obtained. Products also include ensemble dispersion forecasts, on one hand multi-input ensembles utilizing the ECMWF EPS system, and on the other hand multi-model ensembles based on different dispersion models driven with different input data. As part of the work, socio-economic aspects need to be taken into account as well. This includes also the identification of best practices on how results can be presented to the stakeholders, including national authorities and policy makers, and the general public.

  2. Andean region study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    New opportunities for climate change mitigation arising from a higher energy integration among Andean Pact nations were analysed within the framework of the UNEP/GEF Project. Apart from the search for regional mitigation actions, the study was mainly aimed at detecting methodological problems which arise when passing from a strictly national view to the co-ordination of regional actions to deal with climate change. In accordance with the available resources and data, and in view of the mainly methodological nature of the project, it was decided to analyse the opportunities to delve into the energy integration of the Region as regards electricity and natural gas industries and their eventual impact on the emission of greenhouse gases. Although possibilities of setting up electricity and natural gas markets are real, their impacts on GHG emission from the energy system would not prove substantially higher than those which the nations could achieve through the use of their own energy resources, in view that the Andean systems are competitive rather than complementary. More in-depth studies and detail information will be required - unavailable for the present study - to be able to properly evaluate all benefits associated with higher energy integration. Nevertheless, the supply of natural gas to Ecuador seems to be the alternative with the highest impact on GHG emission. If we were to analyse the supply and final consumption of energy jointly, we would most certainly detect additional mitigation options resulting from higher co-operation and co-ordination in the energy field. (EHS)

  3. Evidence of recent deep magmatic activity at Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex, central Colombia. Implications for future volcanic activity at Nevado del Ruiz, Cerro Machín and other volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, John Makario

    2016-09-01

    In the last nine years (2007-2015), the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex (CBCMVC), located in central Colombia, has experienced many changes in volcanic activity. In particular at Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Cerro Machin volcano (CMV) and Cerro Bravo (CBV) volcano. The recent activity of NRV, as well as increasing seismic activity at other volcanic centers of the CBCMVC, were preceded by notable changes in various geophysical and geochemical parameters, that suggests renewed magmatic activity is occurring at the volcanic complex. The onset of this activity started with seismicity located west of the volcanic complex, followed by seismicity at CBV and CMV. Later in 2010, strong seismicity was observed at NRV, with two small eruptions in 2012. After that, seismicity has been observed intermittently at other volcanic centers such as Santa Isabel, Cerro España, Paramillo de Santa Rosa, Quindío and Tolima volcanoes, which persists until today. Local deformation was observed from 2007 at NRV, followed by possible regional deformation at various volcanic centers between 2011 and 2013. In 2008, an increase in CO2 and Radon in soil was observed at CBV, followed by a change in helium isotopes at CMV between 2009 and 2011. Moreover, SO2 showed an increase from 2010 at NRV, with values remaining high until the present. These observations suggest that renewed magmatic activity is currently occurring at CBCMVC. NRV shows changes in its activity that may be related to this new magmatic activity. NRV is currently exhibiting the most activity of any volcano in the CBCMVC, which may be due to it being the only open volcanic system at this time. This suggests that over the coming years, there is a high probability of new unrest or an increase in volcanic activity of other volcanoes of the CBCMVC.

  4. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  5. Compilation of Disruptions to Airports by Volcanic Activity (Version 1.0, 1944-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Mayberry, Gari C.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wunderman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. To more fully characterize the nature and scope of volcanic hazards to airports, we collected data on incidents of airports throughout the world that have been affected by volcanic activity, beginning in 1944 with the first documented instance of damage to modern aircraft and facilities in Naples, Italy, and extending through 2006. Information was gleaned from various sources, including news outlets, volcanological reports (particularly the Smithsonian Institution's Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network), and previous publications on the topic. This report presents the full compilation of the data collected. For each incident, information about the affected airport and the volcanic source has been compiled as a record in a Microsoft Access database. The database is incomplete in so far as incidents may not have not been reported or documented, but it does present a good sample from diverse parts of the world. Not included are en-route diversions to avoid airborne ash clouds at cruise altitudes. The database has been converted to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. To make the PDF version of table 1 in this open-file report resemble the spreadsheet, order the PDF pages as 12, 17, 22; 13, 18, 23; 14, 19, 24; 15, 20, 25; and 16, 21, 26. Analysis of the database reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were impacted on 171 occasions from 1944 through 2006 by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. The number of affected airports (101) probably is better constrained than the number of incidents (171) because recurring disruptions at a given airport may have been lumped together or not reported by news agencies, whereas the initial disruption likely is noticed and reported and thus the airport correctly counted.

  6. Analysis of volcanic activity patterns using MODIS thermal alerts

    OpenAIRE

    Rothery, Dave A.; Coppola, Diego; Saunders, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    We investigate eruptive activity by analysis of thermal-alert data from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) thermal infrared satellite instrument, detected by the MODVOLC (MODIS Volcano alert) algorithm. These data are openly available on a website, and easy to use. We show how such data can plug major gaps in the conventional monitoring record of volcanoes in an otherwise generally poorly-documented region (Melanesia), including: characterising the mechanism of lava effusion...

  7. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency

  8. Soil organic matter dynamics at the paramo and puna highlands in the Andean mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles Muñoz, M.; Faz, Ángel; Mermut, Ahmet R.; Zornoza, Raúl

    2014-05-01

    Mountains and uplands represent the most diverse and fragile ecosystems in the world, cover about 20% of the terrestrial surface and are distributed across all continents and major ecoregions. The Andean Plateau is the main mountain range of the American continent and one of the largest in the world with more than 7,500 km. The soil organic matter is a corner stone in the fertility management of the Andean agriculture as well as in the erosion control. However, its role is still much unknown in these ecosystems. Moreover, the influence of current global climatic change on soil organic C reservoirs and dynamics is still not clearly understood. The aim of this work was to review the soil C dynamics and the implication of the soil organic matter in the fertility management, erosion control, conservation of biodiversity and global climate change to improve the knowledge on the mountain Andean highlands. Climate, landscape, soil C pools, biomass and management were studied. In general, the Andean climate is affected by three main factors: ocean currents, winds and orography characterized by an abrupt topography. The entire Andean belt is segmented into the Northern, Central and Southern Andes. Northern Andes are called paramo and are characterized by humid climate while Central and Southern Andes dryer zones are called puna. Most of the region is tectonically and volcanically active. Sedimentary rocks predominated in the paramo while sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic ones prevailed in the puna. The most common soils were Andosols, Regosols, Umbrisols and Histosols. The cold and wet climate and the low atmospheric pressure favored organic matter accumulation in the soil. The accumulation of organic matter is further enhanced by the formation of organomineral complexes strongly resistant to the microbial breakdown mainly in the paramo. High organic C contents were observed in the paramo (10%) oppositely to the low contents found in the dryer puna (1%). The C/N ratio

  9. Unraveling the Lipolytic Activity of Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from a Volcanic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Stathopoulou, Panagiota M.; Alexander L. Savvides; Karagouni, Amalia D.; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G.

    2013-01-01

    In a bioprospecting effort towards novel thermostable lipases, we assessed the lipolytic profile of 101 bacterial strains isolated from the volcanic area of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. Screening of lipase activity was performed both in agar plates and liquid cultures using olive oil as carbon source. Significant differences were observed between the two screening methods with no clear correlation between them. While the percentage of lipase producing strains identified in agar plates was o...

  10. Evidence of volcanic and glacial activity in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Alonso, Sara; Mellon, Michael T.; Banks, Maria E.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae show numerous examples of enigmatic landforms previously interpreted to have been influenced by a water/ice-rich geologic history. These landforms include giant polygons bounded by kilometer-scale arcuate troughs, bright pitted mounds, and mesa-like features. To investigate the significance of the last we have analyzed in detail the region between 60°N, 290°E and 10°N, 360°E utilizing HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images as well as regional-scale data for context. The mesas may be analogous to terrestrial tuyas (emergent sub-ice volcanoes), although definitive proof has not been identified. We also report on a blocky unit and associated landforms (drumlins, eskers, inverted valleys, kettle holes) consistent with ice-emplaced volcanic or volcano-sedimentary flows. The spatial association between tuya-like mesas, ice-emplaced flows, and further possible evidence of volcanism (deflated flow fronts, volcanic vents, columnar jointing, rootless cones), and an extensive fluid-rich substratum (giant polygons, bright mounds, rampart craters), allows for the possibility of glaciovolcanic activity in the region.Landforms indicative of glacial activity on Chryse/Acidalia suggest a paleoclimatic environment remarkably different from today's. Climate changes on Mars (driven by orbital/obliquity changes) or giant outflow channel activity could have resulted in ice-sheet-related landforms far from the current polar caps.

  11. MIGRATION OF SEISMIC AND VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AS DISPLAY OF WAVE GEODYNAMIC PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Publications about the earthquake foci migration have been reviewed. An important result of such studies is establishment of wave nature of seismic activity migration that is manifested by two types of rotational waves; such waves are responsible for interaction between earthquakes foci and propagate with different velocities. Waves determining long-range interaction of earthquake foci are classified as Type 1; their limiting velocities range from 1 to 10 cm/s. Waves determining short-range interaction of foreshocks and aftershocks of individual earthquakes are classified as Type 2; their velocities range from 1 to 10 km/s. According to the classification described in [Bykov, 2005], these two types of migration waves correspond to slow and fast tectonic waves. The most complete data on earthquakes (for a period over 4.1 million of years and volcanic eruptions (for 12 thousand years of the planet are consolidated in a unified systematic format and analyzed by methods developed by the authors. For the Pacific margin, Alpine-Himalayan belt and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which are the three most active zones of the Earth, new patterns of spatial and temporal distribution of seismic and volcanic activity are revealed; they correspond to Type 1 of rotational waves. The wave nature of the migration of seismic and volcanic activity is confirmed. A new approach to solving problems of geodynamics is proposed with application of the data on migration of seismic and volcanic activity, which are consolidated in this study, in combination with data on velocities of movement of tectonic plate boundaries. This approach is based on the concept of integration of seismic, volcanic and tectonic processes that develop in the block geomedium and interact with each other through rotating waves with a symmetric stress tensor. The data obtained in this study give grounds to suggest that a geodynamic value, that is mechanically analogous to an impulse

  12. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  13. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  14. Multi-Source Autonomous Response for Targeting and Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley G.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Tran, Daniel Q.

    2014-01-01

    The study of volcanoes is important for both purely scientific and human survival reasons. From a scientific standpoint, volcanic gas and ash emissions contribute significantly to the terrestrial atmosphere. Ash depositions and lava flows can also greatly affect local environments. From a human survival standpoint, many people live within the reach of active volcanoes, and therefore can be endangered by both atmospheric (ash, debris) toxicity and lava flow. There are many potential information sources that can be used to determine how to best monitor volcanic activity worldwide. These are of varying temporal frequency, spatial regard, method of access, and reliability. The problem is how to incorporate all of these inputs in a general framework to assign/task/reconfigure assets to monitor events in a timely fashion. In situ sensing can provide a valuable range of complementary information such as seismographic, discharge, acoustic, and other data. However, many volcanoes are not instrumented with in situ sensors, and those that have sensor networks are restricted to a relatively small numbers of point sensors. Consequently, ideal volcanic study synergistically combines space and in situ measurements. This work demonstrates an effort to integrate spaceborne sensing from MODIS (Terra and Aqua), ALI (EO-1), Worldview-2, and in situ sensing in an automated scheme to improve global volcano monitoring. Specifically, it is a "sensor web" concept in which a number of volcano monitoring systems are linked together to monitor volcanic activity more accurately, and this activity measurement automatically tasks space assets to acquire further satellite imagery of ongoing volcanic activity. A general framework was developed for evidence combination that accounts for multiple information sources in a scientist-directed fashion to weigh inputs and allocate observations based on the confidence of an events occurrence, rarity of the event at that location, and other scientists

  15. Chemistry of ash-leachates to monitor volcanic activity: An application to Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armienta, M.A., E-mail: victoria@geofisica.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); De la Cruz-Reyna, S. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Soler, A. [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Fac. Geologia, Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Cruz, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    Monitoring volcanic activity and assessing volcanic risk in an on-going eruption is a problem that requires the maximum possible independent data to reduce uncertainty. A quick, relatively simple and inexpensive method to follow the development of an eruption and to complement other monitoring parameters is the chemical analysis of ash leachates, particularly in the case of eruptions related to dome emplacement. Here, the systematic analysis of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} concentrations in ash leachates is proposed as a valuable tool for volcanic activity monitoring. However, some results must be carefully assessed, as is the case for S/Cl ratios, since eruption of hydrothermally altered material may be confused with degassing of incoming magma. Sulfur isotopes help to identify SO{sub 4} produced by hydrothermal processes from magmatic SO{sub 2}. Lower S isotopic values correlated with higher F{sup -} percentages represent a better indicator of fresh magmatic influence that may lead to stronger eruptions and emplacement of new lava domes. Additionally, multivariate statistical analysis helps to identify different eruption characteristics, provided that the analyses are made over a long enough time to sample different stages of an eruption.

  16. Overview of electromagnetic methods applied in active volcanic areas of western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokan, Catherine K.

    1993-06-01

    A better understanding of active volcanic areas in the United States through electromagnetic geophysical studies received foundation from the many surveys done for geothermal exploration in the 1970's. Investigations by governmental, industrial, and academic agencies include (but are not limited to) mapping of the Cascades. Long Valley/Mono area, the Jemez volcanic field, Yellowstone Park, and an area in Colorado. For one example — Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California — gravity, magnetic, and seismic, as well as electromagnetic methods have all been used in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the subsurface structure. In each of these volcanic regions, anomalous zones were mapped. When conductive, these anomalies were interpreted to be correlated with hydrothermal activity and not to represent a magma chamber. Electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods can offer valuable information in the understanding of volcanoes by being the method which is most sensitive to change in temperature and, therefore, can best map heat budget and hydrological character to aid in prediction of eruptions.

  17. Yanshan, Gaoshan-Two Active Volcanoes of the Volcanic Cluster in Arshan, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Zhida; Tian Mingzhong; Wu Fadong; Xu Debing; Li Tuanjie

    2005-01-01

    The volcanic cluster in Arshan, Inner Mongolia, is located in the west of the middle section of the Da Hinggan Mountains. There are more than forty Cenozoic volcanoes among which the Yanshan Volcano and Gaoshan Volcano are the active ones in broad sense and basaltic central vents. Arshan is a newly found volcanic active region in the Chinese continent. The volcanoes are perfectly preserved and composed of cinder cones, pyroclastic sheets and lava flows. Their cones are grand and the Gaoshan cone is about 362m high, and the depth of the Yanshan crater is about 140m. The pyroclastic sheet is mainly made up of scoria, and the distribution area of scoria with thickness more than 1m is about 27km2. There are two Carbonized-wood sites in the pyroclastic sheet and the 14C datings indicate ages of 1990 ± 100a B. P and 1900 ±70a B. P, which are rectified by dendrodating. Basaltic lava flows are uncovered, and they change from pahoehoe in the early stage to aa in the later stage. There are lots of perfect fumarolic cones, fumarolic dishes and lava tumulus in the front zones. The spread of lava flow is controlled by the local topography and its main body flowed northwestwards covering the Holocene rivers and swamp deposits and blocked up the Halahahe river and its branches to create six lava-dam lakes. For these distinguishing features, Arshan volcanic cluster could be called another natural "Volcano Museum".

  18. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  19. Temporal and geochemical constraints on active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, J. P.; Baldwin, S.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Webb, L. E.; Hollocher, K.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington and Mt. Victory), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the mantle produces basalts. However, the cause of volcanism on the Papuan Peninsula and immediately west of active seafloor spreading rift tip in the Woodlark Basin is controversial. Previous studies have suggested active volcanism there results from 1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere at the Trobriand Trough or 2) decompression melting as the lithosphere is extended and eventually ruptures. To evaluate these possibilities 20 samples were collected from a bimodal basalt-rhyolite suite in the D’Entrecasteaux Islands approximately 80 km west of the sea floor spreading rift tip. Siliceous ash flow tuffs on Dobu Island, Sanaroa Island, and Eastern Fergusson Island consist of sanidine/anorthoclase + Fe/Ti oxides (illmenite/ magnetite) ± quartz ± nepheline ± clinopyroxene ± xenocrystic olivine. Sanidine and K-feldspar from these ash flow tuffs yielded flat age spectra with 40Ar/39Ar isochron ages of 0.008 ± 0.002 Ma and 0.553 ± 0.001 Ma. ICP-MS trace and REE geochemistry on felsic rocks from Dobu Island and Eastern Fergusson Island yielded multi-element diagrams with enriched incompatible elements, and corresponding negative Nb, Sr, Eu, and Ti anomalies. In contrast, mafic volcanics from SE Goodenough Island are comprised of plagioclase + olivine + Fe/Ti oxides ± orthopyroxene ± clinopyroxene ± hornblende ± biotite. Biotite yielded a 40Ar/39Ar isochron age of 0.376 ± 0.05 Ma. MORB-normalized multi-element diagrams of mafic rocks from SE Goodenough Island are LREE-enriched patterns with negative Nb and positive Sr anomalies. In comparison, multi-element diagrams from previous work on mafic rocks from the New Britain arc to the north also

  20. Infrasound Monitoring of the Volcanic Activities of Japanese Volcanoes in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. I.; Che, I. Y.; Shin, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1999 when our first infrasound array station(CHNAR) has been installed at Cheolwon, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) is continuously observing infrasound signals with an infrasound array network, named KIN(Korean Infrasound Network). This network is comprised of eight seismo-acoustic array stations(BRDAR, YPDAR, KMPAR, CHNAR, YAGAR, KSGAR, ULDAR, TJIAR). The aperture size of the smallest array is 300m and the largest is about 1.4km. The number of infrasound sensors are between 4(TJIAR) and 18(YAGAR), and 1~5 seismometers are collocated with infrasound sensors. Many interesting infrasound signals associated with different type of sources, such as blasting, large earthquake, bolide, volcanic explosion are detected by KIN in the past 15 years. We have analyzed the infrasound signals possibly associated with the japanese volcanic explosions with reference to volcanic activity report published by Japanese Meteorological Agency. Analysis results of many events, for example, Asama volcano explosion in 2004 and Shinmoe volcano in 2011, are well matched with the official report. In some cases, however, corresponding infrasound signals are not identified. By comparison of the infrasound signals from different volcanoes, we also found that the characteristics of signals are distinguishing. It may imply that the specific volcano has its own unique fingerprint in terms of infrasound signal. It might be investigated by long-term infrasound monitoring for a specific volcano as a ground truth generating repetitive infrasound signal.

  1. The ELSA tephra stack: Volcanic activity in the Eifel during the last 500,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael W.; Sirocko, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Tephra layers of individual volcanic eruptions are traced in several cores from Eifel maar lakes, drilled between 1998 and 2014 by the Eifel Laminated Sediment Archive (ELSA). All sediment cores are dated by 14C and tuned to the Greenland interstadial succession. Tephra layers were characterized by the petrographic composition of basement rock fragments, glass shards and characteristic volcanic minerals. 10 marker tephra, including the well-established Laacher See Tephra and Dümpelmaar Tephra can be identified in the cores spanning the last glacial cycle. Older cores down to the beginning of the Elsterian, show numerous tephra sourced from Strombolian and phreatomagmatic eruptions, including the 40Ar/39Ar dated differentiated tephra from Glees and Hüttenberg. In total, at least 91 individual tephra can be identified since the onset of the Eifel volcanic activity at about 500,000 b2k, which marks the end of the ELSA tephra stack with 35 Strombolian, 48 phreatomagmatic and 8 tephra layers of evolved magma composition. Many eruptions cluster near timings of the global climate transitions at 140,000, 110,000 and 60,000 b2k. In total, the eruptions show a pattern, which resembles timing of phases of global sea level and continental ice sheet changes, indicating a relation between endogenic and exogenic processes.

  2. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  3. Tectonomagmatic Associations on the Central Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, S. L.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Central Andes is characterized by a strong association between plate convergence, mountain building and plateau formation, and magmatism. Plateau uplift by crustal shortening and thickening in the lower crust is broadly coincident with large scale silicic magmatism defined by the Neogene Central Andean ignimbrite province. Of particular interest here are the spatiotemporal correlations between silicic magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Although magmatism is driven by the subduction-related flux from mantle to crust, the shift to "crustal" magmatism as indicated by elevated crustal isotopic indices after ~10Ma suggests a link between crustal thickening, plateau formation and silicic magmatism. In particular, elevated geotherms associated with crustal thickening and enhanced mantle flux associated with lithospheric delamination may have played a role in thermally preparing the Central Andean crust for enhanced silicic magma production during the extensive Neogene ignimbrite flare-up. Emplacement of these magmas in the upper crust throughout the Neogene may have fuelled a period of significant interaction between magmatism and tectonism on the plateau. With particular reference to the 21° to 24°S segment of the Central Andes, spatial and structural coincidence of calderas of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex with the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapata-El Toro fault zone suggests significant tectonomagmatic interaction. Location of calderas suggest that these regional faults focused magma intrusion and storage, while spatially and temporally correlated eruption pulses connote a tectonic control. Indeed, current thermomechanical models of magma chamber development and eruption triggering promote a role for external triggering of "perched" upper crustal magma chambers. This might have been achieved by melt-enhanced deformation, or alternatively, significant uplift (~1km) associated with the development of large

  4. The effect of high altitude on the glycolytic activity of erythrocytes in natives of the Andean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, J; Gutiérrez, N; Vergnes, H

    1983-01-01

    Glucose consumption by anaerobic glycolysis and the pentose pathway were studied in two Aymara populations living at different altitudes (3 600 m and 450 m). The measurements were made both with and without methylene blue. We observed a Pasteur effect for both pathways which may explain the increase in 2-3 DPG and ATP levels found in blood samples from people living at high altitudes. The results in the presence of methylene blue showed a reduced activity of the methaemoglobin reductase system in the high altitude group which may be partly responsible for their increased levels of methaemoglobin.

  5. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  6. The Cenozoic volcanism in the Kivu rift: Assessment of the tectonic setting, geochemistry, and geochronology of the volcanic activity in the South-Kivu and Virunga regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouclet, A.; Bellon, H.; Bram, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Kivu rift is part of the western branch of the East African Rift system. From Lake Tanganyika to Lake Albert, the Kivu rift is set in a succession of Precambrian zones of weakness trending NW-SE, NNE-SSW and NE-SW. At the NW to NNE turn of the rift direction in the Lake Kivu area, the inherited faults are crosscut by newly born N-S fractures which developed during the late Cenozoic rifting and controlled the volcanic activity. From Lake Kivu to Lake Edward, the N-S faults show a right-lateral en echelon pattern. Development of tension gashes in the Virunga area indicates a clockwise rotation of the constraint linked to dextral oblique motion of crustal blocks. The extensional direction was W-E in the Mio-Pliocene and ENE-WSW in the Pleistocene to present time. The volcanic rocks are assigned to three groups: (1) tholeiites and sodic alkali basalts in the South-Kivu, (2) sodic basalts and nephelinites in the northern Lake Kivu and western Virunga, and (3) potassic basanites and potassic nephelinites in the Virunga area. South-Kivu magmas were generated by melting of spinel + garnet lherzolite from two sources: an enriched lithospheric source and a less enriched mixed lithospheric and asthenospheric source. The latter source was implied in the genesis of the tholeiitic lavas at the beginning of the South-Kivu tectono-volcanic activity, in relationships with asthenosphere upwelling. The ensuing outpouring of alkaline basaltic lavas from the lithospheric source attests for the abortion of the asthenospheric contribution and a change of the rifting process. The sodic nephelinites of the northern Lake Kivu originated from low partial melting of garnet peridotite of the sub-continental mantle due to pressure release during swell initiation. The Virunga potassic magmas resulted from the melting of garnet peridotite with an increasing degree of melting from nephelinite to basanite. They originated from a lithospheric source enriched in both K and Rb, suggesting the

  7. A spaceborne inventory of volcanic activity in Antarctica and southern oceans, 2000-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Smellie, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the more than twenty historically active volcanoes in Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic region only two, to our knowledge, host any ground-based monitoring instruments. Moreover, because of their remoteness, most of the volcanoes are seldom visited, thus relegating the monitoring of volcanism in this region almost entirely to satellites. In this study, high temporal resolution satellite data from the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology's MODVOLC system using MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) are complemented with high spatial resolution data (ASTER, or Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, and similar sensors) to document volcanic activity throughout the region during the period 2000–10. Five volcanoes were observed in eruption (Mount Erebus, Mount Belinda, Mount Michael, Heard Island and McDonald Island), which were predominantly low-level and effusive in nature. Mount Belinda produced tephra, building a cinder cone in addition to an extensive lava field. Five volcanoes exhibited detectable thermal, and presumed fumarolic, activity (Deception, Zavodovski, Candlemas, Bristol, and Bellingshausen islands). A minor eruption reported at Marion Island was not detected in our survey due to its small size. This study also discovered a new active vent on Mount Michael, tracked dramatic vent enlargement on Heard Island, and provides an improved picture of the morphology of some of the volcanoes.

  8. Self-potential, geoelectric and magnetotelluric studies in Italian active volcanic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Siniscalchi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of self-potential, geoelectric and magnetotelluric studies in Italian active volcanic areas as essential contributions both to structural modeling and to hazard evaluation. On Mt. Etna and Mt. Somma-Vesuvius complexes structural modeling was emphasized due to a lack of global information involving the whole apparatuses, at least from the electrical point of view. Hazard investigation was, instead, investigated with high resolution techniques on the island of Vulcano, where intense unrest phenomena have long been recorded.

  9. Results From NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Nicaragua, Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, J.; Mann, P.; McIntosh, K.; Wulf, S.; Dull, R.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    In May of 2006 we used a chartered ferry boat to collect 520 km of seismic data, 886 km of 3.5 kHz subbottom profiler data, and 35 cores from Lake Nicaragua. The lake covers an area of 7700 km2 within the active Central American volcanic arc, forms the largest lake in Central America, ranks as the twentieth largest freshwater lake in the world, and has never been previously surveyed or cored in a systematic manner. Two large stratovolcanoes occupy the central part of the lake: Concepcion is presently active, Maderas was last active less than 2000 years ago. Four zones of active faulting and doming of the lake floor were mapped with seismic and 3.5 kHz subbottom profiling. Two of the zones consist of 3-5-km-wide, 20-30-km-long asymmetric rift structures that trend towards the inactive cone of Maderas Volcano in a radial manner. The northeastern rift forms a 20-27-m deep depression on the lake bottom that is controlled by a north-dipping normal fault. The southwestern rift forms a 25-35-m deep depression controlled by a northeast-dipping normal fault. Both depressions contain mound-like features inferred to be hydrothermal deposits. Two zones of active faulting are associated with the active Concepcion stratovolcano. A 600-m-wide and 6-km-long fault bounded horst block extends westward beneath the lake from a promontory on the west side of the volcano. Like the two radial rift features of Maderas, the horst points roughly towards the active caldera of Concepcion. A second north-south zone of active faulting, which also forms a high, extends off the north coast of Concepcion and corresponds to a localized zone of folding and faulting mapped by previous workers and inferred by them to have formed by gravitational spreading of the flank of the volcano. The close spatial relation of these faults to the two volcanic cones in the lake suggests that the mechanism for faulting is a result of either crustal movements related to magma intrusion or gravitational sliding and is

  10. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  11. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  12. Surface deformation of active volcanic areas retrieved with the SBAS-DInSAR technique: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the surface deformation retrieval capability of the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR algorithm, referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS technique, in the context of active volcanic areas. In particular, after a brief description of the algorithm some experiments relevant to three selected case-study areas are presented. First, we concentrate on the application of the SBAS algorithm to a single-orbit scenario, thus considering a set of SAR data composed by images acquired on descending orbits by the European Remote Sensing (ERS radar sensors and relevant to the Long Valley caldera (eastern California area. Subsequently, we address the capability of the SBAS technique in a multipleorbit context by referring to Mt. Etna volcano (southern Italy test site, with respect to which two different ERS data set, composed by images acquired both on ascending and descending orbits, are available. Finally, we take advantage of the capability of the algorithm to work in a multi-platform scenario by jointly exploiting two different sets of SAR images collected by the ERS and the Environment Satellite (ENVISAT radar sensors in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy area. The presented results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm to investigate the deformation field in active volcanic areas and the potential of the DInSAR methodologies within routine surveillance scenario.

  13. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  14. Connecting Io's volcanic activity to the Io plasma torus: comparison of Galileo/NIMS volcanic and ground-based torus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, F. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Rathbun, J. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Echer, E.; Echer, M. P. D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Io, the innermost of the Jupiter's four Galilean moons, is a remarkable object in the Solar System, due to its intense and energetic volcanic activity. The volcanic sulfur and oxygen in Io's tenuous atmosphere escapes forming an extended neutral cloud around Io and Jupiter. Subsequently, by ionization and pickup ions, a ring of charged particles encircling Jupiter is created, forming the Io plasma torus. Considering this scenario, it is reasonable to expect that the Io plasma torus should be affected by changes in Io's volcanism. Interactions between Io and the Jovian environment is unique and yet not very well understood. Here we present two sets of observations. One from the Galileo Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (NIMS) instrument, which obtained spectral image cubes between 0.7 and 5.2 microns. The other dataset is from ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines from the Io plasma torus, obtained at McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak. Our dataset from the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines cover more years than the one from the NIMS data. The years presented in this work for a comparative study are from 1998 through 2001. Using the NIMS instrument we were able to identify which volcanoes were active and measure their level of activity. From the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines we were able to trace the densest part of the torus and also the brightness of both ansa. By comparing the results from the Galileo instrument and the ground-based observations, we are exploring how the Io plasma torus responds to large eruptions from Io. We aim with this study to help improve our understanding of this complex coupled system, Jupiter-Io.

  15. Use of space, activity patterns, and foraging behavior of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in an Andean forest fragment in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Ana Cristina; Vélez, Adriana; Gómez-Posada, Carolina; López, Harrison; Zárate, Diego A; Stevenson, Pablo R

    2011-10-01

    Howler monkeys are among the most studied primates in the Neotropics, however, behavioral studies including estimation of food availability in Andean forests are scarce. During 12 months we studied habitat use, behavior, and feeding ecology of two groups of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in an isolated fragment in the Colombian Andes. We used a combination of focal animal and instantaneous sampling. We estimated fruit production (FP) using phenology transects, and calculated young leaf abundance by observing marked trees. The home range area used by each group was 10.5 and 16.7 ha and daily distances traveled were 431 ± 228 and 458 ± 259 m, respectively. We found that both groups spent most of their time resting (62-64%). Resting time did not increase with leaf consumption as expected using a strategy of energy minimization. We did not find a relationship between daily distances traveled and leaf consumption. However, howlers consumed fruits according to their availability, and the production of young leaves did not predict feeding time on this resource. Overall, our results are similar to those found on other forest types. We found that despite limited FP in Andean forests, this did not lead to a higher intake of leaves, longer resting periods, or shorter traveling distances for red howlers.

  16. Use of space, activity patterns, and foraging behavior of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in an Andean forest fragment in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Ana Cristina; Vélez, Adriana; Gómez-Posada, Carolina; López, Harrison; Zárate, Diego A; Stevenson, Pablo R

    2011-10-01

    Howler monkeys are among the most studied primates in the Neotropics, however, behavioral studies including estimation of food availability in Andean forests are scarce. During 12 months we studied habitat use, behavior, and feeding ecology of two groups of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in an isolated fragment in the Colombian Andes. We used a combination of focal animal and instantaneous sampling. We estimated fruit production (FP) using phenology transects, and calculated young leaf abundance by observing marked trees. The home range area used by each group was 10.5 and 16.7 ha and daily distances traveled were 431 ± 228 and 458 ± 259 m, respectively. We found that both groups spent most of their time resting (62-64%). Resting time did not increase with leaf consumption as expected using a strategy of energy minimization. We did not find a relationship between daily distances traveled and leaf consumption. However, howlers consumed fruits according to their availability, and the production of young leaves did not predict feeding time on this resource. Overall, our results are similar to those found on other forest types. We found that despite limited FP in Andean forests, this did not lead to a higher intake of leaves, longer resting periods, or shorter traveling distances for red howlers. PMID:21710630

  17. Chemical evolution at the coasts of active volcanic islands in a primordial salty ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasdeit, H.; Fox, S.

    2008-09-01

    The Prebiotic Hot-Volcanic-Coast Scenario It has been suggested that in the Hadean eon (4.5-3.8 Ga before present) no permanent continents but volcanic islands and short-lived protocontinents protruded from the first ocean [1, 2]. As the geothermal heat production was considerably higher than today, it is reasonable to assume that hot volcanic coasts were much more abundant. The salinity of the ocean was probably up to two times higher than the modern value [3]. Under these conditions, the evaporation of seawater at active volcanic coasts must have produced sea salt crusts - a process that can still be observed today [4]. On the hot lava rock, the salt crusts can subsequently experience temperatures up to some hundred degrees Celsius. The seawater probably contained abiotically formed organic molecules such as amino acids, which were inevitably embedded into the sea salt crusts. Different prebiotic sources of amino acids have been discussed: (i) comets and meteorites [5], electrical discharges in the atmosphere [6, 7], and deep-sea hydrothermal vents [8]. We undertook a systematic study of solid salt-amino acid mixtures, especially of their formation and thermal behavior under simulated conditions of the hotvolcanic- coast scenario. Laboratory Experiments Amino acids@salts Artificial Hadean seawater was prepared by dissolving NaCl (705 mmol), MgCl2 (80 mmol), KCl (15 mmol), CaCl2 (15 mmol), and an α-amino acid (5-10 mmol) or a mixture of α-amino acids. In order to model the first step of the hot-volcanic-coast scenario, the solutions were evaporated to dryness. Vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman) and X-ray powder diffraction showed that the resulting solid residues were not heterogeneous mixtures of salt and amino acid crystals. Instead the amino acid molecules were coordinated in calcium or magnesium complexes. We have studied the rac-alanine ( + H3NCH(CH3)COO -, Hala) system in more detail and found that the complex that is present in the mixture has the

  18. Geochemical constraints on the relationship between the Miocene-Pliocene volcanism and tectonics in the Palaoco and Fortunoso volcanic fields, Mendoza Region, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo J.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar analyses constrain the formation of the volcanic succession of Sierra de Palaoco in the present back-arc of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), near 36°S, to the Late Miocene and assigns them to the Huincán II Formation. The composition of major and trace elements, Sr, Nd and P...

  19. Geochemical monitoring of volcanic lakes. A generalized box model for active crater lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    In the past, variations in the chemical contents (SO42−, Cl−, cations of crater lake water have not systematically demonstrated any relationships with eruptive activity. Intensive parameters (i.e., concentrations, temperature, pH, salinity should be converted into extensive parameters (i.e., fluxes, changes with time of mass and solutes, taking into account all the internal and external chemical–physical factors that affect the crater lake system. This study presents a generalized box model approach that can be useful for geochemical monitoring of active crater lakes, as highly dynamic natural systems. The mass budget of a lake is based on observations of physical variations over a certain period of time: lake volume (level, surface area, lake water temperature, meteorological precipitation, air humidity, wind velocity, input of spring water, and overflow of the lake. This first approach leads to quantification of the input and output fluxes that contribute to the actual crater lake volume. Estimating the input flux of the "volcanic" fluid (Qf- kg/s –– an unmeasurable subsurface parameter –– and tracing its variations with time is the major focus during crater lake monitoring. Through expanding the mass budget into an isotope and chemical budget of the lake, the box model helps to qualitatively characterize the fluids involved. The (calculated Cl− content and dD ratio of the rising "volcanic" fluid defines its origin. With reference to continuous monitoring of crater lakes, the present study provides tips that allow better calculation of Qf in the future. At present, this study offers the most comprehensive and up-to-date literature review on active crater lakes.

  20. RSTVOLC implementation on MODIS data for monitoring of thermal volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Paciello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An optimized configuration of the Robust Satellite Technique (RST approach was developed within the framework of the ‘LAVA’ project. This project is funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection and the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, with the aim to improve the effectiveness of satellite monitoring of thermal volcanic activity. This improved RST configuration, named RSTVOLC, has recently been implemented in an automatic processing chain that was developed to detect hot-spots in near real-time for Italian volcanoes. This study presents the results obtained for the Mount Etna eruption of July 14-24, 2006, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. To better assess the operational performance, the RSTVOLC results are also discussed in comparison with those obtained by MODVOLC, a well-established, MODIS-based algorithm for hot-spot detection that is used worldwide.

  1. Use of Logistic Regression for Forecasting Short-Term Volcanic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T. Woods

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm that forecasts volcanic activity using an event tree decision making framework and logistic regression has been developed, characterized, and validated. The suite of empirical models that drive the system were derived from a sparse and geographically diverse dataset comprised of source modeling results, volcano monitoring data, and historic information from analog volcanoes. Bootstrapping techniques were applied to the training dataset to allow for the estimation of robust logistic model coefficients. Probabilities generated from the logistic models increase with positive modeling results, escalating seismicity, and rising eruption frequency. Cross validation yielded a series of receiver operating characteristic curves with areas ranging between 0.78 and 0.81, indicating that the algorithm has good forecasting capabilities. Our results suggest that the logistic models are highly transportable and can compete with, and in some cases outperform, non-transportable empirical models trained with site specific information.

  2. Aspects of historical eruptive activity and volcanic unrest at Mt. Tongariro, New Zealand: 1846-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bradley J.; Potter, Sally H.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August and 21 November 2012 eruptions from Upper Te Maari crater have heightened interest in past activity at Mt. Tongariro, New Zealand. Risks caused by volcanic hazards are increasingly being quantified by using probability estimates through expert elicitation, partly based on the frequency of past eruptions. To maximise the accuracy of these risk values at Mt. Tongariro, a historical eruption catalogue is required. This paper presents the findings of a detailed historical chronology of unrest and eruptions at Mt. Tongariro between 1846 AD and 2013 AD. It builds on the findings of previous researchers, highlighting that volcanic eruptions and unrest have occurred frequently from this volcano. Eruptions are now thought to have occurred at Mt. Tongariro in 1869, 1892, 1896-97, 1899, 1926, 1927, 1934 and 2012. Eruptions also potentially occurred in 1846, 1855, 1886, and 1928, in addition to frequent eruptions from neighbouring Mt. Ngauruhoe. The number of recognised eruptions during the 1896-97 episode has increased to 18, and the Red Crater area has been found to be more active than previously appreciated. Multiple episodes of unrest not resulting in eruptions have also been identified. New eruption recurrence rates are derived from this catalogue, with the baseline probability of the onset of an eruption episode calculated to be 0.07 per year (if 1896-97 and 2012 are considered as one episode each, and all others separately), and the maximum eruption rate within an eruption episode is 18 per year. These new data contribute towards risk assessments for future eruptions at Mt. Tongariro.

  3. Recent and episodic volcanic and glacial activity on Mars revealed by the High Resolution Stereo Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G; Jaumann, R; Hoffmann, H; Hauber, E; Head, J W; Basilevsky, A T; Ivanov, B A; Werner, S C; van Gasselt, S; Murray, J B; McCord, T

    2004-12-23

    The large-area coverage at a resolution of 10-20 metres per pixel in colour and three dimensions with the High Resolution Stereo Camera Experiment on the European Space Agency Mars Express Mission has made it possible to study the time-stratigraphic relationships of volcanic and glacial structures in unprecedented detail and give insight into the geological evolution of Mars. Here we show that calderas on five major volcanoes on Mars have undergone repeated activation and resurfacing during the last 20 per cent of martian history, with phases of activity as young as two million years, suggesting that the volcanoes are potentially still active today. Glacial deposits at the base of the Olympus Mons escarpment show evidence for repeated phases of activity as recently as about four million years ago. Morphological evidence is found that snow and ice deposition on the Olympus construct at elevations of more than 7,000 metres led to episodes of glacial activity at this height. Even now, water ice protected by an insulating layer of dust may be present at high altitudes on Olympus Mons.

  4. Activity and population characteristics of Andean Condors in southern Chile Actividad y características poblacionales de los Cóndores Andinos en el sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONALD J. SARNO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Data were collected on general activity patterns and population characteristics of free-ranging Andean Condors Vultur gryphus in Torres del Paine National Park, Chile from July 1992 to June 1994 during 3,680 h of observation. Seasonal differences were evident in relative abundance and activity patterns. The mean number of condors sighted/ observation significantly higher in fall-winter than in spring-summer. There was a significant decrease from spring-summer to fall-winter in the percentage of observations during which we sighted solitary condors and a significant increase in the number of groups of condors. In addition, mean monthly maximum group size was significantly larger in fall-winter than spring-summer. The sex ratio (males:females of juveniles was significantly skewed in favor of females, and that of adults was significantly skewed in favor of males. The significantly different adult:juvenile ratio of condors visiting the park could have resulted from differences in distribution and habitat use and/or low breeding rates. Differential juvenile mortality and dispersal could also have produced skewed age and sex ratios, but more research is needed. Condor activity seemed related to wind speed. The greatest proportion of condors was observed flying in calm and low winds and less frequently in moderate to very strong winds. Temperature seemed to have an important effect on aerial activity because the greatest proportion of condors was sighted flying and soaring on warm days. Temperature and wind speed were weakly correlated.Se recolectaron datos sobre los patrones generales de actividad y caractersticas de la población del Cóndor Andino Vultur gryphus. El estudio se realizó en el Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, Chile, entre julio 1992 y junio de 1994, totalizando 3680 horas de observación. Durante el estudio fueron evidentes diferencias estacionales en los patrones de actividad y abundancia relativa de estas aves. El numero promedio

  5. Possible Recent Volcanic Activity on the East Pacific Rise at 9° 32'N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, T.; Edwards, M. H.; Johnson, P.; Fornari, D. J.; Perfit, M.; Schouten, H.; Tivey, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    In 2001, the DSL-120A near-bottom mapping system was used to survey a 31.4 km by 6.8 km corridor of the East Pacific Rise crest between 9° 25'N and 9° 57'N. The mapping system included a 120 kHz sidescan and interferometric bathymetry sonar that was used to produce 2 meter-resolution sidescan images of the corridor. The sidescan data depict three scarps located approximately 3 km west of the ridge axis that are interpreted to have been volcanically overprinted between 9° 31'N and 9° 32'N on the basis of sharply lineated features that are interrupted along-strike. In transcripts, video, and 35 mm film footage of the same region collected during Alvin Dive 2490 in 1992, these same scarps are documented as two inward-facing and one outward-facing vertical walls that are 17-18 m high. Co-registration of the DSL-120A and Alvin 2490 datasets shows a strong correlation between other features that are depicted in both the acoustic and photographic data, but the appearance of the scarps changes markedly between 1992 and 2001. In the DSL-120A sidescan data, amorphous-shaped regions of relatively high backscatter characterize the area where the scarps are thought to be volcanically overprinted. In some cases, these reflective patches appear to pond at the base of faults or to spill over the faults. To verify whether the morphology changes between 1992 and 2001 reflect recent volcanic activity on the flank of the ridge axis, we have located SeaMARC-II data for the same region collected in 1987. A cursory examination of the much lower-resolution SeaMARC-II sidescan images vaguely shows the presence of similarly-shaped reflective scarps in the approximate location of the new flow. We are presently reprocessing the SeaMARC-II data to improve the data resolution, making a map from the DSL-120A bathymetry data, and searching for additional datasets that may confirm the existence of a new off-axis flow. The results of our efforts will be reported in December.

  6. Impact of volcanic fluoride and SO/sub 7/ emissions from moderated activity volcanoes on the surrounding vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrec, J.P.; Plebin, R.; Faivre-Pierret, R.X.

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the regions of the volcanoes Etna (Italy) and Masaya (Nicaragua) show that the continuous emissions of gaseous pollutants (HF and SO/sub 2/) from moderated activity volcanoes causes a chronic pollution in the surrounding vegetation with certain economical and ecological consequences. Reciprocally the measure of the pollutants in the plants growing in volcanic regions may be a simple and fast method to investigate some characteristics of the volcanic plume: for example, intensity of the emissions of gas, direction and extent of the plume. 12 references.

  7. Foreland sedimentary record of Andean mountain building during advancing and retreating subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Brian K.

    2016-04-01

    As in many ocean-continent (Andean-type) convergent margins, the South American foreland has long-lived (>50-100 Myr) sedimentary records spanning not only protracted crustal shortening, but also periods of neutral to extensional stress conditions. A regional synthesis of Andean basin histories is complemented by new results from the Mesozoic Neuquén basin system and succeeding Cenozoic foreland system of west-central Argentina (34-36°S) showing (1) a Late Cretaceous shift from backarc extension to retroarc contraction and (2) an anomalous mid-Cenozoic (~40-20 Ma) phase of sustained nondeposition. New detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results from Jurassic through Neogene clastic deposits constrain exhumation of the evolving Andean magmatic arc, retroarc thrust belt, foreland basement uplifts, and distal eastern craton. Abrupt changes in sediment provenance and distal-to-proximal depositional conditions can be reconciled with a complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of extension, post-extensional thermal subsidence, punctuated tectonic inversion involving thick- and thin-skinned shortening, alternating phases of erosion and rapid accumulation, and overlapping igneous activity. U-Pb age distributions define the depositional ages of several Cenozoic stratigraphic units and reveal a major late middle Eocene-earliest Miocene (~40-20 Ma) hiatus in the Malargüe foreland basin. This boundary marks an abrupt shift in depositional conditions and sediment sources, from Paleocene-middle Eocene distal fluviolacustrine deposition of sediments from far western volcanic sources (Andean magmatic arc) and subordinate eastern cratonic basement (Permian-Triassic Choiyoi igneous complex) to Miocene-Quaternary proximal fluvial and alluvial-fan deposition of sediments recycled from emerging western sources (Malargüe fold-thrust belt) of Mesozoic basin fill originally derived from basement and magmatic arc sources. Neogene eastward advance of the fold-thrust belt involved thick

  8. In situ zircon U-Pb and Hf-O isotopic results for ca. 73 Ma granite in Hainan Island: Implications for the termination of an Andean-type active continental margin in southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xian-Hua

    2014-03-01

    We report in the paper integrated analyses of in situ zircon U-Pb ages, Hf-O isotopes, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes for the Longlou granite in northern Hainan Island, southeast China. SIMS zircon U-Pb dating results yield a crystallization age of ˜73 Ma for the Longlou granite, which is the youngest granite recognized in southeast China. The granite rocks are characterized by high SiO2 and K2O, weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.04-1.10), depletion in Sr, Ba and high field strength elements (HFSE) and enrichment in LREE and large ion lithophile elements (LILE). Chemical variations of the granite are dominated by fractional crystallization of feldspar, biotite, Ti-Fe oxides and apatite. Their whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7073-0.7107) and ɛNd(t) (-4.6 to -6.6) and zircon ɛHf(t) (-5.0 to 0.8) values are broadly consistent with those of the Late Mesozoic granites in southeast China coast. Zircon δ18O values of 6.9-8.3‰ suggest insignificant involvement of supracrustal materials in the granites. These granites are likely generated by partial melting of medium- to high-K basaltic rocks in an active continental margin related to subduction of the Pacific plate. The ca. 73 Ma Longlou granite is broadly coeval with the Campanian (ca. 80-70 Ma) granitoid rocks in southwest Japan and South Korea, indicating that they might be formed along a common Andean-type active continental margin of east-southeast Asia. Tectonic transition from the Andean-type to the West Pacific-type continental margin of southeast China likely took place at ca.70 Ma, rather than ca. 90-85 Ma as previously thought.

  9. Unraveling the lipolytic activity of thermophilic bacteria isolated from a volcanic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, Panagiota M; Savvides, Alexander L; Karagouni, Amalia D; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G

    2013-01-01

    In a bioprospecting effort towards novel thermostable lipases, we assessed the lipolytic profile of 101 bacterial strains isolated from the volcanic area of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. Screening of lipase activity was performed both in agar plates and liquid cultures using olive oil as carbon source. Significant differences were observed between the two screening methods with no clear correlation between them. While the percentage of lipase producing strains identified in agar plates was only 17%, lipolytic activity in liquid culture supernatants was detected for 74% of them. Nine strains exhibiting elevated extracellular lipase activities were selected for lipase production and biochemical characterization. The majority of lipase producers revealed high phylogenetic similarity with Geobacillus species and related genera, whilst one of them was identified as Aneurinibacillus sp. Lipase biosynthesis strongly depended on the carbon source that supplemented the culture medium. Olive oil induced lipase production in all strains, but maximum enzyme yields for some of the strains were also obtained with Tween-80, mineral oil, and glycerol. Partially purified lipases revealed optimal activity at 70-80°C and pH 8-9. Extensive thermal stability studies revealed marked thermostability for the majority of the lipases as well as a two-step thermal deactivation pattern. PMID:23738330

  10. Quantitative Modeling of Volcanic SO2: Integrated Monitoring of Precursory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath, K. A.; Watson, M.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to a large eruption. However, this activity may only be detected depending on the available monitoring system in place. In certain cases, precursors can be interpreted to make forecasts about the timing and magnitude of the impending eruption. Furthermore, changes in this activity are used to determine the style of the eruption provided the mechanics producing these precursory signals are properly understood. One important precursory measurement is the rate of volcanic gas exsolution. In particular CO2 and SO2 are measured to predict changes in the magma depth as well as its composition. Another important precursory measurement is the thermal flux discharged from summit vents. For example, three precursory periods at Kliuchevskoi volcano in 2005, 2007, and 2009 were studied using thermal infrared (TIR) satellite data obtained from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. TIR data is also sensitive to the spectral absorbance of volcanogenic SO2. Software to detect and model SO2 flux has now been applied to previously-acquired ASTER data of these three eruptions at Kliuchevskoi. By directly comparing the measured thermal flux and the modelled SO2 flux during the precursory period, the mechanisms leading to the larger eruption are better resolved. Applying these same techniques to future precursory activity would allow the type and duration until onset of the impending eruption to be better predicted in the precursory phase.

  11. Unraveling the Lipolytic Activity of Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from a Volcanic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota M. Stathopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a bioprospecting effort towards novel thermostable lipases, we assessed the lipolytic profile of 101 bacterial strains isolated from the volcanic area of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. Screening of lipase activity was performed both in agar plates and liquid cultures using olive oil as carbon source. Significant differences were observed between the two screening methods with no clear correlation between them. While the percentage of lipase producing strains identified in agar plates was only 17%, lipolytic activity in liquid culture supernatants was detected for 74% of them. Nine strains exhibiting elevated extracellular lipase activities were selected for lipase production and biochemical characterization. The majority of lipase producers revealed high phylogenetic similarity with Geobacillus species and related genera, whilst one of them was identified as Aneurinibacillus sp. Lipase biosynthesis strongly depended on the carbon source that supplemented the culture medium. Olive oil induced lipase production in all strains, but maximum enzyme yields for some of the strains were also obtained with Tween-80, mineral oil, and glycerol. Partially purified lipases revealed optimal activity at 70–80°C and pH 8-9. Extensive thermal stability studies revealed marked thermostability for the majority of the lipases as well as a two-step thermal deactivation pattern.

  12. Impact of the Popocatepetl's volcanic activity on the air quality of Puebla City, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Gay, C. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Flores, Y. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    In this work we report measurements of atmospheric pollutants in Puebla City, including those registered during the period characterized by intense volcanic activity from Popocatepetl volcano between December 2000 and January 2001. We used a gaussian air dispersion model to calculate the impact of sulfur compounds from volcanic emissions on the measurements of these compounds in the stations belonging to Puebla City Atmospheric Monitoring Network. The data show that during the analyzed period, this volcanic emissions affected the air quality, increasing the indexes of PM{sub 1}0, CO and sulfur compounds. Also, the results of applying a Gaussian air dispersion model to these sulfur compounds explains the measurements from Tecnologico station for days with intense volcanic activity and wind coming from the volcano to Puebla City. [Spanish] En este trabajo se reportan mediciones de contaminantes atmosfericos en la ciudad de Puebla, incluyendo las registradas durante el periodo caracterizado por una intensa actividad del volcan Popocatepetl, entre diciembre de 200 y enero de 2001. Aplicamos un modelo de dispersion gaussiano para calcular el impacto de las emisiones volcanicas de compuestos de azufre en las mediciones de estos compuestos en las estaciones de la Red de Monitoreo Atmosferico de la ciudad de Puebla. Los datos muestran que durante el periodo analizado, las emisiones volcanicas afectaron la calidad del aire incrementando los indices de PM{sub 1}0, CO y compuestos de azufre. Ademas, los resultados del modelo gaussiano de dispersion del aire para los compuestos de azufre, explican las mediciones de la estacion Tecnologico para los dias con intensa actividad volcanica y viento viniendo del volcan hacia la ciudad de Puebla.

  13. Helium isotope characteristics of Andean geothermal fluids and lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. R.; Hammerschmidt, K.; Teufel, S.; Friedrichsen, H.

    1993-12-01

    The first comprehensive helium isotope survey of the Andes is reported here. We have sampled geothermal fluids and phyric lava flows from the Southern (svz) and Central (cvz) Volcanic Zones, the volcanically active Puna region and the Precordillera, Salta Basin, Longitudinal Valley and the aseismic region between the two volcanic zones. Although the active areas are characterized by significant differences in crustal age and thickness, the svz, cvz and Puna are characterized by a wide and overlapping range in He-3/He-4 ratios (for fluids and phenocrysts) from predominantly radiogenic values to close to the Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) ratio. The measured ranges in He-3/He-4 ratios (R) (reported normalised to the air He-3/He-4 -- R(sub A)) are: svz (0.18 less than R/R(sub A) less than 6.9); cvz (0.82 less than R/R(sub A) less than 6.0); and Puna (1.8 less than R/R(sub A) less than 5.4). Modification of magmatic He-3/He-4 ratios by water/rock interactions (fluids) or post-eruptive grow-in of radiogenic He-4 or preferential diffusive loss of He-3 (phenocrysts) is considered unlikely; this means that the wide range reflects the helium isotope characteristics of magma bodies in the Andean crust. The mechanism controlling the He-3/He-4 ratios appears to be a mixing between mantle (MORB-like) helium and a radiogenic helium component derived from radioactive decay within the magma (magma aging) and/or interaction with He-4-rich country rock: a process expected to be influenced by pre-eruptive degassing of the mantle component. Assimilation of lower crust is also capable of modifying He-3/He-4 ratios, albeit to a much lesser extent. However, it is possible that the highest measured values in each zone were established by the addition of lower crustal radiogenic helium to MORB helium. In this case, the higher 'base level' ratios of the svz would reflect the younger crustal structure of this region. In contrast to helium, there is no overlap in the Sr or Pb isotope

  14. Terrestrial volcanism in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of current volcanic activity around the world and of dated volcanism over the past 10,000 yrs. The patterns in the data are described. The hazard presented by volcanism is briefly examined.

  15. Results from NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Managua,Central American Volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, K.; Funk, J.; Mann, P.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Managua covers an area of 1,035 km2 of the Central American volcanic arc and is enclosed by three major stratovolcanoes: Momotombo to the northwest was last active in AD 1905, Apoyeque in the center on the Chiltepe Peninsula was last active ca. 4600 years BP, and Masaya to the southeast was last active in AD 2003. A much smaller volcano in the lake (Momotombito) is thought to have been active <4500 yrs B.P. In May of 2006, we used a chartered barge to collect 330 km of 3.5 kHz profiler data along with coincident 274 km of sidescan sonar and 27 km of seismic reflection data. These data identify three zones of faulting on the lake floor: 1) A zone of north-northeast-striking faults in the shallow (2.5-7.5 m deep) eastern part of the lake that extends from the capital city of Managua, which was severely damaged by shallow, left-lateral strike-slip displacements on two of these faults in 1931 (M 5.6) and 1972 (M 6.2): these faults exhibit a horst and graben character and include possible offsets on drowned river valleys 2) a semicircular rift zone that is 1 km wide and can be traced over a distance of 30 km in the central part of the lake; the rift structure defines the deepest parts of the lake ranging from 12 to 18 m deep and is concentric about the Apoyeque stratocone/Chiltepe Peninsula; and 3) a zone of fault scarps defining the northwestern lake shore that may correlate to the northwestern extension of the Mateare fault zone, a major scarp-forming fault that separates the Managua lowlands from the highlands south and west of the city. Following previous workers, we interpret the northeast- trending group of faults in the eastern part of the lake as part of a 15-km-long discontinuity where the trend of the volcanic arc is offset in a right-lateral sense. The semi-circular pattern of the rift zone that is centered on Chiltepe Peninsula appears to have formed as a distal effect of either magma intrusion or withdrawal from beneath this volcanic complex. The

  16. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  17. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic geothermal soils at Pantelleria (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated at about 2.5 Mg a-1 (t a-1). Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values of up to 59.2 nmol g-1 soil d.w. h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile, the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer, and values greater than 6.23 nmol g-1 h-1 were still detected up to a depth of 13 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still detectable consumption at 80 °C (> 1.25 nmol g-1 h-1) was recorded. The soil total DNA extracted from the three samples was probed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers, targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected at sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not at FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site (FAV2) pointed to a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, distantly related to Methylocaldum-Metylococcus genera, and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures under a methane

  18. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  19. Exploring for Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity Above Off-axis Melt Lenses near the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Lee, A. J.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Two Alvin dives (AL 4771 and 4774) transected the seafloor directly above the two largest Off-Axis Melt Lenses (O-AML) east of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis at 9 39'N and 9 54'N. In 2008, a 3D high-resolution seismic reflection survey (MGL-0812) discovered O-AMLs 3-7 km from the EPR at 2-3 km below the seafloor. Several other O-AML in the crust have been subsequently detected in several locations up to 20 km from the spreading axis at fast and intermediate spreading ridges; understanding their impacts is increasingly important. During the dives, no currently active hydrothermal venting or fresh lava was seen, suggesting that these features do not constantly power off-axis geological activity. However, the seafloor appears much younger at small volcanic seamounts in the 9 39'N than at the 9 54'N site. At 9 39'N, we used Alvin to explore the off-axis volcanic mound complex, reaching the summit of the three largest mounds. Although no evidence for on-going hydrothermal or volcanic activity was detected, the seafloor wore a thin sediment layer of ~10cm and thin Mn-coatings on 9 rock samples, suggesting volcanism more recently than would be expected based on the spreading-rate age of the crust. At 9 54'N, the Alvin trackline started south of a prominent abyssal hill, which has an unusual D-shape over 1 km wide in the center, crossed the abyssal hill, visited two local hummocks on top, and then attempted to find volcanic activity on the near slope of EPR axis by going as far west was possible during the dive. Heavy sediment everywhere on the abyssal hill, to the depth of push cores (~30 cm) and probably much deeper in many areas and 4 rock samples from the abyssal hill were quite weathered with little glass intact, suggest that this site is unaffected by the underlying O-AML. Upslope toward the EPR west of the abyssal hill, 4 rocks collected appear somewhat younger, and sediment became thinner. In addition, 3 CTD tow-yos over each O-AML found no evidence of active

  20. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  1. Morphological and speleothemic development in Brujas Cave (Southern Andean Range, Argentine): palaeoenvironmental significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Carlos; Peña, José Luis; Mikkan, Raúl; Osácar, Cinta; Quinif, Yves

    2004-02-01

    Brujas Cave, in the Southern Andean Range, is a well-known endokarstic site in Argentina. However, the origin and evolution of this cave system are poorly known. Based on morphological cave features as well as characteristics of cave deposits, we propose a meteogene drawdown cave genesis, including a change from phreatic to vadose conditions related to the high rate of fluvial downcutting in the area. During the vadose period, various cave-related deposits, including authogenic calcite and gypsum speleothems, allogenic volcanic ash and external tufas were deposited. Gypsum crusts are the oldest cave deposits identified (90.2-64.3 ky BP). Their origin, deduced from isotopic characteristics ( ∂34S=9.6‰), is related to the oxidation of pyrite contained in the Jurassic limestone bedrock as well as the dissolution of overlying Jurassic-Triassic evaporite formations. Gypsum crust deposition is associated with evaporation of water flowing and seeping into the cave during arid environmental conditions. Calcite deposits precipitated from flowing water under equilibrium conditions represent the main speleothem growth period (67.6-34 ky BP in age). Their stable isotope values ( ∂13C=-3‰ to -5‰ and ∂18O=-9‰ to -11‰) may indicate slightly humid and warm conditions related to the regional Minchin lacustrine phase and global oxygen isotope stage 3. Following this stage, a seismic event is evidenced by accumulations of broken stalactites. Seepage calcite speleothems covering cave walls were deposited under disequilibrium conditions by evaporation, probably during Holocene time. Finally, another more recent gypsum deposition period represented by gypsum balls has been differentiated. Micromorphological as well as isotopic ( ∂34S=5.6‰) data indicate that these gypsum forms are related to cyclic processes (solution-deposition) from water seeping into the cave under arid conditions. In addition, intense volcanic activity in the area during Holocene time is deduced

  2. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater, Icarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A; Horgan, Briony H N; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O; Bell, James F III; Paige, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Oppenheimer Crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/Visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  3. Integrating science and education during an international, multi-parametric investigation of volcanic activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Andrews, Benjamin; Wolf, Rudiger; Rose, William; Chigna, Gustavo; Pineda, Armand

    2016-04-01

    In January 2016, we held the first scientific/educational Workshops on Volcanoes (WoV). The workshop took place at Santiaguito volcano - the most active volcano in Guatemala. 69 international scientists of all ages participated in this intensive, multi-parametric investigation of the volcanic activity, which included the deployment of seismometers, tiltmeters, infrasound microphones and mini-DOAS as well as optical, thermographic, UV and FTIR cameras around the active vent. These instruments recorded volcanic activity in concert over a period of 3 to 9 days. Here we review the research activities and present some of the spectacular observations made through this interdisciplinary efforts. Observations range from high-resolution drone and IR footage of explosions, monitoring of rock falls and quantification of the erupted mass of different gases and ash, as well as morphological changes in the dome caused by recurring explosions (amongst many other volcanic processes). We will discuss the success of such integrative ventures in furthering science frontiers and developing the next generation of geoscientists.

  4. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  5. Intumescence and pore structure of alkali-activated volcanic glasses upon exposure to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Structures formed with ground perlite, a natural volcanic glass, activated with NaOH solutions, are shown to possess the ability to expand up to ~225 % of their original volumes upon exposure to temperatures in the 200-600 °C range. Porous solid with 3-7 MPa compressive strength and ˜450 kg/m3 or higher density are obtained. The observed expansion is believed to occur due to a loss of silanol condensation water, as vapor and is accompanied by an up to ~20 % loss in mass. A drop in pH to near-neutral values supports this idea. The size and total amount of pores in the final solid are controlled by concentration of the NaOH solution and thermal processing conditions. The pores formed are observed to be ~1-10 μm to mm-sized. The ability of perlite-based solids to intumesce over specific temperature ranges could be beneficial in applications where absorption of thermal energy is necessary, such as passive fire protection.

  6. Volcanic and seismic activity at Stromboli preceding the 2002-2003 flank eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M.; Calvari, S.; Spampinato, L.; Lodato, L.; Pino, N. A.; Marchetti, E.; Murè, F.

    Regular surveys with a thermal camera from both ground- and helicopter-based surveys have been carried out on Stromboli since October 2001. This data set allowed us to detect morphological changes in Stromboli's summit craters produced by major explosions and to track an increase in volcanic activity associated with a heightened magma level within the main conduit that preceded the 2002-2003 effusive eruption. Together with thermal measurements, geophysical surveys performed in May and September/October 2002 highlighted clear increases in the amplitude of very long period (VLP) events, consistent with the ascent of the magma column above the VLP source region. The increased magma level was probably induced by elevated pressure in the deep feeding system, controlled by regional tectonic stress. This, in turn, pressurized the uppermost part of the crater terrace, producing greater soil permeability and soil degassing. Eventually, the magma loading caused the NW flank of the summit craters to fracture, allowing lava to flood out at high effusion rates on 28 December 2002, starting an approximately 6-month-long effusive eruption.

  7. Paterae on Io: Volcanic Activity Observed by Galileo's NIMS and SSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Kamp, Lucas; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Gregg, Tracy K.

    2003-01-01

    Paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic construct on Io s surface. Paterae are irregular craters, or complex craters with scalloped edges, interpreted as calderas or pit craters. Data from Galileo has shown that the activity of Ionian paterae is often confined to its interior and that generally lava flows are not seen spilling out over the edges. We use observations from Galileo s Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) to study the thermal emission from several Ionian paterae and compare them with images in visible wavelengths obtained by Galileo s Solid State Imaging System (SSI). Galileo s close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 have allowed NIMS to image the paterae at high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, several of these features reveal greater thermal emission around the edges, which can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the paterae walls. Comparisons with imaging data show that lower albedo areas (which are indicative of young lavas) coincide with higher thermal emission areas on NIMS data. Other paterae, however, show thermal emission and features in the visible that are more consistent with lava flows over a solid patera floor. Identifying eruption styles on Io is important for constraining eruption and interior models on Io.

  8. The nature of the volcanic activity at Loki: Insights from Galileo NIMS and PPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Robert R.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Loki is the largest patera and the most energetic hotspot on Jupiter's moon Io, in turn the most volcanically active body in the Solar System, but the nature of the activity remains enigmatic. We present detailed analysis of Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and PhotoPolarimeter/Radiometer (PPR) observations covering the 1.5-100 μm wavelength range during the I24, I27, and I32 flybys. The general pattern of activity during these flybys is consistent with previously proposed models of a resurfacing wave periodically crossing a silicate lava lake. In particular our analysis of the I32 NIMS observations shows, over much of the observed patera, surface temperatures and implied ages closely matching those expected for a wave advancing counterclockwise at 0.94-1.38 km/day. The age pattern is different than other published analyses which do not show as clearly this azimuthal pattern. Our analysis also shows two additional distinctly different patera surfaces. The first is located along the inner and outer margins where components with a 3.00-4.70-μm color temperature of 425 K exist. The second is located at the southwestern margin where components with a 550-K color temperature exist. Although the high temperatures could be caused by disruption of a lava lake crust, some additional mechanism is required to explain why the southwest margin is different from the inner or outer ones. Finally, analysis of the temperature profiles across the patera reveal a smoothness that is difficult to explain by simple lava cooling models. Paradoxically, at a subpixel level, wide temperature distributions exist which may be difficult to explain by just the presence of hot cracks in the lava crust. The resurfacing wave and lava cooling models explain well the overall characteristics of the observations. However, additional physical processes, perhaps involving heat transport by volatiles, are needed to explain the more subtle features.

  9. The Andean Geotrail (2): An educational project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Sassier, C.; Vial, M.; Thiberge, P.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In the framework of the UNESCO International Year of Planet Earth, we performed an educational project in collaboration with primary, secondary and high schools in France and Norway. Geosciences are not usually studied in schools, but this project allowed more than 600 pupils (from 17 schools) aged 8 to 18 years old to share the geological discoveries of our popular science adventure The Andean Geotrail (see Sassier et al., this session). The main educational goal was to promote Geosciences by illustrating in the field what geology is. Our natural laboratory was the spectacular Andean Cordillera. The secondary goal was to promote careers in geology and highlight their variety by allowing the pupils to meet geologists through portraits of geologists. The teachers of the partner schools used our project as a dynamic complement to their theoretical lessons. To set up this partnership, we obtained the support of the pedagogic supervisors of the French Ministry of National Education. The pedagogical project consisted of three steps: (1) Before the expedition (Oct.-Nov. 2008), we visited the pupils of each partner school to present the project, establish personal contact and engage the pupils in our adventure. (2) During The Andean Geotrail itself (Nov. 2008-Aug. 2009), we continuously documented our

  10. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  11. Fractal dimension analysis of the magnetic time series associated with the volcanic activity of Popocatépetl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Flores-Marquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractal analysis of the total magnetic field (TMF time series from 1997 to 2003 at Popocatépetl Volcano is performed and compared with the TMF-series of the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory, 100 km away. Using Higuchi's fractal dimension method (D. The D changes over time for both series were computed. It was observed, when the time windows used to compute D increase in length, both series show nearly the same behavior. Some criteria of comparison were employed to discriminate the local effects inherent to volcano-magnetism. The simultaneous maximum in D (1.8 of the TMF series at Popocatépetl Volcano and the recovered volcanic activity indicates a scaling relation of the TMF at Popocatépetl Volcano and demonstrates a link between the magnetic field and volcanic activity.

  12. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Gagliano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10–40 Tg of CH4 a−1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy, Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a−1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g−1 dry soil h−1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g−1 h−1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g−1 h−1 was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido

  13. Dynamic paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of transgression and localisation of main straits through the magmatic arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-C. Vicente

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The paleogeographic evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin is examined at a global scale for the Central Andes. In this paper, it is called for the striking continuity and lasting of the active volcanic arc. Both direct and indirect sedimentologic evidences allow to locate the western border (insular of the basin and opposite it with the eastern border (cratonic. Emphasis is placed on the volcaniclastic deposits and synsedimentary structures associated with this insular border. It is concluded that the arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably in sediment supply to the basin. Extent and continuity of the arc implies to locate the straits connecting with the Paleopacific. Systematic check of the time of transgressions coupled with sequential facies analysis provides a dynamic outlook of the transgressive process. Sectors with early transgression allow to distinguish two main gulfs of passage through the arc from which waters have progressed lengthwise at the same time northward and southward in a narrow retroarc furrow : the first at latitude of Taltal (25°S, the second at latitude of Curepto (35°S. Both initiated in the upper Triassic and extended during the Hettangian. The evolution as separate basins (Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén ended by fusion in middle Pliensbachian giving rise to a continuous elongated basin from Chubut to northern Peru. The remarkable continuity and narrowness of the Andean Basin leaves no doubt about its tectonic control. This stems to its geotectonic setting as a typical retroarc basin adjacent to a very active magmatic arc and explains the extreme mobility of its insular margin characterized by a huge volcanoclastic apron with associated debris flows and turbidites.

  14. Evolution of Popocatépetl volcano's glaciers in Mexico with and without volcanic activity: diagnosis from a minimal mass balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontiveros-Gonzalez, G.; Cortes Ramos, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2013-05-01

    This work describes the influence of eruptive activity on the evolution of the glacial cover on Popocatepetl volcano. Here, we try to answer a simple question: what had happened if this glacier had not been affected by the volcanic activity? In order to answer this question we modeled the mass balance evolution of this glacier using meteorological data and a minimal mass balance model developed for glaciers elsewhere. For this model we assumed no volcanic activity. These results were compared with measurements available for the actual situation at Popocatépetl Volcano. It was possible to separate the influence of the volcanic activity on the evolution of this glacier system considering two scenarios: one was modeled with a simulation of the mass balance where volcanic activity does not affect, and a second scenario is based on the documented studies developed around the glacial disappearance of the glaciers.

  15. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  16. Integration of geophysical datasets by a conjoint probability tomography approach: application to Italian active volcanic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We expand the theory of probability tomography to the integration of different geophysical datasets. The aim of the new method is to improve the information quality using a conjoint occurrence probability function addressed to highlight the existence of common sources of anomalies. The new method is tested on gravity, magnetic and self-potential datasets collected in the volcanic area of Mt. Vesuvius (Naples, and on gravity and dipole geoelectrical datasets collected in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna (Sicily. The application demonstrates that, from a probabilistic point of view, the integrated analysis can delineate the signature of some important volcanic targets better than the analysis of the tomographic image of each dataset considered separately.

  17. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  18. Andean uplift and Neogene climate change in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, J. A.; Currie, B. S.; Jordan, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Today the Andean Cordillera and Altiplano provide a major obstacle to atmospheric circulation over South America. The Altiplano Plateau prevents moist air masses from the Amazon Basin from reaching the Atacama Desert, causing the Atacama to be one of the driest places on Earth. Although Neogene sedimentary records from the western flank of the Andes should record the dramatic shift to hyperaridity that resulted from the growth of the Altiplano Plateau, the climatic implications of many sedimentary sequences have been difficult to decipher. The causes of the difficulties are complex, such as the relative influences of tectonics and active volcanism versus climate, and the roles of local as well as regional precipitation on groundwater and on the deposition of paludal sediments in basin centers. Over the last few years our research group has focused on using paleosols and the isotopic composition of palustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin (22°S) to try to identify a local precipitation signal and determine the onset of extreme hyperaridity as a consequence of the growth of the Altiplano. We have determined the soil morphological characteristics, salt chemistry, and mass independent fractionation anomalies (Δ17O values) in dated paleosols to reconstruct a Middle Miocene climatic transition from semi-aridity to extreme hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. Paleosols along the southeastern margin of the Calama Basin change from calcic Vertisols with root traces, slickensides, and gleyed horizons to an extremely mature salic Gypsisol with pedogenic nitrate. We interpret this transition, which occurred between 19 and 13 Ma, to represent a change in precipitation from >200 mm/yr to Calama Basin also show a marked change during this time period. δ13C values of palustrine carbonates increase from -7 to +7? VPDB and δ18O values increases from -7 to +1? VPDB over the late to Middle Miocene time. This major trend towards more positive values is likely the result of several

  19. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    other active volcanic systems on Earth.

  20. Mesozooplankton distribution near an active volcanic island in the Andaman Sea (Barren Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Honey U K; Jayaraj, K A; Rafeeq, M; Jayalakshmi, K J; Revichandran, C

    2011-05-01

    The study addresses the distribution and diversity of mesozooplankton near the active volcano-Barren Island (Andaman Sea) in the context of persistent volcanic signature and warm air pool existing for the last few months. Sampling was done from the stations along the west and east side of the volcano up to a depth of 1,000 m during the inter monsoon (April) of 2006. Existence of feeble warm air pool was noticed around the Island (Atm. Temp. 29°C). Sea surface temperature recorded as 29.9°C on the west and 29.6°C on the east side stations. High mesozooplankton biomass was observed in the study area than the earlier reports. High density and biomass observed in the surface layer decreased significantly to the deeper depths. Lack of correlation was observed between mesozooplankton biomass and density with chl. a. Twenty-three mesozooplankton taxa were observed with copepoda as the dominant taxa followed by chaetognatha. The relative abundance of chaetognatha considerably affected the copepod population density in the surface layer. A noticeable feature was the presence of cumaceans, a hyperbenthic fauna in the surface, mixed layer and thermocline layer on the western side station where the volcano discharges in to the sea. The dominant order of copepoda, the calanoida was represented by 52 species belonging to 17 families. The order poecilostomatoida also had a significant contribution. Copepods exhibited a clear difference in their distribution pattern in different depth layers. The families Calanidae and Pontellidae showed a clear dominance in the surface whereas small-sized copepods belonging to the families Clausocalanidae and Paracalanidae were observed as the predominant community in the mixed layer and thermocline layer depth. Families Metridinidae, Augaptilidae and Aetideidae were observed as dominant in deeper layers.

  1. Mesozooplankton distribution near an active volcanic island in the Andaman Sea (Barren Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Honey U K; Jayaraj, K A; Rafeeq, M; Jayalakshmi, K J; Revichandran, C

    2011-05-01

    The study addresses the distribution and diversity of mesozooplankton near the active volcano-Barren Island (Andaman Sea) in the context of persistent volcanic signature and warm air pool existing for the last few months. Sampling was done from the stations along the west and east side of the volcano up to a depth of 1,000 m during the inter monsoon (April) of 2006. Existence of feeble warm air pool was noticed around the Island (Atm. Temp. 29°C). Sea surface temperature recorded as 29.9°C on the west and 29.6°C on the east side stations. High mesozooplankton biomass was observed in the study area than the earlier reports. High density and biomass observed in the surface layer decreased significantly to the deeper depths. Lack of correlation was observed between mesozooplankton biomass and density with chl. a. Twenty-three mesozooplankton taxa were observed with copepoda as the dominant taxa followed by chaetognatha. The relative abundance of chaetognatha considerably affected the copepod population density in the surface layer. A noticeable feature was the presence of cumaceans, a hyperbenthic fauna in the surface, mixed layer and thermocline layer on the western side station where the volcano discharges in to the sea. The dominant order of copepoda, the calanoida was represented by 52 species belonging to 17 families. The order poecilostomatoida also had a significant contribution. Copepods exhibited a clear difference in their distribution pattern in different depth layers. The families Calanidae and Pontellidae showed a clear dominance in the surface whereas small-sized copepods belonging to the families Clausocalanidae and Paracalanidae were observed as the predominant community in the mixed layer and thermocline layer depth. Families Metridinidae, Augaptilidae and Aetideidae were observed as dominant in deeper layers. PMID:20717718

  2. Maximizing Mission Science Return Through use of Spacecraft Autonomy: Active Volcanism and the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S.; Davies, A. G.; Sherwood, R.; ASE Science Team

    2005-08-01

    Deep-space missions have been unable to react to dynamic events as encounter observation sequences are planned well in advance. In the case of planet, asteroid and comet fly-bys, the limited resources available are allocated to individual instruments long beforehand. However, for monitoring or mapping mission phases, alternative strategies and technologies are now available. Now, onboard data processing allows greater spacecraft and instrument flexibility, affording the ability to react rapidly to dynamic events, and increasing the science content of returned data. Such new technology has already been successfully demonstrated in the form of the New Millennium Program Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE). In 2004 ASE successfully demonstrated advanced autonomous science data acquisition, processing, and product downlink prioritization, as well as autonomous fault detection and spacecraft command and control. ASE is software onboard the EO-1 spacecraft, in Earth-orbit. ASE controlled the Hyperion instrument, a hyperspectral imager with 220 wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.5 μm and 30 m/pixel spatial resolution. ASE demonstrated that spacecraft autonomy will be advantageous to future missions by making the best use of limited downlink, e.g., by increasing science content per byte of returned data, and by avoiding the return of null (no-change/no feature) datasets. and by overcoming communication delays through decision-making onboard enabling fast reaction to dynamic events. We envision this flight-proven science-driven spacecraft command-and-control technology being used on a wide range of missions to search for and monitor dynamic events, such as active, high-temperature volcanism on Earth and Io, and cryovolcanism on Triton and possibly other icy satellites. Acknowledgements: Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the EO-1 Flight Management Team and Chris Stevens and Art

  3. Volcanic and Tectonic Activity in the Red Sea Region (2004-2013): Insights from Satellite Radar Interferometry and Optical Imagery

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Studying recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region is important for improving our knowledge of the Red Sea plate boundary and for regional geohazard assessments. However, limited information has been available about the past activity due to insufficient in-situ data and remoteness of some of the activity. In this dissertation, I have used satellite remote sensing to derive new information about several recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region. I first report on three volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea, the 2007-8 Jebel at Tair eruption and the 2011-12 & 2013 Zubair eruptions, which resulted in formation of two new islands. Series of high- resolution optical images were used to map the extent of lava flows and to observe and analyze the growth and destructive processes of the new islands. I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the evolution of lava flows, to estimate their volumes, as well as to generate ground displacements maps, which were used to model the dikes that fed the eruptions. I then report on my work of the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion and the 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence in western Saudi Arabia. I used InSAR observations and stress calculations to study the intruding dike at Harrat Lunayyir, while I combined InSAR data and Bayesian estimation to study the Tabuk earthquake activity. The key findings of the thesis are: 1) The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea indicate that the area is magmatically more active than previously acknowledged and that a rifting episode has been taken place in the southern Red Sea; 2) Stress interactions between an ascending dike intrusion and normal faulting on graben-bounding faults above the dike can inhibit vertical propagation of magma towards the surface; 3) InSAR observations can improve locations of shallow earthquakes and fault model uncertainties are useful to associate earthquake activity with mapped faults; 4). The

  4. Phylogenetic insights into Andean plant diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuebert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Andean orogeny is considered as one of the most important events for the developmentof current plant diversity in South America. We compare available phylogenetic studies anddivergence time estimates for plant lineages that may have diversified in response to Andeanorogeny. The influence of the Andes on plant diversification is separated into four major groups:The Andes as source of new high-elevation habitats, as a vicariant barrier, as a North-Southcorridor and as generator of new environmental conditions outside the Andes. Biogeographicalrelationships between the Andes and other regions are also considered. Divergence timeestimates indicate that high-elevation lineages originated and diversified during or after the majorphases of Andean uplift (Mid-Miocene to Pliocene, although there are some exceptions. Asexpected, Andean mid-elevation lineages tend to be older than high-elevation groups. Mostclades with disjunct distribution on both sides of the Andes diverged during Andean uplift.Inner-Andean clades also tend to have divergence time during or after Andean uplift. This isinterpreted as evidence of vicariance. Dispersal along the Andes has been shown to occur ineither direction, mostly dated after the Andean uplift. Divergence time estimates of plant groupsoutside the Andes encompass a wider range of ages, indicating that the Andes may not benecessarily the cause of these diversifications. The Andes are biogeographically related to allneighbouring areas, especially Central America, with floristic interchanges in both directionssince Early Miocene times. Direct biogeographical relationships between the Andes and otherdisjunct regions have also been shown in phylogenetic studies, especially with the easternBrazilian highlands and North America. The history of the Andean flora is complex and plantdiversification has been driven by a variety of processes, including environmental change,adaptation, and biotic interactions

  5. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  6. Evidences of active and ancient Volcanism on Mars. A review. Second Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVÀRI

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent research have brought some further evidence of volcanism on the planet Mars. At the same time certain erroneous descriptions and conclusions, which are to be found in the first paper (3, are here corrected.

  7. The Andean Geotrail (1): A scientific adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassier, C.; Galland, O.; Raufaste, C.; Mair, K.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In this context and with the label of the UNESCO, we organized and performed a popular science adventure that was followed in real time by both school children and many adults around the world. The Andean Geotrail consisted of a cycling expedition through a spectacular geological environment, the Andean Cordillera. During the nine month expedition, we cycled 8000 km and walked 400 km from Ushuaia in the Southern tip of Argentina to Nazca in Peru to encounter a rich variety of geological environments: active volcanoes, earthquakes, mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, and fantastic geological scenery. All this makes the Andes a great pedagogical natural laboratory. During the expedition, we visited spectacular geological localities that illustrate key Earth Science phenomena (such as mines and hydrocarbon deposits, erupting volcanoes and seismogenically active areas, and national parks) and discovered their implications for the local people. Along the way, we interviewed local geologists and scientists who helped us understand the geology of their areas. We gathered our own observations with those of the local specialists and published essays, articles and photographs on our website and blog (www.georouteandine.fr/English, http://georouteandine.blogspot.com). Seventeen schools in France and Norway

  8. A warning model based on temporal changes of coda Q for volcanic activity at Nevado Del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londoño, John M.; Sudo, Yasuaki

    2002-07-01

    The coda Q has been calculated for Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (NRV) from 1985 to 1999 by using a single scattering model. During this period, the inverse of Q (Q-1 proportional to attenuation) exhibited a long-term decrease with time, as well as shorter-term variations related to the volcanic activity. Q-1 increased prior to volcanic crises and decreased afterward. Based on these observations, a seismic warning criterion has been developed. The parameters (frequency band, size of moving average window, and threshold levels) necessary to evidence clear and significant short-term changes in Q-1 have been investigated and appropriated values are proposed. We suggest a phenomenological model with three stages for the short-term temporal changes in Q-1 at NRV. Firstly, Q-1 increases before a volcanic crises because of accumulation of gas and/or liquid, which decreases the aspect ratio of fluid pockets and increases the fractional volume of fluid in the rocks and the pore aspect ratio. Secondly, Q-1 starts to decrease during the crises by the discharging of fluids such as gas, water, etc. from the volcano. Finally, Q-1 becomes more stable after the crisis at a lower value because of the degassing and/or increasing of rigidity of the medium because of the long-term crystallization and cooling processes. Q-1 seems to be a promising monitoring tool at NRV. It is possible that the observed temporal changes of Q-1, combined with other parameters, may help to predict with greater accuracy a volcanic crisis at NRV.

  9. Lake-level rise in the late Pleistocene and active subaquatic volcanism since the Holocene in Lake Kivu, East African Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kelly Ann; Smets, Benoît; De Batist, Marc; Hilbe, Michael; Schmid, Martin; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-09-01

    The history of Lake Kivu is strongly linked to the activity of the Virunga volcanoes. Subaerial and subaquatic volcanoes, in addition to lake-level changes, shape the subaquatic morphologic and structural features in Lake Kivu's Main Basin. Previous studies revealed that volcanic eruptions blocked the former outlet of the lake to the north in the late Pleistocene, leading to a substantial rise in the lake level and subsequently the present-day thermohaline stratification. Additional studies have speculated that volcanic and seismic activities threaten to trigger a catastrophic release of the large amount of gases dissolved in the lake. The current study presents a bathymetric mapping and seismic profiling survey that covers the volcanically active area of the Main Basin at a resolution that is unprecedented for Lake Kivu. New geomorphologic features identified on the lake floor can accurately describe related lake-floor processes for the first time. The late Pleistocene lowstand is observed at 425 m depth, and volcanic cones, tuff rings, and lava flows observed above this level indicate both subaerial and subaquatic volcanic activities during the Holocene. The geomorphologic analysis yields new implications on the geologic processes that have shaped Lake Kivu's basin, and the presence of young volcanic features can be linked to the possibility of a lake overturn.

  10. Enzyme activities and microbial indices of Mexican volcanic soils under different managements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils at the Mexican Trans-volcanic Belt are extremely important because the lack of agricultural land in overpopulated areas in Mexico. In addition, contents of soil organic matter (SOM) have been declining since the Mexican fields have been cultivated intensively. The aim of this work was to study how different agricultural management practices affect the SOM quality, using biochemical and microbiological parameters as indices. (Author)

  11. Two new Cystoderma species from high Andean Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saar, I.; Læssøe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador.......ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador....

  12. Short-lived tectonic switch mechanism for long-term pulses of volcanic activity after mega-thrust earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lupi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eruptive rates in volcanic arcs increase significantly after mega-thrust earthquakes in subduction zones. Over short to intermediate time periods the link between mega-thrust earthquakes and arc response can be attributed to dynamic triggering processes or static stress changes, but a fundamental mechanism that controls long-term pulses of volcanic activity after mega-thrust earthquakes has not been proposed yet. Using geomechanical, geological, and geophysical arguments, we propose that increased eruption rates over longer timescales are due to the relaxation of the compressional regime that accompanies mega-thrust subduction zone earthquakes. More specifically, the reduction of the horizontal stress σh promotes the occurrence of short-lived strike-slip kinematics rather than reverse faulting in the volcanic arc. The relaxation of the pre-earthquake compressional regime facilitates magma mobilization by providing a short-circuit pathway to shallow depths by significantly increasing the hydraulic properties of the system. The timescale for the onset of strike-slip faulting depends on the degree of shear stress accumulated in the arc during inter-seismic periods, which in turn is connected to the degree of strain-partitioning at convergent margins. We performed Coulomb stress transfer analysis to determine the order of magnitude of the stress perturbations in present-day volcanic arcs in response to five actual mega-thrust earthquakes; the 2005 M8.6, 2007 M8.5, and 2007 M7.9 Sumatra earthquakes; the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake; and the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake. We find that all, but one, the shallow earthquakes that occurred in the arcs of Sumatra, Chile and Japan show a marked lateral component. Our hypothesis suggests that the long-term response of volcanic arcs to subduction zone mega-thrust earthquakes will be manifested as predominantly strike-slip seismic events, and that these future earthquakes will be followed closely by

  13. Eighteen years of geochemical monitoring at the oceanic active volcanic island of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Alonso, Mar; Sharp, Emerson; Woods, Hannah; Barrancos, José; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    We report herein the latest results of a diffuse CO2 efflux survey at El Hierro volcanic system carried out during the summer period of 2015 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area a during post-eruptive period. El Hierro Island (278 km2) is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands. On July 16, 2011, a seismic-volcanic crisis started with the occurrence of more than 11,900 seismic events and significant deformation along the island. On October 10, 2011, the dominant character of seismicity changed dramatically from discrete earthquakes to continuous tremor, a clear indication that magma was rapidly approaching the surface immediately before the onset of the eruption, October 12. Eruption was declared over on 5 March, 2012. In order to monitor the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island, from 1998 to 2015 diffuse CO2 emission studies have been performed at El Hierro volcanic system in a yearly basis (˜600 observation sites) according to the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. To quantify the total CO2 emission from the studied area, 100 simulations for each survey have been performed. During the eruption period, soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m‑2 d‑1) up to 457 g m‑2 d‑1, reaching in November 27, 2011, the maximum CO2 output estimated value of all time series, 2,398 t d‑1, just before the episodes of maximum degassing observed as vigorous bubbling at the sea surface and an increment in the amplitude of the tremor signal. During the 2015 survey, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 41 g m‑2 d‑1. The spatial distribution of diffuse CO2 emission values seemed to be controlled by the main volcano structural features of the island. The total diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere was estimated at 575 ± 24 t d‑1, value slightly higher that the background CO2 emission estimated at 422 t

  14. Andean tectonics: Implications for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1984-09-01

    Current knowledge and theories of large scale Andean tectonics as they relate to site planning for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program's proposed high precision geodetic measurements of relative motions between the Nazca and South American plates are summarized. The Nazca Plate and its eastern margin, the Peru-Chile Trench, is considered a prototype plate marked by rapid motion, strong seismicity and well defined boundaries. Tectonic activity across the Andes results from the Nazca Plate subducting under the South American plate in a series of discrete platelets with different widths and dip angles. This in turn, is reflected in the tectonic complexity of the Andes which are a multitutde of orogenic belts superimposed on each other since the Precambrian. Sites for Crustal Dynamics Program measurements are being located to investigate both interplate and extraplate motions. Observing operations have already been initiated at Arequipa, Peru and Easter Island, Santiago and Cerro Tololo, Chile. Sites under consideration include Iquique, Chile; Oruro and Santa Cruz, Bolivia; Cuzco, Lima, Huancayo and Bayovar, Peru; and Quito and the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Based on scientific considerations, Santa Cruz, Huancayo (or Lima), Quito and the Galapagos Islands should be replaced by Isla San Felix, Chile; Brazilia or Petrolina, Brazil; and Guayaquil, Ecuador. If resources permit, additional important sites would be Buenaventura and Villavicencio or Puerto La Concordia, Colombia; and Mendoza and Cordoba, Argentina.

  15. Influence of seismic processes and volcanic activity on the formation of disastrous floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Dmitriy

    2014-05-01

    models of hydraulic systems, but ultimately due to difference of pressures in their respective segments and areas of the transport network. At the exit of the groundwater on the surface such change in pressure is connected both with the state of the actual water flow in underground cavities, or violations of the structure (topology) of 3D-network. As one of the major and sudden reasons of change of pressure in the underground system can serve seismic processes, including volcanic eruptions (as magmatic and ash). During these processes enormous underground space can be freed from the dense rock. This leads to rapid changes in pressure and that, in principle, a new topology of 3D network and water flows in it. It is important that such dynamic processes occur over huge distances in underground basins of thousands of kilometers [3], of course, with a certain time delay. In the result of the analysis of large-scale flooding in Russia in 2001-2002, as well as the catastrophic floods in Western Europe, in the Amur region of Russia and in the state of Colorado USA in 2013, a correlation between seismic and volcanic activities and floods, expressed by specific numerical correlation coefficients, has been revealed. For example, knowing the date, location and magnitude of an earthquake, we can identify potentially dangerous territories in the aspect of the probability of occurrence of floods, because the stresses in the crust, spreading from the hypocenter of earthquakes, and their subsequent relaxation are one of the most important factors of floods. Mechanisms of distribution of these stresses are well-studied today [2] unlike their influence on the groundwater. The defined boundaries of potentially dangerous sites are broad enough; with regard to the direction of distribution of stress, it is about the sectors in 40 degrees (from the line of the movement of the crustal plate) in the direction from the boundaries of lithospheric plates. Distribution of this impact occurs, as a

  16. Seismicity and volcanic activity in Japan based on crustal thermal activity. 1; Chikaku no netsukatsudo ni motozuku Nippon no jishin kazan katsudo. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M. [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Marine Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the following matters about correlation between seismic and volcanic activities and thermal energy. Investigations on the status of seismic and volcanic activities in the Japanese archipelago during about 400 years in the past reveals the following matters: noticing earthquakes with magnitudes of upper M6 to about M7, flows of energy going outward from deep crust of the earth repeat ups and downs, whereas several prominent rising periods having certain time widths can be seen; volcanic activities are included in the rising period at the same rank as seismic activities; with regard to years 1900 and on, the similar fact can be seen if the Japanese archipelago is divided into a north portion, a south portion, and an extremely south portion southern than the Hiuga area; and the present time is going toward a period of rise in energy flows. In other words, it is thought that the crust and the uppermost portion of the mantle form one body like an organic body, making an action like a geyser releasing the energy outward. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cenozoic back-arc magmatism of the southern extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S: A review of geochemical data and geodynamic interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Orazio

    2004-12-01

    framework of the space-time evolution of the magmatism and in the wider frame of the Cenozoic history of the Pacific margin of southern South America. The slab window openings associated with the collision between oceanic spreading ridges and the Chile Trench are the preferred geodynamic interpretation of the southern Patagonia magmatism. However, the occurrence of many volcanic formations whose age and location are not entirely compatible with the slab window model suggests that other geodynamic processes inducing mantle melting could have been active during Cenozoic time in the extra Andean Patagonia.

  18. A statistical method linking geological and historical eruption time series for volcanic hazard estimations: Applications to active polygenetic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando

    2008-09-01

    The probabilistic analysis of volcanic eruption time series is an essential step for the assessment of volcanic hazard and risk. Such series describe complex processes involving different types of eruptions over different time scales. A statistical method linking geological and historical eruption time series is proposed for calculating the probabilities of future eruptions. The first step of the analysis is to characterize the eruptions by their magnitudes. As is the case in most natural phenomena, lower magnitude events are more frequent, and the behavior of the eruption series may be biased by such events. On the other hand, eruptive series are commonly studied using conventional statistics and treated as homogeneous Poisson processes. However, time-dependent series, or sequences including rare or extreme events, represented by very few data of large eruptions require special methods of analysis, such as the extreme-value theory applied to non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Here we propose a general methodology for analyzing such processes attempting to obtain better estimates of the volcanic hazard. This is done in three steps: Firstly, the historical eruptive series is complemented with the available geological eruption data. The linking of these series is done assuming an inverse relationship between the eruption magnitudes and the occurrence rate of each magnitude class. Secondly, we perform a Weibull analysis of the distribution of repose time between successive eruptions. Thirdly, the linked eruption series are analyzed as a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a generalized Pareto distribution as intensity function. As an application, the method is tested on the eruption series of five active polygenetic Mexican volcanoes: Colima, Citlaltépetl, Nevado de Toluca, Popocatépetl and El Chichón, to obtain hazard estimates.

  19. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rio Cuarto (Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Cabassi

    Full Text Available Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun

  20. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon).

  1. Geosphere-Biosphere Interactions in Bio-Activity Volcanic Lakes: Evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  2. Sediment budget in the Ucayali River basin, an Andean tributary of the Amazon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, W.; Martinez, J.-M.; Espinoza-Villar, R.; Cochonneau, G.; Vauchel, P.; Moquet, J.-S.; Baby, P.; Espinoza, J.-C.; Lavado, W.; Carranza, J.; Guyot, J.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Formation of mountain ranges results from complex coupling between lithospheric deformation, mechanisms linked to subduction and surface processes: weathering, erosion, and climate. Today, erosion of the eastern Andean cordillera and sub-Andean foothills supplies over 99% of the sediment load passing through the Amazon Basin. Denudation rates in the upper Ucayali basin are rapid, favoured by a marked seasonality in this region and extreme precipitation cells above sedimentary strata, uplifted during Neogene times by a still active sub-Andean tectonic thrust. Around 40% of those sediments are trapped in the Ucayali retro-foreland basin system. Recent advances in remote sensing for Amazonian large rivers now allow us to complete the ground hydrological data. In this work, we propose a first estimation of the erosion and sedimentation budget of the Ucayali River catchment, based on spatial and conventional HYBAM Observatory network.

  3. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  4. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three basic topics are addressed for the disruptive event analysis: first, the range of disruptive consequences of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity; second, the possible reduction of the risk of disruption by volcanic activity through selective siting of a repository; and third, the quantification of the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity

  5. Administrative Law in the Andean Community of Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Santos Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the contemporary tendencies of Administrative Law is the recognition of its existence beyond the borders of a State. Under such premise, this paper aims to demonstrate that in the Andean Community of Nations sufficient elements to consider the existence of an Andean administrative Law. In the Andean statutes and rules, it is possible to identify an administrative function, as well as an administrative organization inside the Andean Integration System; and a system of Andean administrative rules and an administrative justice system.

  6. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  7. Volcanic gas emissions during active dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Alaska, August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia; Kern, Christoph; Lyons, John; Kelly, Peter; Schneider, David; Wallace, Kristi; Wessels, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic gas emissions and chemistry data were measured for the first time at Mount Cleveland (1730 m) in the Central Aleutian arc, Alaska, on August 14-15, 2015 as part of the NSF-GeoPRISMS initiative, and co-funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) and the USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory. The measurements were made in the month following two explosive events (July 21 and August 7, 2015) that destroyed a small dome (˜50x85 m), which had experienced episodic growth in the crater since November, 2014. These explosions resulted in the elevation of the aviation color code and alert level from Yellow/Advisory to Orange/Watch on July 21, 2015. Between the November, 2014 and July, 2015 dome-destroying explosions, the volcano experienced: (1) frequent periods of elevated surface temperatures in the summit region (based on Mid-IR satellite observations), (2) limited volcano-seismic tremor, (3) visible degassing as recorded in webcam images with occasionally robust plumes, and (4) at least one aseismic volcanic event that deposited small amounts of ash on the upper flanks of the volcano (detected by infrasound, observed visually and in Landsat 8 images). Intermittent plumes were also sometimes detectable up to 60 km downwind in Mid-IR satellite images, but this was not typical. Lava extrusion resumed following the explosion as indicated in satellite data by highly elevated Mid-IR surface temperatures, but was not identifiable in seismic data. By early-mid August, 2015, a new dome growing in the summit crater had reached 80 m across with temperatures of 550-600 C as measured on August 4 with a helicopter-borne thermal IR camera. A semitransparent plume extended several kilometers downwind of the volcano during the field campaign. A helicopter instrumented with an upward-looking UV spectrometer (mini DOAS) and a Multi-GAS was used to measure SO2 emission rates and in situ mixing ratios of H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S in the plume. On August 14 and 15, 2015, a total of 14

  8. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 1--major and trace element composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W; Bellomo, S; Brusca, L; Martin, R S; Saiano, F; Parello, F

    2015-01-01

    Active biomonitoring using moss-bags was applied to an active volcanic environment for the first time. Bioaccumulation originating from atmospheric deposition was evaluated by exposing mixtures of washed and air-dried mosses (Sphagnum species) at 24 sites on Mt. Etna volcano (Italy). Concentrations of major and a large suite of trace elements were analysed by inductively coupled mass and optical spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) after total acid digestion. Of the 49 elements analysed those which closely reflect summit volcanic emissions were S, Tl, Bi, Se, Cd, As, Cu, B, Na, Fe, Al. Enrichment factors and cluster analysis allowed clear distinction between volcanogenic, geogenic and anthropogenic inputs that affect the local atmospheric deposition. This study demonstrates that active biomonitoring with moss-bags is a suitable and robust technique for implementing inexpensive monitoring in scarcely accessible and harsh volcanic environments, giving time-averaged quantitative results of the local exposure to volcanic emissions. This task is especially important in the study area because the summit area of Mt. Etna is visited by nearly one hundred thousand tourists each year who are exposed to potentially harmful volcanic emissions.

  9. Volcanic and glacial evolution of Chachani-Nocarane complex (Southern Peru) deduced from the geomorphologic map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    The Chachani-Nocarane (16°11'S; 71°31'W; 6.057 m asl) is a large volcanic complex located in the western Central-Andean Cordillera, South of Peru. The date of the last eruption is not known and there are no registers of recent volcanic activity. The complex is shaped by glacial forms belonging to different phases, and periglacial forms (several generations of rock glaciers) which alternate with volcanic forms. The aim of this research is to establish the glacio-volcanic evolution of the volcanic complex Chachani-Nocarane. In order to do so, a detailed 1:20.000 scale geomorphological map was elaborated by integrating the following techniques: interpretation of the 1:35.000 scale aerial photographs (Instituto Geográfico Nacional de Perú, 1956) and the analysis of satellite images (Mrsid; NASA, 2000). Finally, the cartography was corrected though field work campaigns. Through the geomorphologic analysis of the landforms and their relative position, we have identified twelve phases, seven volcanic and five glacial phases. The most ancient volcanic phase is locate to the north area of the study area and correspond with Nocarane and Chingana volcanoes, alignment NW-SE. Above those ensemble the rest of the large delimited geomorphological units overlap. The most recent is located to the SW and consists of a complex series of domes, lava cones and voluminous lavas. Within the glacial phases, the most ancient one is related to the Last Glacial Maximum during the Pleistocene. Over this period, glaciers formed moraines from 3150 to 3600 m asl. The most recent glacier pulsation corresponds to the Little Ice Age (LIA). The moraines related to that event are the closest to the summits, located between 5.100 and 5.300 m asl, and they represent the last trace of glacial activity on the volcanic complex. Currently, this tropical mountain does not have glaciers. The only solid-state water reserves are found in the form of permafrost, as shown by various generations of rock

  10. Andean highlands: Implications of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Seth, Anji; Thibeault, J.M.; García, Magali

    2007-01-01

    This presentation provides background on the SANREM CRSP project "Adapting to Change in the Andean Highlands: Practices and Strategies to Address Climate and Market Risks in Vulnerable Agro-Eco Systems" and discusses the means, variability and projections for the Altiplano climate. available in SANREM office, ESIILTRA-4 (Practices and Strategies for Vulnerable Agro-Ecosystems)

  11. Tectonic and paleoenvironmental evolution of Mesozoic sedimentary basins along the Andean foothills of Argentina (32°-54°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, Juan; Spalletti, Luis; Pérez, Irene Gómez; Macdonald, David

    2003-05-01

    Chronoenvironmental and tectonic charts are presented for Mesozoic basins located along the Andean foothills of the South American plate. On the basis of the main tectonic events, pre-Andean basins, break-up-related basins, extensional back-arc basins, and Andean foreland basins are recognized. The pre-Andean basins were formed by continental extension and strike-slip movement before the development of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Andean magmatic arc. Upper Permian to Middle Triassic extension along Palaeozoic terrane sutures resulted in rifting, bimodal magmatism (Choiyoi group), and continental deposition (Cuyo basin). From the Late Triassic to the Early Jurassic, continental extension related to the collapse of the Gondwana orogen initiated a series of long, narrow half-grabens that filled with continental volcaniclastic deposits. These depocenters were later integrated into the Neuquén basin. Coeval development of the shallow marine Pampa de Agnia basin (42-44°S) is related to short-lived extension, probably driven by dextral displacement along major strike-slip faults (e.g. the Gastre fault system). Widespread extension related to the Gondwana breakup (180-165 Ma) and the opening of the Weddell Sea reached the western margin of the South American plate. As a result, wide areas of Patagonia were affected by intraplate volcanism (Chon Aike province), and early rifting occurred in the Magallanes basin. The Andean magmatic arc was almost fully developed by Late Jurassic times. A transgressive stage with starvation and anoxia characterized the Neuquén basin. In western Patagonia, back-arc and intra-arc extension produced the opening of several grabens associated with explosive volcanism and lava flows (e.g. Rı´o Mayo, El Quemado). To the south, a deep marginal basin floored by oceanic crust (Rocas Verdes) developed along the back-arc axis. In mid-to late Cretaceous times, Andean compressional tectonics related to South Atlantic spreading caused the inversion of

  12. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  13. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  14. Pharmaceutical policy of the Andean sub-region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Senior policy makers and health officials from the Andean countries--Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela--have developed a common pharmaceutical policy. The government's role is to assure availability and equal access to effective, quality, and affordable drugs and to safeguard their proper use. The government cannot delegate this role. The availability and accessibility of drugs gauge quality of health services and are social indicators of justice and equity. The public sector must use drugs from the essential drug list. These drugs are also valuable for the private sector. Drugs must not be treated like other merchandise, because the drug market is susceptible to misuse since the consumer cannot select the drug. Commercial advertising strongly influences prescribing of drugs and their use. The 2 major policy points are that promotion of essential drugs is the best approach from a health viewpoint and promotion of generic drug use is the best commercial alternative. The policy calls for the individual countries to pass a comprehensive drug law that reflects commitment to equity and appropriate use and incorporates standardization mechanisms. Criteria for selecting which drugs are allowed on the market include safety, proven efficacy, risk/benefit ratio, and treating the most common health problems at the lowest possible price. The Andean group is working towards harmonization of national essential drugs lists. To assure quality, health authorities must develop the capacity to enforce regulations when situations arise that threaten individual and community health. Supply, marketing, and logistics activities need to be improved and coordinated between the commercial and public sectors. Drug prices are being distanced from administrative control mechanisms and are going to be determined by a dynamic and well-supplied market. Drug information centers and prescription training are needed to achieve rational use of drugs. A joint pharmaceutical market for

  15. Fluid escape structures in the Graham Bank region (Sicily Channel, Central Mediterranean) revealing volcanic and neotectonic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatola, Daniele; Pennino, Valentina; Basilone, Luca; Interbartolo, Francesco; Micallef, Aaron; Sulli, Attilio; Basilone, Walter

    2016-04-01

    In the Sicily Channel, (Central Mediterranean), two geodynamic processes overlap each other, the Maghrebides-Apennines accretionary prism and the Sicily Channel rift. Moreover, the northwestern sector (Banks sector) is characterised by an irregular seafloor morphology linked to the recent volcanic and tectonic activity.In order to discriminate the role exerted by both the processes in the morphostructural setting of the area we used a dataset of both high and very high resolution single-channel and multi-channel profiles, acquired in the frame of the RITMARE project respectively with CHIRP and sparker, and airgun sources, and high resolution (5 m cell) morpho-bathymetric data. The data allowed us to identify and characterise two areas where different geological features (sedimentary and volcanic) are prevailing. They present fluid escaping evidence, which often appears to be active and generating different types of morphologies (both positive and negative). In the western sector we recognised pockmarks at water depths of 195 to 317 m, with diameters from 25 to 580 m, depths from 1.3 to 15 m, and slope up to 23°. They show sub-circular shape in plan-view and reflectors with upward concavity in cross section, and are oriented along a NW-SE trend.The CHIRP and multichannel profiles highlight fluids that affect the Plio-Quaternary succession, especially in areas where the top surface of the Messinian succession is shallower. Conversely, wipe-out acoustic facies were recognised in proximity of: i) extensional faults of Mesozoic age with NW-SE trend; ii) dip/strike slip faults of Cenozoic age with NW-SE, N-S and about NNE-SSW trends, and iii) extensional neo-tectonic faults with NW-SE and NNW-SSE trends. We cannot exclude that they could feed the shallower reservoir producing a mixing between the two. In the eastern sector we recognised a cluster of volcanoes composed of seven cone-shaped structures (SCV1-7), pertaining to a wide area known as Graham Bank. A detailed

  16. Exploration and monitoring geothermal activity using Landsat ETM + images. A case study at Aso volcanic area in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mia, Md. Bodruddoza; Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Thermal activity monitoring in and around active volcanic areas using remote sensing is an essential part of volcanology nowadays. Three identical approaches were used for thermal activity exploration at Aso volcanic area in Japan using Landsat ETM + images. First, the conventional methods for hydrothermal alteration mapping were applied to find the most active thermal region after exploring geothermal indicator minerals. Second, we found some thermally highly anomalous regions around Nakadake crater using land surface temperature estimation. Then, the Stefan-Boltzmann equation was used for estimating and also monitoring radiative heat flux (RHF) from the most active region of about 8 km2 in and around Nakadake crater in the central part of the Aso volcano. To fulfill the required parameter in the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux, the NDVI (Normalized differential vegetation index) method was used for spectral emissivity, and the mono-window algorithm was used for land surface temperature of this study area. The NDVI value was used to divide land-cover in the study area into four types: water, bare ground, mixed and vegetated land. The bare land was found within the most active region. Vegetation coverage area showed an inverse relationship with total RHF in this study as health of thermally stressed vegetation supports this relationship. The spatial distribution of spectral emissivity ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 in our study. Land surface temperature was estimated using a mono-window algorithm and was highest LST in 2008 and lowest in 2011. The results of RHF showed that the highest pixel RHF was found to be about 296 W/m2 in 2008. Total RHF was obtained of about 607 MW in 2002 and the lowest was about 354 MW in 2008. The RHF anomaly area was found the highest in 2002 and was lowest in 2011. The highest total heat discharge rate (HDR) obtained about 3918 MW in 2002 and lowest total HDR about 2289 MW in 2008 from this study area. But in the case of

  17. Elastic flexure explains the offset of primary volcanic activity upstream of the Réunion and Hawaii plume axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Fontaine, Fabrice; Rabinowicz, Michel; Bystricky, Micha

    2016-04-01

    Recent tomography reveals that surface volcanism at la Réunion and Hawaii develops offset by 150-180 km upstream to the plume axis with respect to plate motion. We use elasto-visco-plastic 2D numerical models to describe the development of compressional stresses at the base of the lithosphere, resulting from elastic plate bending above the upward load exerted by the plume head. This horizontal compression is ~20 km thick, has a ~ 150 km radius and lays around ~50-70 km depth where temperature varies from ~600°C to ~750°C. It is suggested that the buoyant melts percolating in the plume head pond below this zone of compression and eventually spread laterally to the extent where compression vanishes. There, melts resume their ascension and propagate through dikes up to ~35 km depth where the field stress rotates again due to plate curvature change. Flexural compression is a transient phenomenon that depends: (i) on the relaxation time of elasto-plastic stresses between ~600° and ~750°C, (ii) on the thermal erosion of the lithosphere induced by the plume, and (iii) on the ratio of the normal versus tangential stress exerted by the plume on the lithosphere. We find that for a plate 70 My old, this horizontal compression lasts for about 5 Myrs. This time span exceeds the time during which both the Indian and Pacific plates drift over the Reunion and Hawaii plumes, respectively. Accordingly, our model explains i) the ~150 km shift between the surface volcanism and the axis of the plume, ii) the ~5 Myrs synchronous activity of the volcanoes of la Réunion and Mauritius, and (iii) the present pounding of melts at 35 km depth detected below the Reunion and Mauritius Islands. Plume-lithosphere interaction is one of the numerous subjects that Genia Burov studied and modeled; the present study uses a similar code to the one he used, and is inspired by several of his assumptions. In support of his own goals and worries, we show here the importance of thermo

  18. Volcview: A Web-Based Platform for Satellite Monitoring of Volcanic Activity and Eruption Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Randall, M.; Parker, T.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with University and State partners, operates five volcano observatories that employ specialized software packages and computer systems to process and display real-time data coming from in-situ geophysical sensors and from near-real-time satellite sources. However, access to these systems both inside and from outside the observatory offices are limited in some cases by factors such as software cost, network security, and bandwidth. Thus, a variety of Internet-based tools have been developed by the USGS Volcano Science Center to: 1) Improve accessibility to data sources for staff scientists across volcano monitoring disciplines; 2) Allow access for observatory partners and for after-hours, on-call duty scientists; 3) Provide situational awareness for emergency managers and the general public. Herein we describe VolcView (volcview.wr.usgs.gov), a freely available, web-based platform for display and analysis of near-real-time satellite data. Initial geographic coverage is of the volcanoes in Alaska, the Russian Far East, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Coverage of other volcanoes in the United States will be added in the future. Near-real-time satellite data from NOAA, NASA and JMA satellite systems are processed to create image products for detection of elevated surface temperatures and volcanic ash and SO2 clouds. VolcView uses HTML5 and the canvas element to provide image overlays (volcano location and alert status, annotation, and location information) and image products that can be queried to provide data values, location and measurement capabilities. Use over the past year during the eruptions of Pavlof, Veniaminof, and Cleveland volcanoes in Alaska by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Air Force has reinforced the utility of shared situational awareness and has guided further development. These include overlay of volcanic cloud trajectory and

  19. Improved techniques in data analysis and interpretation of potential fields: examples of application in volcanic and seismically active areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Florio

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Geopotential data may be interpreted by many different techniques, depending on the nature of the mathematical equations correlating specific unknown ground parameters to the measured data set. The investigation based on the study of the gravity and magnetic anomaly fields represents one of the most important geophysical approaches in the earth sciences. It has now evolved aimed both at improving of known methods and testing other new and reliable techniques. This paper outlines a general framework for several applications of recent techniques in the study of the potential methods for the earth sciences. Most of them are here described and significant case histories are shown to illustrate their reliability on active seismic and volcanic areas.

  20. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  1. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania-Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries. PMID:27479914

  2. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-08-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania-Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries.

  3. High-up: a remote reservoir of microbial extremophiles at Central Andean Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Helena Albarracín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3,700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern -though quite imperfect- analogues of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth’s history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure. Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e. DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes.

  4. High-Up: A Remote Reservoir of Microbial Extremophiles in Central Andean Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Virginia H.; Kurth, Daniel; Ordoñez, Omar F.; Belfiore, Carolina; Luccini, Eduardo; Salum, Graciela M.; Piacentini, Ruben D.; Farías, María E.

    2015-01-01

    The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called “High-Altitude Andean Lakes” (HAAL) are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles) such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern—though quite imperfect—analogs of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure). Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e., DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes. PMID:26733008

  5. Characterization of the volcanic eruption emissions using neutron activation analysis; Caracterizacion de las emisiones de una erupcion volcanica mediante analisis por activacion neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, Rita R. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Radioquimica, Tecnicas Analiticas Nucleares; Tafuri, Victoria V. [Servicio Meteorologico Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro de Contaminacion del Aire

    1997-10-01

    Characterization of the volcanic particulate material has been performed by analyzing aerosols and ashes with instrumental neutron activation analysis. Crustal enrichment factors were calculated using the elemental concentration and clustering techniques, and multivariate analysis were done. The analytical and data treatment methodologies allowed the sample differentiation from their geographical origin viewpoint, based on their chemical composition patterns, which are related to the deposit formation processes, which consist of direct deposition from the volcanic cloud, and removal by wind action after the end of the eruption, and and finally the deposition. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut de Ciències de la Terra “Jaume Almera” (ICTJA-CSIC) One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing...

  7. Identification of a volcaniclastic tsunami deposit at a volcanically active region in southeastern Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Moriwaki, H.; Chiba, T.; Fujino, S.

    2014-12-01

    A total of two pumiceous layers bounded by sharp upper and lower contacts with surrounding mud were evident in almost all of the 19 sediment cores in southeastern Kyushu, Japan. The upper orange-tinged pumiceous layer A with approx. 5 cm thickness was present at around 2.0-3.5 m deep, while the lower white-tinged pumiceous layer B with a few millimeters to 1.5 cm thickness was found beneath the layer A. The major element composition and refraction index of volcanic glass shards in layers A and B were consistent with those of standard sample of Kr-M and Sz-7, respectively. The Kr-M tephra, sourced from the Mt. Kirishima in southern part of Kyushu, was deposited approx. 4600 years ago, while the Sz-7 tephra, sourced from the Sakurajima in southern part of Kyushu, was deposited approx. 5000 years ago. Selected seeds, leaves, and plant debris obtained from mud samples immediately beneath the layers A and B provided their limiting-maximum ages of approx. 4500 cal. yr BP and 4500-4600 cal. yr BP. The results of the tephra analyses and radiocarbon age indicate that the layer A is the Kr-M fall tephra. However, the limiting-maximum age of the layer B is 400 years younger than the fall age of Sz-7. Given the higher percentage of marine and brackish diatoms than the background mud, deposition of the layer B is thought to be due to a seawater inundation event such as tsunami. It is quite likely that volcaniclastic tsunami deposits exist not only in Kyushu, but also at any site in the subduction zones all over the world. The same approach as this study contributes to the discovery of overlooked tsunami deposits in other areas.

  8. Strategies in the processing and analysis of continuous gravity record in active volcanic areas: the case of Mt. Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hinderer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is intended to describe new strategies in the processing and analysis of continuous gravity records collected in active volcanic areas and to assess how permanent gravity stations can improve the geophysical monitoring of a volcano. The experience of 15 years in continuous gravity monitoring on Mt. Vesuvius is discussed. Several geodynamic phenomena can produce temporal gravity changes. An eruption, for instance, is associated with the ascent of magma producing changes in the density distribution at depth, and leading to ground deformation and gravity changes The amplitude of such gravity variations is often quite small, in the order of 10-102 nms-2, so their detection requires high quality data and a rigorous procedure to isolate from the records those weak gravity signals coming from different sources. Ideally we need gravity signals free of all effects which are not of volcanic origin. Therefore solid Earth tide, ocean and atmospheric loading, instrumental drift or any kind of disturbances other than due to the volcano dynamics have to be removed. The state of the art on the modelling of the solid Earth tide is reviewed. The atmospheric dynamics is one of the main sources precluding the detection of small gravity signals. The most advanced methods to reduce the atmospheric effects on gravity are presented. As the variations of the calibration factors can prevent the repeatability of high-precision measurements, new approaches to model the instrumental response of mechanical gravimeters are proposed too. Moreover, a strategy for an accurate modelling of the instrumental drift and to distinguish it from longterm gravity changes is suggested.

  9. The volcanic response to deglaciation: Evidence from glaciated arcs and a reassessment of global eruption records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.

    Several lines of evidence have previously been used to suggest that ice retreat after the last glacial maximum (LGM) resulted in regionally-increased levels of volcanic activity. It has been proposed that this increase in volcanism was globally significant, forming a substantial component of the post-glacial rise in atmospheric CO2, and thereby contributing to climatic warming. However, as yet there has been no detailed investigation of activity in glaciated volcanic arcs following the LGM. Arc volcanism accounts for 90% of present-day subaerial volcanic eruptions. It is therefore important to constrain the impact of deglaciation on arc volcanoes, to understand fully the nature and magnitude of global-scale relationships between volcanism and glaciation. The first part of this paper examines the post-glacial explosive eruption history of the Andean southern volcanic zone (SVZ), a typical arc system, with additional data from the Kamchatka and Cascade arcs. In all cases, eruption rates in the early post-glacial period do not exceed those at later times at a statistically significant level. In part, the recognition and quantification of what may be small (i.e. less than a factor of two) increases in eruption rate is hindered by the size of our datasets. These datasets are limited to eruptions larger than 0.1 km3, because deviations from power-law magnitude-frequency relationships indicate strong relative under-sampling at smaller eruption volumes. In the southern SVZ, where ice unloading was greatest, eruption frequency in the early post-glacial period is approximately twice that of the mid post-glacial period (although frequency increases again in the late post-glacial). A comparable pattern occurs in Kamchatka, but is not observed in the Cascade arc. The early post-glacial period also coincides with a small number of very large explosive eruptions from the most active volcanoes in the southern and central SVZ, consistent with enhanced ponding of magma during

  10. Simulation of tsunamis induced by volcanic activity in the Gulf of Naples (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tinti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the potential of tsunami generation by pyroclastic flows travelling down the flank of the volcano Vesuvius that is found south of Naples in Italy. The eruption history of Vesuvius shows that it is characterised by large explosive eruptions of plinian or subplinian type during which large volume of pyroclastic flows can be produced. The most remarkable examples of such eruptions occurred in 79 AD and in 1631 and were catastrophic. Presently Vesuvius is in a repose time that, according to volcanologists, could be interrupted by a large eruption, and consequently proper plans of preparedness and emergency management have been devised by civil authorities based on a scenario envisaging a large eruption. Recently, numerical models of magma ascent and of eruptive column formation and collapse have been published for the Vesuvius volcano, and propagation of pyroclastic flows down the slope of the volcanic edifice up to the close shoreline have been computed. These flows can reach the sea in the Gulf of Naples: the denser slow part will enter the waters, while the lighter and faster part of the flow can travel on the water surface exerting a pressure on it. This paper studies the tsunami produced by the pressure pulse associated with the transit of the low-density phase of the pyroclastic flow on the sea surface by means of numerical simulations. The study is divided into two parts. First the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Gulf of Naples as regards the propagation of long waves are analysed by studying the waves radiating from a source that is a static initial depression of the sea level localised within the gulf. Then the tsunami produced by a pressure pulse moving from the Vesuvius toward the open sea is simulated: the forcing pulse features are derived from the recent studies on Vesuvian pyroclastic flows in the literature. The tsunami resulting from the computations is a perturbation involving the whole Gulf of Naples, but it

  11. Geodynamic Drivers of Vertical Crustal Motion: Integrating Paleoaltimetry with Basin Development in the Central Andean Plateau of Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, K. E., II; Saylor, J. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Villarreal, D. P.; Styron, R. H.; Horton, B. K.; Cardenas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the spatial and temporal relationships between surface uplift, tectonic subsidence, and exhumation during periods of oblique crustal shortening is essential to discriminating geodynamic processes controlling formation of high topography in the central Andes. Although subsidence analysis is now a standard tool, paleoelevation estimation remains a challenging task, as estimates based on proxy data can be complicated by uncertainties in the relative controls of tectonics and climate. We therefore adopt an approach of combining established tools of subsidence analysis and detrital geochronology with emerging methods of volcanic glass paleoaltimetry, which enables us to explore a broad range of viable interpretations to understand the development of intermontane basins and their relationship to the development of the central Andean plateau. We investigated a suite of temporally overlapping and spatially separate Cenozoic basins spanning the east-west extent of the central Andean plateau in southern Peru. These basins contain an exceptional record of the vertical movements of this region. We calculate sediment accumulation and subsidence rates through decompaction of measured stratigraphic sections, and reconstruct past environmental conditions based on the stable isotopic composition of ancient waters preserved in hydrated volcanic glass. These data and published records of crustal shortening and exhumation show that although paleoaltimetry data in the study areas may be interpreted in various ways, they are best explained by multiple geodynamic processes driving (i) Eocene-early Miocene development of high topography in the Western Cordillera, then (ii) a pulsed middle Miocene-present building of the central Andean plateau from west to east, consistent with global climate changes as well as regional climate shifts driven by topographic development of the Andean orogen.

  12. Variability in New Shortening Estimates from Southern Peru (12-14S); Implications for Mass Balance of the Andean Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotberg, N.; McQuarrie, N.

    2008-12-01

    One of the fundamental questions of interest with regards to the Andean Plateau is the mass balance of material needed to create and sustain a 3-4 km high plateau. Is crustal shortening sufficient to support an isostatically compensated crust of 60-70km? We present new estimates of shortening across the northern margin of the Andean Plateau. The cross section extent, from the eastern edge of the volcanic arc to foreland basin, is approximately one half of the physiographic width of the Andean Plateau in Peru. Cross sectional shortening estimates in southern Peru (12-14°S) provide a best estimate of 123 km or 40% shortening with an absolute minimum estimate of 86 km or 30% and absolute maximum estimate of 275 km or 60%. We determined the maximum and minimum shortening estimates using the cross sectional area and possible variations in assumptions made about the amount of erosion, detachment dip, involvement of basement thrusts and displacement along faults. The best estimate of shortening is well short of the required 240-300km of shortening needed in order to account for a 60-70km thick crust under the entire plateau. This suggests that for an isostatically equilibrated crust either 1) there is a significant amount of shortening (~150km) in the western half of the plateau which, is hidden by the volcanic arc or 2) crustal material is being added to the Peruvian section of the Andean Plateau either through lower crustal flow or a process of magmatic underplating followed by differentiation and delamination.

  13. A quantitative model for volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Marzocchi, W.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Sandri, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia; Furlan, C.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia

    2006-01-01

    Volcanic hazard assessment is a basic ingredient for risk-based decision-making in land-use planning and emergency management. Volcanic hazard is defined as the probability of any particular area being affected by a destructive volcanic event within a given period of time (Fournier d’Albe 1979). The probabilistic nature of such an important issue derives from the fact that volcanic activity is a complex process, characterized by several and usually unknown degrees o...

  14. Lava lakes on Io: Observations of Io's volcanic activity from Galileo NIMS during the 2001 fly-bys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Kamp, L.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E.P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D.A.; Carlson, R.W.; Doute, S.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) obtained its final observations of Io during the spacecraft's fly-bys in August (I31) and October 2001 (I32). We present a summary of the observations and results from these last two fly-bys, focusing on the distribution of thermal emission from Io's many volcanic regions that give insights into the eruption styles of individual hot spots. We include a compilation of hot spot data obtained from Galileo, Voyager, and ground-based observations. At least 152 active volcanic centers are now known on Io, 104 of which were discovered or confirmed by Galileo observations, including 23 from the I31 and I32 Io fly-by observations presented here. We modify the classification scheme of Keszthelyi et al. (2001, J. Geophys. Res. 106 (E12) 33 025-33 052) of Io eruption styles to include three primary types: promethean (lava flow fields emplaced as compound pahoehoe flows with small plumes 200 km high plumes and rapidly-emplaced flow fields), and a new style we call "lokian" that includes all eruptions confined within paterae with or without associated plume eruptions). Thermal maps of active paterae from NIMS data reveal hot edges that are characteristic of lava lakes. Comparisons with terrestrial analogs show that Io's lava lakes have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes. The majority of activity on Io, based on locations and longevity of hot spots, appears to be of this third type. This finding has implications for how Io is being resurfaced as our results imply that eruptions of lava are predominantly confined within paterae, thus making it unlikely that resurfacing is done primarily by extensive lava flows. Our conclusion is consistent with the findings of Geissler et al. (2004, Icarus, this issue) that plume eruptions and deposits, rather than the eruption of copious amounts of effusive lavas, are responsible for Io's high resurfacing rates. The origin and longevity of islands within ionian

  15. Investigation of active volcanic areas through oceanographic data collected by the NEMO-SN1 multiparametric seafloor observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Bue, Nadia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Embriaco, Davide; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the European Research Infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org), the cabled multidisciplinary seafloor observatory node NEMO-SN1 was deployed in the Western Ionian Sea (Southern Italy) at a depth of 2100 m, about 25 km off-shore Eastern Sicily, close to the Mt. Etna volcano system. The oceanographic payload mounted on this observatory was originally designed to monitor possible variations of the local hydrodynamic playing a crucial role on the redistribution of deep water in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. In particular the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP RDI WorkHorse 600 kHz) was configured with the main aim to record the bottom dynamics, watching few meters of water column above the station (about 30 m). Surprisingly, this sensor offered a spectacular recording of the Mt.Etna pyroclastic activity occurred on 2013 which affected the ESE sector of the volcano. Although the ADCP sensor is commonly used to measure speed and direction of sea currents, it is more often used to monitor concentration suspended matter of controlled areas, such as rivers or coastal marine environments, by the analysis of the acoustic backscatter intensity. This standard condition entails some a-priori knowledge (i.e. suspended sediment concentration, particle size, echo intensity calibration) useful to well configure the sensors before starting its acquisition. However, in the case of Mt. Etna pyroclastic activity, due to the unexpected recording, these information were not available and it was necessary to work in a post-processing mode considering all acquired data. In fact, several different parameters contribute to complete the comprehension of the observed phenomenon: the ADCP acoustic wavelength able to indirectly provide information on the detectable particle size, the intensity of the explosive activity useful to define the starting energy of the volcanic system, the oceanographic local

  16. Reconciling Local and Global Agendas in Sustainable Development: Participatory Research with Indigenous Andean Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert E. Rhoades; Virginia Nazarea

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses participatory research in the Andes and presents a case study in Cotacachi, Ecuador, where sustainability scientists and indigenous people seek common ground in their respective but drastically different research and social agendas. Participatory research based on Andean experiences pre-dated and inspired much of the later international movement in agriculture, health, and conservation. Andean communities have a long history in demanding that outsiders address the needs of the community as a condition for carrying out scientific or applied activities. What an Andean community, however, sees as relevant may or may not practiced throughout much of the world. In fact,overzealous participatory researchers are just as bothersome as their predecessors bearing long questionnaires. More important to Andean people is an equitable relationship with researchers and developers in which exchanges of value are made. A research is drawn. In the case of the SANREM project in Cotacachi, Ecuador, scientists carried out enriching research activities of interest to local people as a way to generate social capital for conducting basic research which does not have an obvious, immediate local benefit. The requested research did not have a conventional participatory methodology but provided valuable products (educational opportunity,germplasm, community visualization tools, and information) to the indigenous community in exchange for time and resources to conduct research on more basic natural resource questions. We argue that in the Andean context the key to reconciling the needs of scientists and of local needs is seeking new forms of equitable collaboration which reach beyond the present and now somewhat tired discourse of ‘participation'.

  17. Preliminary review and summary of the potential for tectonic, seismic, and volcanic activity at the Nevada Test Site defense waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A change from compressional to extensional tectonics, which occurred about 17 m.y. ago, marks the emergence of the present tectonic regime in the southern Great Basin. Crustal extension is continuing at the present time, oriented in a NW-SE direction in the NTS region. Concurrently with the onset of crustal extension a system of NW- and NE-trending shear zones developed, along which mutual offset has occurred. Present seismic and tectonic activity in the NTS region is concentrated along the intersections of the shear zones and in areas of deep basin formation. Natural historic seismicity of the NTS region has been low to moderate. Seismic hazard assessments suggest a maximum magnitude 6-7 earthquake, associated with a maximum peak acceleration of 0.7 to 0.9 g, is probable for the NTS. A return period of 12,700 to 15,000 y for the maximum peak acceleration indicates a relatively low seismic hazard. Silicic volcanism in the NTS region was active from 16 to 6 m.y. ago, followed by a transition to basaltic volcanism. The tectonic settings most favorable for Quaternary basaltic activity are areas of young basin-range extension, caldera ring fracture zones, and intersections of conjugate shear zones. Probability calculations for the Yucca Mountain waste repository result in a volcanic disruption hazard of 10-8 to 10-9/y. This value is extremely low and is probably representative of the hazard at Frenchman Flat. However, due to its tectonic setting, Frenchman Flat may be an area conducive to future basaltic volcanism; further investigation is needed to properly assess volcanic hazard

  18. Seismicity and volcanic activity in Japan based on crustal thermal activity . 2; Chikaku no netsukatsudo ni motozuku Nippon no Jishin kazan katsudo. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M. [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Marine Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the following matters about seismic and volcanic activities in Japan. The previous paper has reported a view that energy is transported from deep portions of the earth`s crust toward outer portions, and the stored energy thrusts up collectively in a certain time period (a rising period). A fact may be accounted for as one of the endorsements thereof that earthquakes and volcanic eruptions take place successively over a wide area from Okinawa to Hokkaido in a short period of time (included in the rising period). When viewed by limiting the time period and areas, a great earthquake would not occur suddenly, but stored energy is released wholly at a certain time while it has been released little by little. Referring to the Kanto Great Earthquake (1923) and the Tokai and Nankai Earthquakes (1944 and 1946), it is found that earthquakes had been occurring successively in the surrounding areas since about 20 years before the occurrence of these great earthquakes. Similar phenomena may be seen in the great earthquakes of Ansei (1854) and An-ei (1707). 5 figs.

  19. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  20. Shifts in leaf litter breakdown along a forest-pasture-urban gradient in Andean streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Rausche, Sirkka; Cueva, Augusta; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Espinosa, Carlos; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    Tropical montane ecosystems of the Andes are critically threatened by a rapid land-use change which can potentially affect stream variables, aquatic communities, and ecosystem processes such as leaf litter breakdown. However, these effects have not been sufficiently investigated in the Andean region and at high altitude locations in general. Here, we studied the influence of land use (forest-pasture-urban) on stream physico-chemical variables (e.g., water temperature, nutrient concentration, and pH), aquatic communities (macroinvertebrates and aquatic fungi) and leaf litter breakdown rates in Andean streams (southern Ecuador), and how variation in those stream physico-chemical variables affect macroinvertebrates and fungi related to leaf litter breakdown. We found that pH, water temperature, and nutrient concentration increased along the land-use gradient. Macroinvertebrate communities were significantly different between land uses. Shredder richness and abundance were lower in pasture than forest sites and totally absent in urban sites, and fungal richness and biomass were higher in forest sites than in pasture and urban sites. Leaf litter breakdown rates became slower as riparian land use changed from natural to anthropogenically disturbed conditions and were largely determined by pH, water temperature, phosphate concentration, fungal activity, and single species of leaf-shredding invertebrates. Our findings provide evidence that leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams is sensitive to riparian land-use change, with urban streams being the most affected. In addition, this study highlights the role of fungal biomass and shredder species (Phylloicus; Trichoptera and Anchytarsus; Coleoptera) on leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams and the contribution of aquatic fungi in supporting this ecosystem process when shredders are absent or present low abundance in streams affected by urbanization. Finally, we summarize important implications in terms of managing of

  1. Shifts in leaf litter breakdown along a forest-pasture-urban gradient in Andean streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Rausche, Sirkka; Cueva, Augusta; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Espinosa, Carlos; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    Tropical montane ecosystems of the Andes are critically threatened by a rapid land-use change which can potentially affect stream variables, aquatic communities, and ecosystem processes such as leaf litter breakdown. However, these effects have not been sufficiently investigated in the Andean region and at high altitude locations in general. Here, we studied the influence of land use (forest-pasture-urban) on stream physico-chemical variables (e.g., water temperature, nutrient concentration, and pH), aquatic communities (macroinvertebrates and aquatic fungi) and leaf litter breakdown rates in Andean streams (southern Ecuador), and how variation in those stream physico-chemical variables affect macroinvertebrates and fungi related to leaf litter breakdown. We found that pH, water temperature, and nutrient concentration increased along the land-use gradient. Macroinvertebrate communities were significantly different between land uses. Shredder richness and abundance were lower in pasture than forest sites and totally absent in urban sites, and fungal richness and biomass were higher in forest sites than in pasture and urban sites. Leaf litter breakdown rates became slower as riparian land use changed from natural to anthropogenically disturbed conditions and were largely determined by pH, water temperature, phosphate concentration, fungal activity, and single species of leaf-shredding invertebrates. Our findings provide evidence that leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams is sensitive to riparian land-use change, with urban streams being the most affected. In addition, this study highlights the role of fungal biomass and shredder species (Phylloicus; Trichoptera and Anchytarsus; Coleoptera) on leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams and the contribution of aquatic fungi in supporting this ecosystem process when shredders are absent or present low abundance in streams affected by urbanization. Finally, we summarize important implications in terms of managing of

  2. Mitigate and Assess risk from Volcanic Impact on Terrain and human Activities: the FP7 MIAVITA project

    OpenAIRE

    Thierry, Pierre; Vagner, Amélie; Fontaine, Mélanie

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are one of the most impressive, violent and dramatic agents of change on Earth. Volcanic emissions (gas and ashes) can widely affect human health and disturb air-traffic and little is known about their impact on agriculture. Some phenomena constitute therefore a multi-level threat to human societies and environment. Nevertheless, soils fertility, amongst other characteristics, often attracts populations, which settle on volcanoes flanks, creating, by the conjunction of haza...

  3. Reducing volcanic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R.; Decker, B.

    1991-01-01

    The last two decades have brought major advances in research on how volcanoes work and how to monitor their changing habits. Geologic mapping as well as studies of earthquake patterns and surface deformation associated with underground movement of magma have given scientists a better view of the inner structure and dynamics of active volcanoes. With the next decade, the time has come to focuses more on applying this knowledge toward reducing the risk from volcanic activity on a worldwide basis. 

  4. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  5. Andean region: a shapefile of Morrone's (2015) biogeographical regionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg-Neto, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Morrone's (2015) biogeographic regionalisation of the Andean region is based on the distributional ranges of terrestrial plants and animals. It is the most comprehensive and methodologically supported biogeographical scheme for the region to date. The Andean region comprises one transition zone (the South American transition zone), three subregions (Central Chilean, Subantarctic and Patagonian) and 15 provinces (Morrone, 2015). PMID:26250168

  6. Cenozoic stratigraphic development in the north Chilean forearc: Implications for basin development and uplift history of the Central Andean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Evenstar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    with volcanic activity limited to the periodic eruption of extensive ignimbrite sheets. Alluvial fan, fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation dominated within the endorheic basins from ˜ 8 to 3 Ma. After development of a regional unconformity at 3 Ma a change to isolated evaporite sub-basins took place in the Central Depression with small lacustrine basins developed along the flank of the Western Cordillera. The scale and grain size recorded in the sedimentary systems indicates that a substantial source area was located in the present day area of the Western Cordillera by 30 Ma and that this has persisted to the present day. This area also shed material eastwards into the Altiplano. The presence of such a topographic feature by 30 Ma suggests that a significant proportion of Andean uplift had occurred prior to the Late Miocene. This important uplift phase should be incorporated into any model of Andean uplift. The evidence from the basin-fill succession suggests that sediments accumulated in a basin developed in front of a broad monocline between 38 and 19 Ma and that a transition to a thrust-bounded foreland style basin took place after the development of the unconformity at 19 Ma.

  7. Geochemical monitoring of volcanic lakes. A generalized box model for active crater lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Rouwet, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Tassi, F.; Università degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Firenze, Italy

    2011-01-01

    In the past, variations in the chemical contents (SO4 2−, Cl−, cations) of crater lake water have not systematically demonstrated any relationships with eruptive activity. Intensive parameters (i.e., concentrations, temperature, pH, salinity) should be converted into extensive parameters (i.e., fluxes, changes with time of mass and solutes), taking into account all the internal and external chemical–physical factors that affect the crater lake system. This study presents ...

  8. Geochemical monitoring of volcanic lakes. A generalized box model for active crater lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Tassi; Dmitri Rouwet

    2011-01-01

    In the past, variations in the chemical contents (SO42−, Cl−, cations) of crater lake water have not systematically demonstrated any relationships with eruptive activity. Intensive parameters (i.e., concentrations, temperature, pH, salinity) should be converted into extensive parameters (i.e., fluxes, changes with time of mass and solutes), taking into account all the internal and external chemical–physical factors that affect the crater lake system. Thi...

  9. Combination of SAR remote sensing and GIS for monitoring subglacial volcanic activity – recent results from Vatnajökull ice cap (Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Münzer

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents latest results from the combined use of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing and GIS providing detailed insights into recent volcanic activity under Vatnajökull ice cap (Iceland. Glaciers atop active volcanoes pose a constant potential danger to adjacent inhabited regions and infrastructure. Besides the usual volcanic hazards (lava flows, pyroclastic clouds, tephra falls, etc., the volcano-ice interaction leads to enormous meltwater torrents (icelandic: jökulhlaup, devastating large areas in the surroundings of the affected glacier. The presented monitoring strategy addresses the three crucial questions: When will an eruption occur, where is the eruption site and which area is endangered by the accompanying jökulhlaup. Therefore, sufficient early-warning and hazard zonation for future subglacial volcanic eruptions becomes possible, as demonstrated for the Bardárbunga volcano under the northern parts of Vatnajökull. Seismic activity revealed unrest at the northern flanks of Bardárbunga caldera at the end of September 2006. The exact location of the corresponding active vent and therefore a potentially eruptive area could be detected by continuous ENVISAT-ASAR monitoring. With this knowledge a precise prediction of peri-glacial regions prone to a devastating outburst flood accompanying a possible future eruption is possible.

  10. Episodes of volcanic activity and their environmental effects in the Okinawa Trough during the last 150 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A piston core Z14-6 was used in this study. The core, 896 cm long, was collected from eastern slope of the Okinawa Trough (27°07′N, 127°27′E, water depth 739m). The δ18O and δ13C values of the sediment bearing planktonic foraminifera G. sacculifer and N. dutertrei were determined; and the abundance of volcanic glass was analyzed. The volcanic glass content high occurred in early stage of polar ice-sheet growth period, or the beginning of cold climate periods corresponding to Milankovitch cycles (Peak Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅴ are corresponding to the beginnings of oxygen isotopic stages 2, 4 and 6, and Peak Ⅲ and Ⅳ are matching oxygen isotopic stage 5b-5d.). It might be possible that volcanic episodes and climate changes were responding to orbital forcing in the Okinawa Trough in late Quaternary. The δ18O difference between N. dutertrei and G. sacculifer shows no clear correlation to the volcanic glass content high, which suggests that the volcanic eruptions did not influence the structure of upper water column. However, the low δ13C difference between G. sacculifer and N. dutertrei is coeval with the volcanic glass high or sub-high content. This fact suggests that volcanic eruptions might influence the reduction in vertical nutritional gradient and carbon cycle process in upper water column. A possible mechanism is that huge quantity of ash and dust had weakened the light intensity, resulting in photosynthesis reduction, productivity decrease, and biological pumping.

  11. Methane production and consumption in an active volcanic environment of Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, Simona; Tedesco, Dario

    2005-01-01

    Methane fluxes were measured, using closed chambers, in the Crater of Solfatara volcano, Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy), along eight transects covering areas of the crater presenting different landscape physiognomies. These included open bare areas, presenting high geothermal fluxes, and areas covered by vegetation, which developed along a gradient from the central open area outwards, in the form of maquis, grassland and woodland. Methane fluxes decreased logarithmically (from 150 to -4.5 mg CH4 m(-2)day(-1)) going from the central part of the crater (fangaia) to the forested edges, similarly to the CO2 fluxes (from 1500 g CO2 m(-2)day(-1) in the centre of the crater to almost zero flux in the woodlands). In areas characterized by high emissions, soil presented elevated temperature (up to 70 degrees C at 0-10 cm depth) and extremely low pH (down to 1.8). Conversely, in woodland areas pH was higher (between 3.7 and 5.1) and soil temperature close to air values. Soil (0-10 cm) was sampled, in two different occasions, along the eight transects, and was tested for methane oxidation capacity in laboratory. Areas covered by vegetation mostly consumed CH4 in the following order woodland>macchia>grassland. Methanotrophic activity was also measured in soil from the open bare area. Oxidation rates were comparable to those measured in the plant covered areas and were significantly correlated with field CH4 emissions. The biological mechanism of uptake was demonstrated by the absence of activity in autoclaved replicates. Thus results suggest the existence of a population of micro-organisms adapted to this extreme environment, which are able to oxidize CH4 and whose activity could be stimulated and supported by elevated concentrations of CH4.

  12. The geochemistry of lithium-bearing geothermal water, Taupo Volcanic Zone, and shallow fluid processes in a very active silicic volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A. S.; Hoskin, P. W.; Rudnick, R. L.; Liu, X.; Boseley, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Li abundances and isotopic systematics of Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal fluids preserves a record of processes occurring within shallow portions of geothermal reservoirs as well as deeper portions of the arc crust. Understanding Li cycling and isotopic fractionation in TVZ geothermal systems contributes to a more refined understanding of physicochemical processes affecting New Zealand's geothermal resources. A comprehensive dataset of 73 samples was compiled, with samples collected from geothermal surface features (springs, spouters, geysers, etc.) and electric-power industry production wells, collectively representing18 geothermal fields across the breadth and width the TVZ. No comparable dataset of fluid analyses exists. Ion chromatography, AAS, and quadrupole ICP-MS analyses were done for Li, Cl-, SiO2, SO42- K, Na, Ca, Mg, B, Sr and Pb concentrations. Lithium abundance in geothermal fluids from the TVZ have a dataset-wide average of 5.9 mg/L and range 4 μg/L to 29 mg/L. The Li abundance and Li/Cl ratios for geothermal water and steam condensates vary systematically as a result of boiling, mixing, and water/rock reaction. Lithium abundance and Li/Cl ratios are, therefore, indicators of shallow (above 2.5 km) and locally variable reservoir processes. δ7Li analysis of 63 samples was performed at the University of Maryland, College Park. Data quality was controlled by measurement of L-SVEC as a calibration standard and by multiple analysis of selected samples. The average δ7Li value for TVZ geothermal fluids is -0.8%. Most δ7Li values for geothermal water fall within a small range of about -3% to+2% indicating similar processes are causing similar isotopic fractionation throughout the region. Considered together, Li aundances and δ7Li values, in combination with numerical models, indicate possible evolution pathways and water/rock reactions in TVZ geothermal systems. Models based on rocks and surface water analysis indicate that Li cycles and

  13. Soil gas measurements as an indicator of volcanic activity at Popocatepetl, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, N.R.; Armienta, M.A. [Inst. de Geofisica, Circuito Cientifico (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    Recently Popocatepetl has commenced a new active phase with several explosive events producing ash falls at large variation. For a better understanding of the processes occurring within the volcano, as well as its structure, further data of different types is required. This study will include an extensive program of soil gas measurements, including radon, carbon dioxide, methane and helium. A comparison will be made with seismic and groundwater and ash geochemical data. One goal will be an improved understanding of the mechanism whereby seismic events influence the concentration of soil gases, which is not currently well understood. Here the preliminary data are presented.

  14. Volcanic activities in the Southern part of East African rift initiation: Melilitites and nephelinites from the Manyara Basin (North Tanzania rift axis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Celine; Parat, Fleurice; Tiberi, Christel; Gautier, Stéphanie; Peyrat, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift exposes different stages of plate boundary extension, from the initiation of the rift (North (N) Tanzania) to oceanic accretion (Afar). The N Tanzania rift-axis (north-south (S) trend) is divided into 2 different volcanic and seismic activities: (1) the Natron basin (N) with shallow seismicity and intense volcanism and (2) the Manyara basin (S) with deep crustal earthquakes and sparse volcanism. The Natron basin is characterized by extinct volcanoes (2 Ma-0.75 Ma) and active volcano (Oldoinyo Lengai) and a link between seismicity and volcanism has been observed during the Oldoinyo Lengai crisis in 2007. In the S part of the N Tanzanian rift, volcanoes erupted in the Manyara basin between 0.4 and 0.9 Ma. In this study, we used geochemical signature of magmas and deep fluids that percolate into the lithosphere beneath Manyara basin, to define the compositions of magmas and fluids at depth beneath the S part of the N Tanzania rift, compare to the Natron basin and place constrain on the volcanic and seismic activities. The Manyara basin has distinct volcanic activities with mafic magmas as melilitites (Labait) and Mg-nephelinites (carbonatite, Kwaraha), and more differentiated magmas as Mg-poor nephelinites (Hanang). Melilitites and Mg-nephelinites are primary magmas with olivine, clinopyroxene (cpx), and phlogopite recording high-pressure crystallization environment, (melilitites >4 GPa and Mg-nephelinites>1 GPa) with high volatile contents (whole rock: 0.7-4.6 wt% CO2, 0.1-0.3 wt% F and 0.1 wt% Cl). FTIR analyses of olivine constrained the water content of Labait and Kwaraha magmas at 0.1 and 0.4 wt% H2O, respectively. Geochemical modelling suggests that mafic magmas result from a low degree of partial melting (1-2%) of a peridotitic source with garnet and phlogopite (high Tb/Yb (>0.6) and Rb/Sr (0.03-0.12) ratio). Mg-poor nephelinites from Hanang volcano crystallized cpx, Ti-garnet, and nepheline as phenocrysts. Magmas result from fractional

  15. Multistation alarm system for eruptive activity based on the automatic classification of volcanic tremor: specifications and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Horst; Falsaperla, Susanna; Messina, Alfio; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    With over fifty eruptive episodes (Strombolian activity, lava fountains, and lava flows) between 2006 and 2013, Mt Etna, Italy, underscored its role as the most active volcano in Europe. Seven paroxysmal lava fountains at the South East Crater occurred in 2007-2008 and 46 at the New South East Crater between 2011 and 2013. Month-lasting lava emissions affected the upper eastern flank of the volcano in 2006 and 2008-2009. On this background, effective monitoring and forecast of volcanic phenomena are a first order issue for their potential socio-economic impact in a densely populated region like the town of Catania and its surroundings. For example, explosive activity has often formed thick ash clouds with widespread tephra fall able to disrupt the air traffic, as well as to cause severe problems at infrastructures, such as highways and roads. For timely information on changes in the state of the volcano and possible onset of dangerous eruptive phenomena, the analysis of the continuous background seismic signal, the so-called volcanic tremor, turned out of paramount importance. Changes in the state of the volcano as well as in its eruptive style are usually concurrent with variations of the spectral characteristics (amplitude and frequency content) of tremor. The huge amount of digital data continuously acquired by INGV's broadband seismic stations every day makes a manual analysis difficult, and techniques of automatic classification of the tremor signal are therefore applied. The application of unsupervised classification techniques to the tremor data revealed significant changes well before the onset of the eruptive episodes. This evidence led to the development of specific software packages related to real-time processing of the tremor data. The operational characteristics of these tools - fail-safe, robustness with respect to noise and data outages, as well as computational efficiency - allowed the identification of criteria for automatic alarm flagging. The

  16. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  17. Seismic activity and thermal regime of low temperature fumaroles at Mt. Vesuvius in 2004-2011: distinguishing among seismic, volcanic and hydrological signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cusano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Seismological, soil temperature and hydrological data from Mt. Vesuvius are collected to characterize the present-day activity of the volcanic/hydrothermal system and to detect possible unrest-related phenomena. We present patterns of seismicity and soil temperature in the crater area during the period February 2004-December 2011. The temporal distribution of number and depth of Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes and the energy release are considered. Hourly data of soil temperature have been acquired since January 2004 in different locations along the rim and within the crater. The observed changes of temperature are studied to establish a temporal-based correlation with the volcanic activity and/or with external forcing, as variations of the regional and local stress field acting on the volcano or meteorological phenomena. The comparison between seismic activity and temperature data highlights significant variations possibly related to changes in fluid circulation in the hydrothermal system of the volcano. The common continuous observations start just before a very shallow earthquake occurred in August 2005, which was preceded by a thermal anomaly. This coincidence has been interpreted as related to fluid-driven rock fracturing, as observed in other volcanoes. For the successive temporal patterns, the seismicity rate and energy release are characterized by slight variations accompanied by changes in temperature. This evidence of reactivity of the fumarole thermal field to seismic strain can be used to discriminate between tectonic and volcanic signals at Mt. Vesuvius.

  18. Regional Tectonic Framework and Human Activities on the North Central Part of The Mexican Volcanic Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Obregon, J.

    2001-12-01

    Faults and fractures northeasterly oriented dipping NW and SE, with slips mainly normal with a slight left lateral component, affect a suite of rocks of Mesozoic to Pleistocene age, in the area of El Bajio, in the states of Queretaro, Guanajuato, Michoacan, and Aguascalientes. The faults and fractures have affected the infrastructure of the cities and surroundings of Queretaro, Celaya, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon and Aguascalientes. In the city of Queretaro, the Tlacote-Balvanera active fault has developed a scarp and its motion may potentially affect life lines of great importance. In Celaya City a N-S trending fault traverses the city and has produced a step wise scarp more than 1.80 m high, damaging houses, streets and life lines. In Salamanca, a fault trending N 60oE, dipping to the SE extends from Cerro Gordo to the SW traversing the city and affecting with a varying degree its infrastructure. Displacements observed within the urban area reach as much as 50 cm. Close to Irapuato City, in a quarry near La Valencianita village, a N 45oE trending fault dipping to the NW affects a lacustrine sequence bearing calcareous horizons. The fault exhibits a throw of 10 m and passes north of the urban area. A similarly oriented fault traverses the city of Irapuato, and near the Traffic Circle of Puente de Guadalupe, changes its strike to the SE and continues to the city limits. In the city of Silao, a fault oriented N 60oE, traverses the city and continues to the SW up to the localities of Venta de Ramales and La Aldea. Important displacements in urban and rural areas reach more than 60 cm. Outside the city of Leon in the junction of the highways to Aguascalientes and Guadalajara a normal fault plane NE oriented and dipping SE shows striations compatible with a normal left lateral motion. Faulting is associated with old buried scarps controlled by pre existing faults, and over exploited aquifers. Some of these faults however are considered potentially active based on

  19. 基于碱激发剂作用下火山灰的活性研究%The Volcanic Ash Activity With the Action of Alkaline Activator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力; 龚爱民; 王昌成; 张俊

    2016-01-01

    掺碱激发剂火山灰-水泥既可以有效利用火山灰和保护环境,又可以改善火山灰-水泥胶凝材料的性能。选用掺合料为火山灰,变换不同含量的碱激发剂(氢氧化钠与水玻璃),测定龄期为7、28、90 d时混凝土的力学性能,确定最佳组合,并进行电镜试验,观察微观结构。研究结果表明:掺碱激发剂会使胶凝材料的强度随碱掺量的变化而变化,掺氢氧化钠的早期强度要优于掺水玻璃的早期强度,而后期掺水玻璃的强度要比掺氢氧化钠的强度发展得好。%Volcanic ash mixed alkali excitation agent-cement can effectively utilize the fly ash and protect the environment,also can improve the performance of volcanic ash-cement gel material. Selecting volcanic ash as admixture,changing different alkali activator’s content(NaOH & Na2SiO3 · 9H2O),we analyzed the mechanical properties of concrete at the age for 7 d,28 d and 90 d,to determine the best combination,and observe microscopic structure with a scanning electronic microscope. The results show that the strength of cementitious materials with the mixed alkali activator will change with alkali dosage. The early strength of mixed NaOH is superior to that of mixed Na2SiO3 · 9H2O,while the development strength of mixed Na2SiO3 · 9H2O will be better than that of mixed NaOH.

  20. Mafic monogenetic vents at the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (35.5°S-70.8°W): the northernmost evidence of regional primitive volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Pablo A.; Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ruprecht, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    In the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), the broad distribution of mafic compositions along the recent volcanic arc occurs mainly south of 37°S, above a comparatively thin continental crust (≤~35 km) and mostly associated with the dextral strike-slip regime of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ). North of 36°S, mafic compositions are scarce. This would be in part related to the effect resulting from protracted periods of trapping of less evolved ascending magmas beneath a thick Meso-Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary cover that lead to more evolved compositions in volcanic rocks erupted at the surface. Here, we present whole-rock and olivine mineral chemistry data for mafic rocks from four monogenetic vents developed above a SVZ segment of thick crust (~45 km) in the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (~35.5°S). Whole-rock chemistry (MgO > 8 wt%) and compositional variations in olivine (92 ≥ Fo ≥ 88 and Ni up to ~3650 ppm) indicate that some of the basaltic products erupted through these vents (e.g., Los Hornitos monogenetic cones) represent primitive arc magmas reaching high crustal levels. The combined use of satellite images, regional data analysis and field observations allow to recognize at least 38 mafic monogenetic volcanoes dispersed over an area of about 5000 km2 between 35.5° and 36.5°S. A link between ancient structures inherited from pre-Andean tectonics and the emplacement and distribution of this mafic volcanism is suggested as a first-order structural control that may explain the widespread occurrence of mafic volcanism in this Andean arc segment with thick crust.

  1. Survey and assessment of post volcanic activities of a young caldera lake, Lake Cuicocha, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gunkel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cuicocha is a young volcano adjacent to the inactive Pleistocene Cotacachi volcano complex, located in the western cordilleras of the Ecuadorian Andes. A series of eruptions with intensive ash emission and collapse of the caldera occurred around 4500–3000 y BP. A crater 3.2 km in diameter and a maximum depth of 450 m was formed. Further eruptions of the volcano occurred 1300 y BP and formed four smaller domes within the caldera. Over the last few hundred years, a caldera lake has developed, with a maximum depth of 148 m. The lake water is characterized by sodium carbonate with elevated concentrations of manganese, calcium and chloride. Nowadays, an emission of gases, mainly CO2, and an input of warm spring water occur in Lake Cuicocha. The zone of high activity is in the western basin of the lake at a depth of 78 m, and continuous gas emissions with sediment resuspension were observed using sonar. In the hypolimnion of the lake, CO2 accumulation occurs up to 0.2% saturation, but the risk of a limnic eruption can be excluded at present. The lake possesses monomictic stratification behaviour, and during overturn an intensive gas exchange with the atmosphere occurs. Investigations concerning the sedimentation processes of the lake suggest only a thin sediment layer of up to 10–20 cm in the deeper lake basin; in the western bay, in the area of gas emissions, the lake bottom is partly depleted of sediment in the form of holes, and no lake colmation exists. Decreases in the lake water level of about 30 cm y−1 indicate a percolation of water into fractures and fissures of the volcano, triggered by a nearby earthquake in 1987.

  2. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran,

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  4. Transplanting the European Court of Justice: The Experience of the Andean Tribunal of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Saldías; Laurence R. Helfer; Alter, Karen J.

    2011-01-01

    Although there is an extensive literature on domestic legal transplants, far less is known about the transplantation of supranational judicial bodies. The Andean Tribunal of Justice (ATJ) is one of eleven copies of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), and the third most active international court. This article considers the origins and evolution of the ATJ as a transplanted judicial institution. It first reviews the literatures on legal transplants, neofunctionalist theory, and the spread of ...

  5. Slope instability induced by volcano-tectonics as an additional source of hazard in active volcanic areas: the case of Ischia island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Seta, Marta; Marotta, Enrica; Orsi, Giovanni; de Vita, Sandro; Sansivero, Fabio; Fredi, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Ischia is an active volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples whose history has been dominated by a caldera-forming eruption (ca. 55 ka) and resurgence phenomena that have affected the caldera floor and generated a net uplift of about 900 m since 33 ka. The results of new geomorphological, stratigraphical and textural investigations of the products of gravitational movements triggered by volcano-tectonic events have been combined with the information arising from a reinterpretation of historical chronicles on natural phenomena such as earthquakes, ground deformation, gravitational movements and volcanic eruptions. The combined interpretation of all these data shows that gravitational movements, coeval to volcanic activity and uplift events related to the long-lasting resurgence, have affected the highly fractured marginal portions of the most uplifted Mt. Epomeo blocks. Such movements, mostly occurring since 3 ka, include debris avalanches; large debris flows (lahars); smaller mass movements (rock falls, slumps, debris and rock slides, and small debris flows); and deep-seated gravitational slope deformation. The occurrence of submarine deposits linked with subaerial deposits of the most voluminous mass movements clearly shows that the debris avalanches impacted on the sea. The obtained results corroborate the hypothesis that the behaviour of the Ischia volcano is based on an intimate interplay among magmatism, resurgence dynamics, fault generation, seismicity, slope oversteepening and instability, and eruptions. They also highlight that volcano-tectonically triggered mass movements are a potentially hazardous phenomena that have to be taken into account in any attempt to assess volcanic and related hazards at Ischia. Furthermore, the largest mass movements could also flow into the sea, generating tsunami waves that could impact on the island's coast as well as on the neighbouring and densely inhabited coast of the Neapolitan area.

  6. Quinoa trade in Andean countries: opportunities and challenges for family

    OpenAIRE

    Baudoin, Andrea; Lacroix, Pierril; Didier BAZILE; Chia, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Quinoa’s revival has roused much interest in Andean as well as in European and North American countries. This Andean product, formerly denigrated and destined only for self-consumption, has made its way into the diet of the urban populations of Andean countries and has now spread to the United States of America, Europe and other parts of the world. In the Andes, farmgate prices have gone up and the quinoa sector has become attractive to investors. A wide range of products based on this Chenop...

  7. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  8. Volcanic history of El Chichon Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.M.; Macias, J.L.; Tilling, R.I.; Sheridan, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichon Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichon in the past 8000 years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700 years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500 years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600 years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichon also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the

  9. Volcanic history of El Chichón Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Macías, J. L.; Tilling, R. I.; Sheridan, M. F.

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichón Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichón in the past 8000years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichón also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the collapse

  10. Synopsis of volcanic stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    Volcanic stratigraphic units are mappable layered units composed of volcanic rocks that are formed on land (subaerially) or under water (subaqueously) by volcanic processes. At least ten different types of volcanic stratigraphic units are recognized. The characteristics for each are discussed briefly and some typical examples are illustrated by diagrams to show their salient features.

  11. Reappraisal of the significance of volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    "Volcanic field" is a term commonly used to loosely describe a group of volcanoes. Often, it is implicitly assumed that the volcanoes on a volcanic field are small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic, but none of those attributes is indispensable on some definitions of the term. Actually, the term "volcanic field" can be used to describe a group of purely monogenetic edifices, a group of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices, or even a group formed only by purely polygenetic edifices. Differences between each of those alternatives might be important, but the extent to which those differences are truly relevant remains still to be explored. Furthermore, there are several limitations on the current knowledge of this type of volcanic activity that explain the lack of a comprehensive effort to study volcanic fields in global contexts. In this work, issues concerning current definitions of a volcanic field are examined, and some criteria that can be used to distinguish volcanic fields from non-field volcanoes are suggested. Special attention is given to the role played by spatial scale on such a distinction. Also, the tectonic implications of their spatial distribution are explored. In particular, it is shown that volcanic fields are an important component of volcanic activity at a global scale that is closely associated to diffuse plate boundaries, and might well be considered the archetypical volcanic form of such tectonic scenarios.

  12. Andean flat subduction maintained by slab tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Gerben; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Kosters, Martha; Boschman, Lydian; McQuarrie, Nadine; Spakman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    In two segments below the Andean mountain belt, the Nazca Plate is currently subducting sub-horizontally below South America over a distance of 200-300 km before the plate bends into the mantle. Such flat slab segments have pronounced effects on orogenesis and magmatism and are widely believed to be caused by the downgoing plate resisting subduction due to its local positive buoyancy. In contrast, here we show that flat slabs primarily result from a local resistance against rollback rather than against subduction. From a kinematic reconstruction of the Andean fold-thrust belt we determine up to ~390 km of shortening since ~50 Ma. During this time the South American Plate moved ~1400 km westward relative to the mantle, thus forcing ~1000 km of trench retreat. Importantly, since the 11-12 Ma onset of flat slab formation, ~1000 km of Nazca Plate subduction occurred, much more than the flat slab lengths, which leads to our main finding that the flat slabs, while being initiated by arrival of buoyant material at the trench, are primarily maintained by locally impeded rollback. We suggest that dynamic support of flat subduction comes from the formation of slab tunnels below segments with the most buoyant material. These tunnels trap mantle material until tearing of the tunnel wall provides an escape route. Fast subduction of this tear is followed by a continuous slab and the process can recur during ongoing rollback of the 7000 km wide Nazca slab at segments with the most buoyant subducting material, explaining the regional and transient character of flat slabs. Our study highlights the importance of studying subduction dynamics in absolute plate motion context.

  13. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  14. An ontological approach to creating an Andean Weaving Knowledge Base

    OpenAIRE

    Brownlow, Richard; Capuzzi, Stefano; Helmer, Sven; Martins, Luciana; Normann, Immanuel; Poulovassilis, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Andean textiles are products of one of the richest, oldest and continuous weaving traditions in the world. Understanding the knowledge and practice of textile production as a form of cultural heritage is particularly relevant in the Andean context due to erosion of clothing traditions, reuse of traditional textiles on commodities targeted at the tourism market, and loss of knowledge embedded in textile production. ``Weaving Communities of Practice'' was a pilot project that aimed to create a ...

  15. Transplanting the European Court of Justice: The Experience of the Andean Tribunal of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Saldías

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there is an extensive literature on domestic legal transplants, far less is known about the transplantation of supranational judicial bodies. The Andean Tribunal of Justice (ATJ is one of eleven copies of the European Court of Justice (ECJ, and the third most active international court. This article considers the origins and evolution of the ATJ as a transplanted judicial institution. It first reviews the literatures on legal transplants, neofunctionalist theory, and the spread of European ideas and institutions, explaining how the intersection of these literatures informs the study of supranational judicial transplants. The article next explains why the Andean Pact's member states decided to add a court to their regional integration initiative, why they adapted the European Community model, and how the ECJ's existence has shaped the evolution of Andean legal doctrine and the political space within which the ATJ operates. We conclude by analyzing how the ATJ's experience informs the challenges of supranational transplants and theories of supranational legal integration more generally. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1948405

  16. A regional perspective on the diversity and conservation of tropical Andean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth P; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A

    2011-02-01

    The tropical Andes harbor an extraordinarily varied concentration of species in a landscape under increasing pressure from human activities. Conservation of the region's native plants and animals has received considerable international attention, but the focus has been on terrestrial biota. The conservation of freshwater fauna, particularly the conservation of fishes, has not been emphasized. Tropical Andean fishes are among the most understudied vertebrates in the world. We estimate that between 400 and 600 fish species inhabit the diverse aquatic environments in the region. Nearly 40% of these species are endemic. Tropical Andean fishes are vulnerable to ongoing environmental changes related to deforestation, water withdrawals, water pollution, species introductions, and hydropower development. Additionally, their distributions and population dynamics may be affected by hydrologic alterations and warmer water temperatures associated with projected climate change. Presently, at least three species are considered extinct, some populations are endangered, and some species are likely to decline or disappear. The long-term persistence of tropical Andean fishes will depend on greater consideration of freshwater systems in regional conservation initiatives.

  17. Statistical eruption forecast for the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone: typical probabilities of volcanic eruptions as baseline for possibly enhanced activity following the large 2010 Concepción earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dzierma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic eruption forecast is provided for ten volcanoes of the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ. Since 70% of the Chilean population lives in this area, the estimation of future eruption likelihood is an important part of hazard assessment. After investigating the completeness and stationarity of the historical eruption time series, the exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic distribution functions are fit to the repose time distributions for the individual volcanoes and the models are evaluated. This procedure has been implemented in two different ways to methodologically compare details in the fitting process. With regard to the probability of at least one VEI ≥ 2 eruption in the next decade, Llaima, Villarrica and Nevados de Chillán are most likely to erupt, while Osorno shows the lowest eruption probability among the volcanoes analysed. In addition to giving a compilation of the statistical eruption forecasts along the historically most active volcanoes of the SVZ, this paper aims to give "typical" eruption probabilities, which may in the future permit to distinguish possibly enhanced activity in the aftermath of the large 2010 Concepción earthquake.

  18. Metamorfismo de muy bajo grado asociado a un sistema geotermal en rocas volcánicas básicas del Jurásico Medio, Formación Lonco Trapial, Paso Berwin, Chubut extra-andino Very low grade metamorphism associated with a geothermal system in basic volcanic rocks of the Middle Jurassic, Lonco Trapial Formation, Paso Berwin, Extra-Andean Chubut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Montecinos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Las rocas volcánicas básicas de la Formación Lonco Trapial, poseen una mineralogía primaria compuesta principalmente por olivino, plagioclasa cálcica y piroxeno, presentando además gran cantidad de amígdalas. La mineralogía metamórfica de muy bajo grado en estas rocas está caracterizada por ceolitas, minerales arcillosos y micáceos. La asociación mineral más característica está compuesta por celadonita, montmorillonita, heulandita, analcima, gonnardita y, además, por levyna y minerales de la serie analcima-wairakita en forma subordinada. Esta asociación pertenece a la facies ceolita y tuvo un origen asociado a un sistema geotermal. La analogía establecida con las zonas de ceolitas conocidas para sistemas geotermales equivalentes y el uso de la grilla petrogénetica para paragénesis ceolíticas, en el sistema An-Ab-SiO2-H2O, permiten establecer un rango de temperatura entre 80°-180°C. En este contexto habría ocurrido un único evento metamórfico hidrotermal en presencia de una fase fluida, muy pobre en CO2, cuya composición química habría cambiado desde un carácter neutro con baja a(SiO2 y a(K2O moderada (permitiendo la precipitación de esmectitas y celadonita a un carácter neutro-alcalino con a(SiO2 que posibilita la estabilidad de la heulandita.The basic volcanic rocks of the Lonco Trapial Formation, have a primary mineralogy mainly composed of olivine, calcic plagioclase and pyroxene, and present a large quantity of amygdales. Their metamorphic mineralogy is characterized by zeolites, clay and micaceous minerals. The main mineral association includes celadonite, montmorillonite, heulandite, analcime, gonnardite and subordinate levyne and minerals of the wairakite-analcime series. This association belongs to the zeolite facies and its origin was associated with a geothermal system. The analogy with known zeolite zones in equivalent geothermal systems and the use of the petrogenetic grid for zeolite parageneses, in

  19. Changes of sub-fossil chironomid assemblages associated with volcanic sediment deposition in an Andean lake (38°S, Chile Cambios en las asociaciones sub-fósiles de quironómidos, producto de la depositación de sedimentos volcánicos en un lago andino (38°S, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO ARANEDA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Chironomid assemblages and sedimentological parameters (grain size, organic content, mineralogy of a short sediment core from Lake Galletué (38°41' S, 71°17' W were analysed. The sedimentary record includes one volcanic ash (tephra layer, which has a completely different composition than the host sediment in terms of organic content, grain size, and mineralogy. According to the geochronology (210Pb and 137Cs, this ash layer corresponds to the eruption of Llaima Volcano in 1956-1957. The tephra deposition had an impact on chironomid assemblages producing, among other changes, an increase in Parakiefferiella and a decrease in Ablabesmyia, although no noticeable change was detected in the diversity index. When compared with other studies, our results also show an impact in terms of the presence of chironomid head capsules within the tephra. The presence of these head capsules could result from the effects of percolation, since the coarse grain size of the tephra particles provides large interstitial spaces. The recovery in the abundances of some taxa after the tephra input, suggests the lake is probably restoring the conditions prevailing before the tephra fallSe analizan las asociaciones de restos sub-fósiles de quironómidos y los parámetros sedimentológicos de un núcleo sedimentario del lago Galletué (38°41' S, 71°17' O. Es evidente en este núcleo la presencia de un estrato de sedimentos volcánicos (tefra de una composición distinta en el contenido deµmateria orgánica, en el tamaño de partícula y en la mineralogía, respecto de los sedimentos del lago. De acuerdo a la geocronología isotópica (210Pb y 137Cs, los sedimentos de esta tefra podrían corresponder a la erupción del volcán Llaima de 1956-1957. Por otra parte la depositación de esta tefra también provocó un cambio en las asociaciones de quironómidos, siendo evidente el aumento de Parakiefferiella y la disminución de Ablabesmyia dentro del estrato de tefra. Si

  20. Volcanic processes in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    This article stresses that terrestrial volcanism represents only part of the range of volcanism in the solar system. Earth processes of volcanicity are dominated by plate tectonics, which does not seem to operate on other planets, except possibly on Venus. Lunar volcanicity is dominated by lava effusion at enormous rates. Mars is similar, with the addition to huge shield volcanoes developed over fixed hotspots. Io, the moon closest to Jupiter, is the most active body in the Solar System and, for example, much sulphur and silicates are emitted. The eruptions of Io are generated by heating caused by tides induced by Jupiter. Europa nearby seems to emit water from fractures and Ganymede is similar. The satellites of Saturn and Uranus are also marked by volcanic craters, but they are of very low temperature melts, possibly of ammonia and water. The volcanism of the solar system is generally more exotic, the greater the distance from Earth. -A.Scarth

  1. Long-lived explosive volcanism on Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rebecca J.; Rothery, David A.; Conway, Susan J.; Anand, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    The duration and timing of volcanic activity on Mercury are key indicators of the thermal evolution of the planet and provide a valuable comparative example for other terrestrial bodies. The majority of effusive volcanism on Mercury appears to have occurred early in the planet's geological history (~4.1–3.55 Ga), but there is also evidence for explosive volcanism. Here we present evidence that explosive volcanism occurred from at least 3.9 Ga until less than a billion years ago and so was sub...

  2. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  3. Cenozoic foreland basin evolution during Andean shortening in the Malargüe region of western Argentina (35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, S. G.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.

    2015-12-01

    Cenozoic clastic deposits in western Argentina provide key opportunities to evaluate the timing and duration of Andean deformation and uplift. We studied the Malargüe segment of the Andean foreland basin at 35°S to better understand latest Cretaceous to Pliocene deformation and eastward propagation of Andean retroarc shortening. Our multi-technique approach included logging of a well-exposed ~1500m Paleocene-Miocene stratigraphic succession, paleocurrent measurements, conglomerate clast counts, and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological analyses of basin fill exposed in the Sosneado region along the Rio Atuel. The Pircala and Coihueco Formations define the lowermost ~180 m of the section and are represented by fine to medium sandstones, siltstones, claystones and marls interpreted as distal fluvial floodplain and localized lacustrine deposits. Pircala paleocurrents show a major reversal from west- to east-directed flow. These finer deposits of the lower succession are separated from the overlying coarser-grained ~800 m thick Agua de la Piedra Formation by a conspicuous unconformity that spans up to roughly 20 Myr. The Agua de la Piedra Formation is composed of upward-coarsening amalgamated beds of massive medium to coarse sandstones and lenticular conglomerates interpreted as a prograding proximal fluvial to alluvial fan system. Conglomerate clast counts show initial dominance by Mesozoic detritus from the pre-Andean Neuquen basin system, with a progressive upsection increase in Cenozoic volcanic detritus from the Andean magmatic arc. Collectively, the paleocurrents, clast compositions, sedimentary facies associations, and emerging U-Pb results suggest a long-term shift, commencing in the Paleocene, from eastern cratonic sources to magmatic-arc and thrust-belt sources during a systematic eastward propagation of deformation, with a pronounced phase of Miocene magmatism and shortening that incorporated the proximal foreland basin into the advancing thrust belt.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  5. A high resolution history of the El Niño - Southern Oscillation and of the solar activity during the Late Glacial - Early Holocene in the subtropical Andean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, S.; Schimmel, M.; Hernández, A.; Bao, R.; Valero-Garcés, B. L.; Sáez, A.; Pueyo, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution laminated lacustrine sediments are excellent archives of the past hydrological changes and they provide valuable insights about the climatic processes that trigger these changes. The paleoclimatic records located in the Southern Hemisphere are fundamental for understanding the evolution of the El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) since this climatic phenomena is the main cause of droughts and floods in many areas of South America and other regions of the world, like Spain and Egypt. Available regional paleoclimate reconstructions show that modern climatic patterns in South America were established during the Late Holocene. The laminated sediments of Lago Chungará (18° 15' S - 69° 10' W, 4520 m a.s.l., Chilean altiplano) have allowed us to characterize the evolution of this climatic phenomena for the transition Late Glacial - Early Holocene (12,300 - 9,500 calendar years BP) as well as its relationship with other climate forcings, namely the solar activity. The studied sediments correspond to the lowermost 2.4 m of 8 m long Kullemberg cores recovered from this lake. These sediments are mainly made up of greenish and whitish laminae and thin layers constituted by diatomaceous oozes with carbonates and organic matter, arranged in rhythms and cycles. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) (Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Zn, Sb and Ba) analyses, total organic carbon (TOC), total carbon (TC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), biogenic silica, stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) on carbonates and on diatoms (delta18O) and magnetic susceptibility were determined in order to characterize the sediments of Lago Chungará. Previous statistical studies (cluster and Principal Component Analyses (PCA)) were used to disentangle the paleoclimatic signal from the other ones (volcanic and tectonic). The chronological model framework was built using 6 radiocarbon dates, allowing us to establish that laminated couplets were deposited on a pluriannual basis. These couplets are

  6. Characterization of Two Microbial Isolates from Andean Lakes in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demergasso, C.; Blamey, J.; Escudero, L.; Chong, G.; Casamayor, E. O.; Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently investigating the biological population present in the highest and least explored perennial lakes on earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes of more than 6000 m elevation, in combination of microbiological and molecular biological methods. Our samples were collected in saline lakes of the Laguna Blanca Laguna Verde area in the Bolivian Altiplano and in the Licancabur volcano crater (27 deg. 47 min S/67 deg. 47 min. W) in the ongoing project studying high altitude lakes. The main goal of the project is to look for analogies with Martian paleolakes. These Bolivian lakes can be described as Andean lakes following the classification of Chong. We have attempted to isolate pure cultures and phylogenetically characterize prokaryotes that grew under laboratory conditions. Sediment samples taken from the Licancabur crater lake (LC), Laguna Verde (LV), and Laguna Blanca (LB) were analyzed and cultured using enriched liquid media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. All cultures were incubated at room temperature (15 to 20 C) and under light exposure. For the reported isolates, 36 hours incubation were necessary for reaching optimal optical densities to consider them viable cultures. Ten serial dilutions starting from 1% inoculum were required to obtain a suitable enriched cell culture to transfer into solid media. Cultures on solid medium were necessary to verify the formation of colonies in order to isolate pure cultures. Different solid media were prepared using several combinations of both trace minerals and carbohydrates sources in order to fit their nutrient requirements. The microorganisms formed individual colonies on solid media enriched with tryptone, yeast extract and sodium chloride. Cells morphology was studied by optical and electronic microscopy. Rodshape morphologies were observed in most cases. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from 50 ml late-exponential phase culture by using the CTAB

  7. Global scale concentrations of volcanic activity on Venus: A summary of three 23rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference abstracts. 1: Venus volcanism: Global distribution and classification from Magellan data. 2: A major global-scale concentration of volcanic activity in the Beta-Atla-Themis region of Venus. 3: Two global concentrations of volcanism on Venus: Geologic associations and implications for global pattern of upwelling and downwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Head, James W.; Guest, J.; Saunders, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the analysis of data from the Magellan Mission, we have compiled a global survey of the location, dimensions, and subsidiary notes of all identified volcanic features on Venus. More than 90 percent of the surface area was examined and the final catalog comprehensively identifies 1548 individual volcanic features larger than approximately 20 km in diameter. Volcanic features included are large volcanoes, intermediate volcanoes, fields of small shield volcanoes, calderas, large lava channels, and lava floods as well as unusual features first noted on Venus such as coronae, arachnoids, and novae.

  8. Postcaldera volcanism and hydrothermal activity revealed by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys in Myojin Knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Myojin Knoll caldera, one of the submarine silicic calderas lying on the volcanic front of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, has attracted increasing attention since the discovery of a large hydrothermal field called the Sunrise deposit. Although numerous submersible surveys have been conducted in Myojin Knoll caldera, they have not sufficiently explored areas to produce a complete picture of the caldera and understand the origin of the Sunrise deposit. We conducted comprehensive deep-sea surveys using an autonomous underwater vehicle and obtained high-resolution bathymetric and magnetic data and sonar images from ~70% of the caldera. The detailed bathymetric map revealed that faulting and magma eruptions, possibly associated with an inflation-deflation cycle of the magma reservoir during postcaldera volcanism, had generally occurred in the caldera wall. The main dome of the central cone was covered with lava flows and exhibits exogenous growth, which is unusual for rhyolitic domes. The magnetization distribution in the central cone indicates preferential magma intrusion along a NW-SE direction. It is presumed that magma migrated along this direction and formed a rhyolite dome at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall, where the Sunrise deposit occurs. The Sunrise deposit is composed mainly of three ridges extending in slope directions and covers ~400 × ~400 m. Magnetization reduction in the deposit area is small, indicating that the alteration zone beneath the Sunrise deposit is slanting rather than vertical. It is presumed that several slanting and near-vertical volcanic vents serve as pathways of hydrothermal fluid in Myojin Knoll caldera.

  9. Investigation of the deep crustal structure and magmatic activity at the NW Hellenic Volcanic Arc with 3-D aeromagnetic inversion and seimotectonic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Angeliki; Tzanis, Andreas; Chailas, Stylianos; Stamatakis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of geophysical (aeromagnetic) and seismotectonic data, applied to the investigation of the deep structure, magmatic activity and geothermal potential of the north-western stretches of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is usually considered to be a single arcuate entity stretching from Sousaki (near Corinth) at the NW, to Nisyros Island at the SE. However, different types of and their ages indicate the presence of two different volcanic groups. Our study focuses on the northern part of the west (older) volcanic group and includes the Crommyonian (Sousaki) volcanic field at the west end of Megaris peninsula (east margin on the contemporary Corinth Rift), the Aegina and Methana volcanic complex at the Saronic Gulf, where typical Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanics predominate, and the Argolid peninsula to the south and south-west. In addition to the rocks associated with Quaternary volcanism, the study area includes a series of Mesozoic ultramafic (ophiolitic) outcrops at the Megaris peninsula, to the north and north-east of the Crommyonian volcanic field, as well as throughout the Argolid. A major deep structural and tectonic feature of the study area, and one with profound influence on crustal deformation and the evolution of rapidly deforming extensional structures like the Corinth Rift and the Saronic Gulf, is the local geometry and dynamics of the African oceanic crust subducting beneath the Aegean plate. Locally, the subducting slab has a NNW strike and ENE plunge, with the dip angle changing rapidly (steepening) approx. beneath the Argolid. The aeromagnetic data was extracted from the recently (re)compiled aeromagnetic map of Greece (Chailas et al, 2010) and was inverted with the UBC-GIF magnetic inversion suite (Li and Oldenburg, 1996). The inversion included rigorous geological constraints introduced by means of numerous in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. The inversion has imaged several isolated

  10. Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening contributions to Andean orogenesis: Preliminary results from structural mapping in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Horton, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Estimates of Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening from the southern Peruvian Andes are necessary to address ongoing debates regarding growth of the Andes and Altiplano plateau. However, limited regional studies in southern Peru prevent accurate assessments of the structural contributions to high topography. This study provides new structural mapping along a >200 km transect spanning the northernmost Altiplano to Subandes at 13-15.5°S and fills the gap between existing central Peruvian and northern Bolivian studies. New stratigraphic data, fault relationships and fold orientations are used to create an updated geologic map and provide insights into the style, timing and magnitude of crustal deformation. Preliminary cross sections accompanying these map transects illustrate deformation style and provide first-order estimates of shortening. Further cross section analyses will be balanced and provide estimates of total crustal shortening and associated thickening in southern Peru. The study transect is subdivided into belts according to the age of exposed rocks and style of deformation. From west to east these belts include: Cretaceous strata dominated by tight folds, closely spaced faults and multiple detachments; Permo-Triassic strata dominated by thicker thrust sheets and fault-fold orientations departing from typical Andean trends; and Paleozoic rocks characterized by thick thrust sheets and deformation focused near major faults. The Cretaceous belt is composed of marine limestones and upward coarsening, siltstone to coarse sandstone progradational sequences. Disharmonic and detachment folds in the Cretaceous section demonstrate the importance of interbedded gypsum and mudstone layers. Fault relationships suggest local shortening during the Early Cretaceous. The Permo-Triassic belt is composed of thick Permian carbonates (Copacabana Formation) and interbedded sandstones, conglomerates and volcanics of the Mitu Formation. This study defines the orientation of

  11. Influence of volcanic activity on the population genetic structure of Hawaiian Tetragnatha spiders: Fragmentation, rapid population growth and the potential for accelerated evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, A.G.; Gillespie, R.G.; Roderick, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic activity on the island of Hawaii results in a cyclical pattern of habitat destruction and fragmentation by lava, followed by habitat regeneration on newly formed substrates. While this pattern has been hypothesized to promote the diversification of Hawaiian lineages, there have been few attempts to link geological processes to measurable changes in population structure. We investigated the genetic structure of three species of Hawaiian spiders in forests fragmented by a 150-year-old lava flow on Mauna Loa Volcano, island of Hawaii: Tetragnatha quasimodo (forest and lava flow generalist), T. anuenue and T. brevignatha (forest specialists). To estimate fragmentation effects on population subdivision in each species, we examined variation in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (DNA sequences and allozymes, respectively). Population subdivision was higher for forest specialists than for the generalist in fragments separated by lava. Patterns of mtDNA sequence evolution also revealed that forest specialists have undergone rapid expansion, while the generalist has experienced more gradual population growth. Results confirm that patterns of neutral genetic variation reflect patterns of volcanic activity in some Tetragnatha species. Our study further suggests that population subdivision and expansion can occur across small spatial and temporal scales, which may facilitate the rapid spread of new character states, leading to speciation as hypothesized by H. L. Carson 30 years ago.

  12. Trans-Andean Ancistrus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taphorn, Donald C; Armbruster, Jonathan W; Villa-Navarro, Francisco; Ray, C Keith

    2013-01-01

    We review the trans-Andean species of Ancistrus from Panama, Colombia and Venezuela. Based on analyses of meristic, morphometric and pigmentation pattern data of preserved specimens, eight of sixteen species reported from this region are considered valid and two new species are described. Here we review Ancistrus chagresi Eigenmann & Eigenmann 1889 from both slopes of central Panama; A. centrolepis Regan 1913 from Pacific slopes of eastern Panama and western Colombia; Ancistrus caucanus Fowler 1943, from the Magdalena River drainage in northern Colombia; Ancistrus martini Schultz 1944, from the Lake Maracaibo Basin of Venezuela and Colombia. Ancistrus galani Pérez & Viloria 1994, from a cave in the Lake Maracaibo Basin of Venezuela is considered valid but was not examined. Ancistrus tolima new species is described from the upper Magdalena River drainage and Ancistrus vericaucanus new species is described from the upper Cauca River drainage. Ancistrus gymnorhynchus Kner 1854 and A. falconensis Taphorn, Armbruster & Rodriguez-O. 2010 were treated previously. One specimen of A. clementinae Rendahl 1937 from the Pacific coast of Ecuador was examined, it is considered a valid species. A key for identification and geographical ranges are provided. PMID:26287090

  13. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  14. How to Deepen the Dialogue between the Andean Community and the EU

    OpenAIRE

    Sheila Page

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the European Union trade policy making process and implications for the Andean community. The European Union (EU) divides its agreements with other countries into three types: neighbourhood, trade and development, and is currently classifying the negotiations with the Andean Community as development. The Andean Community must examine how the EU has approached its agreements in the past and what the Andean countries need from an agreement, and decide whether it wants to ne...

  15. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  16. Tephrochronology of the Mont-Dore volcanic Massif (Massif Central, France): new 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomade, Sébastien; Pastre, Jean-François; Nehlig, Pierre; Guillou, Hervé; Scao, Vincent; Scaillet, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The Mont-Dore Massif (500 km2), the youngest stratovolcano of the French Massif Central, consists of two volcanic edifices: the Guéry and the Sancy. To improve our knowledge of the oldest explosive stages of the Mont-Dore Massif, we studied 40Ar/39Ar-dated (through single-grain laser and step-heating experiments) 11 pyroclastic units from the Guéry stratovolcano. We demonstrate that the explosive history of the Guéry can be divided into four cycles of explosive eruption activity between 3.09 and 1.46 Ma (G.I to G.IV). We have also ascertained that deposits associated with the 3.1-3.0-Ma rhyolitic activity, which includes the 5-km3 "Grande Nappe" ignimbrite, are not recorded in the central part of the Mont-Dore Massif. All the pyroclastites found in the left bank of the Dordogne River belong to a later explosive phase (2.86-2.58 Ma, G.II) and were channelled down into valleys or topographic lows where they are currently nested. This later activity also gave rise to most of the volcanic products in the Perrier Plateau (30 km east of the Mont-Dore Massif); three quarters of the volcano-sedimentary sequence (up to 100 m thick) was emplaced within less than 20 ky, associated with several flank collapses in the northeastern part of the Guéry. The age of the "Fournet flora" (2.69 ± 0.01 Ma) found within an ash bed belonging to G.II suggests that temperate forests already existed in the French Massif Central before the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary. The Guéry's third explosive eruption activity cycle (G.III) lasted between 2.36 and 1.91 Ma. It encompassed the Guéry Lake and Morangie pumice and ash deposits, as well as seven other important events recorded as centimetric ash beds some 60 to 100 km southeast of the Massif in the Velay region. We propose a general tephrochronology for the Mont-Dore stratovolcano covering the last 3.1 My. This chronology is based on 44 40Ar/39Ar-dated events belonging to eight explosive eruption cycles each lasting between 100 and 200

  17. On the Nature of Cross-Linguistic Transfer: A Case Study of Andean Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntendam, Antje G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on cross-linguistic transfer in Andean Spanish word order. In Andean Spanish the object appears in preverbal position more frequently than in non-Andean Spanish, which has been attributed to an influence from Quechua (a Subject-Object-Verb language). The high frequency of preverbal objects could be…

  18. Permian plate margin volcanism and tuffs in adjacent basins of west Gondwana: Age constraints and common characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gamundí, Oscar

    2006-12-01

    Increasing evidence of Permian volcanic activity along the South American portion of the Gondwana proto-Pacific margin has directed attention to its potential presence in the stratigraphic record of adjacent basins. In recent years, tuffaceous horizons have been identified in late Early Permian-through Middle Permian (280-260 Ma) sections of the Paraná Basin (Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). Farther south and closer to the magmatic tract developed along the continental margin, in the San Rafael and Sauce Grande basins of Argentina, tuffs are present in the Early to Middle Permian section. This tuff-rich interval can be correlated with the appearance of widespread tuffs in the Karoo Basin. Although magmatic activity along the proto-Pacific plate margin was continuous during the Late Paleozoic, Choiyoi silicic volcanism along the Andean Cordillera and its equivalent in Patagonia peaked between the late Early Permian and Middle Permian, when extensive rhyolitic ignimbrites and consanguineous airborne tuffaceous material erupted in the northern Patagonian region. The San Rafael orogenic phase (SROP) interrupted sedimentation along the southwestern segment of the Gondwana margin (i.e., Frontal Cordillera, San Rafael Basin), induced cratonward thrusting (i.e., Ventana and Cape foldbelts), and triggered accelerated subsidence in the adjacent basins (Sauce Grande and Karoo) located inboard of the deformation front. This accelerated subsidence favored the preservation of tuffaceous horizons in the syntectonic successions. The age constraints and similarities in composition between the volcanics along the continental margin and the tuffaceous horizons in the San Rafael, Sauce Grande, Paraná, and Karoo basins strongly suggest a genetic linkage between the two episodes. Radiometric ages from tuffs in the San Rafael, Paraná, and Karoo basins indicate an intensely tuffaceous interval between 280 and 260 Ma.

  19. Onboard Processing of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Data of Volcanic Activity for Future Earth-Orbiting and Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel Q.; Doubleday, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous onboard processing of data allows rapid response to detections of dynamic, changing processes. Software that can detect volcanic eruptions from thermal emission has been used to retask the Earth Observing 1 spacecraft to obtain additional data of the eruption. Rapid transmission of these data to the ground, and the automatic processing of the data to generated images, estimates of eruption parameters and maps of thermal structure, has allowed these products to be delivered rapidly to volcanologists to aid them in assessing eruption risk and hazard. Such applications will enhance science return from future Earth-orbiting spacecraft and also from spacecraft exploring the Solar System, or beyond, which hope to image dynamic processes. Especially in the latter case, long communication times between the spacecraft and Earth exclude a rapid response to what may be a transient process - only using onboard autonomy can the spacecraft react quickly to such an event.

  20. Nature, Source and Composition of Volcanic Ash in Surficial Sediments Around the Zhongsha Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; WANG Xinyu

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic detrital sediments are a unique indicator for reconstructing the petrogenetie evolution of submarine volcanic terrains. Volcanic ash in surficial sediments around the Zhongsha Islands includes three kinds of volcanogenic detritus, i.e., brown volcanic glass, colorless volcanic glass and volcanic scoria. The major element characteristics show that bimodal volcanic activity may have taken place in the northern margin of the South China Sea, with brown volcanic glass and colorless volcanic glass repre-senting the maric end-member and felsie end-member, respectively. Fractional crystallization is the main process for magma evolu-tion. The nature of the volcanic activity implies that the origin of volcanic activity was related to extensional tectonic settings, which is corresponding to an extensional geodynamie setting in the Xisha Trench, and supports the notion, which is based on geophysical data and petrology, that there may exist a mantle plume around the Hainan Island.

  1. Chlorine isotope and Cl-Br fractionation in fluids of Poás volcano (Costa Rica): Insight into an active volcanic-hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Eggenkamp, H. G. M.; Martínez-Cruz, María; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2016-10-01

    Halogen-rich volcanic fluids issued at the surface carry information on properties and processes operating in shallow hydrothermal systems. This paper reports a long-term record of Cl-Br concentrations and δ37Cl signatures of lake water and fumaroles from the active crater of Poás volcano (Costa Rica), where surface expressions of magmatic-hydrothermal activity have shown substantial periodic changes over the last decades. Both the hyperacid water of its crater lake (Laguna Caliente) and subaerial fumaroles show significant temporal variability in Cl-Br concentrations, Br/Cl ratios and δ37Cl, reflecting variations in the mode and magnitude of volatile transfer. The δ37Cl signatures of the lake, covering the period 1985-2012, show fluctuations between + 0.02 ± 0.06‰ and + 1.15 ± 0.09‰. Condensate samples from adjacent fumaroles on the southern shore, collected during the interval (2010-2012) with strong changes in gas temperature (107-763°C), display a much larger range from - 0.43 ± 0.09‰ to + 14.09 ± 0.08‰. Most of the variations in Cl isotope, Br/Cl and concentration signals can be attributed to interaction between magma-derived gas and liquid water in the volcanic-hydrothermal system below the crater. The δ37Cl were lowest and closest to magmatic values in (1) fumarolic gas that experienced little or no interaction with subsurface water and followed a relatively dry pathway, and (2) water that captured the bulk of magmatic halogen output so that no phase separation could induce fractionation. In contrast, elevated δ37Cl can be explained by partial scavenging and fractionation during subsurface gas-liquid interaction. Hence, strong Cl isotope fractionation leading to very high δ37Cl in Poás' fumaroles indicates that they followed a wet pathway. Highest δ37Cl values in the lake water were found mostly in periods when it received a significant input from subaqueous fumaroles or when high temperatures and low pH caused HCl evaporation. It is

  2. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  3. Structural inheritance and selective reactivation in the central Andes: Cenozoic deformation guided by pre-Andean structures in southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.; Carlotto, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic constraints from the Eastern Cordillera in the central Andean plateau of southern Peru (14-15°S) demonstrate the existence and position of major pre-Andean structures that controlled the accumulation of Triassic synrift fill and guided subsequent Cenozoic deformation. The timing of initial clastic deposition of the Triassic Mitu Group is here constrained to ~ 242-233 Ma on the basis of detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb geochronology. Regionally distinct provenance variations, as provided by U-Pb age populations from localized synrift accumulations, demonstrate Triassic erosion of multiple diagnostic sources from diverse rift-flank uplifts. Stratigraphic correlations suggest synchronous initiation of extensional basins containing the Mitu Group, in contrast with previous interpretations of southward rift propagation. Triassic motion along the NE-dipping San Anton normal fault accommodated up to 7 km of throw and hanging-wall deposition of a synrift Mitu succession > 2.5 km thick. The contrasting orientation of a non-reactivated Triassic normal fault suggests selective inversion of individual structures in the Eastern Cordillera was dependent on fault dip and strike. Selective preservation of a ~ 4 km thick succession of Carboniferous-Permian strata in the down-dropped San Anton hanging wall, beneath the synrift Mitu Group, suggests large-scale erosional removal in the uplifted footwall. Field and map observations identify additional pre-Andean thrust faults and folds attributed to poorly understood Paleozoic orogenic events preserved in the San Anton hanging wall. Selective thrust reactivation of normal and reverse faults during later compression largely guided Cenozoic deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. The resulting structural compartmentalization and across-strike variations in kinematics and deformation style highlight the influence of inherited Paleozoic structures and Triassic normal faults on the long

  4. Species richness and indices of abundance of medium-sized mammals in andean forest and reforestations with andean alder: a preliminary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Francisco; SÁNCHEZ-PALOMINO, PEDRO; CADENA, ALBERTO

    2013-01-01

    We studied the species richness and two indices of abundance of medium-sizedmammals in areas with Andean forest and Andean alder (Alnus acuminata)reforestations in a reserve at the Central Andes of Colombia. Since reforested areashave a less complex habitat structure and lower plant diversity than native forests, wepredicted that they have lower richness of mammals than areas with Andean forest.We obtained the indices of abundance from direct contacts in transects and from theuse of track sta...

  5. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes

  6. The Mw4.8 Norris Geyser Basin Earthquake of 30 March, 2014 and its Relationship to Crustal Deformation and Seismic Activity of the Yellowstone Volcanic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J.; Shelly, D. R.; Smith, R. B.; Puskas, C. M.; Chang, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquake to be recorded in Yellowstone in over 30 years, a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, occurred on March 30, 2014 near the Norris Geyser Basin on the NW side of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera. The earthquake was felt throughout Yellowstone and the surrounding region. We analyze this unusual event using data from the Yellowstone Seismic and Geodetic networks in the context of active volcanic-tectonic processes of the Yellowstone volcanic system and its relationship to regional swarm seismicity and crustal deformation. Moment tensor analysis of the March 30 earthquake revealed a strike-slip, double-couple source mechanism with no isotropic contribution. This earthquake was part of a larger sequence of earthquake swarm activity in the Norris Geyser Basin area that began in September 2013 and continued into June 2014. During that period, 50-60% of the total seismicity recorded in Yellowstone, including nearly all of the swarm seismicity (earthquakes clustered in time and space), occurred in the Norris Geyser Basin area. In addition, GPS derived deformation data revealed unusually high uplift rates at ~15 cm/yr in the Norris area prior to the MW4.8 event, while a dramatic reversal to subsidence at rates of ~20 cm/yr occurred after the event. Regionally, the much larger Yellowstone caldera had experienced subsidence since January 2010 at rates of ~1.5 cm/yr prior to the MW4.8 event. After March 30, 2014 the caldera reversed to regional uplift at rates of ~10 cm/yr, similar to accelerated uplift rates observed in mid-2004.

  7. Double, double, (but mostly) toil, and trouble: A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of an active volcanic hydrothermal system (Whakaari volcano, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Kennedy, Ben; Farquharson, Jamie; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, Albert; Scheu, Betty; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Art; Dingwell, Donald

    2016-04-01

    Our multidisciplinary approach, which combines field techniques and traditional laboratory methods, aims to better understand the permeability of an active volcanic hydrothermal system, a vital prerequisite for understanding and modelling the behaviour of hydrothermal systems worldwide. Whakaari volcano (an active stratovolcano located 48 km off New Zealand's North Island) hosts an open, highly reactive hydrothermal system (hot springs and mud pools, fumaroles, acid streams and lakes) and represents an ideal natural laboratory to undertake such a study. We first gained an appreciation of the different lithologies at Whakaari and (where possible) their lateral and vertical extent through reconnaissance by land, sea, and air. Due to the variable nature of these altered lithologies (mainly lavas and tuffs), we measured porosity-permeability for in excess of a hundred rock hand samples using field techniques. We also measured the permeability of recent, unconsolidated deposits using a field soil permeameter. Our field measurements were then groundtruthed on a subset of these samples (~40-50) using traditional laboratory techniques: helium pycnometry and measurements of permeability using a benchtop permeameter, including measurements under increasing confining pressure (i.e., depth). In all, our measurements highlight that the porosity of the materials at Whakaari can vary from ~0.01 to ~0.6, and permeability can vary by eight orders of magnitude. However, our data show no discernable trend between porosity and permeability. A combination of macroscopic and microscopic observations, chemistry (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), and mercury porosimetry highlight that the absence of a robust porosity-permeability relationship is the product of an insane variability in alteration and microstructure (pore size, particle size, pore connectivity, presence/absence of microcracks, layering, amongst others). While our systematic study offers the most complete porosity-permeability dataset

  8. Improvement forecasting of volcanic activity by applying a Kalman filter to the SSEM signal. The case of the El Hierro Island eruption (October 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Berrocoso, M.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.

    2012-04-01

    The FFM (Failure Forecast Method) is developed from the eruption of St. Helens, being repeatedly applied to forecast eruptions and recently to the prediction of seismic activity in active volcanic areas. The underwater eruption of El Hierro Island has been monitored from three months before starting (October 10, 2011). This allowed a large catalogue of seismic events (over 11000) and continuous recording seismic signals that cover the entire period. Since the beginning of the seismic-volcanic crisis (July 2011), the FFM was applied to the SSEM signal of seismic records. Mainly because El Hierro is a very small island, the SSEM has a high noise (traffic and oceanic noise). To improve the signal / noise ratio has been used a Kalman filter. The Kalman filter coefficients are adjusted using an inversion process based on forecasting errors occurred in the twenty days preceding. The application of this filter has been a significant improvement in the reliability of forecasts. The analysis of the results shows, before the start of the eruption, that 90% of the forecasts are obtained with errors less than 10 minutes with more than 24 hours in advance. It is noteworthy that the method predicts the events of greater magnitude and especially the beginning of each swarm of seismic events. At the time the eruption starts reducing the efficiency of the forecast 50% with a dispersion of more than one hour. This fact is probably due to decreased detectability by saturation of some of the seismic stations and decreased the average magnitude. However, the events of magnitude greater than 4 were predicted with an error less than 20 minutes.

  9. Seismic activity and stress tensor inversion at Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua-Vera, Yanet; Lermo-Samaniego, Javier; Quintanar-Robles, Luis; Campos-Enríquez, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    We analyze local earthquakes occurring between 2003 and 2012 at the Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (TVVGF) to establish their temporal and spatial distribution, and relationships with local and regional fault systems, water injection, acid stimulation and steam production tests. We obtained focal mechanisms and inverted data for the stress tensor to understand the local and regional stress fields. We analyzed 423 local earthquakes with magnitudes between 0.1 and 2.9 Mc and hypocentral depths from 0.2 to 7.4 km b.s.l. The cutoff depth at ~ 7.4 km possibly delineates the brittle-ductile transition zone. We identified seven swarms (from 1 to 7). Swarms 1 (December 2009), 2 (May 2010), 3 (June-July 2010) and 7 (December 2012) are strongly correlated with injection processes; whereas swarms 5 (April 2012) and 6 (September 2012) are correlated with local tectonic faults. Stress inversion showed NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW extensional orientations (Shmin), in agreement with the local tectonic stress field; while NE-SW compressional orientations (SHmax) are correlated with the regional tectonic stress field.

  10. Structural control on geothermal circulation in the Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The reconstruction of the stratigraphical-structural framework and the hydrogeology of geothermal areas is fundamental for understanding the relationships between cap rocks, reservoir and circulation of geothermal fluids and for planning the exploitation of the field. The Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Central Andes, NW Argentina) has a high geothermal potential. It is crossed by the active NW-SE trans-Andean tectonic lineament known as the Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) fault system, which favours a high secondary permeability testified by the presence of numerous thermal springs. This study presents new stratigraphic, structural, volcanological, geochemical and hydrogeological data on the geothermal field. Our data suggest that the main geothermal reservoir is located within or below the Pre-Palaeozoic-Ordovician basement units, characterised by unevenly distributed secondary permeability. The reservoir is recharged by infiltration in the ridges above 4500 m a.s.l., where basement rocks are in outcrop. Below 4500 m a.s.l., the reservoir is covered by the low permeable Miocene-Quaternary units that allow a poor circulation of shallow groundwater. Geothermal fluids upwell in areas with more intense fracturing, especially where main regional structures, particularly NW-SE COT-parallel lineaments, intersect with secondary structures, such as at the Tocomar field.

  11. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    activity predominates) - except during extraordinary events when dykes are long enough to reach those parts, as in 2005. The eruption ages of the different lava units correlates with their degrees of differentiation, allowing different magmatic cycles of about a few tens of years each to be distinguished. During the first recorded magmatic cycle (~70 ka to ~55 ka), Dabbahu is built of wide-spreading pāhoehoe flows around localised eruptive centres. The resulting topography of the volcanic edifice remains low, and is only slightly affected by rift-related fault activity, with the development of minor scarps. The second recorded magmatic cycle (~50 ka to ~20 ka) coincides with a strong development of Dabbahu topography - underlined by the change in lava morphology with well channelized 'a'ā flows since 50 ka. Tectonic activity also clearly increases over this period, with the initiation of the major fault scarps of the rift, which have been dated at around 35 ka. Our study underlines the role of the magma supply and availability beneath Dabbahu in the evolution both topographies of Dabbahu volcano and of the rift depression morphology.

  12. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  13. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km2 area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10-8 to 10-10 yr-12. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site

  14. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Girardin, C.; Doughty, C.E.; Cahuana, N.; Arenas, C.E.; Oliver, V.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning

  15. Andean shrublands of Moquegua, South Peru: Prepuna plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Sykora, K.V.

    2012-01-01

    A syntaxonomic overview of shrubland vegetation in the southern Andean regions of Peru is presented. For each plant community, information is given on physiognomy, floristic diversity, ecology and geographical distribution. The shrub vegetation on the slopes of the upper Tambo river valley includes

  16. The Andean Common Market: An Experiment in Regional Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Reynold E.

    The Grupo Andino (GRAN) was formed in 1969 as an effort at economic integration by six Latin American countries (Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela). It was an outgrowth of its predecessor, the Latin American Free Trade Association (LAFTA), which had been formed in 1960 with eleven member countries. The Andean Group (GRAN) from…

  17. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    OpenAIRE

    Brian R. Zutta; Phillip W. Rundel; Sassan Saatchi; Jorge D. Casana; Paul Gauthier Gauthier; Aldo Soto; Yessenia Velazco; Wolfgang Buermann

    2012-01-01

    Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects...

  18. Climate change variability and Andean agriculture: The context

    OpenAIRE

    Valdivia, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    A presentation by Valdivia from lessons learned in the SANREM CRSP and past research to frame the two day workshop. First session of the workshop: I. Climate Change Variability and Andean Agriculture: The Context Lessons learned from SANREM CRSP on adapting to climate change. LTRA-4 (Practices and Strategies for Vulnerable Agro-Ecosystems)

  19. High-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD)/HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS) profiling of anthocyanins from Andean Mashua Tubers (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruíz and Pavón) and their contribution to the overall antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Rosana; Campos, David; Betalleluz, Indira; Giusti, M Monica; Schwartz, Steven J; Tian, Qingguo; Pedreschi, Romina; Larondelle, Yvan

    2006-09-20

    Mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruíz and Pavón), an Andean tuber with high antioxidant activity, has sparked interest because of its traditional medicinal use. In this study, we evaluated the anthocyanin composition for three purple mashua genotypes and their contribution to the overall antioxidant activity of the tuber. Mashua anthocyanins, total phenolics, and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) antioxidant activity ranged from 45.5 to 131.9 mg of cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents/100 g fresh weight (FW), 174.9 to 275.5 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g of FW, and 16.2 to 45.7 micromol of Trolox equivalents/g of FW, respectively. The high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MS-MS) profiles revealed the presence of 11 different anthocyanins. The two major pigments (56.4-73.0% total area range at 520 nm) were identified as delphinidin 3-glucoside-5-acetylrhamnoside and delphinidin 3-sophoroside-5-acetylrhamnoside. Other pigments were delphinidin 3-glucoside-5-rhamnoside, delphinidin 3-sophoroside-5-rhamnoside, delphinidin 3-glucoside, cyanidin 3-sophoroside, and cyanidin 3-sophoroside-5-rhamnoside. Cyanidin 3-glucoside and cyanidin 3-rutinoside were only found in two genotypes, while pelargonidin 3-sophoroside and pelargonidin 3-sophoroside-5-rhamnoside were only found in the third one. Anthocyanins from mashua were the major contributors to the total ABTS values for only one of the three genotypes, suggesting that other phenolics present are playing a major role in the antioxidant power of mashua tubers. Results from this study provide important information for the Nutraceutical and Functional Food Market for the use of mashua anthocyanins not only as a source of natural colorants but also as a source of phytonutrients.

  20. IAI Global Change Agenda and Support of Higher Education in the Andean Amazon Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarraga, R.; McClain, M.; Fierro, V.

    2007-05-01

    The Andean Amazon River Analysis and Management project, an IAI Collaborative Research Network operating during 1999-2004, examined the impacts of climate and land-use changes on the hydrobiogeochemistry of rivers draining the Amazon Andes of Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Bolivia. The project also provided a means to strengthen scientific collaboration among these Andean countries and the USA. Research in these countries was carried out under the guidance of investigators with backgrounds in the relevant environmental fields, but the bulk of the research activities were carried out by undergraduate and graduate students who studied within these countries and overseas. Twenty graduate students and 15 undergraduates completed studies within the project, in topics related to monitoring hydrometeorological variables both in time and space. Student research and capacity building were focused in areas central to global environmental change, including modeling of precipitation and precipitation-runoff processes, basin-scale water quality characterization and biogeochemical cycling, and socioeconomic controls on the use and management of riverine resources. The analysis of human dimension aspects of climate change research was also featured, especially those aspects that linked the consequences of water quality degradation on human health. Most of undergraduate and graduate students that collaborated in the AARAM project have joined national environmental institutions and some have continued for higher scientific degrees in fields closely related to the IAI scientific agenda. Through this IAI initiative, the number of trained global change scientists in the Andean countries has grown and there is enhanced awareness of key global change science issues among the scientific community.

  1. Analysis of the drought resilience of Andosols on southern Ecuadorian Andean páramos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Iñiguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neotropical Andean grasslands above 3500 m a.s.l. known as "páramo" offer remarkable ecological services for the Andean region. Most important is the water supply – of excellent quality – to many cities and villages established in the lowlands of the inter-Andean valleys and to the coast. However, the páramo ecosystem is under constant and increased threat by human activities and climate change. In this paper we study the resilience of its soils for drought periods during the period 2007–2013. In addition, field measurements and hydrological conceptual modelling at the catchment-scale are comparing two contrasting catchments in the southern Ecuadorian Andes. Both were intensively monitored during two and a half years (2010–2012 in order to analyse the temporal variability of the soil moisture storage. A typical catchment on the páramo at 3500 m a.s.l. was compared to a lower grassland one at 2600 m a.s.l. The main aim was to estimate the resilience capacity of the soils during a drought period and the recovery during a subsequent wet period. Local soil water content measurements in the top soil (first 30 cm through TDR were used as a proxy for the catchment's average soil moisture storage. The local measurements were compared to the average soil water storage as estimated by the probabilistic soil moisture (PDM model. This conceptual hydrological model with 5 parameters was calibrated and validated for both catchments. The study reveals the extraordinary resilience capacity of this type of shallow organic soils during the droughts in 2009 and 2010. During these droughts, the soil water content dropped from a normal value of about 0.80 to ~ 0.60 cm3 cm−3, while the recovery time was only two to three months.

  2. Edge Influence on Diversity of Orchids in Andean Cloud Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edicson Parra Sánchez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud forests harbor high levels of orchid diversity. However, due to the high fragmentation of these forests in the Andes, combined with the pressure for new agricultural land, orchid diversity is highly threatened. Despite this worrying scenario, few studies have assessed the effects of habitat loss specifically on orchid assemblages in the Andes. The aim of this study was to analyze the edge effect on orchids in cloud forest fragments of varying size. We measured forest structure, neighboring land cover and edge effect on orchid abundance, species richness and beta-diversity, by sampling assemblages along edge-to-interior transects in six different sized Andean (southwest Colombia forest remnants. We recorded 11,127 stem-individuals of orchids in 141 species. Within the forest, edges sustained equal or more species than interior plots. Our results revealed neither patch metrics nor forest structure showed any significant association to orchid diversity at any scale. Nonetheless, from our observations in composition, the type of neighboring cover, particularly pastures, negatively influences interior species (richness and composition in larger reserves. This might be due to the fact that some species found in interior plots tend to be confined, with sporadic appearances in regeneration forest and are very scarce or absent in pastures. Species richness differed significantly between matrix types. Our results suggest that (1 orchid diversity shows spatial variability in response to disturbances, but the response is independent from forest structure, patch size and patch geometry; (2 orchid communities are negatively affected by covers, and this pattern is reflected in reduced richness and high species turnover; (3 orchid richness edge effect across a pasture-interior gradient. Two forest management implications can be discerned from our results: (1 management strategies aiming to reduce edge effects may focus on improvement regeneration

  3. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: review of its development and application in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  4. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  5. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  6. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    to eruption behaviour and during ascent magma behaves in an increasingly rock-like manner as it degasses and crystallises. This character aids the development of shear zones in the conduit, producing fault surfaces that host gouge, cataclasite and pseudotachylyte and which control the last hundreds of meters of ascent by frictional slip. Recent work has shown that the occurrence of vesiculation of gas bubbles modifies the rheology of frictional melt and in extreme cases can trigger eruption style to switch from effusive to explosive activity. Hence it is of vital importance to recognise the frictional behaviour of volcanic rocks and magmas to understand the continuation of an eruption and associated hazards.

  7. Managing the effects of accelerated glacial melting on volcanic collapse and debris flows: Planchon-Peteroa Volcano, Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormey, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Glaciated mountains are among the most sensitive environments to climatic changes, and recent work has shown that large-scale glacial melting, including at the end of the Pleistocene, caused a significant increase in the incidence of large volcanic sector collapse and debris flows on then-active volcanoes. With current accelerated rates of glacial melting, glaciated active volcanoes are at an increasing risk of sector collapse, debris flow and landslide. These catastrophic events are Earth's most damaging erosion phenomenon, causing extensive property damage and loss of life. This paper illustrates these effects in well-studied settings, focusing on the end-Pleistocene to Holocene glaciovolcanic growth and destruction of the cone of the active volcano Planchon-Peteroa in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone at latitude 35° 15' S, along the border between Chile and Argentina. The development of the volcano over the last 14,000 years illustrates how glacial melting and magmatic activity can trigger landslides and sector collapses. Planchon had a large sector collapse that produced a highly mobile and erosive debris avalanche 11,000 years BP, and other slope instabilities during the end-Pleistocene/early Holocene deglaciation. The summit amphitheater left after the sector collapse was subject to alternating periods of glaciation and melting-induced lake formation. Breaching of the moraine dams then formed lahars and landslides originating at the western edge of the summit amphitheater, and the deposits are preserved along the western flank of the volcano. Deep incision of moraine deposits further down the western slope of the volcano indicates that the lahars and landslides were water-rich and had high erosive power. As illustrated by Planchon-Peteroa, the interplay among glacial growth and melting, magmatic activity, and slope stability is complex, but must be accounted for in volcanic hazard assessment. Planchon-Peteroa currently has the southernmost temperate zone

  8. Paired Magmatic-Metallogenic Belts in Myanmar - an Andean Analogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Nicholas; Robb, Laurence; Searle, Michael; Morley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    contrasting minerals endowment. The Mogok-Mandalay-Mergui (MMM) Belt hosts crustal-melt S-type granites with significant tin-tungsten mineralization, and contains the historically major tungsten deposit of Mawchi. The Wuntho-Popa Arc comprises I-type granites and granodiorites with porphyry-type copper-gold and epithermal gold mineralization, and includes the world-class Monywa copper mine. Recent U-Pb radiometric age dating has shown the potential for the two belts to be both active from the Late Cretaceous to Eocene. The spatial juxtaposition of these two sub-parallel belts, the implication of contemporary magmatism, and their distinct but consistent metallogenic endowment bears strong similarities to the metallogenic belts of the South American Cordillera. Here we investigate whether they together represent the magmatic and metallogenic expression of an Andean-type setting in Myanmar during the subduction of Neo-Tethys. In this analogue the Wuntho-Popa Arc represents a proximal I-type magmatic belt sited immediately above the eastwards-verging Neo-Tethys subduction zone. Exhibiting porphyry-type copper-gold and epithermal gold mineralization, this would therefore be the Myanmar equivalent of the Andean coastal copper belts. Conversely, the parallel MMM Belt, comprised of more distal crustal-melt S-type tin granites, would have an analogue in the Bolivian tin belt.

  9. Explosive and Phreatomagmatic Activity from San Salvador Volcanic Complex (El Salvador) and Their Effects on El Cambio Archaeological Site: a Review of the Last 3000 yrs. Based on Volcanic Stratigraphy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado, H.; Pullinger, C.; Castillo, R.; Chávez, H. I.

    2007-05-01

    El Cambio archeological site (ECAS; Zapotitán Valley), 4 km NW from the San Salvador Volcanic Complex comprises 3000 yrs. of pyroclastic record. Sheets (1983) identified different levels rich in cultural remains intercalated within the volcanic deposits, indicating that different prehistoric settings were affected by San Salvador volcano eruptions, and giving information on the reoccupation frequency in the area. Accordingly, ECAS was occupied since the Late Pre-Classic period until before the last plinian eruption of Ilopango Caldera (425AD) reference, that originated the Tierra Blanca Joven (TBJ), pyroclastic deposits generally used as key-layer in stratigraphic reconstructions. Within the next two centuries, there is no evidence of human occupation at ECAS until the end of Late Classic which was a period of maximum splendor in the valley. During this time the area was affected by at least 3 eruptions from the San Salvador volcanic complex that produced the: Laguna Caldera volcanic fall deposits (which affected Joya de Cerén archeological site in 625AD), "Talpetate" surge deposits or Toba de San Andrés (600-900AD), and fall deposits of El Playón volcano (1658). We report new data on volcanic stratigraphy and archeological history including the following: a) the phreatomagmatic nature of eruptions that affected the area, the new excavations allowed the detailed study of surge deposits indicating magma-water interaction at Laguna Caldera and El Playón, previously considered strombolian eruptions; b)document the occupation of ECAS during Middle Pre-Classic period, new surge deposits below TBJ have been identified (with Middle Pre-Classic artifacts and pottery), that had not been documented before, extending the historic record up to 3000 yrs. BP. and c) detailed study of the "Talpetate" deposits, this sequence consists of fall, pyroclastic flow and surge deposits, present in the rim and slopes of San Salvador Volcano, which can be correlated with surge deposits

  10. Insights for the melt migration, the volcanic activity and the ultrafast lithosphere delamination related to the Yellowstone plume (Western USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, A.; Adam, C.; Grégoire, M.; Gerbault, M.; Meyer, R.; Rabinowicz, M.; Fontaine, F.; Bonvalot, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Yellowstone-East Snake River Plain hotspot track has been intensely studied since several decades and is widely considered to result from the interaction of a mantle plume with the North American plate. An integrated conclusive geodynamic interpretation of this extensive data set is however presently still lacking, and our knowledge of the dynamical processes beneath Yellowstone is patchy. It has been argued that the Yellowstone plume has delaminated the lower part of the thick Wyoming cratonic lithosphere. We derive an original dynamic model to quantify delamination processes related to mantle plume-lithosphere interactions. We show that fast (˜300 ka) lithospheric delamination is consistent with the observed timing of formation of successive volcanic centres along the Yellowstone hotspot track and requires (i) a tensile stress regime within the whole lithosphere exceeding its failure threshold, (ii) a purely plastic rheology in the lithosphere when stresses reach this yield limit, (iii) a dense lower part of the 200 km thick Wyoming lithosphere and (iv) a decoupling melt horizon inside the median part of the lithosphere. We demonstrate that all these conditions are verified and that ˜150 km large and ˜100 km thick lithospheric blocks delaminate within 300 ka when the Yellowstone plume ponded below the 200 km thick Wyoming cratonic lithosphere. Furthermore, we take advantage of the available extensive regional geophysical and geological observation data sets to design a numerical 3-D upper-mantle convective model. We propose a map of the ascending convective sheets contouring the Yellowstone plume. The model further evidences the development of a counter-flow within the lower part of the lithosphere centred just above the Yellowstone mantle plume axis. This counter-flow controls the local lithospheric stress field, and as a result the trajectories of feeder dykes linking the partial melting source within the core of the mantle plume with the crust by

  11. Receiver functions and crustal structure of the northwestern Andean region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Esteban; Monsalve, Gaspar; Vargas, Carlos Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We used the receiver function technique to deduce crustal thickness beneath the northwestern Andean system, using data from the permanent seismic network of Colombia, combined with some of the IRIS and CTBTO stations in Colombia and Ecuador. The estimation of crustal thickness was made using the primary P to s conversion and crustal reverberations. The bulk crustal VP/VS ratio was constrained using a crustal thickness versus VP/VS stacking method, in addition to estimations using a time to depth conversion technique based on results of a modified Wadati diagram analysis. We observed a wide range of crustal thicknesses, including values around 17 km beneath the Malpelo Island on the Pacific Ocean, 20 to 30 km at the coastal Pacific and Caribbean plains of Colombia, 25 to 40 km beneath the eastern plains and foothills, 35 km beneath the Western Cordillera, 45 km at the Magdalena River intermountain valley, 52 to 58 km under the northern Central Cordillera, and reaching almost 60 km beneath some of the volcanoes of the Southern Cordilleran system of Colombia; crustal thickness can be slightly greater than 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera. The values of VP/VS are particularly high for some of the stations on the volcanic centers, reaching values above 1.79, probably related to the addition of mafic materials to the lower crust, and in the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera near Bogota, where we speculate about the possibility of crustal seismic anisotropy associated with shear zones.

  12. Volcanic ash detection by GPS signal

    OpenAIRE

    Aranzulla, M.; Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania; Cannavò, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Scollo, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Puglisi, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Immè, G.; sita` degli studi di Catania

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the ability of GPS to detect volcanic plumes at Mt. Etna, Italy. We use a robust statistical approach to highlight whether the presence of a volcanic plume in the atmosphere may really affect the GPS undifferenced post-fit phase residuals. The proposed method has been tested for the September 4–5, 2007 activity of Mt. Etna. This eruption produced powerful lava fountains forming a weak, a few kilometers high plume for several hours, representing typical a...

  13. Immunological properties of Andean starch films are independent of their nanometric roughness and stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F G; Troncoso, O P; Gamucci, O; Corvaglia, S; Brunetti, V; Bardi, G

    2015-04-01

    Starch is a natural material extracted from roots, seeds, stems and tubers of different plants. It can be processed as a thermoplastic to produce a variety promising products for biomedical applications, including foams, sheets and films. In the present work, we investigated the immunological properties of microfilms prepared with starches extracted from six different types of Andean potatoes and their relationship with the different film-surface features. We confirmed the biocompatibility of all the films using THP-1 human monocytes, noticing only slight decrease in cell viability in two of the tested starches. We also analyzed pro-inflammatory cytokine release and immune cell surface receptor modulation on THP-1 plated onto the films. Our data show differences in the immunological profile of the same cells cultured onto the different starch films. Furthermore, we examined whether the dissimilar stiffness or the nanometric roughness of the films might influence the immune stimulation of the THP-1 monocytes. Our results demonstrate no correlation between cultured THP-1 immune activation and surface film characteristics. We conclude that different Andean native potato starch films have specific ability to interact with cell membranes of immune cells, conceivably due to the different spatial localization of amylose and amylopectin in the diverse starches.

  14. Composition and diversity of High Andean in the Fauna Production Reserve Chimborazo, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Caranqui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study inquire the floristic diversity of 9 sampling in four plots of 1 m² of high andean in several locations in the “Reserva de Producción de Fauna Chimborazo”. For the development of this study, we used an adaptation of the method of plots “Gloria”. With coverage (% in each of the plots, Further the diversity indices and similarity with respective analysis were obtained. The data obtained reflect a diversity that can range from medium to low, believe that this is due to anthropogenic activities that have taken place in these ecosistems. With the presence mostly Calamagrostis intermedia, it could establish that the type of vegetation is herbaceous in high andean is higher percentage; is the species that is almost always present in most types of vegetation of the RPF Chimborazo and high dominance that influences the results of low floristic diversity indices was found in the analysis. As a result the most abundant family Asteraceae is well Poaceae.

  15. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  16. 用作混凝土掺合料的火山岩的组成与火山灰活性%Constitution and Pozzolanic Activity of Volcanic Rocks Used as Mineral Admixture in Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻乐华; 周双喜; 欧辉; 邓文武

    2013-01-01

    采集江西火山岩区代表性硅质火山岩样品,用化学分析、岩相学和X射线衍射(XRD)方法研究其化学组成、矿物类型和结构构造,采取火山岩石粉水泥砂浆强度比测定其火山灰活性指数,通过统计方法讨论并揭示硅质火山岩主要性能与火山灰活性的关系。结果表明:火山岩样品(除个别外)28 d火山灰活性指数≥65%,可作为水泥砂浆和混凝土用天然火山灰质材料;珍珠岩火山灰活性最高,这是其玻璃质比例甚高和富硅铝质高温型矿物所致;角砾状熔结凝灰岩含较多大砾状岩屑和低温型矿物致使火山灰活性较低。火山岩岩相学分析的基质含量与XRD分析的非晶态相含量在岩石性能及对火山灰活性影响方面一致。火山岩活性指数与非晶态含量、化学成分SiO2含量或化学成分SiO2+Al2O3含量的复相关性表现良好,可应用活性指数与这些岩石主要参数的拟合方程预测火山岩的火山灰活性指数,从而判断其是否具备用作混凝土掺合料的潜质。%Representative specimens of siliceous volcanic rocks were firstly collected from main volcanic areas in Jiangxi Province, and then their chemical composition, mineral type, structure, texture and vitreous proportion were analyzed by chemical composition analysis, petrographic analysis and X-ray diffraction. The pozzolanic activity index for these volcanic rocks was determined via com-pression strength ratio analysis of cement mortar and cement mixing mortar with powder of volcanic rock. The relations between rock performance and pozzolanic activity were further discussed based on the statistical significance. The results indicate that the volcanic rocks possess a pozzolanic activity index of ≥65%so to satisfy a demand of natural pozzolanic materials used as cement mortar and concrete according to the relevant standards. Perlite has the highest pozzolanic activity among these volcanic rocks

  17. Climate Change Forces New Ecological States in Tropical Andean Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Michelutti, Neal; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Cooke, Colin A.; Hobbs, William O.; Vuille, Mathias; John P. Smol

    2015-01-01

    Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage ...

  18. Climate change and tropical Andean glaciers : past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Vuille, M.; Francou, Bernard; Wagnon, Patrick; I. Juen; G. Kaser; Mark, B G; Bradley, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Observations on glacier extent from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia give a detailed and unequivocal account of rapid shrinkage of tropical Andean glaciers since the Little Ice Age (LIA). This retreat however, was not continuous but interrupted by several periods of stagnant or even advancing glaciers, most recently around the end of the 20th century. New data from mass balance networks established on over a dozen glaciers allows comparison of the glacier behavior in the inner and outer tropics. It ...

  19. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Girardin, C; Doughty, C. E.; Cahuana, N.; Arenas, C. E.; Oliver, V.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning and grazing affect puna productivity? (3) if the montane forest expands into the puna, what will be the resulting change in productivity? The study sites are located at the South-eastern Peruvian ...

  20. Bayesian analysis of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1990-10-01

    The simple Poisson model generally gives a good fit to many volcanoes for volcanic eruption forecasting. Nonetheless, empirical evidence suggests that volcanic activity in successive equal time-periods tends to be more variable than a simple Poisson with constant eruptive rate. An alternative model is therefore examined in which eruptive rate(λ) for a given volcano or cluster(s) of volcanoes is described by a gamma distribution (prior) rather than treated as a constant value as in the assumptions of a simple Poisson model. Bayesian analysis is performed to link two distributions together to give the aggregate behavior of the volcanic activity. When the Poisson process is expanded to accomodate a gamma mixing distribution on λ, a consequence of this mixed (or compound) Poisson model is that the frequency distribution of eruptions in any given time-period of equal length follows the negative binomial distribution (NBD). Applications of the proposed model and comparisons between the generalized model and simple Poisson model are discussed based on the historical eruptive count data of volcanoes Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Etna (Italy). Several relevant facts lead to the conclusion that the generalized model is preferable for practical use both in space and time.

  1. Late Quarternary volcanic activity in the New Ireland Basin: Distribution and geochemical evolution of tephra at the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni chain, Papua New Guinea

    OpenAIRE

    Horz, Kersten

    2002-01-01

    The sedimentology, petrology, and geochemistry of volcanic ash beds in sediment cores recovered during the EDISON II Cruise (SO133) in the New Ireland Basin adjacent to the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) volcanic chain, east of Papua New Guinea are presented. Age determinations through AMS 14C supplemented by d18O on Globigerinoider ruber assisted the correlation of the tephra. Major and trace element compositions of numerous glass shards and minerals within the ash beds were determined using ...

  2. Long-Term Volcanic Activity at Shiveluch Volcano: Nine Years of ASTER Spaceborne Thermal Infrared Observations  

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Carter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiveluch (Kamchatka, Russia is the most active andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc, typically exhibiting near-continual high-temperature fumarolic activity and periods of exogenous lava dome emplacement punctuated by discrete large explosive eruptions. These eruptions can produce large pyroclastic flow (PF deposits, which are common on the southern flank of the volcano. Since 2000, six explosive eruptions have occurred that generated ash fall and PF deposits. Over this same time period, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER instrument has been acquiring image-based visible/near infrared (VNIR, short wave infrared (SWIR and thermal infrared (TIR data globally, with a particular emphasis on active volcanoes. Shiveluch was selected as an ASTER target of interest early in the mission because of its frequent activity and potential impact to northern Pacific air transportation. The north Pacific ASTER archive was queried for Shiveluch data and we present results from 2000 to 2009 that documents three large PF deposits emplaced on 19 May 2001, 9 May 2004, and 28 February 2005. The long-term archive of infrared data provides an excellent record on the changing activity and eruption state of the volcano.

  3. Genetic diversity and germplasm conservation of three minor Andean tuber crop species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malice M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Andean agrosystems, three minor tuber crop species are of regional or local importance: oca (Oxalis tuberosa Molina, ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Caldas and mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruiz and Pav.. Genetic diversity within these species is very large and could result from the high ecological and cultural variability that characterizes the Andean area. Nowadays, many anthropic or ecological factors cause the loss of diversity and contribute to genetic erosion. The development of conservation strategies for genetic resources of Andean tubers, in situ as well as ex situ, includes a better knowledge of diversity in addition to the study of Andean farming strategies linked to this genetic diversity.

  4. State dilemmas in applying the Previous Consultation Law in the Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Barrio de Mendoza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Peruvian government enacted a new law granting consultation rights to indigenous peoples as a mechanism to enhance social inclusion in the country. The law generated debates about the criteria to identify indigenous population in the Andean region. Why does this law have problems granting consultation rights to Andean people? This paper aims to answer the question by reviewing historically the different Andean identities and analyzing the current international debate on indigenity. Our main argument is that the government intrying to apply the law is structuring a restrictive model that is hardlyable to grasp the complexity and dynamism of Andean identities.

  5. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Zutta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects of climate change through reforestation and conservation. The objective of this study was to develop and analyze the distribution models of two species that form extensive woodlands along the Andes, namely Polylepis sericea and P. weberbaueri. This study utilized the program Maxent, climate and remotely sensed environmental layers at 1 km resolution. The predicted distribution model for P. sericea indicated that the species could be located in a variety of habitats along the Andean Cordillera, while P. weberbaueri was restricted to the high elevations of southern Peru and Bolivia. For both species, elevation and temperature metrics were the most significant factors for predicted distribution. Further model refinement of Polylepis and other Andean species using increasingly available satellite data demonstrate the potential to help define areas of diversity and improve conservation strategies for the Andes.

  6. Volcanic tremor at Volcán de Colima, México recorded during May 2002 and its interactions with the seismic signals produced by low-energy explosive activity and rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Reyes, Gabriel A.; Bretón, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The May 2002 eruption episode at Volcán de Colima, México represented the transition period between two stages of effusive activity which were characterized by the formation of lava flows. The short-period seismic signals, recorded during May 2002 at a distance of 1.6 km from the crater, were represented by volcanic tremor and the signals produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls. Two types of volcanic tremor were recognized: harmonic with two fundamental spectral frequencies of 1.2-1.4 Hz and 1.6-1.7 Hz and non-harmonic. The existence of two fundamental frequencies of volcanic tremor may indicate a two-vent magmatic conduit. No clear relationship between the variations in the spectral content of tremor and occurrence of explosions was observed. The waveforms of the signals, produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls and recorded on the background of volcanic tremor, were strongly modulated by the low-frequency harmonic tremor signals, forming, in this manner, pseudo-long period events. Fourier analysis of the seismic signals associated with low-energy explosions and rockfalls but recorded on the background of regular seismic noise indicated their high-frequency sources characterized by dominant frequencies within 2-3 Hz and 3-4.5 Hz, respectively.

  7. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Andean evolution of the Aluminé fold and thrust belt, Northern Patagonian Andes (38°30‧-40°30‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2012-10-01

    The Aluminé fold and thrust belt between 38°30' and 40°30'S is the result of two periods of progression of deformation toward the foreland. The chronology of deformation and its relationship with magmatism through time show spatially and temporally separated magmatic events closely linked to distinct deformational stages. Data presented here confirms a Late Cretaceous mountain-building phase that coexisted in space and time with an eastward arc-migration. During this stage, a belt of deformation expanded through the foreland where it produced the Southern Neuquen Precordillera. This eastern independent mountain grew separately from the main Andean axis through a combination of inversion of the old rift systems and interaction with a pre-Andean belt which acted as a foreland obstacle. On the basis of tectonostratigraphic controls we define the last Andean contractional phase between the Late Miocene and the Pliocene. This event induced the reactivation of both sectors of the fold and thrust belt with minor propagation toward the foreland, leading to the uplift of the Patagonian Andes and reshaping the Southern Neuquén Precordillera. Both intervals of shortening are separated by a period of localized extension that resulted in the development of the Collón Cura basin within this Andean segment. Here, large thicknesses of volcanosedimentary sequences accumulated contemporaneously with the extensional activity between the earliest Oligocene and the Early Miocene.

  9. Neogene volcanism in Gutai Mts. (Eastern Carpathains: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinel Kovacs

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Two types of volcanism developed in Gutâi Mts. (inner volcanic chain of Eastern Carpathians: a felsic, extensional/“back-arc” type and an intermediate, arc type. The felsic volcanism of explosive origin, consisting of caldera-related rhyolitic ignimbrites and resedimented volcaniclastics, had taken place during Early-Middle Badenian and Early Sarmatian. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The geochemical study on the volcanic rocks shows the calc-alkaline character of both felsic and intermediate volcanism and typical subduction zones geochemical signatures for the intermediate one. The felsic volcanism shows affinities with subduction-related rocks as well. The main petrogenetic process in Gutâi Mts. was crustal assimilation, strongly constrained by trace element and isotope geochemistry.

  10. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  11. Petrologic insights into basaltic volcanism at historically active Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 6 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Thornber, Carl R.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the petrology of Hawaiian volcanoes, in particular the historically active volcanoes on the Island of Hawai‘i, has long been of worldwide scientific interest. When Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., established the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in 1912, detailed observations on basaltic activity at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes increased dramatically. The period from 1912 to 1958 saw a gradual increase in the collection and analysis of samples from the historical eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa and development of the concepts needed to evaluate them. In a classic 1955 paper, Howard Powers introduced the concepts of magnesia variation diagrams, to display basaltic compositions, and olivine-control lines, to distinguish between possibly comagmatic and clearly distinct basaltic lineages. In particular, he and others recognized that Kīlauea and Mauna Loa basalts must have different sources.

  12. Exploring a long-lasting volcanic eruption by means of in-soil radon measurements and seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, Susanna; Neri, Marco; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Langer, Horst; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We analyze in-soil radon (Rn) emission and ambient parameters (barometric pressure and air temperature measurements) along with seismic activity during the longest flank eruption of this century at Mt. Etna, Italy. This eruption occurred between 14 May 2008 and 6 July 2009, from a N120-140°E eruptive fissure extending between 3050 and 2620 m above sea level. It was heralded by a short-lived (~5 hours) episode of lava fountaining three days before a dike-forming intrusion fed a lava emission, which affected the summit area of the volcano over ~15 months. The peculiar position of the station for the Rn measurement, which was at an altitude of 2950 m above sea level and near (~1 km) the summit active craters, offered us the uncommon chance: i) to explore the temporal development of the gas emission close (SUV) project.

  13. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Vita, F.; C. Kern; Inguaggiato, S

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, po...

  14. Volcanic evolution of the South Sandwich volcanic arc, South Atlantic, from multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Philip T.; Day, Simon J.; Tate, Alex J.; Martin, Tara J.; Owen, Matthew J.; Tappin, David R.

    2013-09-01

    New multibeam bathymetry data are presented for the South Sandwich intra-oceanic arc which occupies the small Sandwich plate in the South Atlantic, and is widely considered to be a simple end-member in the range of intra-oceanic arc types. The images show for the first time the distribution of submarine volcanic, tectonic and erosional-depositional features along the whole length of the 540 km long volcanic arc, allowing systematic investigation of along-arc variations. The data confirm that the volcanic arc has a simple structure composed of large volcanoes which form a well-defined volcanic front, but with three parallel cross-cutting seamount chains extending 38-60 km from near the volcanic front into the rear-arc. There is no evidence for intra-arc rifting or extinct volcanic lines. Topographic evidence for faulting is generally absent, except near the northern and southern plate boundaries. Most of the volcanic arc appears to be built on ocean crust formed at the associated back-arc spreading centre, as previously proposed from magnetic data, but the southern part of the arc appears to be underlain by older arc or continental crust whose west-facing rifted margin facing the back-arc basin is defined by the new bathymetry. The new survey shows nine main volcanic edifices along the volcanic front and ca. 20 main seamounts. The main volcanoes form largely glaciated islands with summits 3.0-3.5 km above base levels which are 2500-3000 m deep in the north and shallower at 2000-2500 m deep in the south. Some of the component seamounts are interpreted to have been active since the last glacial maximum, and so are approximately contemporaneous with the volcanic front volcanism. Seven calderas, all either submarine or ice-filled, have been identified: Adventure volcano, a newly discovered submarine volcanic front caldera volcano is described for the first time. All but one of the calderas are situated on summits of large volcanoes in the southern part of the arc, and

  15. Specific activities of natural rocks and soils at quaternary intraplate volcanism north of Sana'a, Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of natural radioactivity in rocks and soil of 32 samples collected from locations at North Sana'a in Yemen was measured. Concentrations of radionuclides in rocks and soils samples were determined by gamma-ray spectrometer using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector with specially designed shield. The average radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K were determined and expressed in Bq/kg. The results showed that these radionuclides were present in concentrations of 21.79 ± 3.1, 19.5 ± 2.6 and 399.3 ± 16 Bq/kg, respectively, for rocks. For soil, the corresponding values were 48.2 ± 4.4, 41.7 ± 4.5 and 939.1 ± 36 Bq/kg, respectively. Also, the radiological hazard of the natural radionuclide content, radium equivalent activity, total dose rates, external hazard index and gamma activity concentration index of the (rocks/soils) samples in the area under consideration were calculated. The dose rates at 1 m above the ground from terrestrial sources were 38.39 and 86.89 nGy/h for rocks and surface soil, respectively, which present no significant health hazards to humans. (author)

  16. Magmatic and phreatomagmatic volcanic activity at Mt. Takahe, West Antarctica, based on tephra layers in the Byrd ice core and field observations at Mt. Takahe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, Julie M.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.; Seward, Diane

    1988-12-01

    The morphology, grain size characteristics and composition of ash particles in 30 ka to 150 ka tephra layers from the Byrd ice core were examined to characterize the eruptions which produced them and to test the suggestion that they were erupted from Mt. Takahe, a shield volcano in Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica. Volcanic deposits at Mt. Takahe were examined for evidence of recent activity which could correlate with the tephra layers in the ice core. Coarse- and fine-ash layers have been recognized in the Byrd ice core. The coarse-ash layers have a higher mass concentration than the fine-ash layers and are characterized by fresh glass shards > 50 μm diameter, many containing elongate pipe vesicles. The fine-ash layers have a lower mass concentration and contain a greater variety of particles, typically Takahe is the favored source for the tephra because: (a) chemical analyses of samples from the volcano are distinctive, being peralkaline trachyte, and similar in composition to the analyzed tephra; (b) Mt. Takahe is a young volcano (Takahe indicate styles of eruption similar to that inferred for the ice core tephra; and (d) Mt. Takahe is only about 350 km from the calculated site of tephra deposition. A speculative eruptive history for Mt. Takahe is established by combining observations from Mt. Takahe and the Byrd ice core tephra. Initial eruptions at Mt. Takahe were subglacial and then graded into alternating subaerial and subglacial activity. The tephra suggest alternating subaerial magmatic and hydrovolcanic eruptions from 30 to 20 ka B.P., followed by a sustained period of hydrovolcanic eruptions from 20 to 14 ka B.P., which peaked at 18 ka B.P.

  17. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of an active caldera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ground deformation and gravity changes in active calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide. Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling, which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains. Based on data for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy, a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas. Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of unrest, gravity

  18. Modelling of Subglacial Volcanic and Geothermal Activity, during the 2014-15 Bárdarbunga-Holuhraun Eruption and Caldera Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, H. I.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic unrest was observed within the subglacial caldera of Bárdarbunga on 16 August 2014, followed by seismicity tracing the path of a lateral dyke extending underneath the Vatnajökull glacier out to 45 km to the north east of the volcano. A short subaerial fissure eruption occurred at the site of the Holuhraun lavas, just north of the glacier edge on 29 August, before recommencing in earnest on 31 August with a large effusive eruption and accompanying slow caldera collapse, which lasted for approximately 6 months. The glacier surface around Bárdarbunga was monitored using aerial altimeter profiling. Several shallow depressions, known as ice cauldrons, formed around the caldera rim and on Dyngjujökull glacier above the dyke propagation path. The cauldrons range in volume from approximately 0.0003 km3 to 0.02 km3. Two types of melting were observed: high initial heat flux over a period of days which gradually disappears; and slower but more sustained melting rates. We present time series data of the development and evolution of these cauldrons, with estimates of the heat flux magnitudes involved.The nature of the heat source required to generate these cauldrons is not obvious. Two scenarios are explored: 1) small subglacial eruptions; or 2) increased geothermal activity induced by the dyke intrusion. We investigate these scenarios using numerical modelling, considering the surface heat flux produced, and timescales and spatial extent of associated surface anomalies. It is found that a magmatic intrusion into rocks where the groundwater is near the boiling point curve can cause rapid increase in geothermal activity, but even a shallow intrusion into a cold groundwater reservoir will have a muted thermal response. Thus, our results indicate that minor subglacial eruptions are the most plausible explanation for the observed rapid melting far from known geothermal areas. These results have implications for the interpretation of thermal signals observed at ice

  19. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R. [WRH Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, R.P. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  20. Evidence for the development of the Andean rain shadow from a Neogene isotopic record in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Jason A.; Currie, Brian S.; Shullenberger, Eric D.; Dunagan, Stan P.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Blanco, Nicolás; Tomlinson, Andrew J.; Rowe, Harry D.; Houston, John

    2010-04-01

    Varying ages from Triassic to Pliocene have been proposed for the onset of hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. The exact timing for the initiation of hyperaridity is critical for determining potential causes, which range from regional effects of global cooling to Andean uplift above elevations conducive to extreme rain shadows. Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of lower Miocene-Quaternary (21-0.015 Ma) palustrine and lacustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin reveals extreme changes in their oxygen and carbon isotopic composition during the Miocene. Limestone δ18O values increased by ˜ 5‰ from middle to late Miocene, ranging from - 5.5‰ at 12 Ma to - 1‰ at ˜ 6 Ma. Carbon isotopic values increase by 9‰ over the Neogene, from average values of - 3‰ at 21 Ma to + 3‰ at 12 Ma, and reaching a maximum of + 6‰ at 5 Ma. The increase in oxygen isotopic values occurred over a time span in which the catchment area of the basin experienced significant uplift, causing the δ18O value of precipitation to become more negative. We attribute the shift towards higher δ18O values to enhanced evaporative enrichment both of soil water or snow prior to infiltration, and within shallow lakes or wetlands prior to carbonate precipitation. The large increase in δ13C values was likely caused by a transition from a vegetated landscape influenced primarily by soil-respired CO 2 to a landscape largely devoid of vegetation and influenced by atmospheric and volcanic CO 2. Isotopic values of palustrine carbonates therefore indicate that hyperaridity commenced in the Calama Basin during the middle to late Miocene, in agreement with other paleoclimatic records from the basin. The cause for the onset of this climate change is thought to be due to the development of a strong Andean rain shadow associated with the uplift of the Andes to mean elevations > 2 km.

  1. Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs

  2. The Volcanic History of Mars and Influences on Carbon Outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of Mars has revealed some of the most impressive volcanic landforms found throughout the solar system. Volatiles outgassed from volcanoes were likely to have strongly influenced atmospheric chemistry and affected the martian climate. On Earth the role of carbon involved in volcanic outgassing is strongly influenced by tectonic setting, with the greatest weight percent contributions coming from partial mantle melts associated with hot spot volcanism. Most martian volcanic centers appear to represent this style of volcanism. Thus, one important factor in understanding the martian carbon cycle through time is understanding this volatile's link to the planet's volcanic history. The identified volcanic constructs on Mars are not unlike those of the Earth suggesting similar magmatic and eruptive processes. However, the dimensions of many martian volcanic features are significantly larger. The distribution of volcanoes and volcanic deposits on Mars are not spatially or temporally uniform. Large volcanoes (> 100 km diameter) are spatially concentrated in volcanic provinces that likely represent focused upwellings or zones of crustal weakness that enabled magma ascension. Smaller (10s km diameters) volcanoes such as cones, low shields and fissures are often grouped into fields and their lava flows coalesce to produce low slope plains. In some cases plains lava fields are quite extensive with little to no evidence for the volcanic constructs. Although martian volcanism appears to have been dominated by effusive eruptions with likely contributions from passive degassing from the interior, explosive volcanic centers and deposits are known to exist. After the development of a martian crust the planet's volcanic style appears to have evolved from early explosive activity to effusive activity centered at major volcanoes to effusive distributed activity in fields. However, questions remain as to whether or not these styles significantly overlapped in time and if so

  3. How do subduction processes contribute to forearc Andean uplift? Insights from numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinod, J.; Regard, V.; Letourmy, Y.; Henry, H.; Hassani, R.; Baratchart, S.; Carretier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present numerical models to study how changes in the process of subduction may explain the observed Quaternary uplift of the Andean forearc region. Indeed, most segments of the South American Pacific coasts between 16 and 32° S have been uplifting since the Lower Pleistocene, following a period of stability of the forearc region. Models confirm that local uplift is expected to occur above ridges, this phenomenon being predominant in central Peru where the Nazca Ridge is subducting. We investigate the effects of slab pull, interplate friction and convergence velocity on the vertical displacements of the overriding plate. We propose that the global tendency to coastal uplift is accompanying the deceleration of the Nazca-South America convergence that occurred in the Pleistocene. In contrast, forearc subsidence may accompany increasing convergence velocities, as suggested by the subsidence history of the South America active margin.

  4. Understanding Volcanic Conduit Dynamics: from Experimental Fragmentation to Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    and the effects of such process on the conduit dynamics are independent of size. We first described the very-long period (VLP) and long-period (LP) signals, observed in many active volcanoes around the world, and from comparison of waveform characteristics with their experimental analogues (eLP and eVLP signals) we found remarkable similarities and equivalent physical meaning. Based on our experimental investigations and analysis of field data recorded during volcanic eruptions we may conclude that VLP signals are caused by the inflation-deflation behavior of the volcanic conduit due to the decompression process, and that LP signals are manly associated with cracking and fragmentation of the magmatic material (ash, magma and gas) filling the conduit and ascending to the surface. In addition, we accounted for the repetitive character of LP and VLP signals, as a consequence of contraction and dilatation of a steady non-destructive source mechanism, which systematically responds to pressure changes of the volcanic system.

  5. Seismo-volcanic sources on Stromboli volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Luckett

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of broadband seismic recordings leads to models of eruption mechanisms for Strombolian activity. The data used comprise signals from arrays of nine three-component seismometers and video recordings of visual eruptive activity with precise time reference. As a major tool particle motion analysis is used to locate the seismo-volcanic sources. Here, a surface correction is employed to account for the effects of the steep slopes of the volcanic edifice. After careful filtering of the data single seismic phases can be separated and linked to corresponding eruptive features.

  6. The origin and crust/mantle mass balance of Central Andean ignimbrite magmatism constrained by oxygen and strontium isotopes and erupted volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Heye; Brandmeier, Melanie; Wörner, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Volcanism during the Neogene in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes produced (1) stratovolcanoes, (2) rhyodacitic to rhyolitic ignimbrites which reach volumes of generally less than 300 km3 and (3) large-volume monotonous dacitic ignimbrites of up to several thousand cubic kilometres. We present models for the origin of these magma types using O and Sr isotopes to constrain crust/mantle proportions for the large-volume ignimbrites and explore the relationship to the evolution of the Andean crust. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured on phenocrysts in order to avoid the effects of secondary alteration. Our results show a complete overlap in the Sr-O isotope compositions of lavas from stratovolcanoes and low-volume rhyolitic ignimbrites as well as older (>9 Ma) large-volume dacitic ignimbrites. This suggests that the mass balance of crustal and mantle components are largely similar. By contrast, younger (70 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (assuming plutonic/volcanic ratios of 1:5) which are additional to, but within the order of, the arc background magmatic flux. Comparing our results to average shortening rates observed in the Andes, we observe a "lag-time" with large-volume eruptions occurring after accelerated shortening. A similar delay exists between the ignimbrite pulses and the subduction of the Juan Fernandez ridge. This is consistent with the idea that large-volume ignimbrite eruptions occurred in the wake of the N-S passage of the ridge after slab steepening has allowed hot asthenospheric mantle to ascend into and cause the melting of the mantle wedge. In our model, the older large-volume dacitic ignimbrites in the northern part of the CVZ have lower (15-37 %) crustal contributions because they were produced at times when the Central Andean crust was thinner and colder, and large-scale melting in the middle crust could not be achieved. Younger ignimbrite flare-ups further south (22°S) formed with a significantly higher crustal contribution (22-68 %) because at that

  7. Analysis of the drought recovery of Andosols on southern Ecuadorian Andean páramos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Vicente; Morales, Oscar; Cisneros, Felipe; Bauwens, Willy; Wyseure, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The Neotropical Andean grasslands above 3500 m a.s.l., known as páramo, offer remarkable ecological services for the Andean region. The most important of these is the water supply of excellent quality to many cities and villages in the inter-Andean valleys and along the coast. The páramo ecosystem and especially its soils are under constant and increased threat by human activities and climate change. In this study, the recovery speed of the páramo soils after drought periods are analysed. The observation period includes the droughts of 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 together with intermediate wet periods. Two experimental catchments - one with and one without páramo - were investigated. The Probability Distributed Moisture (PDM) model was calibrated and validated in both catchments. Drought periods and its characteristics were identified and quantified by a threshold level approach and complemented by means of a drought propagation analysis. At the plot scale in the páramo region, the soil water content measured by time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes dropped from a normal value of about 0.84 to ˜ 0.60 cm3 cm-3, while the recovery time was 2-3 months. This did not occur at lower altitudes (Cumbe) where the soils are mineral. Although the soil moisture depletion observed in these soils was similar to that of the Andosols (27 %), decreasing from a normal value of about 0.54 to ˜ 0.39 cm3 cm-3, the recovery was much slower and took about 8 months for the drought in 2010. At the catchment scale, however, the soil water storage simulated by the PDM model and the drought analysis was not as pronounced. Soil moisture droughts occurred mainly in the dry season in both catchments. The deficit for all cases is small and progressively reduced during the wet season. Vegetation stress periods correspond mainly to the months of September, October and November, which coincides with the dry season. The maximum number of consecutive dry days were reached during the drought of

  8. Self-potential changes associated with volcanic activity. Short-term signals associated with March 9, 1998 eruption on La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlotniki, J. [UMR6530, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Laboratoire de Geomagnetisme, Paris (France); Le Mouel, J. L. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Laboratoire de Geomagnetisme, Paris (France); Sasai, Y. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Italy). Earthquake Research Institute; Yvetot, P.; Ardisson, M. H. [UMR6524, Laboratoire de Geophysique d' Orleans, Orleans (France)

    2001-04-01

    After six years of quietness La Fournaise volcano entered into activity on March 9, 1998. Fissures opened gradually downwards on the northern flank of the cone. Two cones, Kapor and Krafft built, from which lava poured until September 1998. Several other vents opened during this eruption. Mappings, surveys, and continuous recordings of the Self-Potential have been performed on the volcano for twenty years. SP mappings disclose the variability of large scale SP anomalies due to the modification of the hydrothermal system over some ten years. Most of the eruptions take place along a Main Fracture Zone (MFZ), in which ground water flows prevail. SP measurements have also regularly been made on the northern flank of the cone, on a west-east profile crossing the MFZ. Between 1981 and 1992 an enlargement and a shift of the MFZ to the east are evidenced. In particular, the eastern fissural axis trending N35{sup 0}E could be related to the possible collapse of the east flank of the volcano. After a decrease between 1992 and 1997, the SP anomaly was enhanced again by the 1998 eruption. Short scale, about 250 m wide, 750 mV amplitude anomalies were superimposed on a large scale one, 2500 m wide, and about 250 mV in amplitude. For several years, continuous stations have been measuring the electric field along two directions, with a 20 s sampling, in order to record the genesis of SP signals associated with the volcanic activity. Oscillations belonging to the ULF band were evidenced several days before the 1988 eruption, some of them at 9 km from the summit. Their amplitude reached several tens mV/km. These oscillations sometimes present a phase lag from summit. Their amplitude reached several tens mV/km. These oscillations sometimes present a phase lag from one station to another; they progressively shift towards the location of the future effusive vents. The polarisation of the oscillations is similar to the polarisation of longer SP variations (1 h period or more) and are

  9. Self-potential chenges associated with volcanic activity: Short-term signals associated with March 9, 1998 eruption on La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yvetot

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available After six years of quietness La Fournaise volcano entered into activity on March 9, 1998. Fissures opened gradually downwards on the northern flank of the cone. Two cones, Kapor and Krafft built, from which lava poured until September 1998. Several other vents opened during this eruption. Mappings, surveys, and continuous recordings of the Self-Potential have been performed on the volcano for twenty years. SP mappings disclose the variability of large scale SP anomalies due to the modification of the hydrothermal system over some ten years. Most of the eruptions take place along a Main Fracture Zone (MFZ in which ground water flows prevail. SP measurements have also regularly been made on the northern flank of the cone, on a west-east profile crossing the MFZ. Between 1981 and 1992 an enlargement and a shift of the MFZ to the east are evidenced. In particular, the eastern fissural axis trending N35°E could be related to the possible collapse of the east flank of the volcano. After a decrease between 1992 and 1997, the SP anomaly was enhanced again by the 1998 eruption. Short scale, about 250 m wide, 750 mV amplitude anomalies were superimposed on a large scale one, 2500 m wide, and about 250 mV in amplitude. For several years, continuous stations have been measuring the electric field along two directions, with a 20 s sampling, in order to record the genesis of SP signals associated with the volcanic activity. Oscillations belonging to the ULF band were evidenced several days before the 1988 eruption, some of them at 9 km from the summit. Their amplitude reached several tens mV/km. These oscillations sometimes present a phase lag from one station to another; they progressively shift towards the location of the future effusive vents. The polarisation of the oscillations is similar to the polarisation of longer SP variations (1 h period or more and are correlated with the structural anisotropy. Finally, during the last hours preceding the

  10. Integration, migration and sustainable development in the Andean group of nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R; Kratochwil, H

    1993-04-01

    This paper, which was presented at the 1993 meeting of the International Organization for Migration, summarizes past and recent progress in Andean integration and migration arrangements. Changes in the strategy of the Andean group of nations (GAN) have occurred in the adjustment to prevailing conditions at the subregional and international level. GAN includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. The Andean Pact originated with the signing of the Cartegena Agreement in 1969. Members approved the Andean Strategic Design in 1989, which loosened up trade integration and the movement of capital, services, and persons across shared borders. The Strategic Design also addressed issues resulting from economic and social integration. A statement of migratory patterns among GAN, Andean integration during 1969-89, and the goals and operation of the Andean Strategic Design and integration are discussed in some detail. The Galapagos Declaration and the La Paz Statement of 1990 are also described. The present situation with Andean integration is based on the following meetings of Andean nations: the First Meeting of Migration Officials of the Andean Group of Nations in March 1991, the Second Meeting of Migration Officials in September 1991, and bilateral agreements between Andean nations. Seven basic conclusions are drawn: 1) the strategy is an institutional, deliberate, programmed process; 2) integration within GAN is the culmination of a joint, coordinated directive of achievement of sustainable development in the subregion which aims to reduce the economic gaps between the North and the South, to lessen the impact of protected markets of the North and their migration barriers, and to improve the possibility of development of technologically sophisticated human capital; 3) subregional policies are more sensitive to short-term change in domestic politics; 4) integration and migration can be sustained better with deliberate planning; 5) implementation is dependent on

  11. Holocene explosive volcanism of the Jan Mayen (island) volcanic province, North-Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerløw, Eirik; Haflidason, H.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    The volcanic island Jan Mayen, located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, hosts the active stratovolcano of Beerenberg, the northernmost active subaerial volcano in the world. At least five eruptions are known from the island following its discovery in the 17th century, but its eruptive history prior to this is basically unknown. In this paper two sediment cores retrieved close to Jan Mayen have been studied in detail to shed light on the Holocene history of explosive volcanism from the Jan Mayen volcanic province. Horizons with elevated tephra concentrations were identified and tephra from these was analysed to determine major element chemistry of the tephra. The tephra chemistry was used to provide a link between the two cores and the land based tephra records from Jan Mayen Island. We managed to link two well-developed tephra peaks in the cores by their geochemical composition and age to Jan Mayen. One of these peaks represents the 1732 AD eruption of Eggøya while the other peak represents a previously undescribed eruption dated to around 10.3 ka BP. Two less prominent tephra peaks, one in each core, dated to approximately 2.3 and 3.0 ka BP, also have a distinct geochemical character linking them to Jan Mayen volcanism. However, the most prominent tephra layer in the cores located close to Jan Mayen and numerous other cores along the Jan Mayen ridge is the 12.1 ka BP Vedde Ash originating from the Iceland volcanic province. We find that the Holocene volcanism on Jan Mayen is much less explosive than volcanism in Iceland, and propose that either low amounts of explosive volcanic activity from the summit region of Beerenberg or small to absent glacier cover on Beerenberg is responsible for this.

  12. Possible Late Pleistocene volcanic activity on Nightingale Island, South Atlantic Ocean, based on geoelectrical resistivity measurements, sediment corings and (14)C dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Anders Anker; Björck, Svante; Cronholm, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island group situated in the central South Atlantic. The oldest of these islands, Nightingale Island, has an age of about 18Ma. In the interior of the island, there are several wetlands situated in topographic depressions. The ages of these basins have been unknown...

  13. Monitoring gas emissions can help forecast volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Maarten de Moor,; Bo Galle,

    2015-01-01

    As magma ascends in active volcanoes, dissolved volatiles partition from melt into a gas phase, rise, and are released into the atmosphere from volcanic vents. The major components of high-temperature volcanic gas are typically water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. 

  14. SENP1, but not fetal hemoglobin, differentiates Andean highlanders with chronic mountain sickness from healthy individuals among Andean highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Matthew M; Callacondo, David; Rojas-Camayo, Jose; Quesada-Olarte, Jose; Wang, Xunde; Uchida, Naoya; Maric, Irina; Remaley, Alan T; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Villafuerte, Francisco C; Tisdale, John F

    2016-06-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) results from chronic hypoxia. It is unclear why certain highlanders develop CMS. We hypothesized that modest increases in fetal hemoglobin (HbF) are associated with lower CMS severity. In this cross-sectional study, we found that HbF levels were normal (median = 0.4%) in all 153 adult Andean natives in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. Compared with healthy adults, the borderline elevated hemoglobin group frequently had symptoms (headaches, tinnitus, cyanosis, dilatation of veins) of CMS. Although the mean hemoglobin level differed between the healthy (17.1 g/dL) and CMS (22.3 g/dL) groups, mean plasma erythropoietin (EPO) levels were similar (healthy, 17.7 mIU/mL; CMS, 12.02 mIU/mL). Sanger sequencing determined that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in endothelial PAS domain 1 (EPAS1) and egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1), associated with lower hemoglobin in Tibetans, were not identified in Andeans. Sanger sequencing of sentrin-specific protease 1 (SENP1) and acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family, member D (ANP32D), in healthy and CMS individuals revealed that non-G/G genotypes were associated with higher CMS scores. No JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in CMS individuals. Thus, HbF and other classic erythropoietic parameters did not differ between healthy and CMS individuals. However, the non-G/G genotypes of SENP1 appeared to differentiate individuals with CMS from healthy Andean highlanders.

  15. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  16. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  17. Lidar Observations of Aerosol Disturbances of the Stratosphere over Tomsk (56.5∘N; 85.0∘E in Volcanic Activity Period 2006–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg E. Bazhenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The lidar measurements (Tomsk: 56.5∘N; 85.0∘E of the optical characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL in the volcanic activity period 2006–2011 are summarized and analyzed. The background SAL state with minimum aerosol content, observed since 1997 under the conditions of long-term volcanically quiet period, was interrupted in October 2006 by series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire: Rabaul (October 2006, New Guinea; Okmok and Kasatochi (July-August 2008, Aleutian Islands; Redoubt (March-April 2009, Alaska; Sarychev Peak (June 2009, Kuril Islands; Grimsvötn (May 2011, Iceland. A short-term and minor disturbance of the lower stratosphere was also observed in April 2010 after eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull. The developed regional empirical model of the vertical distribution of background SAL optical characteristics was used to identify the periods of elevated stratospheric aerosol content after each of the volcanic eruptions. Trends of variations in the total ozone content are also considered.

  18. Evolution of Mesozoic Volcanic Basins and Red Basins in the Gan-Hang Tectonic-Volcanic Metallogenic Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper mainly proposes six major regional geological events in the active continental-margin mantle uplift zone and discusses the oscillation nature of the evolution of Mesozoic volcanic basins and red basins, origin of erosion in the late stage of red basins and mechanism of volcanism.

  19. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt ( than about 7 x 10-8 events yr-1 . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain sit

  20. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  1. Dynamic Paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of regression and general considerations on main features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-C. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following examination of the evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin at a global scale for the Central Andes, this paper analyses the pattern of the regressive process, and discusses some general features concerning Andean Jurassic Paleogeography. The early Upper Jurassic regression obeys to an exactly reverse pattern as the one evidenced for the Lower Jurassic transgressive process. Sectors with late transgressions become those with early regressions while those with early transgressions show later regressions. This fact may indicate that the Norte Chico Isthmus (29°S to 30°30'S was a precociously emerged zone from the Bajocian. This carries again a split up between the Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén basins until their complete drying up in the Late Oxfordian following their restricted circulation. This evaporitic late stage presents great analogy with the Mediterranean «Messinian crisis» and gives evidence of a general tectonic and magmatic control on the straits. The local transgressions observed on the cratonic margin of the central part of these shrinking basins were due to shifting of water masses resulting from the regressive process on the northern and southern margins. Comparison between the main stages of transgression and regression allows some quantification concerning velocities of displacement of coastlines, specifically lengthwise. The permanence of paleogeographic and structural features over the time argues for an indisputable tectonic heritage. In the dynamic framework of this typical barred retroarc basin where arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably to variation on sediment supply and changing bathymetry of the seaways connecting with the Pacific Ocean, evidence for an assumed global eustatic cycle remains questionable or very subordinated.

  2. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  3. Climate change forces new ecological states in tropical Andean lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    Full Text Available Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage of glaciers regionally. Using dated sediment cores from three lakes in the southern Sierra of Ecuador, we record abrupt increases in the planktonic thalassiosiroid diatom Discostella stelligera from trace abundances to dominance within the phytoplankton. This unprecedented shift occurs against the backdrop of rising temperatures, changing atmospheric pressure fields, and declining wind speeds. Ecological restructuring in these lakes is linked to warming and/or enhanced water column stratification. In contrast to seasonally ice-covered Arctic and temperate alpine counterparts, aquatic production has not increased universally with warming, and has even declined in some lakes, possibly because enhanced thermal stability impedes the re-circulation of hypolimnetic nutrients to surface waters. Our results demonstrate that these lakes have already passed important ecological thresholds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for Andean water resources.

  4. Andean microrefugia: testing the Holocene to predict the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Bryan G; Matthews-Bird, Frazer; Urrego, Dunia H; Williams, Joseph J; Gosling, William D; Bush, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Microrefugia are important for supporting populations during periods of unfavourable climate change and in facilitating rapid migration as conditions ameliorate. With ongoing anthropogenic climate change, microrefugia could have an important conservation value; however, a simple tool has not been developed and tested to predict which settings are microrefugial. We provide a tool based on terrain ruggedness modelling of individual catchments to predict Andean microrefugia. We tested the predictions using nine Holocene Polylepis pollen records. We used the mid-Holocene dry event, a period of peak aridity for the last 100 000 yr, as an analogue climate scenario for the near future. The results suggest that sites with high terrain rugosity have the greatest chance of sustaining mesic conditions under drier-than-modern climates. Fire is a feature of all catchments; however, an increase in fire is only recorded in settings with low rugosity. Owing to rising temperatures and greater precipitation variability, Andean ecosystems are threatened by increasing moisture stress. Our results suggest that high terrain rugosity helps to create more resilient catchments by trapping moisture through orographic rainfall and providing firebreaks that shelter forest from fire. On this basis, conservation policy should target protection and management of catchments with high terrain rugosity. PMID:27374975

  5. Andean rural children's views of the environment: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurial, Mahia

    Andean rural children's drawings and narratives about their crops and the immediate biological environment are rich tools to understand local views of the environment. Children's drawings and narratives were collected and linked to interviews as well as participant observation gathered from parents, leaders and teachers. The research sites are the community of Willca and the school of Mayu. Fieldwork was completed in 1998. In the conceptual framework I distinguish between two dissimilar knowledges, school knowledge and local knowledge. These knowledges produce two dissimilar views of the environment. I further analyze relationships of knowledge and power and argue that school knowledge overpowers local knowledge. Concomitantly, I studied set of ideas associated with two knowledges aforementioned: superacion (surpass) and regeneration (Apffel-Marglin 1995). Although these ideas coexist in peoples' minds they are not linked or effectively connected. In order to link local knowledge and school knowledge together, I propose the integration of environmental studies and art education to enhance a local sense of place (Blandy et. al 1993) in Andean and other schools. This will contribute to grassroots educational policy.

  6. Volcanic hazards and public response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.

    1988-05-01

    Although scientific understanding of volcanoes is advancing, eruptions continue to take a substantial toll of life and property. Some of these losses could be reduced by better advance preparation, more effective flow of information between scientists and public officials, and better understanding of volcanic behavior by all segments of the public. The greatest losses generally occur at volcanoes that erupt infrequently where people are not accustomed to dealing with them. Scientists sometimes tend to feel that the blame for poor decisions in emergency management lies chiefly with officials or journalists because of their failure to understand the threat. However, the underlying problem embraces a set of more complex issues comprising three pervasive factors. The first factor is the volcano: signals given by restless volcanoes are often ambiguous and difficult to interpret, especially at long-quiescent volcanoes. The second factor is people: people confront hazardous volcanoes in widely divergent ways, and many have difficulty in dealing with the uncertainties inherent in volcanic unrest. The third factor is the scientists: volcanologists correctly place their highest priority on monitoring and hazard assessment, but they sometimes fail to explain clearly their conclusions to responsible officials and the public, which may lead to inadequate public response. Of all groups in society, volcanologists have the clearest understanding of the hazards and vagaries of volcanic activity; they thereby assume an ethical obligation to convey effectively their knowledge to benefit all of society. If society resists, their obligation nevertheless remains. They must use the same ingenuity and creativity in dealing with information for the public that they use in solving scientific problems. When this falls short, even excellent scientific results may be nullified.

  7. Monitoring glaciers and indications of subglacial volcanic activity using small-scale Top-Hat reflectors - An IsViews experiment on Myrdalsjökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, Christian; Duque Biarge, Sergi; Jaenicke, Julia; Münzer, Ulrich; Mayer, Christoph; Franke, Jonas; Guðmundsson, Águst; Parizzi, Alessandro; Fritz, Thomas; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Subglacial volcanic eruptions often provide indications of activity some time before the actual catastrophic event. Surface undulations appear on top of the ice cap and meltwater torrents can occur at the glacier margin. Even large scale uplifts of ice caps have been observed. Within the project IsViews a processing chain, based on high spatially and temporally resolved remote sensing imagery, will be developed in order to automatically identify such early indications. The main data used for this analysis are acquired by the TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X and RapidEye satellites. First investigations concerning the feasibility of the near real-time warning system and the general baseline conditions are carried out on two large plateau glaciers in southern Iceland, namely Mördalsjökull and Vatnajökull. Within the 2013 IsViews field work an experiment was started in order to test a new way of glacier monitoring. Two test sites were established on the Mördalsjökull ice cap (one at the equilibrium line and one below), each consisting of a permanent GPS station and two nearby RADAR reflectors. These RADAR reflectors are specially designed Top-Hat reflectors, which are cheap to manufacture, small (50 cm diameter) and lightweight and therefore easy to handle, transport and deploy. Their special design makes them visible in SAR images independent of orientation, so different acquisition geometries and even different sensors can be used. The drawback of the small, low reflecting Top-Hat can be overcome by using the newly implemented Staring Spotlight Mode of the German SAR Satellite TerraSAR-X, providing an unprecedented resolution of down to 20 cm in the azimuth direction. The reflectors, as point targets, allow absolute positioning within the cm-level in the TerraSAR-X data. Time series of SAR data can be used to derive position and altitude changes of the reflector itself and possibly even melting rates by exploiting the different signal paths. The visibility of the Top

  8. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N

    1992-05-15

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  9. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  10. CENOZOIC VOLCANISM AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN NORTHEAST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on Cenozoic volcanism and geothermal resources in Northeast China. There are a lot of Cenozoic volcanoes, a large area of volcanic rocks, a large number of active faults and rich geothermal resources in Northeast China. The time and space characteristics of Cenozoic volcanism and the space distribution characters of hot springs and high geothermal flux regions in Northeast China are described and discussed on the basis of geological, geothermal, drilling and volcanological data. It is revealed that the hot springs and high geothermal flux regions are re lated to the Cenozoic volcanism, rifting and faulting in Northeast China. It is especially emphasized that the hot springs and high geothermal anomaly areas are controlled by active deep faults. It is proposed that the Cenozoic volcanism re gions, rift basins, active fault belts, activated plate suture zones and large earthquake occurrence points are the best areas for prospecting geothermal resources. The geothermal resources in younger volcanic zones are richer than those in older volcanic belts. The hot springs and active or activated faults might be a very good clue for looking for geothermal resources.

  11. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  12. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  13. The Carrán-Los Venados volcanic field and its relationship with coeval and nearby polygenetic volcanism in an intra-arc setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Francisco; Lara, Luis E.; Gutiérrez, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between monogenetic and polygenetic volcanism has been a long-standing goal in volcanology, especially in cases where these two styles of volcanism are coeval and geographically adjacent. We studied the Carrán-Los Venados (CLV) volcanic field and made comparisons with published data on CLV's polygenetic neighbor Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (PCC) in the Southern Andean arc, using quantitative tools and recent numerical simulations of magma reservoir formation. CLV is a basaltic to basaltic andesitic volcanic field composed of 65 post-glacial scoria cones and maars and a 1-km-high Pleistocene stratovolcano, whereas PCC is a basaltic to rhyolitic composite volcano. Our results point to three main differences between CLV and PCC: (1) the CLV magmas differentiate at low-crustal reservoirs, followed by rapid ascent to the surface, while the PCC magmas stagnate and differentiate in lower- and upper-crustal reservoirs; (2) CLV is elongated in the NE direction while PCC is elongated in the NW direction. Under the current stress field (N60°E σHmax), these two volcanic alignments correspond, respectively, to local extensional and compressive deformation zones within the arc; and (3), the post-glacial CLV magma flux was estimated to be 3.1 ± 1.0 km3/ky, which is similar to the average magma flux estimated for PCC; however, the PCC magma flux is estimated at approximately twice this value during peak eruptive periods (5.5 ± 1.1 km3/ky). Based on numerical simulations, CLV is in a limit situation to create and sustain a mush-type upper-crustal reservoir containing highly crystalline magma, which is however not eruptible. The PCC volcanic system would have been able to create a stable reservoir containing eruptible silicic magma during periods of peak magma flux. We postulate that monogenetic volcanism occurs at CLV due to both low magma flux and an extensional/transtensional regime that favors rapid magma rise without storage and differentiation in

  14. E-MORB glasses from the Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) at 87°N: evidence for the Earth's most northerly volcanic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mühe, R.; Bohrmann, H.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Kassens, Heidemarie

    1997-01-01

    During the ARCTIC '91 expedition aboard RV Polarstern (ARK VIII/3) to the Central Arctic Ocean, a box corer sample on the Gakkel Ridge at 87 degrees N and 60 degrees E yielded a layer of sand-sized, dark brown volcanic glass shards at the surface of the sediment core. These shards have been investigated by petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and radiogenic isotope methods. The nearly vesicle-free and aphyric glass shards bear only minute microphenocrysts of magnesiochromite and olivine (...

  15. Air Pollution by Hydrothermal Volcanism and Human Pulmonary Function

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Linhares; Patrícia Ventura Garcia; Fátima Viveiros; Teresa Ferreira; Armindo dos Santos Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether chronic exposure to volcanogenic air pollution by hydrothermal soil diffuse degassing is associated with respiratory defects in humans. This study was carried in the archipelago of the Azores, an area with active volcanism located in the Atlantic Ocean where Eurasian, African, and American lithospheric plates meet. A cross-sectional study was performed on a study group of 146 individuals inhabiting an area where volcanic activity is marked by active...

  16. Active tectonics of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, J. F.; Lamb, S. H.

    1992-04-01

    Nearly 90 mm a -1 of relative plate convergence is absorbed in the Andean plate-boundary zone. The pattern of active tectonics shows remarkable variations in the way in which the plate slip vector is partitioned into displacement and strain and the ways in which compatibility between different segments is solved. Along any traverse across the plate-boundary zone, the sum of relative velocities between points must equal the relative plate motion. We have developed a kinematic synthesis of displacement and strain partitioning in the Andes from 47°S to 5°N relevant for the last 5 Ma based upon: (1) relative plate motion deduced from oceanic circuits giving a roughly constant azimuth between 075 and 080; (2) moment tensor solutions for over 120 crustal earthquakes since 1960; (3) structural studies of deformed Plio-Pleistocene rocks; (4) topographic/geomorphic studies; (5) palaeomagnetic data; and (6) geodetic data. We recognize four neotectonic zones, with subzones and boundary transfer zones, that are partitioned in different ways. These zones are not coincident with the 'classic' zones defined by the presence or absence of a volcanic chain or differences in finite displacements and strains and tectonic form; the long-term segmentation and finite evolution of the Andes may not occur in constantly defined segments in space and time. In Segment 1 (47°-39°S), the slip vector is partitioned into roughly orthogonal Benioff Zone slip with large magnitude/large slip-surface earthquakes and both distributed dextral shear giving clockwise rotations of up to 50° and dextral slip in the curved Liquine-Ofqui Fault System giving 5°-10° of anticlockwise fore-arc rotation. In Segment 2 (39°-20°S), the slip vector is partitioned into Benioff Zone slip roughly parallel with the slip vector, Andean crustal shortening and a very small component of dextral slip, including that on the Atacama Fault System. Between 39° and 34°S, a cross-strike dextral transfer, which deflects

  17. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  18. An Outbreak of Bartonella bacilliformis in an Endemic Andean Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Clemente, Nuria; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Solorzano, Nelson; Maguiña, Ciro; Moore, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Bartonellosis affects small Andean communities in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador. Research in this area has been limited. Methods Retrospective review of 191 cases of bartonellosis managed in Caraz District Hospital, Peru, during the last outbreak (2003). Results The majority of cases (65%) were 14 years old and younger. There was a peak in acute cases after the rainy season; chronic cases presented more constantly throughout the year. The sensitivity of blood smear against blood culture in acute disease was 25%. The most commonly used treatment for chronic disease was rifampicin; chloramphenicol was used to treat most acute cases. Complications arose in 6.8% and there were no deaths. Conclusions Diagnostic and treatment algorithms for acute and chronic bartonellosis have been developed without a strong evidence base. Preparation of ready-to-go operational research protocols for future outbreaks would strengthen the evidence base for diagnostic and treatment strategies and enhance opportunities for control. PMID:26991495

  19. Spatial random downscaling of rainfall signals in Andean heterogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas, A.; Duffaut Espinosa, L. A.; Yarlequé, C.; Carbajal, M.; Heidinger, H.; Carvalho, L.; Jones, C.; Quiroz, R.

    2015-07-01

    Remotely sensed data are often used as proxies for indirect precipitation measures over data-scarce and complex-terrain areas such as the Peruvian Andes. Although this information might be appropriate for some research requirements, the extent at which local sites could be related to such information is very limited because of the resolution of the available satellite data. Downscaling techniques are used to bridge the gap between what climate modelers (global and regional) are able to provide and what decision-makers require (local). Precipitation downscaling improves the poor local representation of satellite data and helps end-users acquire more accurate estimates of water availability. Thus, a multifractal downscaling technique complemented by a heterogeneity filter was applied to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) 3B42 gridded data (spatial resolution ~ 28 km) from the Peruvian Andean high plateau or Altiplano to generate downscaled rainfall fields that are relevant at an agricultural scale (spatial resolution ~ 1 km).

  20. A new Andean species of Philodryas (Dipsadidae, Xenodontinae) from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaher, Hussam; Arredondo, Juan C; Valencia, Jorge H; Arbeláez, Ernesto; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Altamirano-Benavides, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new species of Philodryas from the highlands of southern Ecuador. The new species is distinguished from all known species of Philodryas by a unique combination of coloration, scalation, and hemipenial characters. The new species resembles Philodryas simonsii in color pattern. However, they differ notoriously by their hemipenial morphology. The three other trans-Andean members of the genus (Philodryas simonsii, Philodryas chamissonis, and Philodryas tachymenoides), along with the new species, compose a probably monophyletic group that may be characterized by the presence of ungrooved postdiastemal teeth in the maxilla. Unlike most species of the genus Philodryas, the new species shows a restricted distribution, being apparently endemic to a small region of high-altitude (3150-4450m) grasslands in the southern Andes of Ecuador. PMID:24872238

  1. A new minute Andean Pristimantis (Anura: Strabomantidae from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César L. Barrio-Amorós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Pristimantis is described from the Venezuelan Andes. The new species is the smallest in its genus known in Venezuela and belongs to the Pristimantis unistrigatus Group. It differs from the rest of Venezuelan Andean congeners in body size (mean male SVL < 21.3 mm, female SVL < 26.3 mm, expanded discs on fingers and toes, absence of dorsolateral folds, and a distinctivecall consisting in 2–5 cricket-like short notes. The new species inhabits the southwestern part of the Cordillera de Mérida in Venezuela and the Venezuelan side of the Cordillera Oriental deColombia, and could be present on the Colombian portion of the cordillera as well.

  2. Climate Change Impacts in a Colombian Andean Tropical Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, O. L.; Vélez, J. J.; Londoño, A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and climate variability have a large impact on water resources. Developing regions have less capacity to prepare for, respond to, and recover from climate-related hazards and effects, and then, populations may be disproportionately affected. In Colombia, the geographical location and the marked irregularity in the terrain, give as a result, a complex climate. These factors have contributed to the water supply of the territory. Unfortunately, the visualization of abundant and inexhaustible water resources created a great disregard for them. Besides, the water supply is not distributed uniformly across the country, and then there is water-deficit in some areas as Andean Region, where the largest population and the main development centers are located. In recent decades, water conflicts have emerged locally and regionally, which have generated a crisis in the allocation mechanisms and have improved the understanding of the water situation in Colombia. The Second National Communication to CCMNU alerts on possible future consequences of climate change and the need for regional studies for understanding climate change impacts on the fragile ecosystems of high mountains as paramos and fog forest, which are water production regulators. Colombian water resources are greatly affected by changes in rainfall patterns influenced by El Niño and La Niña. The recent disasters in the 2010-2011 rainy seasons have caught the attention of not only the authorities but from the scientific community to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating and responding to climate variability and climate change. Whereas sound water management is built upon long-term, the country is undertaking a pilot exercise for the integrated management of water resources, five Basins are selected, among them, is the Chinchiná River Basin; this Andean tropical Basin is located on the western slopes at the central range in the Andes between 4°48 and 5°12 N

  3. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  4. Farmers' participation and breeding for durable disease resistance in the Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danial, D.L.; Parlevliet, J.E.; Almekinders, C.J.M.; Thiele, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the Andean region, the Preduza project and its partners combined breeding for durable disease resistance using locally adapted cultivars and farmer participatory methods. The approach taken resembles participatory variety selection (PVS). Farmers participated in the selection of advanced material

  5. Watershed-based natural research management: Lessons from projects in the Andean region

    OpenAIRE

    Sowell, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    This Undergraduate Honors Thesis focuses on how different factors affect the success of a watershed management project and lessons learned from projects in the Andean Region. LTRA-3 (Watershed-based NRM for Small-scale Agriculture)

  6. 火山温室气体释放通量与观测的研究进展%Research Advances in Greenhouse Gases Degassing from Cenozoic Volcanic Active Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭正府; 张茂亮; 孙玉涛; 成智慧; 张丽红; 刘嘉麒

    2015-01-01

    火山活动是地球深部碳循环的重要环节,火山区不仅在火山喷发期能够释放温室气体,而且在休眠期也能向大气圈中释放大量的温室气体。在当前全球温室气体减排的背景下,定量化地研究火山区对大气圈温室气体含量增加的贡献,对于识别自然因素和人类因素碳排放的相对规模、为国际碳排放谈判积累基础数据等均具有至关重要的科学价值和现实意义。本文对火山区温室气体的排放方式与特征、温室气体释放通量与成因的研究方法进行了简要概括,并综述了中国新生代典型火山区温室气体释放通量与成因的研究成果。结合国外温室气体排放研究现状,指出深入研究活火山(包括休眠火山)区的温室气体释放通量与成因对于估算火山来源温室气体的释放规模、建立火山未来喷发预测-预警体系、深入理解岩浆脱气过程与机制等问题均具有至关重要的现实意义和科学价值。%Volcanic activities are of great importance to the global deep carbon cycle,which could release large amount of greenhouse gases during both eruptive and quiescent stages,resulting in climatic and environmental changes on local and even global scales.Under the context of global warming,quantitative studies on the contribution of volcanic activities to rising of atmospheric greenhouse gases concentration are critical to discriminating carbon emissions associated with nature and human and to accumulating essential data for geological carbon budget.In this study,we briefly reviewed types,char-acteristics and research methods of greenhouse gases emissions,and the current status of research on fluxes and origin of greenhouse gases emitting from volcanic fields of China.Based on internationally accepted theory in volcanic-related green-house gases,we proposed that,systematic studies on fluxes and origin of greenhouse gases emitting from volcanic activities

  7. Hydrophilic antioxidants from Andean tomato landraces assessed by their bioactivities in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola Naranjo, Romina D; Otaiza, Santiago; Saragusti, Alejandra C; Baroni, Veronica; Carranza, Andrea Del V; Peralta, Iris E; Valle, Estela M; Carrari, Fernando; Asis, Ramón

    2016-09-01

    Potential nutraceutical properties of hydrophilic antioxidants in fruits of tomato landraces collected in Andean valleys were characterised. Antioxidant metabolites were measured by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS in mature fruits and their biological activities were assessed by in vitro and in vivo methods. In vitro antioxidant capacities were established by TEAC and FRAP methods. For in vivo biological activities we used a procedure based on Caenorhabditis elegans subjected to thermal stress. In addition, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a rapid screening system to evaluate tomato antioxidant capacity. All tomato accessions displayed significant differences regarding metabolic composition, biological activity and antioxidant capacity. Metabolite composition was associated with geographical origin and fruit size. Antioxidant activities showed significant association with phenolic compounds, such as caffeoylquinic acids, ferulic acid-O-hexosides and rutin. Combination of in vitro and in vivo methods applied here allowed evaluation of the variability in nutraceutical properties of tomato landraces, which could be applied to other fruits or food products. PMID:27041310

  8. Sediment budget in the Ucayali River basin, an Andean tributary of the Amazon River

    OpenAIRE

    W. Santini; Martinez, J. -M.; Espinoza-Villar, R.; G. Cochonneau; Vauchel, P.; Moquet, J.-S.; Baby, P.; Espinoza, J.-C.; Lavado, W.; Carranza, J.; Guyot, J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of mountain ranges results from complex coupling between lithospheric deformation, mechanisms linked to subduction and surface processes: weathering, erosion, and climate. Today, erosion of the eastern Andean cordillera and sub-Andean foothills supplies over 99% of the sediment load passing through the Amazon Basin. Denudation rates in the upper Ucayali basin are rapid, favoured by a marked seasonality in this region and extreme precipitation cells above sedimentary strata, uplifted...

  9. Genetic diversity and germplasm conservation of three minor Andean tuber crop species

    OpenAIRE

    Malice M.; Baudoin JP.

    2009-01-01

    In traditional Andean agrosystems, three minor tuber crop species are of regional or local importance: oca (Oxalis tuberosa Molina), ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Caldas) and mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruiz and Pav.). Genetic diversity within these species is very large and could result from the high ecological and cultural variability that characterizes the Andean area. Nowadays, many anthropic or ecological factors cause the loss of diversity and contribute to genetic erosion. The development...

  10. Assessment of volcanic hazards, vulnerability, risk and uncertainty (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    A volcanic hazard is any phenomenon that threatens communities . These hazards include volcanic events like pyroclastic flows, explosions, ash fall and lavas, and secondary effects such as lahars and landslides. Volcanic hazards are described by the physical characteristics of the phenomena, by the assessment of the areas that they are likely to affect and by the magnitude-dependent return period of events. Volcanic hazard maps are generated by mapping past volcanic events and by modelling the hazardous processes. Both these methods have their strengths and limitations and a robust map should use both approaches in combination. Past records, studied through stratigraphy, the distribution of deposits and age dating, are typically incomplete and may be biased. Very significant volcanic hazards, such as surge clouds and volcanic blasts, are not well-preserved in the geological record for example. Models of volcanic processes are very useful to help identify hazardous areas that do not have any geological evidence. They are, however, limited by simplifications and incomplete understanding of the physics. Many practical volcanic hazards mapping tools are also very empirical. Hazards maps are typically abstracted into hazards zones maps, which are some times called threat or risk maps. Their aim is to identify areas at high levels of threat and the boundaries between zones may take account of other factors such as roads, escape routes during evacuation, infrastructure. These boundaries may change with time due to new knowledge on the hazards or changes in volcanic activity levels. Alternatively they may remain static but implications of the zones may change as volcanic activity changes. Zone maps are used for planning purposes and for management of volcanic crises. Volcanic hazards maps are depictions of the likelihood of future volcanic phenomena affecting places and people. Volcanic phenomena are naturally variable, often complex and not fully understood. There are

  11. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch. This plan defines agency responsibilities, provides a comprehensive description of an interagency standard for volcanic ash products and their formats, describes the agency backup procedures for operational products, and outlines the actions to be taken by each agency following an occurrence of a volcanic eruption that subsequently affects and impacts aviation services. Since our most recent International Conference on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety, volcanic ash-related product and service activities have grown considerably along with partnerships and alliances throughout the aviation community. In January 2005, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environment Prediction began running the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in place of the Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport and Dispersion (VAFTAD) model, upgrading support to the volcanic ash advisory community. Today, improvements to the HYSPLIT model are ongoing based on recommendations by the OFCM-sponsored Joint Action Group for the Selection and Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Models and the Joint Action Group for Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Modeling (Research and Development Plan). Two international workshops on volcanic ash have already taken place, noticeable improvements and innovations in education, training, and outreach have been made, and federal and public education and training programs on volcanic ash-related products, services, and procedures iv continue to evolve. For example, in partnership with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other academic institutions, volcanic ash hazard and mitigation training has been incorporated into aviation meteorology courses. As an essential next step, our volcanic ash-related efforts in the near term will be centered on the development of an interagency implementation plan to

  12. Petrography, geochemistry and tectonic setting of Salmabad Tertiary volcanic rocks, southeast of Sarbisheh, eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Goodarzi

    2014-10-01

    is attributed to the mantle source, presumably metasomatized by the Sistan ocean subduction. The trace element features are consistent with the roles played by subducted sediments and fluid released from the subducted slab in magma genesis. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank reviewers for the constructive comments which greatly contributed to the improvement of the manuscript. References Berberian, F., Muir, I.D., Pankhurst, R.J. and Berberian, M., 1982. Late Cretaceous and early Miocene Andean type plutonic activity in northern Makran and Central Iran. Journal of the Geological Society, 139(5: 605-614. Camp, V.E. and Griffis, R., 1982. Character, genesis and tectonic setting of igneous rocks in the Sistan suture zone, eastern Iran. Lithos, 15(3: 221-239. Gill, R., 2010. Igneous rocks and processes. Wiley-Blackwell, Malaysia, 428 pp. Harangi, S., Downes, H., Thirlwall, M., Gmeling, K., 2007. Geochemistry, Petrogenesis and Geodynamic Relationships of Miocene Calc-alkalineVolcanic Rocks in the Western Carpathian arc, Eastern Central Europe. Journal of petrology, 48(12: 2261-2287. Jung, D., Keller, J., Khorasani, R., Marcks, Chr., Baumann, A. and Horn, P., 1983. Petrology of the Tertiary magmatic activity the northern Lut area, East of Iran. Ministry of mines and metals, Geological survey of Iran, geodynamic project (geotraverse in Iran, Tehran, Report 51, pp. 285-336. Karimpour, M.H., Stern, C.R., Farmer, L., Saadat, S. and Malekezadeh, A., 2011. Review of age, Rb-Sr geochemistry and petrogenesis of Jurassic to Quaternary igneous rocks in Lut Block, Eastern Iran. Geopersia, 1(1:19-36. Kuscu, G.G. and Geneli, F., 2010. Review of post-collisional volcanism in the central Anatolian volcanic province(Turkey, with special reference to the Tepekoy volcanic complex. International Journal of Earth Sciences, 99(3: 593-621. Richards, J.P., Spell, T., Rameh, E., Razique, A. and Fletcher T., 2012. High Sr/Y Magmas Reflect Arc Maturity,High Magmatic Water Content, and

  13. Seismicity in northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2011, Queretaro, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; A. Figueroa-Soto; Zúñiga, F. R.; Arroyo, M.; M. Montiel; O. Chavez

    2013-01-01

    The Peñamiller town, in the Queretaro state, Mexico is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), which covers a central fringe of Mexico with east-west orientation. In this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity frequent in of the continental regimen of central Mexico are not common, however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw m...

  14. Transient Sulfate Aerosols as a Signature of Exoplanet Volcanism

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Amit; Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Koehler, Matthew C.; Sholes, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Geological activity is thought to be important for the origin of life and for maintaining planetary habitability. We show that transient sulfate aerosols could be a signature of exoplanet volcanism, and therefore a geologically active world. A detection of transient aerosols, if linked to volcanism, could thus aid in habitability evaluations of the exoplanet. On Earth, subduction-induced explosive eruptions inject SO2 directly into the stratosphere, leading to the formation of sulfate aerosol...

  15. Detrital Zircon Provenance Record of Pre-Andean to Modern Tectonics in the Northern Andes: Examples from Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S. W. M.; Jackson, L. J.; Horton, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb age distributions from modern rivers and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill in the northern Andes provide insights into pre-Andean, Andean, and active uplift and exhumation of distinctive sediment source regions. Diagnostic age signatures enable straightforward discrimination of competing sediment sources within the Andean magmatic arc (Western Cordillera-Central Cordillera), retroarc fold-thrust belt (Eastern Cordillera-Subandean Zone), and Amazonian craton (composed of several basement provinces). More complex, however, are the mid/late Cenozoic provenance records generated by recycling of basin fill originally deposited during early/mid Mesozoic extension, late Mesozoic thermal subsidence, and early Cenozoic shortening. Although subject to time-transgressive trends, regionally significant provenance patterns in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia reveal: (1) Triassic-Jurassic growth of extensional subbasins fed by local block uplifts (with commonly unimodal 300­-150 Ma age peaks); (2) Cretaceous deposition in an extensive postrift setting fed by principally cratonic sources (with common 1800-900 Ma ages); and (3) Cenozoic growth of a broad flexural basin fed initially fed by magmatic-arc rocks (100-0 Ma), then later dominance by thrust-belt sedimentary rocks with progressively greater degrees of basin recycling (yielding diverse and variable age populations from the aforementioned source regions). U-Pb results from modern rivers and smaller subbasins prove useful in evaluating source-to-sink relationships, downstream mixing relationships, hinterland-foreland basin connectivity, paleodrainage integration, and tectonic/paleotopographic reconstructions. Most but not all of the elevated intermontane basins in the modern hinterland of the northern Andes contain provenance records consistent with genesis in a broader foreland basin developed at low elevation. Downstream variations within modern axial rivers and Cenozoic axial basins inform predictive models of

  16. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  17. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  18. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  19. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...

  20. Structural control on geothermal circulation in the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Guido; Pinton, Annamaria; Cianfarra, Paola; Baez, Walter; Chiodi, Agostina; Viramonte, José; Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the stratigraphical-structural framework and the hydrogeology of geothermal areas is fundamental for understanding the relationships between cap rocks, reservoir and circulation of geothermal fluids and for planning the exploitation of the field. The Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Central Andes, NW Argentina) has a high geothermal potential. It is crossed by the active NW-SE trans-Andean tectonic lineament known as the Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) fault system, which favours a high secondary permeability testified by the presence of numerous springs. This study presents new stratigraphic and hydrogeological data on the geothermal field, together with the analysis from remote sensed image analysis of morphostructural evidences associated with the structural framework and active tectonics. Our data suggest that the main geothermal reservoir is located within or below the Pre-Palaeozoic-Ordovician basement units, characterised by unevenly distributed secondary permeability. The reservoir is recharged by infiltration in the ridges above 4500 m a.s.l., where basement rocks are in outcrop. Below 4500 m a.s.l., the reservoir is covered by the low permeable Miocene-Quaternary units that allow a poor circulation of shallow groundwater. Geothermal fluids upwell in areas with more intense fracturing, especially where main regional structures, particularly NW-SE COT-parallel lineaments, intersect with secondary structures, such as at the Tocomar field. Away from the main tectonic features, such as at the Cerro Tuzgle field, the less developed network of faults and fractures allows only a moderate upwelling of geothermal fluids and a mixing between hot and shallow cold waters. The integration of field-based and remote-sensing analyses at the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar area proved to be effective in approaching the prospection of remote geothermal fields, and in defining the conceptual model for geothermal circulation.

  1. A probabilistic approach to determine volcanic eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, B.; Karátson, D.

    2009-04-01

    It is often a difficult problem to determine the position of original eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices. Beside of the destructive processes acting during the volcanic activity, subsequent erosion, mass movements and tectonic motions modify the spatial distribution of the volcanic features. The observations including dipping strata, clast orientations, lava flows, etc. made on the present surface are therefore biased by the post-eruptive processes making the reconstruction of the original volcanic pattern problematic. The different types of observations and their various error levels complicate the problem further. We propose a probabilistic approach to evaluate the different types of observations. Each observation type or even each observation may have their own error bars which can be taken into account in this scheme. The only assumption is that it is possible to determine the relative direction of the original volcanic centre based on the specific observation within a given angular accuracy. In our scheme a spatial probability density function (PDF) is assigned to each observation and the weighted sum of these PDFs results in a map. This integrated PDF map then can be evaluated to determine one or multiple eruption centres. In case of multiple centres further decision can be made on whether the various centres are only virtual, caused by subsequent tectonism or, on the contrary, the original setting had several eruption vents. This decision can be made on targeted grouping of PDFs of different types of observations or spatial selection. The resulting compound PDF maps may outline individual centres.

  2. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  3. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  4. Climatic and Chemical Effects of Punctuated Volcanism on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, I.; Head, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The geological record of Mars shows a pronounced peak in volcanic activity during the transition between the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs. This peak appears coeval with profound climatic and chemical changes in the surface environment, including the formation of the majority of known valley networks, open-basin lakes and the deposition of massive sulfate-bearing deposits of aqueous origin. It has been suggested that volcanism maintained a warmer climate and an active hydrological cycle through the radiative effect of volcanically emitted greenhouse gases, such as CO2, H2O and SO2. However, previous model attempts at explaining overland flow with CO2-H2O greenhouse atmospheres required several bars of CO2, even including the warming effect of infrared scattering by CO2 ice clouds. This amount of CO2 is in apparent disagreement with recent estimates of volcanic outgassing on Mars. The net climatic effect of volcanic SO2 emissions into the atmosphere of early Mars has been the topic of recent debate, because it is unclear whether strong greenhouse warming by SO2 or strong cooling by scattering sulfate aerosols should dominate. To address this problem, we considered two previously neglected phenomena: i) the punctuated, rather than continuous, nature of volcanic eruptions, and ii) the role of preexisting dust grains and volcanic ash as condensation nuclei for sulfuric acid. For this purpose we developed a coupled model of volcanic eruption and atmospheric response, including detailed aerosol microphysics. We find that while SO2 concentrations increase rapidly and dramatically with the initiation of a strong volcanic eruption, the dynamics of sulfate aerosol formation in the martian atmosphere results in a delay of aerosol-related cooling by several months to years. Moreover, the existence of dust in the atmosphere prior to the volcanic eruption, as well as the emission and global distribution of fine volcanic ash particles, results in the formation of H2SO4

  5. Volcanism, isostatic residual gravity and regional tectonic setting of the Cascade volcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, R.J.; Jachens, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A technique to locate automatically boundaries between crustal blocks of disparate densities was applied to upward continued isostatic residual gravity data. The boundary analysis delineates a narrow gravitational trough that extends the length of the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic arc from Mount Baker in northern Washington to Lassen Peak in California. Gravitational highs interrupt the trough at two localities: a northwest trending high in southern Washington and a northeast trending high between Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak. The gravity sources may reflect upper crustal structures older than the High Cascades, possibly relicts from earlier accretionary events or more recent crustal deformation, that have actively influenced the spatial location of more recent volcanism. Much of the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism of the Cascade arc has concentrated on or near contacts between crustal blocks of disparate density. These contacts may promote the ascension of magma to the Earth's surface. -from Authors

  6. Human impact on the hydrology of the Andean páramos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Célleri, Rolando; De Bièvre, Bert; Cisneros, Felipe; Wyseure, Guido; Deckers, Jozef; Hofstede, Robert

    2006-11-01

    This paper analyses the problems involved in the conservation and management of the hydrological system of the South American páramo. The páramo consists of a collection of neotropical alpine grassland ecosystems covering the upper region of the northern Andes. They play a key role in the hydrology of the continent. Many of the largest tributaries of the Amazon basin have their headwaters in the páramo. It is also the major water source for the Andean highlands and a vast area of arid and semi-arid lowlands, where páramo water is used for domestic, agricultural and industrial consumption, and the generation of hydropower. Recently, the páramo is increasingly used for intensive cattle grazing, cultivation, and pine planting, among others. These activities, as well as global phenomena such as climate change, severely alter the hydrological regime. A review on the state of knowledge of its hydrology is given in a first part. In a second part, the impact of human activities and climate change on the hydrology of the páramo is discussed.

  7. Climatic Impact of Volcanic Eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Zielinski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions have the potential to force global climate, provided they are explosive enough to emit at least 1–5 megaton of sulfur gases into the stratosphere. The sulfuric acid produced during oxidation of these gases will both absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation, thus warming the stratosphere and cooling the Earth’s surface. Maximum global cooling on the order of 0.2–0.3°C, using instrumental temperature records, occurs in the first 2 years after the eruption, with lesser cooling possibly up to the 4th year. Equatorial eruptions are able to affect global climate, whereas mid- to high-latitude events will impact the hemisphere of origin. However, regional responses may differ, including the possibility of winter warming following certain eruptions. Also, El Niño warming may override the cooling induced by volcanic activity. Evaluation of different style eruptions as well as of multiple eruptions closely spaced in time beyond the instrumental record is attained through the analysis of ice-core, tree-ring, and geologic records. Using these data in conjunction with climate proxy data indicates that multiple eruptions may force climate on decadal time scales, as appears to have occurred during the Little Ice Age (i.e., roughly AD 1400s–1800s. The Toba mega-eruption of ~75,000 years ago may have injected extremely large amounts of material into the stratosphere that remained aloft for up to about 7 years. This scenario could lead to the initiation of feedback mechanisms within the climate system, such as cooling of sea-surface temperatures. These interacting mechanisms following a mega-eruption may cool climate on centennial time scales.

  8. A Self-Consistent Model to Explain Shallow Volcanic Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, T.; Caudron, C.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Taisne, B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic tremor sourced at shallow depths (~ hundreds of meters) is one of the most characteristic seismic signals recorded at active volcanoes and yet to be fully understood. It typically appears preceding many impending volcanic eruptions. However, the origin of this seismic signal remains unclear, which limits our understanding of the sub-surface processes during volcanic unrest. In this study, we propose that the shallow volcanic tremor emerges from pressure oscillations occurring beneath volcanic craters as consequence of continuous degassing. To test this hypothesis, we have coupled a new three-dimensional two-phase flow agent-based model that simulates the bubble dynamics in a magma conduit, a lumped-parameter model for the evolution of the gas pressure beneath the crater, and a lumped-parameter model to simulate the permeable transfer of volcanic gases to the atmosphere. Our numerical experiments reveal that pressure oscillations beneath volcanic craters can explain the main features of shallow volcanic tremor, namely, the direct correlation with gas emissions, the increase of amplitude of the ground vibrations when an eruption approaches, the broadband character of the dominant frequencies (in the range ~ 0.5 - 5 Hz), the frequency gliding towards higher values when the volcanic activity increases, and the power law distribution in the very high-frequency range of the spectra (from the dominant peaks till ~ 10 - 15 Hz). Our model also predicts that the exponent of the power law of the frequency spectra changes systematically with the physical parameters that are thought to vary during the onset of an unrest episode.

  9. Sr-Nd isotope changes of late cretaceous to early miocene volcanic rocks in central Chile (33oS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A longitudinal depression, the Central Valley, separates the Coast Range from the Andean Cordillera in central Chile. It contains volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Late Cretaceous to Tertiary age deposited in a continental environment, and partly eroded Tertiary volcanic complexes. The age of the rocks at the northern end of the Central Valley and their grouping in formations have been a long-standing controversy in Chilean geology (Thomas, 1958; Aguirre, 1960; Drake et al., 1976; Vergara and Drake, 1979; Thiele, 1980; Moscoso et al., 1982; Gana and Wall, 1997; Lopez-Escobar and Vergara, 1997; Selles, 1999). Here, we report new 40Ar/39Ar data and Sr-Nd isotope ratios for lavas, pyroclastic flows and associated subvolcanic rocks from this part of central Chile (au)

  10. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  11. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  12. Magnitude-frequency distribution of volcanic explosion earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Iguchi, Masato; Hendrasto, Mohammad; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Taishi; Ripepe, Maurizio; Genco, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Magnitude-frequency distributions of volcanic explosion earthquakes that are associated with occurrences of vulcanian and strombolian eruptions, or gas burst activity, are examined at six active volcanoes. The magnitude-frequency distribution at Suwanosejima volcano, Japan, shows a power-law distribution, which implies self-similarity in the system, as is often observed in statistical characteristics of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes. On the other hand, the magnitude-frequency distributions at five other volcanoes, Sakurajima and Tokachi-dake in Japan, Semeru and Lokon in Indonesia, and Stromboli in Italy, are well explained by exponential distributions. The statistical features are considered to reflect source size, as characterized by a volcanic conduit or chamber. Earthquake generation processes associated with vulcanian, strombolian and gas burst events are different from those of eruptions ejecting large amounts of pyroclasts, since the magnitude-frequency distribution of the volcanic explosivity index is generally explained by the power law.

  13. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  14. Recurrence models of volcanic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project have progressed to a sufficient degree that it is now prudent to work toward concluding aspects of the work. An advantage of a probabilistic approach to volcanic risk is that it assigns a structured formalism to the problem. This formalism subdivides a complex issue into logical sections. The significance of uncertainty or differences in scientific opinion concerning volcanism issues can be tested for each section of a probabilistic problem. The perspective for making judgement of significance for volcanism studied are the regulatory requirements for assessing the suitability of the potential Yucca Mountain site. This paper attempts to begin the process of helping establish the probabilistic framework for making those judgement. There are three objectives. First, the authors describe the tripartite probability used to define the risk of volcanism and the geologic assumptions required for the probability model. Second, the authors examine and define the first part of this probability, the recurrence of volcanic events. Studies are reviewed from the volcanological literature where time-volume behavior of volcanic centers and fields have been evaluated. These evaluations include both conventional statistical analysis of time-series of volcanic events and applications using newly developing concepts of fractal analysis and deterministic chaos. Third, the authors tabulate past calculations and derive new values for the recurrence of volcanic events using a simple Poison model

  15. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  16. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  17. Volcanic risk perception of young people in the urban areas of Vesuvius: Comparisons with other volcanic areas and implications for emergency management

    OpenAIRE

    Carlino, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Somma, R; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Mayberry, G. C.; U.S. Geological Survey, National Center MS 926A, Reston, VA 20192, USA

    2008-01-01

    More than 600000 people are exposed to volcanic risk in the urban areas near the volcano,Vesuvius, and may need to be evacuated if there is renewed volcanic activity. The success of a future evacuation will strongly depend on the level of risk perception and preparedness of the at-risk communities during the current period of quiescence. The volcanic risk perception and preparedness of young people is of particular importance because hazard education programs in schools have been sho...

  18. Storage of carbon in natural grasses high andean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Marino Yaranga Cano

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the capacity of storage of carbon in species of grasses natural of high andean, between January of 2012 and March of 2013. They were defined two sampling areas in the districts of Huasicancha and Chicche of the county of Huancayo, Junín. The first of the areas was located in the place Pumahuasi (18L 466456E 8628580N and the second in Vista Alegre (18L 464886E 8642964N, between 3 845 and 3 870 meters of altitude. 10 plants per species were collected at random, between April and May, considering the moment of maximum growth of the plants. The samples were washed and dried off to the atmosphere during 15 days, being completed the drying in a stove to 60 °C, during 48 hours. The determination of the percentage of dry matter of the samples was carried out by the difference between the initial and final weights. While that the determination of the percentage of carbon was carried out through the method of Walkley-Black. The results of the correlation of weight between air biomass and biomass radicular were highly significant r = 0.9856 ** and b = 3.4507. The percentage of the weight of the root regarding that of the air biomass oscillated between 27.93% and 30.20%, respectively. The content of carbon expressed as percentage varied according to the part of the plant and the origin place.

  19. The epidemiology and control of leishmaniasis in Andean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Clive Richard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current knowledge of leishmaniasis epidemiology in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. In all 5 countries leishmaniasis is endemic in both the Andean highlands and the Amazon basin. The sandfly vectors belong to subgenera Helcocyrtomyia, Nyssomiya, Lutzomyia, and Psychodopygus, and the Verrucarum group. Most human infections are caused by Leishmania in the Viannia subgenus. Human Leishmania infections cause cutaneous lesions, with a minority of L. (Viannia infections leading to mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis are both rare. In each country a significant proportion of Leishmania transmission is in or around houses, often close to coffee or cacao plantations. Reservoir hosts for domestic transmission cycles are uncertain. The paper first addresses the burden of disease caused by leishmaniasis, focusing on both incidence rates and on the variability in symptoms. Such information should provide a rational basis for prioritizing control resources, and for selecting therapy regimes. Secondly, we describe the variation in transmission ecology, outlining those variables which might affect the prevention strategies. Finally, we look at the current control strategies and review the recent studies on control.

  20. The epidemiology and control of leishmaniasis in Andean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Richard Davies

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current knowledge of leishmaniasis epidemiology in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. In all 5 countries leishmaniasis is endemic in both the Andean highlands and the Amazon basin. The sandfly vectors belong to subgenera Helcocyrtomyia, Nyssomiya, Lutzomyia, and Psychodopygus, and the Verrucarum group. Most human infections are caused by Leishmania in the Viannia subgenus. Human Leishmania infections cause cutaneous lesions, with a minority of L. (Viannia infections leading to mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis are both rare. In each country a significant proportion of Leishmania transmission is in or around houses, often close to coffee or cacao plantations. Reservoir hosts for domestic transmission cycles are uncertain. The paper first addresses the burden of disease caused by leishmaniasis, focusing on both incidence rates and on the variability in symptoms. Such information should provide a rational basis for prioritizing control resources, and for selecting therapy regimes. Secondly, we describe the variation in transmission ecology, outlining those variables which might affect the prevention strategies. Finally, we look at the current control strategies and review the recent studies on control.

  1. Mechanisms of O2 transport in Andean dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchero, N; Cruz, J; Bustinza, J

    1975-04-01

    Using previously inserted catheters, 11 dogs native to high altitude (7.5-23 kg bwt) were studied standing and unsedated in Cerro de Pasco, Peru at 4350 meters. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), O2 and CO2 contents, PO2, PCO2 and pH were measured in simultaneously obtained arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Blood pressures were measured in the pulmonary artery and the left ventricle and cardiac output (Q) was determined by dye dilution. Moderately higher values for Hb and Hct were found in these dogs. Hb-O2 affinity was no different than that found in sea level dogs: the P50 in the Andean dogs was 31.6 mm Hg at 38 degrees C and pH of 7.4. Because of the low barometric pressure at 4350 m (458 mmHg) the partial pressures of oxygen in inspired and in alveolar air were lower than at sea level: 84.3 and 56.4 mm Hg, respectively. PAO2 and PVO2, were 55.5 and 32.9 mm Hg while the SAO2 and SVO2 were 79.5 and 50.7%, respectively. Marked hyperventilation was observed (PACO2, 25.6 mm Hg) however, pH was normal. Cardiac output was normal (average 162 plus or minus 39 ml/min/kg). Moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension was observed in the presence of normal left ventricular end diastolic pressure suggesting increased pulmonary vascular resistance.

  2. Cerebral vasoreactivity in Andeans and headache at sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, O; Passino, C; Roach, R; Gamboa, J; Gamboa, A; Bernardi, L; Bonfichi, M; Malcovati, L

    2004-04-15

    Headache is common in Cerro de Pasco (CP), Peru (altitude 4338 m) and was present in all patients with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) in CP reported here. Forty-seven percent of inhabitants report headache. Twenty-four percent of men have migraine with aura, with an average of 65 attacks a year. We assessed vasoreactivity of the cerebral vessels to CO2 by rebreathing and to NO by the administration of isosorbite dinitrate (IDN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in natives of CP, some of whom suffered from CMS. We repeated the measurements in Lima (altitude 150 m) in the same subjects within 24 h of arrival. Vasodilatation in the middle cerebral artery supply territory in response to CO2 and NO, both physiologic vasodilators, is defective in Andean natives at altitude and in the same subjects at sea level. Incapacitating migraine can occur with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity to physiologic vasodilators. We propose that susceptibility to migraine might depend in part on gene expression with consequent alterations of endothelial function.

  3. Andean subduction orogeny: feedbacks between tectonics, relief evolution and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacassin, Robin; Armijo, Rolando; Coudurier-Curveur, Aurélie; Carrizo, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Andean subduction margin, largest tectonic relief on the Earth (13 km vertically from the trench to the Altiplano) has a stepped morphology, which results of the evolution over the past 50 Myr of two parallel flat-ramp thrust systems, at the - previously unidentified - West Andean Thrust (WAT), and at the subduction interface. The evolution of those thrusts appears concomitant with increasing aridity in the Atacama Desert, which keeps a large-scale record of interplaying tectonics and Cenozoic climate change. The coastal morphology is dominated by the Atacama Bench, a giant uplifted terrace at 1-2km asl. Geomorphic and climatic data, numerical experiments of drainage formation are consistent with the development of a flat Atacama morphology close to sea level, interrupted at ≤10 Ma by tectonic uplift prevailing to the present. This suggests recent trench-ward relief growth by incorporation of the coastal Atacama Bench to the Andes reliefs. Thrust splay structures and other complexities above the subduction interface may explain this relief growth, as well as the distribution of asperities under the oceanward forearc, and the down-dip segmentation of coupling and seismicity on the megathrust. Combining those results with geological knowledge at the scale of the whole Central Andes, we show that the Andean orogeny results from protracted processes of bivergent crustal shortening in a wide region squeezed between the rigid Marginal Block and the S America Plate. The overall growth curve of Andean orogeny over the past 50 Myr appears synchronous with the onset of the "ramp-shaped" temperature decrease since the Early Eocene climatic optimum. Andean growth and global cooling may have operated under the same forcing mechanism at plate-scale, involving viscous flow in the mantle. But Andean growth appears modulated by climatic feedbacks causative of stepwise reductions of erosive power over the Andean margin. The first of such events is coeval with Late Eocene

  4. Geothermal systems in volcanic arcs: Volcanic characteristics and surface manifestations as indicators of geothermal potential and favorability worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, P.; Shevenell, L.; Hinz, N.; Coolbaugh, M.; Melosh, G.; Cumming, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper brings a global perspective to volcanic arc geothermal assessments by evaluating trends and correlations of volcanic characteristic and surface manifestation data from world power production sites in subduction zone volcanic settings. The focus of the work was to evaluate volcanic centers individually and as a group in these arcs by correlating various geologic characteristics with known potential to host electricity grade geothermal systems at the volcanic centers. A database was developed that describes key geologic factors expected to be indicative of productive geothermal systems in a global training set, which includes all 74 subduction zone volcanic centers world-wide with current or proven power production capability. Importantly, this data set only contains data from subduction zone volcanoes and contains no negative cases, limiting the populations of any statistical groups. Regardless, this is the most robust geothermal benchmark training set for magmatic-heated systems to date that has been made public. The work reported here is part of a larger project that included data collection, evaluation, correlations and weightings, fairway and favorability modeling and mapping, prediction of blind systems, and uncertainty analysis to estimate errors associated with model predictions. This first paper describes volcano characteristics, compositions and eruption ages and trends along with surface manifestation observations and temperatures as they relate to known power producing systems. Our findings show a strong correlation between the presence and size of active flank fumarole areas and installed power production. Additionally, the majority of volcanic characteristics, including long-held anecdotal correlations related to magmatic composition or size, have limited to no correlation with power production potential. Notable exceptions are correlations between greater power yield from geothermal systems associated with older (Pleistocene) caldera systems

  5. [Floristic composition and distribution of the Andean subtropical riparian forests of Lules River, Tucuman, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirombra, Martín G; Mesa, Leticia M

    2010-03-01

    We studied the floristic composition and distribution of the riparian forest of two hydrographical systems in a subtropical Andean region. Using uni and multivariate techniques, we tested the hypotheses that a differentiable riparian forest exists, composed by native vegetation typical of the Yungas phytogeographical province, and that the distribution of vegetation varied significantly with geomorphologic characteristics. Parallel transects along the water courses were used to collect presence-absence data of vegetation in eleven sites. Detrended Correspondence Analysis defined a group of common riparian species for the studied area (Solanum riparium, Phenax laevigatus, Tipuana tipu, Cestrum parqui, Carica quercifolia, Acacia macracantha, Celtis iguanaea, Juglans australis, Pisoniella arborescens, Baccharis salicifolia, Cinnamomum porphyrium and Eugenia uniflora) and identified two reference sites. The distribution of the riparian vegetation varied significantly with the geomorphic characteristics along the studied sites. Riparian habitats were composed by native and exotic species. A distinct riparian flora, different in structure and function from adjacent terrestrial vegetation, could not be identified. Riparian species were similar to the adjacent terrestrial strata. These species would not be limited by the proximity to the river. Anthropogenic impacts were important factors regulating the introduction and increase of exotic vegetation. The lack of regulation of some activities in the zone could cause serious problems in the integrity of this ecosystem.

  6. California's Vulnerability to Volcanic Hazards: What's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Wood, N. J.; Dinitz, L.

    2015-12-01

    California is a leader in comprehensive planning for devastating earthquakes, landslides, floods, and tsunamis. Far less attention, however, has focused on the potentially devastating impact of volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the State about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have occurred in the past 1,000 years—most recently in northern California (Lassen Peak 1914 to 1917)—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The likelihood of renewed volcanism in California is about one in a few hundred to one in a few thousand annually. Eight young volcanoes, ranked as Moderate to Very High Threat [1] are dispersed throughout the State. Partially molten rock (magma) resides beneath at least seven of these—Medicine Lake Volcano, Mount Shasta, Lassen Volcanic Center, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, Long Valley Volcanic Region, Coso Volcanic Field, and Salton Buttes— causing earthquakes, toxic gas emissions, hydrothermal activity, and (or) ground deformation. Understanding the hazards and identifying what is at risk are the first steps in building community resilience to volcanic disasters. This study, prepared in collaboration with the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Management and the California Geological Survey, provides a broad perspective on the State's exposure to volcano hazards by integrating mapped volcano hazard zones with geospatial data on at-risk populations, infrastructure, and resources. The study reveals that ~ 16 million acres fall within California's volcano hazard zones, along with ~ 190 thousand permanent and 22 million transitory populations. Additionally, far-field disruption to key water delivery systems, agriculture, utilities, and air traffic is likely. Further site- and sector-specific analyses will lead to improved hazard mitigation efforts and more effective disaster response and recovery. [1] "Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities

  7. Climate Variability, Andean Livelihood Strategies, Development and Adaptation in the Andean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, C.; Quiroz, R.; Zorogastua, P.; Baigorrea, G.

    2002-05-01

    Development programs in the Andes have failed to recognize climate variability as an element that is crucial to the adoption of new alternatives. Dairy, potatoes, improved sheep, forages are all part of the history of development in this region. A combination of climate variability, changes in the economy, the political environment, and land tenure reform shape rural livelihoods and welfare. Diversification, linking to markets, and networking are some elements that contribute to the resilience of families in the Andes. Strategies change, are flexible, and may incorporate non-agricultural activities. While some farmers are able to improve their welfare through the life cycle, others become poorer. Climate variability increases the vulnerability of some groups; in other cases, because of diversification and assets, households build economic portfolios that are more resilient to the elements. The many projects provide insights into how in the long run households improve their environment, hinting at mechanisms to adapt to climate change. In order to understand changing composition of portfolios in future scenarios of spatial heterogeneous areas such as mountains (Andes), estimates of models predicting climate change at a global scale are not useful because their resolution. Therefore, downscaling tools are useful. Spatial heterogeneity is assessed through agroecozoning. Both production and the impact on some environmental indicators are simulated through process-based models, for the Ilave-Huenque watershed in Peru that help in discussing scenarios of adaptation.

  8. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chouliaras

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue.

    In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region.

    The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth.

    These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  9. Brain blood flow in Andean and Himalayan high-altitude populations: evidence of different traits for the same environmental constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F.A. Jansen; B. Basnyat

    2011-01-01

    Humans have populated the Tibetan plateau much longer than the Andean Altiplano. It is thought that the difference in length of occupation of these altitudes has led to different responses to the stress of hypoxia. As such, Andean populations have higher hematocrit levels than Himalayans. In contras

  10. Ultraviolet-B-driven pigmentation and genetic diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates from high-altitude Andean streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Loayza Muro; J.K. Marticorena-Ruíz; E.J. Palomino; C Merrit; J.A.J. Breeuwer; P. Kuperus; M.H.S. Kraak; W. Admiraal

    2013-01-01

    Photoprotective pigments in benthic macroinvertebrates may reduce the damage caused by the blistering UV-B radiation in Andean high-altitude streams above 3500 m. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether melanisation in macroinvertebrates inhabiting high-altitude Andean streams is an

  11. 月球仍然活跃的构造、火成和内部特征等证据%Evidence for Recent Lunar Tectonic, Volcanic and Interior Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clive NEAL; 平劲松

    2014-01-01

    月球尽管被作为类地行星演化的最终形态的代表,被认为在25亿年前已经完全冷却,根据阿波罗时代以来、特别是近十余年的月球轨道器和着陆器获得的关于月球构造、火成活动、月震和内部结构等多种证据,表明月球从深层内部到表面仍然活跃,尚未彻底冷却“死亡”。这将完全改变人们关于月球演化历史和状态的观念。%The Moon,which was believed that died out about 2.5 ~ 3.5 billion years ago with volcanic and tectonic activity had essentially ceased by 2.5 Ga.,represents an end member in terms of terrestrial planet evolution in the inner Solar System.However,the Apollo data,especially coupled with the new data of the Moon about lunar tectonic,volcanic,moonquake and interior structure obtained by lunar orbiters and landers during the past dozen years,shows evidence that suggests the Moon remained active from deep interior to the surface,and by no means of died out totally.This will change our view of the lunar evolution history and status.

  12. Closer look at lunar volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the American Apollo and Soviet Luna missions concentrated on mare basalt samples, major questions remain about lunar volcanism. Lunar field work will be indispensable for resolving the scientific questions about ages, compositions, and eruption processes of lunar volcanism. From a utilitarian standpoint, a better knowledge of lunar volcanism will also yield profitable returns in lunar base construction (e.g., exploitation of rille or lava-tube structures) and in access to materials such as volatile elements, pure glass, or ilmenite for lunar industry

  13. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  14. Transference of some microsatellite molecular markers from Fabaceae family to Andean Lupin (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Chirinos-Arias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze transferibility of 15 microsatellite primers from Fabaceae family to Lupinus mutabilis Sweet "andean lupine" chosen to present transferability between species and genera, by its high rate of polymorphic content (PIC and high degree of observed and expected heterozygosity. DNA was extracted of 300 andean lupines plants, PCR conditions were standardized by gradients of master mix components. Primers for screening were run on 3% agarose gel with some samples. Finally population was amplified and run on 6% polyacrylamide gel for its highest resolution. Only 6.67% of primers were amplified, but they were monomorphic, so they cannot be used for molecular characterization. We proposed eight microsatellite primers for andean lupin wich should be probed in laboratory conditions.

  15. Self-potential anomalies in some Italian volcanic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Silenziario

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of Self-Potential (SP space and time variations in volcanic areas may provide useful information on both the geometrical structure of the volcanic apparatuses and the dynamical behaviour of the feeding and uprising systems. In this paper, the results obtained on the islands of Vulcano (Eolian arc and Ponza (Pontine archipelago and on the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius complex are shown. On the island of Vulcano and on the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius apparatus areal SP surveys were performed with the aim of evidencing anomalies closely associated to the zones of major volcanic activity. On the island of Vulcano a profile across the fumaroles along the crater rim of the Fossa Cone was also carried out in order to have a direct relationship between fumarolic fracture migration and flow rate and SP anomaly space and time variations. The areal survey on the island of Ponza, which is considered an inactive area, is assumed as a reference test with which to compare the amplitude and pattern of the anomalies in the active areas. A tentative interpretation of the SP anomalies in volcanic areas is suggested in terms of electrokinetic phenomena, related to the movement of fluids of both volcanic and non-volcanic origin.

  16. Quaternary volcanism in the Acambay graben, Mexican Volcanic Belt: Re-evaluation for potential volcanic danger in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Lacan, P.; Roldan-Quintana, J.; Ortuňo, M.; Zuniga, R. R.; Laurence, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) is best known for the major active stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatépetl, Citlaltépetl and Colima. The most common stratovolcanoes in this province are modest-size cones with heights of 800 to 1000 m. Examples are Tequila, Sangangüey, Las Navajas, Culiacán, La Joya, El Zamorano, Temascalcingo and Altamirano; these last two were formed within the Acambay Graben in central MVB. The Acambay graben (20 x 70 km) is 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, with E-W trending seismically active normal faults; in particular the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault related to a mB =7 earthquake in 1912. Within the graben there are many volcanic structures, including calderas, domes, cinder cones and stratovolcanoes; Temascalcingo and Altamirano are the largest, with about 800 and 900 m heights, respectively. Temascalcingo is mostly composed of dacitic lavas and block and ash flow deposits. Includes a 3 x 2.5 km summit caldera and a magmatic sector collapse event with the associated debris avalanche deposit. 14C ages of 37-12 ka correspond to the volcano's latest phases that produced pyroclastic deposits. A major plinian eruption formed the San Mateo Pumice with an age of <20 Ka. Altamirano volcano is poorly studied; it is andesitic-dacitic, composed of lavas, pyroclastic flow deposits, and pumice fallouts. Morphologically is better preserved than Temascalcingo, and it should be younger. 14C ages of 4.0-2.5 ka were performed in charcoal within pyroclastic flow deposits that apparently were erupted from Altamirano. An undated 3 m thick pumice fallout on the flanks of Altamirano volcano could be also Holocene. It represents a major explosive event. The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally thought as an inactive volcanic zone. The two major volcanoes, Temascalcingo and Altamirano, should be considered as dormant volcanoes that could restart activity at any time. We

  17. Diverging Responses of Tropical Andean Biomes under Future Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%–17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for

  18. [Structural recovering in Andean successional forests from Porce (Antioquia, Colombia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Adriana P; del Valle, Jorge I; Jaramillo, Sandra L; Orrego, Sergio A

    2010-03-01

    Places subjected to natural or human disturbance can recover forest through an ecological process called secondary succession. Tropical succession is affected by factors such as disturbances, distance from original forest, surface configuration and local climate. These factors determine the composition of species and the time trend of the succession itself. We studied succession in soils used for cattle ranching over various decades in the Porce Region of Colombia (Andean Colombian forests). A set of twenty five permanent plots was measured, including nine plots (20 x 50 m) in primary forests and sixteen (20 x 25 m) in secondary forests. All trees with diameter > or =1.0 cm were measured. We analyzed stem density, basal area, above-ground biomass and species richness, in a successional process of ca. 43 years, and in primary forests. The secondary forests' age was estimated in previous studies, using radiocarbon dating, aerial photographs and a high-resolution satellite image analysis (7 to >43 years). In total, 1,143 and 1,766 stems were measured in primary and secondary forests, respectively. Basal area (5.7 to 85.4 m2 ha(-1)), above-ground biomass (19.1 to 1,011.5 t ha(-1)) and species richness (4 to 69) directly increased with site age, while steam density decreased (3,180 to 590). Diametric distributions were "J-inverted" for primary forests and even-aged size-class structures for secondary forests. Three species of palms were abundant and exclusive in old secondary forests and primary forests: Oenocarpus mapora, Euterpe precatoria and Oenocarpus bataua. These palms happened in cohorts after forest disturbances. Secondary forest structure was 40% in more than 43 years of forest succession and indicate that many factors are interacting and affecting the forests succession in the area (e.g. agriculture, cattle ranching, mining, etc.). PMID:20411733

  19. Diverging responses of tropical Andean biomes under future climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%-17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for other

  20. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, I.; Girardin, C.; Doughty, C. E.; Cahuana, N.; Arenas, C. E.; Oliver, V.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning and grazing affect puna productivity? (3) if the montane forest expands into the puna, what will be the resulting change in productivity? The study sites are located at the South-eastern Peruvian Andes; one grassland site and the forest sites are in Wayqecha biological station, and another grassland site in Manu National Park. At each grassland site, we selected a burnt and an unburnt area, installed unfenced and fenced transects in each area, and monitored above-ground productivity (NPPAG), below-ground productivity (NPPBG) and soil respiration (Rs) for 2 yr. In the forest, we monitored NPPAG, NPPBG and Rs for 2-4 yr. Grassland NPP varied between 4.6 ± 0.25 (disturbed areas) to 15.3 ± 0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (undisturbed areas) and cloud forest NPP was between 7.05 ± 0.39 and 8.0 ± 0.47 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, while soil carbon stocks were in the range of 126 ± 22 to 285 ± 31 Mg C ha-1. There were no significant differences on NPP between the puna and forest sites. The most undisturbed site had significantly higher NPP than other grassland sites, but no differences were found when relating grazing and fire at other sites. There were lower residence times of above-ground biomass compared to below-ground biomass. There was a strong seasonal signal on grassland NPPAG and NPPBG, with a shift on allocation at the beginning of the austral summer. High elevation tropical grasslands can be as productive as adjacent cloud forests, but have very different carbon cycling and retention properties than cloud forests.

  1. Volcanology: Volcanic bipolar disorder explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Eruptions come in a range of magnitudes. Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments show that rare, giant super-eruptions and smaller, more frequent events reflect a transition in the essential driving forces for volcanism.

  2. Different sources involved in generation of continental arc volcanism: The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuan-Hong; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Jian-Min; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    New zircon U-Pb dating results on the Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block (NCB) indicate their eruption during the Early Carboniferous to Late Permian from 347 ± 3 Ma to 258 ± 1 Ma and a slight decrease of the upper limits of the volcanic sequences from west to east. They have a main rock association of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, rhyolite, tuff, and tufaceous sandstone. Most of them have calc-alkaline compositions and exhibit variable SiO2 contents from 48.2 wt.% to 77.1 wt.%. There is no significant gap between the mafic and felsic volcanic rocks in major and trace element classification diagrams, indicating that they are not bimodal in composition. The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks exhibit subduction-related geochemical features such as negative Nb and Ta anomalies of mafic to intermediate rocks on primitive mantle-normalized diagrams, indicating they were formed in an Andean-type continental arc during southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate beneath the northern NCB. However, their wide range of whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions indicate that their source areas are very complex and different sources were involved in generation of these volcanic rocks. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic results show that the basalt and some andesite were produced by fractional crystallization of mafic magma derived from partial melting of mantle wedge and subducted oceanic crust; however, most of the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks were derived from partial melting of lower continental crust. There is an increasing input of crustal materials from the Carboniferous to Permian as indicated by increasing volumes of felsic volcanic rocks in the volcanic sequences. The results show that origin of the continental arc volcanism is very complex and both materials from the subducted oceanic crust and sediments, mantle wedge and arc continental crust could be involved in their

  3. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the volcanic rocks from Fanchang-Ningwu volcanic basins in the Lower Yangtze region and its geological implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; LIU HaiQuan; SONG ChuanZhong; XU XiSheng; AN YaJun; LIU Jia; DAI LiQun

    2009-01-01

    The latest eruptions in two important Mesozoic volcanic basins of Fanchang and Ningwu located in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River formed the bimodal volcanic rocks of the Kedoushan Formation and ultrapotassic volcanic rocks of the Niangniangshan Formation,respectively.The representative volcanic rocks of the two Formations were selected for LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating.The results indicate that there exist a large amount of magmatic zircons as indicated by high Th/U ratios in these volcanic rocks.The weighted mean age of 21 analyses is 130.7±1.1 Ma for the Kedoushan Formation,and that of 20 analyses is 130.6±1.1 Ma for the Niangniangshan Formation.These U-Pb ages are interpreted to represent the formation times of the volcanic rocks.In combination with other known geochronological data for Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the Lower Yangtze region,it is proposed that the latest volcanic activations in the Jinniu,Luzong,Fanchang and Ningwu volcanic basins probably came to end prior to ca.128 Me.There is no significant time interval between the early and later volcanic activities in the Luzong and Ningwu basins,suggesting e short duration of volcanic activities and thus implying the onset of an extensional tectonic setting at about 130 Ma in the Lower Yangtze region.Integrated studies reveal that the Early Cretaceous magmatic activities and their geochronological framework in the Lower Yangtze region are a response to progressively dynamic deep processes that started with the transformation of tectonic setting from compression to extension,followed by delaminating of the lower part of the thickened lithosphere,lithospheric thinning,asthenosphere upwelling,and crust-mantle interaction.

  4. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  5. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  6. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  7. An Andean tectonic cycle:From crustal thickening to extension in a thin crust (34º-37ºSL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor A. Ramos; Vanesa D. Litvak; Andrés Folguera; Mauro Spagnuolo

    2014-01-01

    Several orogenic cycles of mountain building and subsequent collapse associated with periods of shal-lowing and steepening of subduction zones have been recognized in recent years in the Andes. Most of them are characterized by widespread crustal delamination expressed by large calderas and rhyolitic flare-up produced by the injection of hot asthenosphere in the subduction wedge. These processes are related to the increase of the subduction angle during trench roll-back. The Payenia paleoflat-slab, in the southern Central Andes of Argentina and Chile (34º~37º S) recorded a complete cycle from crustal thickening and mountain uplift to extensional collapse and normal faulting, which are related to changes in the subduction geometry. The early stages are associated with magmatic expansion and migration, subsequent deformation and broken foreland. New ages and geochemical data show the middle to late Miocene expansion and migration of arc volcanism towards the foreland region was associated with important deformation in the Andean foothills. However, the main difference of this orogenic cycle with the previously described cycles is that the steepening of the oceanic subducted slab is linked to basaltic flooding of large areas in the retroarc under an extensional setting. Crustal delamination is concentrated only in a narrow central belt along the cordilleran axis. The striking differences between the two types of cycles are interpreted to be related to the crustal thickness when steepening the subducting slab. The crustal thickness of the Altiplano is over 60e80 km, whereas Payenia is less than 42 km in the axial part, and near 30 km in the retroarc foothills. The final extensional regime associated with the slab steepening favors the basaltic flooding of more than 8400 km3 in an area larger than 40,000 km2, through 800 central vents and large fissures. These characteristics are unique in the entire present-day Andes.

  8. A new comprehensive database of global volcanic gas analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clor, L. E.; Fischer, T. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; McCormick, B.; Hauri, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic volatiles are the driving force behind eruptions, powerful indicators of magma provenance, present localized hazards, and have implications for climate. Studies of volcanic emissions are necessary for understanding volatile cycling from the mantle to the atmosphere. Gas compositions vary with volcanic activity, making it important to track their chemical variability over time. As studies become increasingly interdisciplinary, it is critical to have a mechanism to integrate decades of gas studies across disciplines. Despite the value of this research to a variety of fields, there is currently no integrated network to house all volcanic and hydrothermal gas data, making spatial, temporal, and interdisciplinary comparison studies time-consuming. To remedy this, we are working to establish a comprehensive database of volcanic gas emissions and compositions worldwide, as part of the Deep Carbon Observatory's DECADE (Deep Carbon Degassing) initiative. Volcanic gas data have been divided into two broad categories: 1) chemical analyses from samples collected directly at the volcanic source, and 2) measurements of gas concentrations and fluxes, such as remotely by mini-DOAS or satellite, or in-plume such as by multiGAS. The gas flux database effort is realized by the Global Volcanism Program of the Smithsonian Institution (abstract by Brendan McCormick, this meeting). The direct-sampling data is the subject of this presentation. Data from direct techniques include samples of gases collected at the volcanic source from fumaroles and springs, tephras analyzed for gas contents, filter pack samples of gases collected in a plume, and any other data types that involve collection of a sample. Data are incorporated into the existing framework of the Petrological Database, PetDB. Association with PetDB is advantageous as it will allow volcanic gas data to be linked to chemical data from lava or tephra samples, forming more complete ties between the eruptive products and the

  9. Minerogenesis of volcanic caves of Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenya is one of the few countries in which karst cavities are scarce with respect to volcanic ones, which are widespread throughout the whole country. The great variability in lava composition allowed the evolution of very different cavities, some of which are amongst the largest lava tubes of the world. As normal for such a kind of cave, the hosted speleothems and cave minerals are scarce but important from the minerogenetic point of view. Anyway up to present no specific mineralogical research have been carried out therein. During the 8th International Symposium on Volcanospeleology, held in Nairobi in February 1998, some of the most important volcanic caves of Kenya have been visited and their speleothems and/or chemical deposits sampled: most of them were related to thick guano deposits once present inside these cavities. Speleothems mainly consisted of opal or gypsum, while the deposits related to guano often resulted in a mixture of sulphates and phosphates. The analyses confirmed the great variability in the minerogenetic mechanisms active inside the volcanic caves, which consequently allow the evolution of several different minerals even if the total amount of chemical deposit is scarce. Among the observed minerals kogarkoite, phillipsite and hydroxyapophyllite, must be cited because they are new cave minerals not only for the lava tubes of Kenya, but also for the world cave environment. The achieved results are compared with the available random data from previous literature in order to allow an updated overview on the secondary cave minerals of Kenya.

  10. The feeder system for the 2014 fissure eruption at Holuhraun, Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland: Geodetic and seismic constraints on subsurface activity in the area north of the Vatnajökull ice cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andy; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Spaans, Karsten; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Rafn Heimisson, Elias; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    An intense earthquake swarm began on 16 August 2014 at Bárðarbunga volcano under the Vatnajökull ice cap in Central Iceland. It marked the beginning of an intrusive activity, with a dyke propagating over 45 km northward. Such major magmatic activity has not been observed for the last three decades in Iceland, since the Krafla rifting episode 1975-1984. The dyke propagation stopped 15 days after the onset of the seismic activity, with the dyke distal end in the Holuhraun plain north of the Vatnajökull ice cap. A small 4 hour eruption marked the beginning of extrusive activity. A new fissure eruption opened up on 31 August at the northern dyke tip, with lava fountaining and feeding extensive lava flows. In January 2014 the surface covered by the lava had exceeded 80 km2, and the eruption activity does not show significant decline. We have carried out interferometric analysis of SAR data (InSAR) since the onset of the unrest. X-band satellite images from COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X satellites were acquired and analyzed to map ground surface deformation associated with the dyke emplacement. Despite most of the dyke propagation occurring under several hundreds meters of ice, the last 10 km were outside the ice cap, allowing better characterisation of the dyke-induced deformation. Here we focus on the deformation in the Holuhraun plain, in order to better understand the link between the surface deformation detected in the vicinity of the dyke by InSAR as well as GPS measurements, and the eruptive activity. The regular SAR acquisitions made over the Holuhraun area since the beginning of the unrest offer a unique opportunity to better understand the evolution of the intrusion feeding the fissure eruption. For that purpose, we focus on the faults and fissures forming the graben borders on the glacier as well as in the Holuhraun plain, initially mapped using high-resolution radar images, acquired by airborne radar. We extract movement along and perpendicular to these

  11. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  12. Themis Regio, Venus: Evidence for recent (?) volcanism from VIRTIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Mueller, Nils; Helbert, Joern

    2016-06-01

    Themis Regio is interpreted to be a hotspot rise underlain by one or more mantle plumes. Many volcanic features in the Themis region have high emissivity anomalies in Venus Express Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) data. Other high emissivity anomalies have been found to correspond to volcanic flows interpreted to be relatively recent (Smrekar et al. [2010a] Science 328, 605-608). Similarly, at Themis the majority of the high emissivity anomalies closely correspond to flows associated with coronae and volcanic edifices, consistent with the interpretation that they represent recent volcanism. These volcanic features also have negative Bouguer gravity anomalies indicating low density at depth, consistent with hot mantle upwellings leading to pressure release melting. In addition, several volcanic features at Themis have low emissivity anomalies, suggestive of more evolved compositions. Combining geologic mapping data with gravity and emissivity data provide support that Themis is an active hotspot swell, with associated long-lived, volcanoes and coronae that are likely associated with small-scale upwellings.

  13. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  14. Negative impacts of a vertebrate predator on insect pollinator visitation and seed output in Chuquiraga oppositifolia, a high Andean shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Alejandro A; Arroyo, Mary T K

    2004-01-01

    Studies on plant-pollinator interactions have largely neglected the potential negative effects of the predators of pollinators on seed output, even though anti-predatory behaviour of pollinators may affect visitation patterns, pollen transfer, and therefore potentially, plant reproductive output. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of lizards and insectivorous birds, by reducing pollinator visitation, can have significant negative effects on seed output in the insect-pollinated, genetically self-incompatible lower alpine Andean shrub, Chuquiraga oppositifolia (Asteraceae). The lower alpine belt supports a high density of territorial Liolaemus (Tropiduridae) lizards and low shrubs interspersed among rocks of varying sizes, the latter inhabited by lizards and commonly used by flycatchers Muscisaxicola (Tyrannidae) as perching sites. In a 2x2 factorial predator-exclusion experiment, visitation rates of the most frequent pollinators of C. oppositifolia (the satyrid butterfly Cosmosatyrus chilensis and the syrphid fly Scaeva melanostoma), the duration of pollinator visits, and seed output, were 2-4 times greater when lizards were excluded, while birds had no effect. In a natural experiment, visits by S. melanostoma were 9 times shorter, and pollinator visitation rates of C. chilensis and S. melanostoma, and C. oppositifolia seed output were 2-3 times lower on shrubs growing adjacent to lizard-occupied rocks compared to those growing distant from rocks. Our results, verified for additional Andean sites, suggest that lizard predators can alter the behaviour of pollinators and elicit strong top-down indirect negative effects on seed output. Such effects may be especially important in high alpine plant communities, where pollinator activity can be low and erratic, and pollen limitation has been reported. PMID:14551828

  15. Assessment of terrain slope influence in SWAT modeling of Andean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, C.; Pérez-Foguet, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological processes in the Andean Region are difficult to model. Large range of altitudes involved (from over 4000 meters above sea level, masl, to zero) indicates the high variability of rainfall, temperature and other climate variables. Strong runoff and extreme events as landslides and floods are the consequence of high slopes of terrain, especially in the upper part of the basins. Strong seasonality of rain and complex ecosystems (vulnerable to climate changes and anthropogenic activities) helps these processes. Present study focuses in a particular watershed from Peruvian Andes, the Jequetepeque River. The distributed watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is applied to model run-off and sediments transport through the basin with data from 1997 to 2006. Specifically, the study focuses in the assessment of the influence of considering terrain slope variation in the definition of Hydrographical Response Units within SWAT. The Jequetepeque watershed (4 372.5 km2) is located in the north part of Peru. River flows east to west, to the Pacific Ocean. Annual average precipitation ranges from 0 to 1100 mm and altitude from 0 to 4188 masl. The "Gallito Ciego" reservoir (400 masl) separates upper-middle part from lower part of the watershed. It stores water for supplying the people from the big cities on the coast and for extensive agriculture uses. Upper-middle part of the watershed covers 3564.8 km2. It ranges from 400 to 4188 masl in no more that 80 km, with slopes up to 20%. Main activities are agricultural and livestock and mining and about 80% of the population are rural. Annual mean temperature drops from 25.4 °C at the reservoir to less than 4 °C in the upper part. Also the highest rainfall variability is found in the upper-middle part of the watershed. Erosion produced by extreme events like 1997/98 "el Niño" Phenomenon is silting the reservoir faster than expected. Moreover, anthropogenic activities like agriculture and

  16. New Paleomagnetic Results and Ar-Ar Geochronology From the Vallenar Region (29oS), N. Chile: Implications for the Timing of Rotations in the Andean Forearc Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, M. J.; Taylor, G. K.; Grocott, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Andean forearc in northern Chile comprises from west to east three tectonomorphic zones - the Coastal Cordillera, the Central Valley and the Precordillera/Chilean Altiplano which lie outboard of the High Andes which represent the present-day active magmatic/volcanic arc. In the Vallenar region the Coastal Cordillera passes directly eastward into the Precordillera with no Central Valley present. The Coastal Cordillera is composed of deformed Palaeozoic sediments intruded by Permo-Triassic plutons, which together comprise the basement of the region. This basement is intruded by Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous plutons of the Coastal Batholith, which is in part overlain by and intruded into Lower Cretaceous arc to back-arc sequences of volcanics and marine limestones. This region is separated from the Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary volcanics and intrusives of the Precordillera to the east by a narrow deformational zone which extends for at least 200km along strike and which we believe to have formed as a result of sinistral transpression. New palaeomagnetic results from the westernmost part of the Lower Cretaceous batholith (n = 7/9 sites, dec = 35.5, inc = -45.0, {α }95 = 4.9), dated to between 130-128 Ma using Ar-Ar geochronology, reveal a well constrained clockwise rotation of 47 {+/-} 7o, consistent with previous results from further north in the Coastal Cordillera. Results from the easternmost pluton of the batholith, dated at 91 Ma, yields a characteristic direction (n = 9 sites, dec = 22.6, inc = -51.1, {α }95 = 4.5) and a rotation of 37 {+/-} 7o. The Coastal Cordillera - Precordillera boundary in this region is marked by an interbedded sequence of red sandstones and andesitic flows (the Punte del Cobre Fm.) overlain by limestones (Chanarcillo Gp.) which are here deformed in a relatively narrow (5-10km wide) fold and thrust belt. The characteristic magnetization of these units (n = 9 sites, dec = 31.5, inc = -50.7, α 95 = 4.3) clearly fails the fold

  17. Assessment of satellite rainfall products over the Andean plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satgé, Frédéric; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Gosset, Marielle; Molina, Jorge; Hernan Yuque Lima, Wilson; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Timouk, Franck; Garnier, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Nine satellite rainfall estimations (SREs) were evaluated for the first time over the South American Andean plateau watershed by comparison with rain gauge data acquired between 2005 and 2007. The comparisons were carried out at the annual, monthly and daily time steps. All SREs reproduce the salient pattern of the annual rain field, with a marked north-south gradient and a lighter east-west gradient. However, the intensity of the gradient differs among SREs: it is well marked in the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 (TMPA-3B42), Precipitation Estimation from remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) and Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) products, and it is smoothed out in the Climate prediction center MORPHing (CMORPH) products. Another interesting difference among products is the contrast in rainfall amounts between the water surfaces (Lake Titicaca) and the surrounding land. Some products (TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and GSMaP) show a contradictory rainfall deficit over Lake Titicaca, which may be due to the emissivity contrast between the lake and the surrounding lands and warm rain cloud processes. An analysis differentiating coastal Lake Titicaca from inland pixels confirmed this trend. The raw or Real Time (RT) products have strong biases over the study region. These biases are strongly positive for PERSIANN (above 90%), moderately positive for TMPA-3B42 (28%), strongly negative for CMORPH (- 42%) and moderately negative for GSMaP (- 18%). The biases are associated with a deformation of the rain rate frequency distribution: GSMaP underestimates the proportion of rainfall events for all rain rates; CMORPH overestimates the proportion of rain rates below 2 mm day- 1; and the other products tend to overestimate the proportion of moderate to high rain rates. These biases are greatly reduced by the gauge adjustment in the TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and CMORPH products, whereas a

  18. Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Santiago; Sede, Silvana M.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain uplifts have generated new ecologic opportunities for plants, and triggered evolutionary processes, favouring an increase on the speciation rate in all continents. Moreover, mountain ranges may act as corridors or barriers for plant lineages and populations. In South America a high rate of diversification has been linked to Andean orogeny during Pliocene/Miocene. More recently, Pleistocene glacial cycles have also shaped species distribution and demography. The endemic genus Escallonia is known to have diversified in the Andes. Species with similar morphology obscure species delimitation and plants with intermediate characters occur naturally. The aim of this study is to characterize genetic variation and structure of two widespread species of Escallonia: E. alpina and E. rubra. We analyzed the genetic variation of populations of the entire distribution range of the species and we also included those with intermediate morphological characters; a total of 94 accessions from 14 populations were used for the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Plastid DNA sequences (trnS-trnG, 3′trnV-ndhC intergenic spacers and the ndhF gene) from sixteen accessions of Escallonia species were used to construct a Statistical Parsimony network. Additionally, we performed a geometric morphometrics analysis on 88 leaves from 35 individuals of the two E. alpina varieties to further study their differences. Wright’s Fst and analysis of molecular variance tests performed on AFLP data showed a significant level of genetic structure at the species and population levels. Intermediate morphology populations showed a mixed genetic contribution from E. alpina var. alpina and E. rubra both in the Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE. On the other hand, E. rubra and the two varieties of E. alpina are well differentiated and assigned to different genetic clusters. Moreover, the Statistical Parsimony network showed a high degree of divergence between the

  19. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning and grazing affect puna productivity? (3) if the montane forest expands into the puna, what will be the resulting change in productivity? The study sites are located at the South-eastern Peruvian Andes; one grassland site and the forest sites are in Wayqecha biological station, and another grassland site in Manu National Park. At each grassland site, we selected a burnt and an unburnt area, installed unfenced and fenced transects in each area, and monitored above-ground productivity (NPPAG), below-ground productivity (NPPBG) and soil respiration (Rs) for 2 yr. In the forest, we monitored NPPAG, NPPBG and Rs for 2–4 yr. Grassland NPP varied between 4.6 ± 0.25 (disturbed areas) to 15.3 ± 0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (undisturbed areas) and cloud forest NPP was between 7.05 ± 0.39 and 8.0 ± 0.47 Mg C ha−1 yr−1, while soil carbon stocks were in the range of 126 ± 22 to 285 ± 31 Mg C ha−1. There were no significant differences on NPP between the puna and forest sites. The most undisturbed site had significantly higher NPP than other grassland sites, but no differences were found when relating grazing and fire at other sites. There were lower residence times of above-ground biomass compared to below-ground biomass. There was a strong seasonal signal on grassland NPPAG and NPPBG, with a shift on allocation at the beginning of the austral summer. High elevation tropical grasslands can be as productive as adjacent cloud forests, but have very different carbon cycling and retention properties than cloud forests. (paper)

  20. Andean snowpack since AD 1150 inferred from rainfall, tree-ring and documentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean snowpack is the main source of freshwater and arguably the single most important natural resource for the populated, semi-arid regions of central Chile and central-western Argentina. However, apart from recent analyses of instrumental snowpack data, very little is known about the long ter...

  1. The electronic procurement in the framework of the Andean Community. State of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William David Hernández Martínez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is structured as a brief survey of the academic and policy approach on the unification or harmonization of regulations about electronic commerce, specifically relating the electronic contracts, in Latin America, with special emphasis on the Andean Community of Nations as a proposed work on the development of modern trends of international trade law.

  2. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Angel, Tatiana; Hernández, Mónica; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clon

  3. Marcos Zapata's "Last Supper": a feast of European religion and Andean culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendt, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In Marcos Zapata's 1753 painting of the Last Supper in Cuzco, Peru, Christian symbolism is filtered through Andean cultural tradition. Zapata was a late member of the Cuzco School of Painting, a group comprised of few European immigrants and handfuls of mestizo and Indian artists. The painters in Cuzco learned mostly from prints of European paintings, and their style tends to blend local culture into the traditional painting of their conquistadors. Imagery was the most successful tool used by the Spaniards in their quest to Christianize the Andean population. By teaching locals to paint Christian subjects, they were able to infuse Christianity into Andean traditions. Zapata's rendering of the Last Supper utilizes this cultural blending while staying true to the Christian symbolism within the subject. Instead of the traditional lamb, Zapata's Last Supper features a platter of cuy, or guinea pig, an Andean delicacy stocked with protein as well as cultural significance. Cuy was traditionally a sacrificial animal at Inca agricultural festivals and in this way it offers poignant parallel to the lamb, as a traditional Christian sacrificial animal. PMID:21568039

  4. Persistence of chironomids in metal polluted Andean high altitude streams: does melanin play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Loayza Muro; J.K. Marticorena-Ruíz; E.J. Palomino; C. Merritt; M.L. de Baat; M. van Gemert; R.A. Verweij; M.H.S. Kraak; W. Admiraal

    2013-01-01

    In high altitude Andean streams an intense solar radiation and coinciding metal pollution allow the persistence of only a few specialized taxa, including chironomids. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine the mechanisms underlying the persistence of chironomids under these multiple

  5. The Rise and Fall of Andean Empires: El Nino History Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on El Nino and the methods for investigating ancient climate record. Traces the rise and fall of the Andean empires focusing on the climatic forces that each empire (Tiwanaku, Wari, Moche, and Inca) endured. States that modern societies should learn from the experiences of these ancient civilizations. (CMK)

  6. The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Condamine, Fabien L; Antonelli, Alexandre; Mulch, Andreas; Davis, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The tropical Andes of South America, the world's richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for its direct incorporation of geological data on Andean uplift into a macroevolutionary model. We show that speciation and extinction are differentially influenced by abiotic factors: speciation rates rose concurrently with Andean elevation, while extinction rates decreased during global cooling. Pollination syndrome and fruit type, both biotic traits known to facilitate mutualisms, played an additional role in driving diversification. These abiotic and biotic factors resulted in one of the fastest radiations reported to date: the centropogonids, whose 550 species arose in the last 5 million yr. Our study represents a significant advance in our understanding of plant evolution in Andean cloud forests. It further highlights the power of combining phylogenetic and Earth science models to explore the interplay of geology, climate, and ecology in generating the world's biodiversity. PMID:26990796

  7. Formal Law and Local Water Control in the Andean Region: A Fiercely Contested Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de H.; Boelens, R.A.; Bustamente, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    Water access and control rights of peasant and indigenous communities in Andean countries are threatened. Vertical state law and intervention practices, as well as new privatization policies generally ignore, discriminate or undermine local normative frameworks. Recognition of diverse local rights a

  8. Institutional reform in the Andean irrigation sector: enabling policies for strengthening local rights and water management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, L.; Ooijevaar, M.; Boelens, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, local and indigenous water rights and rules in the Andean region have been largely neglected and discriminated against. The process of undermining local communities' water access and control rights continues up to today and not only is it headed by powerful local, national and interna

  9. The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Condamine, Fabien L; Antonelli, Alexandre; Mulch, Andreas; Davis, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The tropical Andes of South America, the world's richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for its direct incorporation of geological data on Andean uplift into a macroevolutionary model. We show that speciation and extinction are differentially influenced by abiotic factors: speciation rates rose concurrently with Andean elevation, while extinction rates decreased during global cooling. Pollination syndrome and fruit type, both biotic traits known to facilitate mutualisms, played an additional role in driving diversification. These abiotic and biotic factors resulted in one of the fastest radiations reported to date: the centropogonids, whose 550 species arose in the last 5 million yr. Our study represents a significant advance in our understanding of plant evolution in Andean cloud forests. It further highlights the power of combining phylogenetic and Earth science models to explore the interplay of geology, climate, and ecology in generating the world's biodiversity.

  10. The electronic procurement in the framework of the Andean Community. State of the art

    OpenAIRE

    William David Hernández Martínez

    2010-01-01

    The article is structured as a brief survey of the academic and policy approach on the unification or harmonization of regulations about electronic commerce, specifically relating the electronic contracts, in Latin America, with special emphasis on the Andean Community of Nations as a proposed work on the development of modern trends of international trade law.

  11. Successional position of dry Andean dwarf forest species as a basis for restoration trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, J.P.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Cleef, A.M.; Rietman, N.

    2005-01-01

    The successional affinity of nine woody species was inferred from the structure, diversity and disturbance history of the vegetation where these occurred. This was done in order to obtain a basis for a restoration experiment, currently in execution, in the dry Andean dwarf forest zone on the edge of

  12. Synopsis of Central Andean Orthalicoid land snails (Gastropoda, Stylommatophora), excluding Bulimulidae

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham S.H. Breure; Avila, Valentín Mogollón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A faunal overview is presented of the molluscan families Amphibulimidae , Megaspiridae , Odontostomidae , Orthalicidae , Simpulopsidae in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. These Central Andean countries are known for their biodiverse malacofauna, of which the superfamily Orthalicoidea takes relatively a large share. In this paper the five families containing 103 (sub)species, for which systematic information (original publication, type locality, type depository, summarizing literature) and...

  13. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report

  14. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that