WorldWideScience

Sample records for activation tagging element

  1. Shark Tagging Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  2. Suppression of the barley uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene by a Ds activation tagging element generates developmental photosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Agostino, Anthony; Clarke, Bryan C; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Pryor, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    Chlorophyll production involves the synthesis of photoreactive intermediates that, when in excess, are toxic due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A novel, activation-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant is described that results from antisense suppression of a uroporphyrinogen III synthase (Uros) gene, the product of which catalyzes the sixth step in the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. In homozygous mutant plants, uroporphyrin(ogen) I accumulates by spontaneous cyclization of hydroxyl methylbilane, the substrate of Uros. Accumulation of this tetrapyrrole intermediate results in photosensitive cell death due to the production of ROS. The efficiency of Uros gene suppression is developmentally regulated, being most effective in mature seedling leaves compared with newly emergent leaves. Reduced transcript accumulation of a number of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes occurs in the mutant, even under 3% light conditions, consistent with a retrograde plastid-nuclear signaling mechanism arising from Uros gene suppression. A similar set of nuclear genes was repressed in wild-type barley following treatment with a singlet oxygen-generating herbicide, but not by a superoxide generating herbicide, suggesting that the retrograde signaling apparent in the mutant is specific to singlet oxygen.

  3. Survey of transposable elements in sugarcane expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Magdalena

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project has produced a large number of cDNA sequences from several plant tissues submitted or not to different conditions of stress. In this paper we report the result of a search for transposable elements (TEs revealing a surprising amount of expressed TEs homologues. Of the 260,781 sequences grouped in 81,223 fragment assembly program (Phrap clusters, a total of 276 clones showed homology to previously reported TEs using a stringent cut-off value of e-50 or better. Homologous clones to Copia/Ty1 and Gypsy/Ty3 groups of long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons were found but no non-LTR retroelements were identified. All major transposon families were represented in sugarcane including Activator (Ac, Mutator (MuDR, Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm and Mariner. In order to compare the TE diversity in grasses genomes, we carried out a search for TEs described in sugarcane related species O.sativa, Z. mays and S. bicolor. We also present preliminary results showing the potential use of TEs insertion pattern polymorphism as molecular markers for cultivar identification.

  4. ICP-MS and elemental tags for the life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesen, Charlotte

    2012-08-07

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been applied for the analysis of biomolecules due to its high sensitivity, wide linear dynamic range, and multielement capabilities. However, outside the elemental MS community the potential of this technique, e.g. for life sciences applications, is not yet fully exploited. Thus, the development of ICP-MS-based (immuno) assays for a wide range of medical (cancer diagnostics, cisplatin toxicity studies), biochemical (DNA microarray, single cell analysis), and environmental (analysis of comestible goods) applications was accomplished by utilization of chemical labels. Laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS was employed for the direct analysis of solid samples like microarrays and thin tissue sections. An immunoassay was developed for ochratoxin A (OTA) determination in wine, and ICP-MS detection was compared to conventional photometry by gold nanoparticle tagging and horseradish peroxidase, respectively. Detection limits of the assay were optimized to 0.003 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and the quantification range was 0.01-1 {mu}g L{sup -1} for both methods. For LA-ICP-MS-based DNA microarray detection, gold nanoparticle tags were specifically introduced via a streptavidin-biotin linkage. In immunohistochemistry (IHC), up to 20 tumor markers are routinely evaluated for one patient and thus, a common analysis results in a series of time consuming staining procedures. Hence, LA-ICP-MS was elaborated as a detection tool for a novel, multiplexed IHC analysis of tissue sections. Different lanthanides were employed for the simultaneous detection of up to three tumor markers (Her 2, CK 7, and MUC 1) in a breast cancer tissue. Additionally, iodine was employed as a labeling reagent, and a new LA-ICP-MS method for single cell and cell nucleus imaging was developed at 4 {mu}m laser spot size. Iodine was also applied as a new internal standard for tissue samples. Moreover, Pt-protein complexes separated by an optimized 1D and 2D gel

  5. Elements of social representation theory incollaborative tagging systems

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Zeni Marchiori; Andre Luiz Appel; Eduardo Michellotti Bettoni; Denise Fukumi Tsunoda; Frank Coelho de Alcântara

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the information representation process based on the Moscovici's Social Representation Theory and domain analysis in Information Science. The aim was to identify mechanisms and constituent dimensions of social representation in collaborative tagging systems/social bookmarking systems. Scientific knowledge was defined as the object/phenomenon of representation in these systems; and the tag as the shareable structure of meaning that connects participants and resources. The...

  6. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  7. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging in plants – Theoretical considerations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Phogat; Pradeep Kumar Burma; Deepak Pental

    2000-03-01

    The two-element transposon constructs, utilizing either Ac/Ds or Spm/dSpm, allow random tagging of genes in heterologous model species, but are inadequate for directed tagging of specific alleles of agronomic importance. We propose the use of Ac/Ds in conjunction with Spm/dSpm to develop a four-element system for directed tagging of crop-specific alleles. The four-element based construct would include both Ds and dSpm along with relevant marker genes and would function in two steps. In the first step dSpm(Ds) stocks (a minimum of two) would be crossed to a line containing transposases of Spm and unlinked integrations would be selected from segregating population by the use of a negative selection marker to develop stocks representing integration of dSpm(Ds) at a large number of locations in the genome. Selections would be made for a line in which dSpm(Ds) shows partial or complete linkage to the allele of interest. In the second step selected line would be crossed to a line containing Ac transposase to induce transpositions of Ds element to linked sites thereby exploiting the natural tendency of Ds element to jump to linked sites. Unlinked jumps of dSpm(Ds) and linked jumps of Ds could be monitored by appropriate marker genes. The proposed model would allow tagging of allele of interest in chromosome addition lines and also help in the efficient use of genic male sterility systems for hybrid seed production by tightly marking the fertility restorer gene with a negative selection marker.

  8. Tag4M, a Wi-Fi RFID Active Tag Optimized for Sensor Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Folea, Silviu; Ghercioiu, Marius

    2010-01-01

    This presentation introduces a Wi-Fi tag named Tag4M. The novelty of the design is Wi-Fi with ultra-low power, in a very small package that is running on a battery for years and offers a platform for sensor measurements using the existing (Internet) network

  9. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Yoav; Nitzan, Noa; Furley, Andrew J W; Kozlov, Serguei V; Klar, Avihu

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1) and Neurofascin (Nfasc) are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  10. An active ac/ds transposon system for activation tagging in tomato cultivar m82 using clonal propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jared D; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W; Veilleux, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar.

  11. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Hadas

    Full Text Available Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1 and Neurofascin (Nfasc are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  12. Laboratory Testing of Active and Passive UHF RFID Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with research of laboratory testing by active and passive UHF tags and therefore mutual coexistence of active and passive RFID technology, which is a part of automatic identification and data capture. In this article we would like to describe an identification of transport unit based on passive technology and also by active technology. We would like to specify, how this technologies can work together and in which application focuses on postal and logistics. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina. Our research contains different types of measurements in order to point out the possible influence of these two technologies. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of UHF RFID technology in postal and logistics applications. At the end of this article is characterized the utilization of the RFID technology in postal logistics chain by using both passive and active technologies.

  13. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  14. Molecular analysis of plant architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana using activation tagging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfun Junior, A.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Arabidopsisthaliana, activation tagging, T-DNA, transposon, mutants, enhancer, DNA methylation, plant architecture, development, forward/reverse genetics, lateral organs, flower, vascular tissue, HLH, transmembrane, transcription factorsPlant development is one of the mos

  15. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Eszter C.; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only...

  16. An Active Ac/Ds Transposon System for Activation Tagging in Tomato Cultivar M82 Using Clonal Propagation1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jared D.; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  17. Histidine tag fusion increases expression levels of active recombinant amelogenin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Johan; Andersson, Christer; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Petter; Bülow, Leif

    2006-07-01

    Amelogenin is a dental enamel matrix protein involved in formation of dental enamel. In this study, we have expressed two different recombinant murine amelogenins in Escherichia coli: the untagged rM179, and the histidine tagged rp(H)M180, identical to rM179 except that it carries the additional N-terminal sequence MRGSHHHHHHGS. The effects of the histidine tag on expression levels, and on growth properties of the amelogenin expressing cells were studied. Purification of a crude protein extract containing rp(H)M180 was also carried out using IMAC and reverse-phase HPLC. The results of this study showed clearly that both growth properties and amelogenin expression levels were improved for E. coli cells expressing the histidine tagged amelogenin rp(H)M180, compared to cells expressing the untagged amelogenin rM179. The positive effect of the histidine tag on amelogenin expression is proposed to be due to the hydrophilic nature of the histidine tag, generating a more hydrophilic amelogenin, which is more compatible with the host cell. Human osteoblasts treated with the purified rp(H)M180 showed increased levels of secreted osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. This response was similar to cells treated with enamel matrix derivate, mainly composed by amelogenin, suggesting that the recombinant protein is biologically active. Thus, the histidine tag favors expression and purification of biologically active recombinant amelogenin.

  18. Tag Correspondence Model for User Tag Suggestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂存超; 刘知远; 孙茂松

    2015-01-01

    Some microblog services encourage users to annotate themselves with multiple tags, indicating their attributes and interests. User tags play an important role for personalized recommendation and information retrieval. In order to better understand the semantics of user tags, we propose Tag Correspondence Model (TCM) to identify complex correspondences of tags from the rich context of microblog users. The correspondence of a tag is referred to as a unique element in the context which is semantically correlated with this tag. In TCM, we divide the context of a microblog user into various sources (such as short messages, user profile, and neighbors). With a collection of users with annotated tags, TCM can automatically learn the correspondences of user tags from multiple sources. With the learned correspondences, we are able to interpret implicit semantics of tags. Moreover, for the users who have not annotated any tags, TCM can suggest tags according to users’ context information. Extensive experiments on a real-world dataset demonstrate that our method can effciently identify correspondences of tags, which may eventually represent semantic meanings of tags.

  19. Small, N-terminal tags activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity by disrupting its autoinhibited conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Burchell

    Full Text Available Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, mutations in which cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson's Disease. Many studies aimed at understanding Parkin function, regulation and dysfunction are performed using N-terminal epitope tags. We report here that the use of small tags such as FLAG, cMyc and HA, influence the physical stability and activity of Parkin in and out of cells, perturbing the autoinhibited native state of Parkin, resulting in an active-for-autoubiquitination species.

  20. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-21

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture.

  1. Microarray of programmable electrochemically active elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCaskill, John; Maeke, Thomas; Straczek, Lukas

    Possible applications of the MICREAgents Dock, a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements, to Alife.......Possible applications of the MICREAgents Dock, a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements, to Alife....

  2. Active Collection of Land Cover Sample Data from Geo-Tagged Web Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Hou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sample data plays an important role in land cover (LC map validation. Traditionally, they are collected through field survey or image interpretation, either of which is costly, labor-intensive and time-consuming. In recent years, massive geo-tagged texts are emerging on the web and they contain valuable information for LC map validation. However, this kind of special textual data has seldom been analyzed and used for supporting LC map validation. This paper examines the potential of geo-tagged web texts as a new cost-free sample data source to assist LC map validation and proposes an active data collection approach. The proposed approach uses a customized deep web crawler to search for geo-tagged web texts based on land cover-related keywords and string-based rules matching. A data transformation based on buffer analysis is then performed to convert the collected web texts into LC sample data. Using three provinces and three municipalities directly under the Central Government in China as study areas, geo-tagged web texts were collected to validate artificial surface class of China’s 30-meter global land cover datasets (GlobeLand30-2010. A total of 6283 geo-tagged web texts were collected at a speed of 0.58 texts per second. The collected texts about built-up areas were transformed into sample data. User’s accuracy of 82.2% was achieved, which is close to that derived from formal expert validation. The preliminary results show that geo-tagged web texts are valuable ancillary data for LC map validation and the proposed approach can improve the efficiency of sample data collection.

  3. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    SV40Tag is transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after 3 pregnancies...and lactations . Using this model, populations of marked cells can be collected for integrated analysis of gene expression, promoter usage, and DNA...completed over the first 6 months on the job . Training included mouse husbandry and colony management, mammary cell isolations in preparation for

  4. Tagging vs. Controlled Vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Petras, Vivien

    2015-01-01

    elements like core bibliographic data, controlled vocabulary terms, reviews, and tags to the retrieval performance. Our comparison is done using a test collection of over 2 million book records with information elements from Amazon, the British Library, the Library of Congress, and LibraryThing. We find...... that tags and controlled vocabulary terms do not actually outperform each other consistently, but seem to provide complementary contributions: some information needs are best addressed using controlled vocabulary terms whereas other are best addressed using tags....

  5. Billfish Tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SWFSC's constituent-based Billfish Tagging Program began in 1963 and since that time has provided conventional spaghetti type tags and tagging supplies to...

  6. Tag questions Tag questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Brazil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The so-called 'tag' structures of English have received a lot of attention in language teaching programmes, attention that is not hard to justify when one considers the problems and anxiety they can occasion for many foreign learners. Most teachers one speaks to seem fairly willing to agree, however, that traditional treatments of the topic leave much to be desired. It happens, also, that, when considered collectively, the tags and some related phenomena have a special heoretical interest. For they constitute a field in which it seems essential to bring together insights that derive from the study of several aspects of linguistic organisation, aspects which in some recent work have been held to need distinctive kinds of descriptive category to handle. Traditional treatments have found it necessary to recognise different syntactic types (e.g. 'same polarity' and 'reversed polarity' tags and ifferent intonational treatments ("falling'and 'rising' tag; while the way the communicative significance of the various permutations is described normally requires reference to the expectations they signal regarding the immediately following behaviour of the other party (in the common phrase, 'What kind of answer they expect'. This last consideration places the matter squarely in the arena of recent work on the analysis of interactive discourse. The so-called 'tag' structures of English have received a lot of attention in language teaching programmes, attention that is not hard to justify when one considers the problems and anxiety they can occasion for many foreign learners. Most teachers one speaks to seem fairly willing to agree, however, that traditional treatments of the topic leave much to be desired. It happens, also, that, when considered collectively, the tags and some related phenomena have a special heoretical interest. For they constitute a field in which it seems essential to bring together insights that derive from the study of several aspects

  7. Integral test on activation cross section of tag gas nuclides using fast neutron spectrum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    Activation cross sections of tag gas nuclides, which will be used for the failed fuel detection and location in FBR plants, were evaluated by the irradiation tests in the fast neutron spectrum fields in JOYO and YAYOI. The comparison of their measured radioactivities and the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 cross section set showed that the C/E values ranged from 0.8 to 2.8 for the calibration tests in YAYOI and that the present accuracies of these cross sections were confirmed. (author)

  8. Activation tagging of ATHB13 in Arabidopsis thaliana confers broad-spectrum disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongli; Appiano, Michela; Huibers, Robin P; Chen, Xi; Loonen, Annelies E H M; Visser, Richard G F; Wolters, Anne-Marie A; Bai, Yuling

    2014-12-01

    Powdery mildew species Oidium neolycopersici (On) can cause serious yield losses in tomato production worldwide. Besides on tomato, On is able to grow and reproduce on Arabidopsis. In this study we screened a collection of activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutants and identified one mutant, 3221, which displayed resistance to On, and in addition showed a reduced stature and serrated leaves. Additional disease tests demonstrated that the 3221 mutant exhibited resistance to downy mildew (Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis) and green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), but retained susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. The resistance trait and morphological alteration were mutually linked in 3221. Identification of the activation tag insertion site and microarray analysis revealed that ATHB13, a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor, was constitutively overexpressed in 3221. Silencing of ATHB13 in 3221 resulted in the loss of both the morphological alteration and resistance, whereas overexpression of the cloned ATHB13 in Col-0 and Col-eds1-2 backgrounds resulted in morphological alteration and resistance. Microarray analysis further revealed that overexpression of ATHB13 influenced the expression of a large number of genes. Previously, it was reported that ATHB13-overexpressing lines conferred tolerance to abiotic stress. Together with our results, it appears that ATHB13 is involved in the crosstalk between abiotic and biotic stress resistance pathways.

  9. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI.

  10. Transcriptional activity of transposable elements in coelacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forconi, Mariko; Chalopin, Domitille; Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; De Moro, Gianluca; Galiana, Delphine; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The morphological stasis of coelacanths has long suggested a slow evolutionary rate. General genomic stasis might also imply a decrease of transposable elements activity. To evaluate the potential activity of transposable elements (TEs) in "living fossil" species, transcriptomic data of Latimeria chalumnae and its Indonesian congener Latimeria menadoensis were compared through the RNA-sequencing mapping procedures in three different organs (liver, testis, and muscle). The analysis of coelacanth transcriptomes highlights a significant percentage of transcribed TEs in both species. Major contributors are LINE retrotransposons, especially from the CR1 family. Furthermore, some particular elements such as a LF-SINE and a LINE2 sequences seem to be more expressed than other elements. The amount of TEs expressed in testis suggests possible transposition burst in incoming generations. Moreover, significant amount of TEs in liver and muscle transcriptomes were also observed. Analyses of elements displaying marked organ-specific expression gave us the opportunity to highlight exaptation cases, that is, the recruitment of TEs as new cellular genes, but also to identify a new Latimeria-specific family of Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements called CoeG-SINEs. Overall, transcriptome results do not seem to be in line with a slow-evolving genome with poor TE activity.

  11. Element distribution over the surface of fish scales and its connection to the geochemical environment of habitats: a potential biogeochemical tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, TsingHai; Lai, Yan-Chen; Chiang, Chia-Che; Cheng, Yu-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2016-03-01

    The elemental content of fish scales is known to be a reliable biogeochemical tag for tracing the origin of fishes. In this study, this correlation is further confirmed to exist on the surface of fish scales using a novel environmental analytical method, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which bypasses several complicated sample preparation procedures such as acid digestion and pre-concentration. The results suggest that the elemental ratios of Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, and Mn/Ca on the surface of fish scales are strongly correlated with the geochemical environment of their original habitat. This correlation is further demonstrated to be sensitive to variation of water in the habitat due to the adsorbed inorganic ions. In this sense, the limitation of fish scales as a biogeochemical tag is the sensitivity of LA-ICP-MS toward the studied elements. Graphical abstract Illustration of the connection between element distribution pattern over the surface of fish scales and biogeochemical environment of its habitat.

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana rlp mutations revert the ectopic leaf blade formation conferred by activation tagging of the LEP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Nussbaumer, C; Keller, Bente

    2003-01-01

    Activation tagging of the gene LEAFY PETIOLE (LEP) with a T-DNA construct induces ectopic leaf blade formation in Arabidopsis, which results in a leafy petiole phenotype. In addition, the number of rosette leaves produced prior to the onset of bolting is reduced, and the rate of leaf initiation...... is retarded by the activation tagged LEP gene. The ectopic leaf blade results from an invasion of the petiole region by the wild-type leaf blade. In order to isolate mutants that are specifically disturbed in the outgrowth of the leaf blade, second site mutagenesis was performed using ethane methanesulphonate...

  14. Construction of new GFP-tagged fusants for Trichoderma harzianum with enhanced biocontrol activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowsari Mojegan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma is one of the most exploited biocontrol agents for the management of plant diseases. In biocontrol ecology, the critical factors are detection, and the monitoring and recovery of specific biocontrol agents either naturally present or deliberately released into the environment. Protoplast fusion is an appropriate tool for the improvement of biocontrol Trichoderma strains. Protoplast isolation from Trichoderma harzianum was achieved using 24 h culture age, 6.6 mg/ml Novazym L 1412 at 30°C which resulted the maximum protoplast yield of 5 × 108/ml. The self-fused protoplasts were regenerated and 12 fusants were selected based on their growth rate on 2% colloidal chitin medium. Next, a comparison was done for chitinase and antagonistic activity. Transcriptomic analysis based on quantitative real-time RT-PCR, demonstrated that T8-05 fusant expressed 1.5 fold of chit42 transcript as compared with the parental line. This fusant with 7.02±0.15U chitinase activity showed a higher growth inhibition rate (100% than the parent strain, against Rhizoctonia solani. To obtain a genetically marked fusant that can be used as a biomonitor, the fusant was cotransformed with the gfp and amdS genes. The morphology and viability of selected cotransformant (FT8-7MK-05-2 was similar to the parent. Green fluorescing conidia were observed within the first 2 days of incubation in the soil, and this was followed by the formation of chlamydopores after 60 days. The colonisation of the gfp-tagged fusant was also monitored visually on R. solani sclerotia by scanning electron microscopy. Production of gfp-tagged fusant of Trichoderma spp. provides a potentially useful tool for monitoring hyphal growth patterns and the population of biocontrol agent isolates introduced into environmental systems.

  15. Microarray of programmable electrochemically active elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. McCaskill, John; Maeke, Thomas; Straczek, Lukas;

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes possible applications of a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements to Alife. The array has been developed as part of the MICREA-gents project, and after several design phases, is now a mature enough device for general use beyond the project. Here...

  16. Microarray of programmable electrochemically active elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. McCaskill, John; Maeke, Thomas; Straczek, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes possible applications of a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements to Alife. The array has been developed as part of the MICREA-gents project, and after several design phases, is now a mature enough device for general use beyond the project. Here...

  17. Tag Gardening for Folksonomy Enrichment and Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Weller

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As social tagging applications continuously gain in popularity, it becomes more and more accepted that models and tools for (re-organizing tags are needed. Some first approaches are already practically implemented. Recently, activities to edit and organize tags have been described as "tag gardening". We discuss different ways to subsequently revise and reedit tags and thus introduce different "gardening activities"; among them models that allow gradually adding semantic structures to folksonomies and/or that combine them with more complex forms of knowledge organization systems. Moreover, power tags are introduced as tag gardening candidates and the personal tag repository TagCare is presented.

  18. Analysis of the SHP2 enhancer for the use of tissue specific activation tagging in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfun Junior, A.; Mes, J.J.; Busscher, M.; Angenent, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Activation tagging is a powerful tool to identify new mutants and to obtain information about possible biological functions of the overexpressed genes. The quadruple cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S enhancer fragment is a strong enhancer, which is most commonly used for this purpose. However, the

  19. Spectral Tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2003-05-01

    This research examines the feasibility of spectral tagging, which involves modifying the spectral signature of a target, e.g. by mixing an additive with the target's paint. The target is unchanged to the human eye, but the tag is revealed when viewed with a spectrometer. This project investigates a layer of security that is not obvious, and therefore easy to conceal. The result is a tagging mechanism that is difficult to counterfeit. Uniquely tagging an item is an area of need in safeguards and security and non-proliferation. The powdered forms of the minerals lapis lazuli and olivine were selected as the initial test tags due to their availability and uniqueness in the visible to near-infrared spectral region. They were mixed with paints and applied to steel. In order to verify the presence of the tags quantitatively, the data from the spectrometer was input into unmixing models and signal detection algorithms. The mixture with the best results was blue paint mixed with lapis lazuli and olivine. The tag had a 0% probability of false alarm and a 100% probability of detection. The research proved that spectral tagging is feasible, although certain tag/paint mixtures are more detectable than others.

  20. Optical-electronic device based on diffraction optical element for control of special protective tags executed from luminophor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, M.; Odinokov, S.

    2017-05-01

    The report focuses on special printing industry, which is called secure printing, which uses printing techniques to prevent forgery or falsification of security documents. The report considered the possibility of establishing a spectral device for determining the authenticity of certain documents that are protected by machine-readable luminophor labels. The device works in two spectral ranges - visible and near infrared that allows to register Stokes and anti-Stokes spectral components of protective tags. The proposed device allows verification of the authenticity of security documents based on multiple criteria in different spectral ranges. It may be used at enterprises related to the production of security printing products, expert units of law enforcement bodies at check of authenticity of banknotes and other structures.

  1. SERS-active nanoparticles as a barcoding technology for tags and seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merkle, Peter B [SNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present our work to modernize tagging and sealing technologies for international safeguards applications. Our work combines technologies developed at both Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), to offer a passive tag and seal system that can be applied and verified in field, with minimal training for on-site personnel, along with a low per-seal cost. Here, we focus primarily on LANL technology: the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) as an inexpensive verification tool. Our nanoparticles offer unique SERS responses, which we can then use to incorporate robust barcoding into tag materials. We describe this technology in more detail, offer preliminary results, and outline integration with SNL developments.

  2. A multi-parametric microarray for protein profiling: simultaneous analysis of 8 different cytochromes via differentially element tagged antibodies and laser ablation ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waentig, Larissa; Techritz, Sandra; Jakubowski, Norbert; Roos, Peter H

    2013-11-07

    The paper presents a new multi-parametric protein microarray embracing the multi-analyte capabilities of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The combination of high throughput reverse phase protein microarrays with element tagged antibodies and LA-ICP-MS makes it possible to detect and quantify many proteins or biomarkers in multiple samples simultaneously. A proof of concept experiment is performed for the analysis of cytochromes particularly of cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play an important role in the metabolism of xenobiotics such as toxicants and drugs. With the aid of the LA-ICP-MS based multi-parametric reverse phase protein microarray it was possible to analyse 8 cytochromes in 14 different proteomes in one run. The methodology shows excellent detection limits in the lower amol range and a very good linearity of R(2) ≥ 0.9996 which is a prerequisite for the development of further quantification strategies.

  3. DG-CST (Disease Gene Conserved Sequence Tags), a database of human–mouse conserved elements associated to disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Angelo; Petrillo, Mauro; di Bernardo, Diego; Guffanti, Alessandro; Mignone, Flavio; Confalonieri, Stefano; Luzi, Lucilla; Pesole, Graziano; Paolella, Giovanni; Ballabio, Andrea; Banfi, Sandro

    2005-01-01

    The identification and study of evolutionarily conserved genomic sequences that surround disease-related genes is a valuable tool to gain insight into the functional role of these genes and to better elucidate the pathogenetic mechanisms of disease. We created the DG-CST (Disease Gene Conserved Sequence Tags) database for the identification and detailed annotation of human–mouse conserved genomic sequences that are localized within or in the vicinity of human disease-related genes. CSTs are defined as sequences that show at least 70% identity between human and mouse over a length of at least 100 bp. The database contains CST data relative to over 1088 genes responsible for monogenetic human genetic diseases or involved in the susceptibility to multifactorial/polygenic diseases. DG-CST is accessible via the internet at http://dgcst.ceinge.unina.it/ and may be searched using both simple and complex queries. A graphic browser allows direct visualization of the CSTs and related annotations within the context of the relative gene and its transcripts. PMID:15608249

  4. Risk, the Element of Any Economic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Coca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The financial risks have appeared since the beginnings of trade relations. While the step up where they were recognized, limited and checked differed greatly. Financial losses endured by internationally famous companies, due to inadequate Risk Management activities and especially highly publicized, have raised awareness by managers of growing importance to risk management In the economic and financial life, the risk is an element of any activity, being exposed in the agenda of company managers. Unforeseeable changes in the interest rate development, the cost of a good or of the exchange rate affects not only the financial effects of an enterprise, but can cause its bankruptcy as well. Financial decisions are made depending on cash flows of contracts foreseen to come, that through excellence are unsafe.

  5. Characterization of soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from dengue virus serotype 2: The polyhistidine tag compromises the polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Maliwan; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2015-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target for inhibition in the treatment of viral infections. In the case of dengue virus (DENV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity resides in the C-terminal two-thirds of non-structural protein (NS) 5 responsible for the de novo synthesis of the viral RNA genome. Among four distinct, but closely related dengue serotypes, serotype 2 (DENV-2) produces more severe diseases than other serotypes. It has been reported that bacterial production of the recombinant DENV-2 RdRp was difficult due to its low expression and solubility levels. To facilitate functional and structural analyses, we here demonstrate complete protocols for overexpression and purification of soluble DENV-2 RdRp, increasing protein yields by a remarkable 10 times compared to earlier reports. Three different forms of DENV-2 RdRp as either N- or C-terminally His-tagged fusions, or without tag, were purified to homogeneity. We show here that the presence of both the N- and C-terminal His-tag had a deleterious effect on polymerase activity and, in contrast to earlier studies, our non-tagged RdRp did not require manganese ions to activate RNA polymerization. We also determined an apparent Kd value of 53nM for binding to the 5'-UTR RNA by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our work provide a more suitable material for basic research of viral RdRp and for drug development.

  6. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph, E-mail: kappock@purdue.edu [Purdue University, 175 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2063 (United States)

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 Å resolution contains tail–active site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  7. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2016-12-17

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  8. Activation tagging of the two closely linked genes LEP and VAS independently affects vascular cell number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Hooykaas, Paul J J; Keller, Beat

    2002-01-01

    report that in addition to this leafy petiole phenotype, the size of the vascular bundles is increased in all aerial organs in let as a result of an increase in the number of xylem, phloem (pro)cambial and pericycle cells. This vascular phenotype is caused by activation tagging of the two genes VASCULAR...... TISSUE SIZE (VAS) and LEP. These genes are closely linked and arranged in tandem. Activation tagging of LEP only caused a specific increase in the number of xylem cells. This increased xylem cell number, together with the ectopic leaf blade formation, indicates that LEP functions as a cell division......-promoting factor. The activation tagging of VAS only resulted in a specific increase in phloem (pro)cambial and pericycle cells. We conclude that activation tagging of LEP and VAS results in additive phenotypes. Insertional mutants for LEP and VAS display wild-type vascular development, indicating the relevance...

  9. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR) chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98) and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03–1.18) than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR) distance/min (ES = 0.67) and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95) during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE) bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69–1.15) and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56). Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43–0.80) for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions. PMID:26642320

  10. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke W Hogarth

    Full Text Available This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2 and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98 and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03-1.18 than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR distance/min (ES = 0.67 and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95 during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69-1.15 and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56. Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43-0.80 for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions.

  11. Trace element inhibition of phytase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T; Connolly, C; Murphy, R

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, 70 % of global monogastric feeds contains an exogenous phytase. Phytase supplementation has enabled a more efficient utilisation of phytate phosphorous (P) and reduction of P pollution. Trace minerals, such as iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) are essential for maintaining health and immunity as well as being involved in animal growth, production and reproduction. Exogenous sources of phytase and trace elements are regularly supplemented to monogastric diets and usually combined in a premix. However, the possibility for negative interaction between individual components within the premix is high and is often overlooked. Therefore, this initial study focused on assessing the potential in vitro interaction between inorganic and organic chelated sources of Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn with three commercially available phytase preparations. Additionally, this study has investigated if the degree of enzyme inhibition was dependent of the type of chelated sources. A highly significant relationship between phytase inhibition, trace mineral type as well as mineral source and concentration, p phytases for Fe and Zn, as well as for Cu with E. coli and Aspergillus niger phytases. Different chelate trace mineral sources demonstrated diversifying abilities to inhibit exogenous phytase activity.

  12. Upper Tag Ontology (UTO) For Integrating Social Tagging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Ying; Fried, Michael; Toma, Ioan; Yan, Erjia; Foo, Schubert

    2010-01-01

    Data integration and mediation have become central concerns of information technology over the past few decades. With the advent of the Web and the rapid increases in the amount of data and the number of Web documents and users, researchers have focused on enhancing the interoperability of data through the development of metadata schemes. Other researchers have looked to the wealth of metadata generated by bookmarking sites on the Social Web. While several existing ontologies capitalize on the semantics of metadata created by tagging activities, the Upper Tag Ontology (UTO) emphasizes the structure of tagging activities to facilitate modeling of tagging data and the integration of data from different bookmarking sites as well as the alignment of tagging ontologies. UTO is described and its utility in harvesting, modeling, integrating, searching and analyzing data is demonstrated with metadata harvested from three major social tagging systems (Delicious, Flickr and YouTube).

  13. Tag team simulation: An innovative approach for promoting active engagement of participants and observers during group simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Andersen, Patrea; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Guinea, Stephen; McAllister, Margaret; Lapkin, Samuel; Palmer, Lorinda; Niddrie, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Active participation in immersive simulation experiences can result in technical and non-technical skill enhancement. However, when simulations are conducted in large groups, maintaining the interest of observers so that they do not disengage from the learning experience can be challenging. We implemented Tag Team Simulation with the aim of ensuring that both participants and observers had active and integral roles in the simulation. In this paper we outline the features of this innovative approach and provide an example of its application to a pain simulation. Evaluation was conducted using the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale. A total of 444 year nursing students participated from a population of 536 (response rate 83%). Cronbach's alpha for the Scale was .94 indicating high internal consistency. The mean satisfaction score for participants was 4.63 compared to 4.56 for observers. An independent sample t test revealed no significant difference between these scores (t (300) = -1.414, p = 0.16). Tag team simulation is an effective approach for ensuring observers' and participants' active involvement during group-based simulations and one that is highly regarded by students. It has the potential for broad applicability across a range of leaning domains both within and beyond nursing.

  14. Improved quantification of brain perfusion using FAIR with active suppression of superior tagging (FAIR ASST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N; Purdy, David E; Haley, Robert W; Briggs, Richard W

    2011-11-01

    To address two problems for perfusion studies in the middle or inferior brain regions: (1) to reduce venous artifacts due to the intrinsic superior labeling of FAIR; (2) to alleviate the discrepancy of the existence of both superior and inferior boluses, but with only the inferior bolus having a temporally defined bolus width with Q2TIPs or QUIPSS. Superior tagging suppression methods for FAIR with different combinations of pre- and postinversion superior saturation pulses were evaluated and compared with FAIR with Q2TIPS for producing perfusion maps of superior, middle, and inferior brain regions. One preinversion plus two postinversion superior saturation radio frequency pulses effectively suppressed the superior tagging of FAIR and sufficiently eliminated venous artifacts without negative effects, avoiding the overestimations of cerebral blood flow that can occur in FAIR. FAIR ASST improves FAIR with Q2TIPS and provides more reliable and accurate blood flow estimations for perfusion studies of middle and lower brain regions. FAIR ASST confers the advantages of asymmetric PASL techniques, such as PICORE, in which only the inferiorly labeled blood is used for perfusion quantification, to the symmetric PASL technique FAIR, while preserving the robustness of FAIR against MT effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Colorimetric Microplate Assay for DNA-Binding Activity of His-Tagged MutS Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Michał; Sachadyn, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    A simple microplate method was designed for rapid testing DNA-binding activity of proteins. The principle of the assay involves binding of tested DNA by his-tagged protein immobilized on a nickel-coated ELISA plate, following colorimetric detection of biotinylated DNA with avidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The method was used to compare DNA mismatch binding activities of MutS proteins from three bacterial species. The assay required relatively low amounts of tested protein (approximately 0.5-10 pmol) and DNA (0.1-10 pmol) and a relatively short time of analysis (up to 60 min). The method is very simple to apply and convenient to test different buffer conditions of DNA-protein binding. Sensitive colorimetric detection enables naked eye observations and quantitation with an ELISA reader. The performance of the assay, which we believe is a distinguishing trait of the method, is based on two strong and specific molecular interactions: binding of a his-tagged protein to a nickel-coated microplate and binding of biotinylated DNA to avidin. In the reported experiments, the solution was used to optimize the conditions for DNA mismatch binding by MutS protein; however, the approach could be implemented to test nucleic acids interactions with any protein of interest.

  16. Fissuring near the TAG active hydrothermal mound, 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Kleinrock, M. C.

    2000-05-01

    Analysis of 12,000 electronic still camera images collected with the ARGO II vehicle near the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) active hydrothermal mound, 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has made possible the first quantitative in situ assessment of both fissure orientation and width within the median valley of a slow-spreading ridge. Fissures near the TAG mound are partially rubble-filled extensional fractures that cut lightly sedimented seafloor and in ∼1% of our observations host pillow lavas. Fissure widths range from 0.15 to 3.5 m, with a mean of 0.7 m, and do not vary systematically within the survey area. First-order estimates of crack depth, based on these width measurements and reasonable elastic moduli, indicate that fissures are restricted to depths 45° from the strike of the ridge axis. The formation of obliquely oriented fissures requires that the local least compressive stress direction varies (at least temporarily) from that predicted by the regional tectonic stress field associated with plate separation. This stress field reorientation may be facilitated by variations in the style of magma emplacement within the rift. The close spatial association of long-term hydrothermal activity, fissure-hosted lava flows, and faults and fissures trending oblique to the spreading axis suggests a causal relationship between the impact of dike intrusion and the maintenance of localized hydrothermal flow.

  17. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion [Nanobiophotonics Center, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Nanobioscience, Babes-Bolyai University, Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela [Department of Biochemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur 3-5, 400372, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian, E-mail: sanda.boca@phys.ubbcluj.ro, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Electron Microscopy Center, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-02-04

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  18. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Sanda; Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Astilean, Simion

    2011-02-01

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  19. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies.

  20. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns.

  1. Analytical studies of torque motor tape active element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgih Antonina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents analytical studies of the torque motor tape active element. The tape active element is a novel type of a motor’s stator organization, where the conventional winding is replaced by a tape winding. Given the operation principle of proposed active element; its torque characteristics are then computationally found with using the finite element method (FEM. The results show the possibility of the optimal value of the relative electrode width, when the torque will be maximal. The analytical studies of the motor’s torque over the number of tape winding coils allowed to receive the recommendations on choosing the number of coils.

  2. Reconstitution of F1-ATPase activity from Escherichia coli subunits alpha, beta and subunit gamma tagged with six histidine residues at the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, A; Watanabe, H; Kuroda, N; Sawada, K; Murakami, H; Kanazawa, H

    1998-05-01

    An engineered gamma subunit of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase with extra 14 and 20 amino acid residues at the N- and C-termini (His-tag gamma), respectively, was overproduced in E. coli and purified. Six histidines are included in the C-terminal extension. The reconstituted F1 containing alpha, beta, and His-tagged gamma exhibited sixty percent of the wild-type ATPase activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex was subjected to affinity chromatography with nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin. ATPase activity was eluted specifically with imidazole. These results implied that the tag sequence protruded to the surface of the complex and did not seriously impair the activity. The reconstituted alphabeta His-tag gamma complex, even after its binding to the resin, exhibited ATPase activity suggesting that the gamma subunit, when fixed to a solid phase, may rotate the alphabeta complex. This system may provide a new approach for analysis of the rotation mechanisms in F1-ATPase.

  3. Locatable-body temperature monitoring based on semi-active UHF RFID tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangwei; Mao, Luhong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Sheng

    2014-03-26

    This paper presents the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for the real-time remote monitoring of body temperature, while an associated program can determine the location of the body carrying the respective sensor. The RFID chip's internal integrated temperature sensor is used for both the human-body temperature detection and as a measurement device, while using radio-frequency communication to broadcast the temperature information. The adopted RFID location technology makes use of reference tags together with a nearest neighbor localization algorithm and a multiple-antenna time-division multiplexing location system. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for collecting temperature and location data for the data fusion by using RFID protocols. With a puppy as test object, temperature detection and localization experiments were carried out. The measured results show that the applied method, when using a mercury thermometer for comparison in terms of measuring the temperature of the dog, has a good consistency, with an average temperature error of 0.283 °C. When using the associated program over the area of 12.25 m2, the average location error is of 0.461 m, which verifies the feasibility of the sensor-carrier location by using the proposed program.

  4. Exploring how musical rhythm entrains brain activity with electroencephalogram frequency-tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie

    2014-12-19

    The ability to perceive a regular beat in music and synchronize to this beat is a widespread human skill. Fundamental to musical behaviour, beat and meter refer to the perception of periodicities while listening to musical rhythms and often involve spontaneous entrainment to move on these periodicities. Here, we present a novel experimental approach inspired by the frequency-tagging approach to understand the perception and production of rhythmic inputs. This approach is illustrated here by recording the human electroencephalogram responses at beat and meter frequencies elicited in various contexts: mental imagery of meter, spontaneous induction of a beat from rhythmic patterns, multisensory integration and sensorimotor synchronization. Collectively, our observations support the view that entrainment and resonance phenomena subtend the processing of musical rhythms in the human brain. More generally, they highlight the potential of this approach to help us understand the link between the phenomenology of musical beat and meter and the bias towards periodicities arising under certain circumstances in the nervous system. Entrainment to music provides a highly valuable framework to explore general entrainment mechanisms as embodied in the human brain.

  5. A new tagged-TEV protease: construction, optimisation of production, purification and test activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Baligh; Bouallagui, Hassib; Dridi, Cyrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Boeuf, Guilhem; Di Martino, Patrick; Dufour, Florence; Elm'Selmi, Abdellatif

    2011-01-01

    The Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease is frequently used in the cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins because of its efficiency and high specificity. In this work, we present a new recombinant form of TEV termed Streptag II-TEV for high-level production and purification of TEV protease from Escherichia coli and compare it to the hexahistidine (6xHis) tagged version of TEV. The effects of varying the host strain, the bacterial induction temperature (25, 30 and 37°C) and the IPTG inducer concentration on production and solubility of the two recombinant TEV proteases have been examined. Optimal Streptag II-TEV protein expression were obtained in the E. coli KRX strain under an induction temperature of 25°C in the presence of IPTG at 0.5 mM. In these conditions, soluble Streptag II-TEV and 6xHis-TEV proteases accounted for about 25% and 18% of total soluble proteins, respectively. About 70% of Streptag II-TEV and 60% of 6xHis-TEV were detected in the supernatant. Streptag II-TEV protease purifies to near homogeneity (approximately 99%) via a simple, single step Strep-Tactin chromatography purification protocol based on the presence of Streptag II. The higher production of Streptag II-TEV coupled to its purification and cleavage efficiencies make it an attractive alternate to 6xHis-TEV.

  6. Reprint of: A new tagged-TEV protease: Construction, optimisation of production, purification and test activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Baligh; Bouallagui, Hassib; Dridi, Cyrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Boeuf, Guilhem; Di Martino, Patrick; Dufour, Florence; Elm'selmi, Abdellatif

    2011-09-02

    The Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease is frequently used in the cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins because of its efficiency and high specificity. In this work, we present a new recombinant form of TEV termed Streptag II-TEV for high-level production and purification of TEV protease from Escherichia coli and compare it to the hexahistidine (6xHis) tagged version of TEV. The effects of varying the host strain, the bacterial induction temperature (25, 30 and 37°C) and the IPTG inducer concentration on production and solubility of the two recombinant TEV proteases have been examined. Optimal Streptag II-TEV protein expression were obtained in the E. coli KRX strain under an induction temperature of 25°C in the presence of IPTG at 0.5mM. In these conditions, soluble Streptag II-TEV and 6xHis-TEV proteases accounted for about 25% and 18% of total soluble proteins, respectively. About 70% of Streptag II-TEV and 60% of 6xHis-TEV were detected in the supernatant. Streptag II-TEV protease purifies to near homogeneity (approximately 99%) via a simple, single step Strep-Tactin chromatography purification protocol based on the presence of Streptag II. The higher production of Streptag II-TEV coupled to its purification and cleavage efficiencies make it an attractive alternate to 6xHis-TEV.

  7. Activation tagging of the LEAFY PETIOLE gene affects leaf petiole development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Dulk-Ras, A D; Hooykaas, P J

    2000-01-01

    In a screen for leaf developmental mutants we have isolated an activator T-DNA-tagged mutant that produces leaves without a petiole. In addition to that leafy petiole phenotype this lettuce (let) mutant shows aberrant inflorescence branching and silique shape. The LEAFY PETIOLE (LEP) gene is loca...... activity in the marginal meristem or patterning along the proximodistal axis....

  8. A Review on Chipless RFID Tag Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hashemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for RFID tags has recently increased due to the development of the RFID. Over the past decade, great efforts have been devoted to the design of RFID tags without chip inside. The concept of chipless RFID tags appears to be a promising solution for low cost item tagging because the cost of active RFID tag depends mainly on the chip used in them. This paper presents the progress of the chipless RFID tag and introduces major studies in this filed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are pointed out.

  9. Detection and characterization of estrus in dairy cattle with an electronic heatmount detector and an electronic activity tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    At-Taras, E E; Spahr, S L

    2001-04-01

    The length and onset of estrus was studied in 71 lactating dairy cows using an electronic heatmount sensor (HeatWatch; DDx Inc., Boulder, CO, DeForest, WI) and an electronic activity tag (Heat Seeker, Boumatic, Madison, WI). Three methods were used to determine estrus: 1) the electronic heatmount system, 2) an increased activity ratio algorithm determined by the Heat Seeker, and 3) an increased activity count algorithm calculated for each estrous period. Mounting and physical activity variables were characterized, and the effects of synchrony, parity, and weather on these variables were determined with data from two different trials. Cows in trial 1 were not synchronized, while cows in trial 2 were synchronized. The results of the study were consistent as follows: mean numbers of mounts were 6.70 +/- 0.7 and 5.42 +/- 0.80 for trials 1 and 2, respectively; each mount lasted 3.20 +/- 0.19 s (trial 1) and 3.36 +/- 0.42 s (trial 2). Total mounting activity averaged 5.83 +/- 0.78 h per estrous period in trial 1 and 5.57 +/- 1.02 h in trial 2. Estrus identified by the increased activity count algorithm corresponded more closely to standing mount activity (determined by the HeatWatch System) than did the increased activity ratio algorithm. Synchrony, parity, and weather did not have a direct effect on physical activity. Hot weather decreased the duration of standing mount activity significantly, but did not affect the number or duration of individual mounts. All three methods of estrus detection employed improved the efficiency of detection over visual observation.

  10. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; Boer, de André; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controll

  11. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick M Stanley

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  12. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after a minimum of 3 pregnancies and...pregnancy and lactation . After 3 pregnancies and lactations , but not after 1 pregnancy and lactation , females develop mammary cancers at an average...mated females per experimental condition (1 or 3 pregnancies/ lactations . 5 breeding strategy to develop triple transgenic cancer -prone and control

  13. Why activity based costing (ABC) is still tagging behind the traditional costing in Malaysia?

    OpenAIRE

    Rasiah, Devinaga

    2011-01-01

    This study compares activity-based costing (ABC) model and traditional costing method in Malaysia. Activity based costing (ABC) which was developed into the manufacturing/service sectors in Malaysia. It calculates the cost and performance of activities, resources and cost objects. It can be considered as an alternative model to Traditional Cost-based accounting systems. In this study the results indicated that most operations managers believed that their present cost systems were adequate for...

  14. The biological activity of a recombinantly expressed (His)(6)-tagged peanut allergen (rAra h 1) is unaffected by endotoxin removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Torp, Anna Maria; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2008-01-01

    The application of recombinant (His)(6)-tagged proteins in cell culture assays is associated with problems due to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. LPS stimulates cells of the immune system, thereby masking antigen-specific activation of T cells. Due to the affinity of LPS for histidine it ...

  15. Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Glahn, Christian; Chatti, Amine; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Glahn, C., Chatti, A., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils. International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education, 2(1), 276-284.

  16. Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Glahn, Christian; Chatti, Amine; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Glahn, C., Chatti, A., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Self-Reported Learning Effects of a Tagging Activity Carried out in a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) by Secondary-School Pupils. International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education, 2(1), 276-284.

  17. Tags, micro-tags and tag editing: improving internet search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Topkara, Mercan

    2009-02-01

    Social tagging is an emerging methodology that allows individual users to assign semantic keywords to content on the web. Popular web services allow the community of users to search for content based on these user-defined tags. Tags are typically attached to a whole entity such as a web page (e.g., del.icio.us), a video (e.g., YouTube), a product description (e.g., Amazon) or a photograph (e.g., Flickr). However, finding specific information within a whole entity can be a difficult, time-intensive process. This is especially true for content such as video, where the information sought may be a small segment within a very long presentation. Moreover, the tags provided by a community of users may be incorrect, conflicting, or incomplete when used as search terms. In this paper we introduce a system that allows users to create "micro-tags," that is, semantic markers that are attached to subsets of information. These micro-tags give the user the ability to direct attention to specific subsets within a larger and more complex entity, and the set of micro-tags provides a more nuanced description of the full content. Also, when these micro-tags are used as search terms, there is no need to do a serial search of the content, since micro-tags draw attention to the semantic content of interest. This system also provides a mechanism that allows users in the community to edit and delete each others' tags, using the community to refine and improve tag quality. We will also report on empirical studies that demonstrate the value of micro-tagging and tag editing and explore the role micro-tags and tag editing will play in future applications.

  18. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    derived adipo- cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We...Mesendoderm 2353 765 051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748...engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon initial transcriptional activation of the SV40 large T

  19. Analysis of Tc1-Mariner elements in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum suggests recent activity and flexible transposases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mateus F; Silva, José C F; Mizubuti, Eduardo S G; Araújo, Elza F; Queiroz, Marisa V

    2014-10-03

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a necrotrophic fungus that is pathogenic to many plants. Genomic analysis of its revealed transposable element expansion that has strongly influenced the evolutionary trajectory of several species. Transposons from the Tc1-Mariner superfamily are thought to be ubiquitous components of fungal genomes and are generally found in low copy numbers with large numbers of deleterious mutations in their transposase coding sequence. This study shows that the genome of S. sclerotiorum has a large number of copies of Tc1-Mariner transposons, and in silico analysis shows evidence that they were recently active. This finding was confirmed by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. Fourteen new Tc1-Mariner transposon families that were distributed throughout the genome were identified, and in some cases, due to the excision/retention of introns, different transcripts were observed for the same family, which might be the result of an efficient strategy to circumvent mutations that generate premature stop codons in the RNA sequence. In addition, the presence of these introns shows that the transposase protein has a flexible coding sequence and, consequently, conformation. No evidence for RIP-like gene silencing mechanisms, which are commonly found in fungi, was found in the identified Tc1-Mariner elements, and analysis of the genomic insertion sites of these elements showed that they were widely distributed throughout the genome with some copies located near the 3' regions of genes. In particular, EST analysis demonstrated that one of these copies was co-expressed with a gene, which showed the potential for these elements to undergo exaptation. Fourteen novel Tc1-Mariner families were characterized. Some families had evidence of introns, which might or might not be excised depending on the family or element in question, and this finding demonstrates a possible strategy for overcoming possible mutations that generate premature stop codons in a RNA sequence

  20. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  1. Folding and activity of mutant cystathionine β-synthase depends on the position and nature of the purification tag: characterization of the R266K CBS mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtan, Tomas; Kraus, Jan P

    2012-04-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), a heme-containing pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the condensation of serine and homocysteine to yield cystathionine. Missense mutations in CBS, the most common cause of homocystinuria, often result in misfolded proteins. Arginine 266, where the pathogenic missense mutation R266K was identified, appears to be involved in the communication between heme and the PLP-containing catalytic center. Here, we assessed the effect of a short affinity tag (6xHis) compared to a bulky fusion partner (glutathione S-transferase - GST) on CBS wild type (WT) and R266K mutant enzyme properties. While WT CBS was successfully expressed either in conjunction with a GST or with a 6xHis tag, the mutant R266K CBS had no activity, did not form native tetramers and did not respond to chemical chaperone treatment when expressed with a GST fusion partner. Interestingly, expression of R266K CBS constructs with a 6xHis tag at either end yielded active enzymes. The purified, predominantly tetrameric, R266K CBS with a C-terminal 6xHis tag had ∼82% of the activity of a corresponding WT CBS construct. Results from thermal pre-treatment of the enzyme and the denaturation profile of R266K suggests a lower thermal stability of the mutant enzyme compared to WT, presumably due to a disturbed heme environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development activities of the high heat flux scraper element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Lore, J.; Lumsdaine, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maier, M. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); McGinnis, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peacock, A.; Tretter, J. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The function of the high heat flux scraper element is to reduce the heat loads on the element ends of the actively cooled divertor of Wendelstein 7-X. The scraper element is actively water cooled to remove up to 550 kW steady state power load, with localized heat fluxes as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. Its surface area, 0.17 m{sup 2}, is contoured to optimally intercept both upstream and downstream particle fluxes. The plasma facing surface is made of 24 individual scraper fingers based on the monoblock technology. Each scraper finger is 247 mm long and 28 mm wide and has 13 monoblocks made of CFC NB31 bonded by hot isostatic pressing onto a CuCrZr cooling tube equipped with a copper twisted tape. Development activities, described here, include the design and fabrication of prototypes to validate the different technologies selected for the scraper element design to prepare a possible production.

  3. Yellowtail Tagging Data (MRDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Yellowtail Flounder Tagging Program began in 2003 and works with commercial fishermen to tag and release yellowtaiI flounder with pink and yellow disc tags or...

  4. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes.

  5. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  6. Ultrashort mode-locked lasers with additional Raman active elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.; Petrov, V. V.; Komarov, A. K.; Komarov, Konstantin P.

    2002-05-01

    Numerical simulation of ultrashort pulse generation in the laser with a composite active medium and additional Raman active element in a cavity has been done. It was created that for some laser parameters the optimization of a Raman gain and a frequency shift values was resulted in additional shortening of pulse duration.

  7. Mixed sand and gravel beaches: accurate measurement of active layer depth and sediment transport volumes using PIT tagged tracer pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A.; Moses, C.; Sear, D. A.; Cope, S.

    2016-12-01

    As sediments containing significant gravel portions are increasingly used for beach replenishment projects globally, the total number of beaches classified as `mixed sand and gravel' (MSG) increases. Calculations for required replenishment sediment volumes usually assume a uniform layer of sediment transport across and along the beach, but research into active layer (AL) depth has shown variations both across shore and according to sediment size distribution. This study addresses the need for more accurate calculations of sediment transport volumes on MSG beaches by using more precise measurements of AL depth and width, and virtual velocity of tracer pebbles. Variations in AL depth were measured along three main profile lines (from MHWS to MLWN) at Eastoke, Hayling Island (Hampshire, UK). Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged pebbles were deployed in columns, and their new locations repeatedly surveyed with RFID technology. These data were combined with daily dGPS beach profiles and sediment sampling for detailed analysis of the influence of beach morphodynamics on sediment transport volumes. Data were collected over two consecutive winter seasons: 2014-15 (relatively calm, average wave height sandy lower foreshore reduced the AL to 10% of wave height in this area. The disparity in AL depth across the beach profile indicates that traditional models are not accurately representing bulk sediment transport on MSG beaches. It is anticipated that by improving model inputs, beach managers will be better able to predict necessary volumes and sediment grain size proportions of replenishment material for effective management of MSG beaches.

  8. Isolation of active regulatory elements from eukaryotic chromatin using FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements)

    OpenAIRE

    Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of sequence-specific regulatory factors and the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities cause nucleosomes to be evicted from chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Traditionally, these active sites have been identified experimentally through their sensitivity to nucleases. Here we describe the details of a simple procedure for the genome-wide isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). We also pro...

  9. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  10. Active element influence on the motor’s torque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgih Antonina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical and experimental studies of the influence of the torque motor active element on the motor’s torque. The tape active element is a novel type of a motor’s stator organization, where the conventional winding is replaced by a tape winding. The force (torque dependence over the rotor pole position using COMSOL is given; the tape winding resistance and the turns number are defined. The relative motor’s characteristics are investigated and the maximum torque over the certain poles pair number is obtained. The application of the proposed active element in brushless DC motor is considered. The results show the possibility of the further synthesis of the torque motor.

  11. Evolutionary active transposable elements in the genome of the coelacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The apparent morphological stasis in the lineage of the coelacanth, which has been called a "living fossil" by many, has been suggested to be causally related to a slow evolution of its genome, with strongly reduced activity of transposable elements (TEs). Analysis of the African coelacanth showed that at least 25% of its genome is constituted of transposable elements including retrotransposons, endogenous retroviruses and DNA transposons, with a strong predominance of non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. The coelacanth genome has been shaped by four major general bursts of transposition during evolution, with major contributions of LINE1, LINE2, CR1, and Deu non-LTR retrotransposons. Many transposable elements are expressed in different tissues and might be active. The number of TE families in coelacanth, but also in lungfish, is lower than in teleost fish, but is higher than in chicken and human. This observation is in agreement with the hypothesis of a sequential elimination of many TE families in the sarcopterygian lineage during evolution. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the coelacanth contains more TE families than birds and mammals, and that these elements have been active during the evolution of the coelacanth lineage. Hence, at the level of transposable element activity, the coelacanth genome does not appear to evolve particularly slowly.

  12. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  13. Production of biologically active IgG hinge-tag soluble epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Takayuki; Hashizume, Toshihiro; Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Fukuda, Tomoko; Tang, Careen K; Salomon, David S; Seno, Masaharu

    2010-03-01

    The extracellular domains (ECD) of epidermal growth factor receptors, ErbB1, 2, 3 and 4, were designed as soluble dimeric forms. Each ECD was fused to a short hinge region derived from IgG, such that the stable dimer could be formed with disulfide bridges. This hinge-tagged design minimized the molecular weight to approximately 50% of the conventional Fc-fusion design without an Fc domain of IgG. The refolded dimers could be easily analyzed and characterized by SDS-PAGE. Hinge-tagged soluble ErbBs demonstrated significant affinity for betacellulin and heregulin. The IgG hinge-tag should be a simple method to design soluble dimers that would be useful for high throughput screening of ligands, antagonists or derivatives.

  14. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  15. Baggage Tags for Learning Out of Doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Lib

    The manual provides teachers with not only educational outdoor activities, but also with activities that can be provided on an individual level. The only equipment needed for most of these activities is a bought or homemade "baggage tag". These tags are used for a variety of purposes such as plant and animal identification, nature quiz games, and…

  16. Seamless gene tagging by endonuclease-driven homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Khmelinskii

    Full Text Available Gene tagging facilitates systematic genomic and proteomic analyses but chromosomal tagging typically disrupts gene regulatory sequences. Here we describe a seamless gene tagging approach that preserves endogenous gene regulation and is potentially applicable in any species with efficient DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. We implement seamless tagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrate its application for protein tagging while preserving simultaneously upstream and downstream gene regulatory elements. Seamless tagging is compatible with high-throughput strain construction using synthetic genetic arrays (SGA, enables functional analysis of transcription antisense to open reading frames and should facilitate systematic and minimally-invasive analysis of gene functions.

  17. Measurement of the B+ meson going to neutral pion-lepton neutrino branching fraction and determination of the CKM matrix element V(ub) with semileptonic tags at the BABAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Sylvie

    In the Standard Model (SM), the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix quantifies the quarks' flavor changing probabilities. The value of the element Vub is not predicted by the SM. Its measurement is a critical constraint on the tinitarity Triangle and thus on the SM itself. Our knowledge of |Vub| comes from measurements of the small B → Xuℓnu decay rates, where the hadronic system in the final state can be reconstructed either inclusively or exclusively using tagged or untagged methods. The precisions are limited by the uncertainties in the non-perturbative QCD calculations (of the so-called form factors in the exclusive approach) that are used to extract |Vub| from the measured decay rates. In this thesis, we study the charmless exclusive semileptonic B+ → pi0ℓ+nu decay, where ℓ can be either a muon or an electron, which implies a b → u transition. We report a total branching fraction and partial branching fractions in three bins of q 2, the invariant mass squared of the lepton-neutrino system. This allows us to evaluate |Vub| and to compare the measured form-factor spectrum, in three bins of q 2 with different theoretical predictions. These results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 210.5 fb-1 (Runs 1-4) collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), USA. The Upsilon(4S) resonance, produced with a e +e- collider, decays into BB meson pairs with a 96% probability. The analysis uses a semileptonic tag technique which first identifies BB events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B- → D(*)0ℓ-nu decays. The signal B+ → pi0 ℓ+nu decays are searched for in the remaining particles of the tagged events. This measurement has been combined with two other complementary analyses (using hadronic and semileptonic tags) and the results have been published in the Physical Review Letters journal in 2006: Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 211801 (2006

  18. Investigations on the activation of recombinant microbial pro-transglutaminase: in contrast to proteinase K, dispase removes the histidine-tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Hertel, Thomas C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Pietzsch, Markus

    2012-02-01

    In order to produce recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG) which is free of the activating protease, dispase was used to activate the pro-rMTG followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). As shown by MALDI-MS, the dispase does not only cleave the pro-sequence, but unfortunately also cleaves within the C-terminal histidine-tag. Hence, the active rMTG cannot properly bind to the IMAC material. As an alternative, proteinase K was investigated. This protease was successfully applied for the activation of purified pro-rMTG either as free or immobilized enzyme and the free enzyme was also applicable directly in the crude cell extract of E. coli. Thus, it enables a simple two-step activation/purification procedure resulting in protease-free and almost pure transglutaminase preparations. The protocol has been successfully applied to both, wild-type transglutaminase of Streptomyces mobaraensis as well as to the highly active variant S2P. Proteinase K activates the pro-rMTG without unwanted degradation of the histidine-tag. It turned out to be very important to inhibit proteinase K activity, e.g., by PMSF, prior to protein separation by SDS-PAGE.

  19. A Compact Dual-Band RFID Tag Antenna Mountable on Metallic Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeonggwi Mun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact (50 × 50 × 4 mm3 dual-band radio frequency identification (RFID tag antenna mountable on metallic objects is proposed for the ultra-high frequency (UHF band (917∼923.5 MHz and the microwave (MW band (2.4∼2.45 GHz. With the proximity-coupled feed loop, the proposed antenna consists of two symmetric planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA elements for the UHF band passive tag and a meander microstrip patch antenna for the MW band active tag. The performance of the proposed antenna is verified by mounting it on the different sizes of the metallic object. Furthermore, the passive tag antenna in the UHF band furthermore may be used for energy harvesting techniques to improve the lifetime of the active tag in the MW band. The measured maximum read range is 5.50 m in the UHF band and 14.15 m in the MW band when the proposed tag antenna is mounted on the metallic objects. The total efficiency for all operating frequency bands is higher than 50%. High isolation (>12 dB between tag antennas in the UHF band and the MW band is achieved.

  20. Gillnet Tag Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Certain fishery management programs require vessels to obtain gillnet tags to be used with their gillnet gear. Gillnet tag data is a collection of requests and...

  1. North Pacific Albacore Tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conventional tagging data are available from 1971 to 1996. Electronic tagging data are available from 2000 to present. The data are managed by SWFSC in Access...

  2. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  3. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  4. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  5. Synthesis of novel 1,2,3-triazole tagged pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives and their cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumurthy, Chavva; Veeraswamy, Banda; Sambasiva Rao, Pillalamarri; Santhosh Kumar, Gautham; Shanthan Rao, Pamulaparthy; Loka Reddy, Velaturu; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala; Narsaiah, Banda

    2014-02-01

    A series of novel 1,2,3-triazole tagged pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives 3 and 4 were prepared respectively starting from 6-phenyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-amine 1 via selective N-propargylation, followed by reaction with diverse substituted alkyl/perfluoroalkyl/aryl/aryl amide azides under Sharpless conditions. All the synthesized compounds 3 and 4 were screened for cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines such as U937, THP-1, HL60 and B16-F10. Compounds 3e, 4g, 4i and 4j which showed promising activity have been identified.

  6. Isolation of active regulatory elements from eukaryotic chromatin using FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giresi, Paul G; Lieb, Jason D

    2009-07-01

    The binding of sequence-specific regulatory factors and the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities cause nucleosomes to be evicted from chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Traditionally, these active sites have been identified experimentally through their sensitivity to nucleases. Here we describe the details of a simple procedure for the genome-wide isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). We also provide protocols for different methods of detecting FAIRE-enriched DNA, including use of PCR, DNA microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. FAIRE works on all eukaryotic chromatin tested to date. To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. Most genomic DNA is crosslinked to nucleosomes and is sequestered to the interphase, whereas DNA recovered in the aqueous phase corresponds to nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome. The isolated regions are largely coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, enhancers, insulators, and active promoters. Given its speed and simplicity, FAIRE has utility in establishing chromatin profiles of diverse cell types in health and disease, isolating DNA regulatory elements en masse for further characterization, and as a screening assay for the effects of small molecules on chromatin organization.

  7. Cutaneous skin tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  8. Detection of a novel active transposable element in Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis and a new search for elements in this genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daehwan; Farkas, Joel; Westpheling, Janet

    2013-05-01

    We show that a previously annotated hypothetical protein is the transposase of a new and active IS element, ISCahy1, widespread in Caldicellulosiruptor species. Transposition generated an 11-bp direct repeat at the insertion site in Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis, suggesting a cut-and-paste mechanism. The discovery of an active insertion sequence in Caldicellulosiruptor species led to a survey of potential IS elements in the genome sequences of eight Caldicellulosiruptor species that identified several new elements, including one novel to this genus.

  9. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Tibély

    Full Text Available Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of

  10. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  11. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  12. Trace elements as an activator of antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wołonciej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a state of impaired balance between the formation of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of the body. It causes many defects of the body, e.g. lipid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage. In order to prevent the effects of oxidative stress, the organism has developed defence mechanisms. These mechanisms capture and inhibit the formation of free radicals and also chelate ion metals that catalyse free radical reactions. Trace elements are components of antioxidant enzymes involved in antioxidant mechanisms. Selenium, as a selenocysteine, is a component of the active site of glutathione peroxidase (GPx. The main function of GPx is neutralization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and organic peroxide (LOOH. Furthermore, selenium is a structural part of a large group of selenoproteins that are necessary for proper functioning of the body. Manganese, copper and zinc are a part of the group of superoxide dismutase enzymes (MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, which catalyse the superoxide anion dismutation into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Formed hydrogen peroxide is decomposed into water and oxygen by catalase or glutathione peroxidase. An integral component of catalase (CAT is iron ions. The concentration of these trace elements has a significant influence on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and thus on defence against oxidative stress. Even a small change in the level of trace elements in the tissue causes a disturbance in their metabolism, leading to the occurrence of many diseases.

  13. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  14. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  15. c-Myc-Induced Extrachromosomal Elements Carry Active Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Smith

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine Pre-13 lymphocytes with experimentally activated MycER show both chromosomal and extrachromosomal gene amplification. In this report, we have elucidated the size, structure, functional components of c-Myc-induced extrachromosomal elements (EEs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that EEs isolated from MycER-activated Pre-B+ cells are an average of 10 times larger than EEs isolated from non-MycER-activated control Pre-B- cells. We demonstrate that these large c-Myc-induced EEs are associated with histone proteins, whereas EEs of non-MycER-activated Pre B- cells are not. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses using pan -histone-specific, histone H3 phosphorylation-specific, histone H4 acetylation-specific antibodies indicate that a significant proportion of EEs analyzed from MycER-activated cells harbors transcriptionally competent and/or active chromatin. Moreover, these large, c-Myc-induced EEs carry genes. Whereas the total genetic make-up of these c-Myc-induced EEs is unknown, we found that 30.2% of them contain the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR gene, whereas cyclin C (CCNC was absent. In addition, 50% of these c-Myc-activated Pre-B+ EEs incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, identifying them as genetic structures that self-propagate. In contrast, EEs isolated from non-Myc-activated cells neither carry the DHFR gene nor incorporate BrdU, suggesting that c-Myc deregulation generates a new class of EEs.

  16. The Binary Frequency of r-Process-Element Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars and its Implications: Chemical Tagging in the Primitive Halo of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Terese; Nordström, Birgitta; Buchhave, Lars A; Beers, Timothy C

    2011-01-01

    A few rare halo giants in the range [Fe/H] $\\simeq -2.9\\pm0.3$ exhibit {\\it r}-process element abundances that vary as a group by factors up to [$r$/Fe] $\\sim80$, relative to those of the iron peak and below. Yet, the astrophysical production site of these {\\it r}-process elements remains unclear. We report initial results from four years of monitoring the radial velocities of 17 {\\it r}-process-enhanced metal-poor giants to detect and characterise binaries in this sample. We find three (possibly four) spectroscopic binaries with orbital periods and eccentricities that are indistinguishable from those of Population I binaries with giant primaries, and which exhibit no signs that the secondary components have passed through the AGB stage of evolution or exploded as supernovae. The other 14 stars in our sample appear to be single -- including the prototypical $r$-process-element enhanced star CS 22892-052, which is also enhanced in carbon, but not in {\\it s}-process elements. We conclude that the {\\it r}-proces...

  17. Idefix insulator activity can be modulated by nearby regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasset, E; Bantignies, F; Court, F; Cheresiz, S; Conte, C; Vaury, C

    2007-01-01

    Insulators play important roles in controlling gene activity and maintaining regulatory independence between neighbouring genes. In this article, we show that the enhancer-blocking activity of the insulator present within the LTR retrotransposon Idefix can be abolished if two copies of the region containing the insulator--specifically, the long terminal repeat (LTR)--are fused to the retrotransposon's 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). The presence of this combination of two [LTR-5' UTR] modules is a prerequisite for the loss of enhancer-blocking activity. We further show that the 5' UTR causes flanking genomic sequences to be displaced to the nuclear periphery, which is not observed when two insulators are present by themselves. This study thus provides a functional link between insulators and independent genomic modules, which may cooperate to allow the specific regulation of defined genomic loci via nuclear repositioning. It further illustrates the complexity of genomic regulation within a chromatic environment with multiple functional elements.

  18. 可伸缩TAGS%Scalable TAGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵帆; 张君雁; 杨国纬

    2003-01-01

    In a distributed Web server system where tasks are unpreemptible,the most important issue for improving quality of service (QoS) is how to realize fairness and reduce average slow down. In this paper we present an algorithm named Scalable TAGS by integrating Central Queue algorithm and Task Assignment by Guessing Size (TAGS), together with its performance analysis, system parameter setting algorithm subject to fairness requirement, and optimal grouping method.

  19. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  20. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  1. 一种射频有源标签充电器的设计与实现%Design and implementation of a RF active tag charger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石封茶; 余剑; 杨广

    2012-01-01

    Active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology with the advantages of long working distance and low reading and writing power consumption, has been widely used in civilian and military fields Due to the limitations of some special applications, the active RFID tags need to implement a hermetically enclosed package with performance of waterproof and dustproof and so on. To solve the charging problem of the fidly sealed active RFID tags, a design and implementation of a wireless charging circuit is presented.Firstly the paper introdues the principle of the whole circuit and analyzes the implementation of transmitter and receiver circuit; Secondly, the charging circuit that can charge to 40 tags at the same time is designed and implemented; finally, the charge and discharge experiments of the tags are done.The results show that the performance of the charging circuit is stable and the charging time is shorter%有源射频识别(RFID)技术因其工作距离远、读写功耗低等优势,在民用和军事领域中得到了广泛的应用。由于某些特殊应用场合的限制,有源RFID标签需要实现具有防水、防尘等性能的全密闭封装。为解决全密封的有源RFID标签电池充电问题,提出了一种无线充电电路的设计与实现方案。首先,介绍了整个电路的实现原理,分析了发射和接收电路的实现方式;其次,设计并实现了可对40个标签同时充电的电路;最后进行了标签的充电和放电实验。实验结果表明,所设计的充电电路性能稳定,充电时间较短。

  2. A compact transmit/receive switch for 2.4 GHz reader-less active RFID tag transceiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Arif Sobhan Bhuiyan; Mamun Bin Ibne Reaz; Jubayer Jalil; Labonnah Farzana Rahman; Tae Gyu Chang

    2015-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a ubiquitous identification technology nowadays. An on-chip high-performance transmit/receive (T/R) switch is designed and simulated in 0.13-µm CMOS technology for reader-less RFID tag. The switch utilizes only the transistor width and length (W/L) optimization, proper gate bias resistor and resistive body floating technique and therefore, exhibits 1 dB insertion loss, 31.5 dB isolation and 29.2 dBm 1-dB compression point (P1dB). Moreover, the switch dissipates only 786.7 nW power for 1.8/0 V control voltages and is capable of switching in 794 fs. Above all, as there is no inductor or capacitor used in the circuit, the size of the switch is 0.00208 mm2 only. This switch will be appropriate for reader-less RFID tag transceiver front-end as well as other wireless transceivers operated at 2.4 GHz band.

  3. Are active elements necessary in the basilar membrane impedance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diependaal, R J; Viergever, M A; de Boer, E

    1986-07-01

    This article is motivated by the current hypothesis [Kim et al., Psychological, Physiological and Behavioural Studies in Hearing (Delft U. P., The Netherlands, 1980); Neely, Doctoral dissertation, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (1981); de Boer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 567-573 (1983a) and 73, 574-576 (1983b)] that it is necessary to include active elements in the basilar membrane (BM) impedance in order to explain recent data on the vibration of the BM [Khanna and Leonard, Science 215, 305-306 (1982); Sellick et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 72, 131-141 (1982); Robles et al., Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms (Springer, New York, 1986)]. In order to test this hypothesis, first, a method which is an inversion of the customary description of cochlear mechanics is described. Instead of computing the BM velocity for a given point impedance of the membrane, we show how to compute the impedance function from a given BM velocity pattern in response to a sinusoidal input at the stapes. This method is then used to study the sensitivity of the recovered impedance to perturbations in the velocity pattern. The simulations used show that the real part of the impedance is extremely sensitive to such perturbations. Therefore, measured velocity patterns are unlikely to resolve the issue of whether active elements should be included. Frequency responses measured at a few points on the membrane are even less likely to do so.

  4. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid

  5. Electrochemical biosensor for protein kinase A activity assay based on gold nanoparticles-carbon nanospheres, phos-tag-biotin and β-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlei; Yin, Huanshun; Li, Xue; Li, Zhi; Ai, Shiyun; Lin, Hai

    2016-12-15

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor was fabricated for protein kinase A (PKA) activity assay. Multiple signal amplification techniques were employed including the nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres (Au@C), the biocomposite of SiO2 and streptavidin (SiO2-SA), the composite of AuNPs and biotinylated β-galactosidase (AuNPs-B-Gal) and in situ enzymatic generation of electrochemical activity molecule of p-aminophenol. After peptides were assembled on Au@C modified electrode surface, they were phosphorylated by PKA in the presence of ATP. Then, biotinylated Phos-tag was modified on electrode surface through the specific interaction between Phos-tag and phosphate group. Finally, SiO2-SA and AuNPs-B-Gal were captured through the specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Because the electrochemical response of p-aminophenol was directly related to PKA concentration, an innovative electrochemical assay could be realized for PKA detection. The detection limit was 0.014unit/mL. The developed method showed high detection sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the fabricated biosensor can be also applied to detect PKA in human normal gastricepithelial cell line and human gastric carcinoma cell line with satisfactory results.

  6. Extracting tag hierarchies

    CERN Document Server

    Tibély, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy betwe...

  7. Emergent Community Structure in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cattuto, Ciro; Servedio, Vito D P; Loreto, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    A distributed classification paradigm known as collaborative tagging has been widely adopted in new Web applications designed to manage and share online resources. Users of these applications organize resources (Web pages, digital photographs, academic papers) by associating with them freely chosen text labels, or tags. Here we leverage the social aspects of collaborative tagging and introduce a notion of resource distance based on the collective tagging activity of users. We collect data from a popular system and perform experiments showing that our definition of distance can be used to build a weighted network of resources with a detectable community structure. We show that this community structure clearly exposes the semantic relations among resources. The communities of resources that we observe are a genuinely emergent feature, resulting from the uncoordinated activity of a large number of users, and their detection paves the way for mapping emergent semantics in social tagging systems.

  8. Essential trace elements in edible mushrooms by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Patricia L.C.; Maihara, Vera A.; Castro, Lilian P. de [Instituto de Pesquisa e Energetica e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: patricialandim@ig.com.br; vmaihara@ipen.br; lilian.Pavanelli@terra.com.br; Figueira, Rubens C.L. [Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: figueiraru@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    Mushrooms are excellent nutritional sources since they provide proteins, fibers and mineral, such as K, P, Fe. They have also been the focus of medical research. In Brazil mushrooms are not consumed in large quantities by the general population since people know little about the nutritional and medicinal benefits that mushrooms offer. Hence, this study intends to contribute to a better understanding of the essential element content in edible mushrooms, which are currently commercialized in Sao Paulo state. Br Fe, K, Na and Zn concentrations were determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in the following mushroom species: Shitake (Lentinus edodes), Shimeji (Pleurotus ssp), Paris Champignon (Agaricus bisporus), Hiratake ( Pleurotus ssp) and Eringue (Pleurotus Eryngu. The mushroom samples were acquired from commercial establishments in the city of Sao Paulo and directly from the producers. Essential element contents in mushrooms varied between Br 0.03 to 4.1 mg/kg; Fe 20 to 267 mg/kg; K 1.2 to 5.3 g/kg, Na 10 to 582 mg/kg and Zn 60 to 120 mg/kg. The results confirm that mushrooms can be considered a good source of K, Fe and Zn. The low Na level is a good nutritional benefit for the consumer. (author)

  9. Development of large aperture elements for active and adaptive optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stranakova E.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-aperture elements for laser active and adaptive optics are investigated in collaboration within IOP AcSci CR, FEng CTU and 5M. A bimorph deformable mirror for high-power lasers based on a lightweight structure with a composite core is currently in development. In order to realize a sufficiently large working aperture we are using new technologies for production of core, bimorph actuator and DM reflector. Detailed simulation of components and structure is validated by measurement and testing. A research of DM actuation and response of a complicated mirror structure needed for an accurate control of a deformation is performed. Testing of samples and subscale measurements are currently performed, measurement of a complete structure is in preparation.

  10. An Ikaros Promoter Element with Dual Epigenetic and Transcriptional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Elizabeth A; Georgopoulos, Katia; Yoshida, Toshimi

    2015-01-01

    Ikaros DNA binding factor plays critical roles in lymphocyte development. Changes in Ikaros expression levels during lymphopoiesis are controlled by redundant but also unique regulatory elements of its locus that are critical for this developmental process. We have recently shown that Ikaros binds its own locus in thymocytes in vivo. Here, we evaluated the role of an Ikaros binding site within its major lympho-myeloid promoter. We identified an Ikaros/Ets binding site within a promoter sub-region that was highly conserved in mouse and human. Deletion of this binding site increased the percentage of the reporter-expressing mouse lines, indicating that its loss provided a more permissive chromatin environment. However, once transcription was established, the lack of this site decreased transcriptional activity. These findings implicate a dual role for Ikaros/Ets1 binding on Ikzf1 expression that is exerted at least through its promoter.

  11. An Ikaros Promoter Element with Dual Epigenetic and Transcriptional Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Perotti

    Full Text Available Ikaros DNA binding factor plays critical roles in lymphocyte development. Changes in Ikaros expression levels during lymphopoiesis are controlled by redundant but also unique regulatory elements of its locus that are critical for this developmental process. We have recently shown that Ikaros binds its own locus in thymocytes in vivo. Here, we evaluated the role of an Ikaros binding site within its major lympho-myeloid promoter. We identified an Ikaros/Ets binding site within a promoter sub-region that was highly conserved in mouse and human. Deletion of this binding site increased the percentage of the reporter-expressing mouse lines, indicating that its loss provided a more permissive chromatin environment. However, once transcription was established, the lack of this site decreased transcriptional activity. These findings implicate a dual role for Ikaros/Ets1 binding on Ikzf1 expression that is exerted at least through its promoter.

  12. Self-organization in social tagging systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2011-01-01

    Individuals often imitate each other to fall into the typical group, leading to a self-organized state of typical behaviors in a community. In this paper, we model self-organization in social tagging systems and illustrate the underlying interaction and dynamics. Specifically, we introduce a model in which individuals adjust their own tagging tendency to imitate the average tagging tendency. We found that when users are of low confidence, they tend to imitate others and lead to a self-organized state with active tagging. On the other hand, when users are of high confidence and are stubborn for changes, tagging becomes inactive. We observe a phase transition at a critical level of user confidence when the system changes from one regime to the other. The distributions of post length obtained from the model are compared to real data which show good agreements.

  13. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7

  14. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  15. The use of external electronic tags on fish: an evaluation of tag retention and tagging effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Niels; Thorstad, Eva B.; Havn, Torgeir

    2015-01-01

    External tagging of fish with electronic tags has been used for decades for a wide range of marine and freshwater species. In the early years of fish telemetry research, it was the most commonly used attachment method, but later internal implants became preferred. Recently, the number of telemetry...... studies using external tagging has increased, especially with the development of archival tags (data storage tags, DSTs), pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) and other environment-sensing tags. Scientific evaluations of the tagging method are rather scarce for most species. We identified 89...... growth and survival have also been recorded, but direct mortality caused by external tagging seems rare. Most of the studies reviewed evaluate tag retention, survival, and tissue reactions. There is a general need for more research on the effects of external tagging of fish with electronic tags...

  16. Human ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E1. Indication of potential nuclear and cytoplasmic subpopulations using epitope-tagged cDNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley-Gearhart, P M; Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-12-30

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 catalyzes the first step in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. Previously, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human E1. Expression of the E1 cDNA in the ts20 cell line, which harbors a thermolabile E1, abrogated the phenotypic defects associated with this line. However, little is known of the cell biology of the E1 protein or the nature of the E1 doublet. Thus, we constructed epitope-tagged E1 cDNAs in which the HA monoclonal antibody epitope tag sequence (from influenza hemagglutinin and recognized by the 12CA5 monoclonal antibody) was fused to the amino terminus of E1. Because the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of E1 is unknown, three constructs were made in which the HA tag was placed at each of the first three ATGs in the open reading frame (HA-1E1, HA-2E1, and HA-3E1). Western analysis of HeLa cells transfected with the constructs revealed that HA-1E1 closely comigrated with the upper band of the E1 doublet, and HA-2E1 comigrated with the lower band of the E1 doublet; HA-3E1 appeared smaller than either of the E1 bands. Metabolic labeling with 32P and immunoprecipitation with anti-HA antibody revealed that only the HA-1E1 protein product is phosphorylated; polyclonal anti-E1 antibody showed that only the upper band of the endogenous E1 doublet is phosphorylated. Each of the constructs was able to rescue the mutant phenotype of the ts20 cell line. Immunofluorescence studies showed that HA-2E1 and HA-3E1 were distributed in the cytoplasm with both negative and positive nuclei. This pattern of distribution has also been observed when immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody to E1 (1C5). However, the staining pattern associated with a polyclonal anti-E1 antibody (JJJ) is characterized by positive staining cytoplasm and nuclei in all cells. The HA-1E1 construct exhibited apparently exclusive nuclear distribution in HeLa cells. The difference between the staining patterns of the polyclonal and monoclonal anti-E1

  17. Emergy of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Biologically Active Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate estimates of the emergy of elemental flows are needed to accurately evaluate the far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformity and specific emergy of the elements and of their different chemical species is also needed to quantify the inputs to many producti...

  18. Emergy of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Biologically Active Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate estimates of the emergy of elemental flows are needed to accurately evaluate the far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformity and specific emergy of the elements and of their different chemical species is also needed to quantify the inputs to many producti...

  19. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Tibely, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamas; Palla, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary topic with great actuality and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely "flat", while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organisation of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other type of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organised into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the "is a sub-category of" type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various r...

  20. TAG Advertisement Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    LaRc SI Material Overall photograph showing the material specimens, the graphite composite, the gold composite and the molded gears on a black background. These photos were used for the TAG CO-OP Public Relations and promotions

  1. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  2. b Tagging in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tomalin, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Many of the exotic particles expected at the LHC, such as SUSY, Higgs bosons and top quarks, will decay to b quarks. This paper presents the methods used to identify b-jets at CMS. The algorithms exploit the long B hadron lifetime, semi-leptonic B decays and jet kinematics. The prospect for measuring the performance of these b-tags directly from CMS data is examined. Finally, the use of b-tagging in the High-Level Trigger is explained.

  3. Several Affinity Tags Commonly Used in Chromatographic Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Affinity tags have become powerful tools from basic biological research to structural and functional proteomics. They were widely used to facilitate the purification and detection of proteins of interest, as well as the separation of protein complexes. Here, we mainly discuss the benefits and drawbacks of several affinity or epitope tags frequently used, including hexahistidine tag, FLAG tag, Strep II tag, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP tag, calmodulin-binding peptide (CBP, glutathione S-transferase (GST, maltose-binding protein (MBP, S-tag, HA tag, and c-Myc tag. In some cases, a large-size affinity tag, such as GST or MBP, can significantly impact on the structure and biological activity of the fusion partner protein. So it is usually necessary to excise the tag by protease. The most commonly used endopeptidases are enterokinase, factor Xa, thrombin, tobacco etch virus, and human rhinovirus 3C protease. The proteolysis features of these proteases are described in order to provide a general guidance on the proteolytic removal of the affinity tags.

  4. Design of Low Power Active RFID Tag Based on IEEE802.15.4%基于IEEE802.15.4低功耗有源电子标签的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶为戈; 贾子彦; 钱志文

    2012-01-01

    针对有源电子标签功耗和防碰撞问题,给出了一种基于IEEE802.15.4标准和MG245X片上系统的2.4 GHz低功耗有源电子标签实现方法.从硬件电路和软件程序两个方面联合优化,设计了有源电子标签和标签读写器,分析了标签休眠时间与功耗及标签最大移动速度的关系.测试结果表明,该标签休眠模式下工作电流小于1.7 μA,空旷环境下有效通信距离大于60m,满足低功耗和远距离读写实用要求.%To the problems of power consumption and data collision avoidance for active RFID tag, based on IEEE 802. 15. 4 standard and MG245X on-chip system, a low power 2.4 GHz active RFID tag realization approach is proposed- With combined optimization of the hardware circuit and software program, the active RFID tag and corresponding tag reader is designed. Then the relationship among tag sleep time , power consumption and maximum moving speed is analyzed. Test results show that, the working current of RFID tag is less than 1. 7 μA in sleep mode, the effective communication distance in open environment is more than 60 m, therefore the practical requirements of low power consumption and long reading and writing distance can be satisfied.

  5. Selection of active elements in system reduction of vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, K.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents non-classical method of design of mechatronic systems. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system understand as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. Electrical elements can be realized in the form of coils with movable core. The system was modelled in Matlab Simulink.

  6. Identification of transmitter systems and learning tag molecules involved in behavioral tagging during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Martinez, María Cecilia; Frey, Julietta U; Viola, Haydee

    2011-08-02

    Long-term memory (LTM) consolidation requires the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). In addition, we have shown recently that LTM formation also requires the setting of a "learning tag" able to capture those PRPs. Weak training, which results only in short-term memory, can set a tag to use PRPs derived from a temporal-spatial closely related event to promote LTM formation. Here, we studied the involvement of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic inputs on the setting of an inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning tag and the synthesis of PRPs. Rats explored an open field (PRP donor) followed by weak (tag inducer) or strong (tag inducer plus PRP donor) IA training. Throughout pharmacological interventions around open-field and/or IA sessions, we found that hippocampal dopamine D1/D5- and β-adrenergic receptors are specifically required to induce PRP synthesis. Moreover, activation of the glutamatergic NMDA receptors is required for setting the learning tags, and this machinery further required α-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA but not ERK1/2 activity. Together, the present findings emphasize an essential role of the induction of PRPs and learning tags for LTM formation. The existence of only the PRP or the tag was insufficient for stabilization of the mnemonic trace.

  7. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of benzophenone tagged pyridine analogues towards activation of caspase activated DNase mediated nuclear fragmentation in Dalton's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Gurupadaswamy, H D; Girish, V; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-04-01

    A series of benzophenones possessing pyridine nucleus 8a-l were synthesized by multistep reaction sequence and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against DLA cells by in vitro and in vivo studies. The results suggested that, compounds 8b with fluoro group and 8e with chloro substituent at the benzoyl ring of benzophenone scaffold as well as pyridine ring with hydroxy group exhibited significant activity. Further investigation in mouse model suggests that compounds 8b and 8e have the potency to activate caspase activated DNase (endonuclease) which is responsible for DNA fragmentation, a primary hallmark of apoptosis and thereby inhibits the Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour growth.

  8. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  9. Transposable DNA elements and life history traits: II. Transposition of P DNA elements in somatic cells reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N; Barker, J S; Huai, H

    1999-01-01

    Some transposable DNA elements in higher organisms are active in somatic cells, as well as in germinal cells. What effect does the movement of DNA elements in somatic cells have on life history traits? It has previously been reported that somatically active P and mariner elements in Drosophila induce genetic damage and significantly reduce lifespan. In this study, we report that the movement of P elements in somatic cells also significantly reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster. If other elements cause similar changes in life history traits, it is doubtful if transposable DNA elements remain active for long in somatic cells in natural populations.

  10. Development of techniques for tagging precursor and essential chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansiger, W.A.; Shepodd, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Phillips, M.L.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to identify the manufacturers and distributors of chemicals seized in raids of illicit drug labs would be of great value in controlling the diversion of these chemicals. We developed a tagging scheme based on the addition of sub-ppM concentrations of various combinations of rare-earth elements to the target chemicals and evaluated a number of techniques for detecting the tags. We developed soluble tags for tagging liquids and selected Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the preferred detection technique. We developed insoluble tags for tagging solids and developed methods to analyze them and mix them into solid precursors. We have successfully demonstrated the tagging of several solvents and two of the precursor chemicals used in one of the most popular clandestine methamphetamine syntheses (ephedrine reacting with hydriodic acid/red phosphorus). The tagging scheme is capable of yielding tens of thousands of signatures (using holmium as an internal standard and up to 9 rare-earths at up to 3 concentrations yields 3{sup 9} {minus} 1 = 19,682 signatures) and is applicable to most of the chemicals on the precursor and essential chemicals list. In the concentrations employed, the tags are safe enough to be added to pharmaceuticals and cheap enough to tag tanker loads of chemicals.

  11. Deep Explosive Volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and Seismological Constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    in the mantle, where rigid tectonic plates move apart and new seafloor material rises to fill the vacant space. The generation of new plate material...focus on shallow seismic activity beneath the hydrothermal mound. The OBS network also detected a large number of local and regional tectonic events...hydrothermal mound with the larger-scale seismicity associated with tectonic extension on the active detachment fault [deMartin et al., 2007]. Thermal

  12. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  13. Tagging SNPs in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes and response of renin activity, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations to antihypertensive treatment in Kazakans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weili; Zhang, Yuanming; Shan, Zimei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yongdi; Wang, Chenchen; Yan, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Polymorphisms of REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 may be associated with responses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity phenotypes to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) antihypertensive treatment. A total of 400 first diagnosed Kazak hypertensives were randomly allocated to two groups and received a 3-week course of either captopril and atenolol as monotherapy under double blinding. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed by covariance analyses between baseline level and responses of blood pressure, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations with tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes. A false discovery rate method was used to adjust multiple testing. After adjustment for multiple testing, we found that the G allele of rs6676670 (T/G) in intron 1 of REN was significantly associated with higher baseline aldosterone concentrations (p < 0.0001, explained variance (EV) = 2.3%). Significant associations after adjustments were also found between the A allele of rs2887284, with higher baseline renin activity (p = 0.022, EV = 1.0%), higher responses of renin (p = 0.018 EV = 5.4%), and higher responses of angiotensin II (p = 0.0255, EV = 3.13%) to the treatment of ACEI. The carriers of the A allele of rs2887284 appeared to be more sensitive to the ACEI treatment. rs2887284 in intron 9 of REN is associated with the response of renin and angiotensin II levels to ACEI treatment.

  14. New library of aminosulfonyl-tagged Hoveyda–Grubbs type complexes: Synthesis, kinetic studies and activity in olefin metathesis transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Borré

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven novel Hoveyda–Grubbs precatalysts bearing an aminosulfonyl function are reported. Kinetic studies indicate an activity enhancement compared to Hoveyda’s precatalyst. A selection of these catalysts was investigated with various substrates in ring-closing metathesis of dienes or enynes and cross metathesis. The results demonstrate that these catalysts show a good tolerance to various chemical functions.

  15. New library of aminosulfonyl-tagged Hoveyda–Grubbs type complexes: Synthesis, kinetic studies and activity in olefin metathesis transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borré, Etienne; Caijo, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Summary Seven novel Hoveyda–Grubbs precatalysts bearing an aminosulfonyl function are reported. Kinetic studies indicate an activity enhancement compared to Hoveyda’s precatalyst. A selection of these catalysts was investigated with various substrates in ring-closing metathesis of dienes or enynes and cross metathesis. The results demonstrate that these catalysts show a good tolerance to various chemical functions. PMID:21165173

  16. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  17. On the Role of the Artistic Element in Pedagogical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatova, O. S.

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogy includes not only knowledge of the different sciences, but also elements of the artistic and imaginative perception of the world. In this article, the author discusses the importance of creating an atmosphere and construct situations that foster a rate of compassion, so that students can internalize feelings in their own spiritual space…

  18. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  19. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  20. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D G; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-04-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen PstDC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes.

  1. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:28243248

  2. Accumulation of FlAsH/Lumio Green in active mitochondria can be reversed by beta-mercaptoethanol for specific staining of tetracysteine-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Matthias F; Genisyuerek, Selda; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2006-06-01

    Recent advances in the field of small molecule labels for live cell imaging promise to overcome some of the limitations set by the size of fluorescent proteins. We tested the tetracysteine-biarsenical labeling system in live cell fluorescence microscopy of reggie-1/flotillin-2 in HeLa and N2a cells. In both cell types, the biarsenical staining reagent FlAsH/Lumio Green accumulated in active mitochondria and led to mitochondrial swelling. This is indicative of toxic side effects caused by arsenic, which should be considered when this labeling system is to be used in live cell imaging. Mitochondrial accumulation of FlAsH/Lumio Green was reversed by addition of low concentrations of thiol-containing reagents during labeling and a subsequent high stringency thiol wash. Both ethanedithiol and beta-mercaptoethanol proved to be effective. We therefore established a staining protocol using beta-mercaptoethanol as thiol binding site competitor resulting in a specific staining of tetracysteine-tagged reggie-1/flotillin-2 of adequate signal to noise ratio, so that the more toxic and inconvenient ethanedithiol could be avoided. Furthermore, we show that staining efficiency was greatly enhanced by introducing a second tetracysteine sequence in tandem.

  3. Visualization of Protonation/Deprotonation of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient in Solid State by Vapor Phase Amine-Selective Alkyne Tagging and Raman Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kei; Yasuhara, Yukiko; Ota, Hiromi

    2017-07-01

    Here, we report a simple and direct method to visualize the protonation/deprotonation of an amine active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in the solid state using a solid-vapor reaction with propargyl bromide and Raman imaging for the assessment of the API during the manufacturing process of solid formulations. An alkyne tagging occurred on the free form of solid haloperidol by the vapor phase reaction, and a distinct Raman signal of alkyne was detected. Alkyne signal monitoring by Raman imaging enabled us to visualize the distribution of the free-form haloperidol in a solid formulation. On the other hand, haloperidol hydrochloride did not react with propargyl bromide in the solid-vapor reaction, and the alkyne signal was not observed. Using the difference in reactivity, the protonation/deprotonation of the amine API in the solid state could be visualized. As an example of application, we tried to visually assess the protonation/deprotonation state when the free-form haloperidol was ground with acids using the solid-vapor reaction and Raman imaging and found that haloperidol was partially protonated when ground with 2 equivalents of hydrogen chloride. Furthermore, we demonstrated the relationship between the degree of protonation and the amount of water added as a medium for grinding haloperidol with succinic acid. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  5. Building as active elements of energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bulut, Mehmet Börühan

    2016-01-01

    Buildings account for approximately 40% of the energy demand and 33% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union. Accordingly, there are several efforts that target energy efficiency in buildings both at the European and Swedish levels. The role of buildings in climate change mitigation, however, is not limited to energy savings. Buildings are expected to become key elements of the future smart energy systems by supplying and using energy in a more flexible way. Reducing the e...

  6. Trans-activation of an artificial dTam3 transposable element in transgenic tobacco plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haring, Michel A.; Teeuwen-de Vroomen, Marianne J.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1991-01-01

    In Antirrhinum majus only autonomous Tam3 transposons have been characterized. We investigated whether an artificial dTam3 element, with a deletion in the presumptive transposase coding region, can be trans-activated in tobacco by an activator Tam3 element, which was immobilized by the deletion of o

  7. Identification of transmitter systems and learning tag molecules involved in behavioral tagging during memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Martinez, María Cecilia; Frey, Julietta U.; Viola, Haydee

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) consolidation requires the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). In addition, we have shown recently that LTM formation also requires the setting of a “learning tag” able to capture those PRPs. Weak training, which results only in short-term memory, can set a tag to use PRPs derived from a temporal-spatial closely related event to promote LTM formation. Here, we studied the involvement of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic inputs on the setting of an inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning tag and the synthesis of PRPs. Rats explored an open field (PRP donor) followed by weak (tag inducer) or strong (tag inducer plus PRP donor) IA training. Throughout pharmacological interventions around open-field and/or IA sessions, we found that hippocampal dopamine D1/D5- and β-adrenergic receptors are specifically required to induce PRP synthesis. Moreover, activation of the glutamatergic NMDA receptors is required for setting the learning tags, and this machinery further required α-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA but not ERK1/2 activity. Together, the present findings emphasize an essential role of the induction of PRPs and learning tags for LTM formation. The existence of only the PRP or the tag was insufficient for stabilization of the mnemonic trace. PMID:21768371

  8. RATC: A Robust Automated Tag Clustering Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratto, Ludovico; Carta, Salvatore; Vargiu, Eloisa

    Nowadays, the most dominant and noteworthy web information sources are developed according to the collaborative-web paradigm, also known as Web 2.0. In particular, it represents a novel paradigm in the way users interact with the web. Users (also called prosumers) are no longer passive consumers of published content, but become involved, implicitly and explicitly, as they cooperate by providing their own resources in an “architecture of participation”. In this scenario, collaborative tagging, i.e., the process of classifying shared resources by using keywords, becomes more and more popular. The main problem in such task is related to well-known linguistic phenomena, such as polysemy and synonymy, making effective content retrieval harder. In this paper, an approach that monitors users activity in a tagging system and dynamically quantifies associations among tags is presented. The associations are then used to create tags clusters. Experiments are performed comparing the proposed approach with a state-of-the-art tag clustering technique. Results -given in terms of classical precision and recall- show that the approach is quite effective in the presence of strongly related tags in a cluster.

  9. Tagging behaviour with support from controlled vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Høj, Anne Lyhne; Madsen, Line Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags) and an enha...

  10. Personalization of tagging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Clements, M.; Yang, J.; Vries, A.P. de; Reinders, M.J.T.

    2010-01-01

    Social media systems have encouraged end user participation in the Internet, for the purpose of storing and distributing Internet content, sharing opinions and maintaining relationships. Collaborative tagging allows users to annotate the resulting user-generated content, and enables effective retrie

  11. Tagging the Teleman Corpus

    CERN Document Server

    Brants, T; Brants, Thorsten; Samuelsson, Christer

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out comparing the Swedish Teleman and the English Susanne corpora using an HMM-based and a novel reductionistic statistical part-of-speech tagger. They indicate that tagging the Teleman corpus is the more difficult task, and that the performance of the two different taggers is comparable.

  12. Tagging Grammatical Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Brants, T; Krenn, B; Brants, Thorsten; Skut, Wojciech; Krenn, Brigitte

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses issues in automated treebank construction. We show how standard part-of-speech tagging techniques extend to the more general problem of structural annotation, especially for determining grammatical functions and syntactic categories. Annotation is viewed as an interactive process where manual and automatic processing alternate. Efficiency and accuracy results are presented. We also discuss further automation steps.

  13. LHCb flavour tagging performance

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Musy, M

    2003-01-01

    In CP violation measurements, the most accurate determination of the B flavour of neutral and charged B-mesons is necessary. In this note we summarize the tagging performances for the LHCb experiment, using different approaches and studying different decay channels.

  14. Search for accuracy in activation in activation analysis of trace elements in different matrices. [Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meloni, S.; Ganzerli-Valentini, M.T.; Caramella-Crespi, V.; Maxia, V.; Maggi, L.; Pisani, U.; Soma, R.; Borroni, P.

    1976-01-01

    Different factors may affect accuracy in activation analysis of trace elements. The evaluation of these factors often requires a number of time consuming experiments, but the statement of accuracy in activation analysis is of great value to cast some light on the overall reliability of the method itself. It can be pointed out that accuracy is often inversely proportional to the number of steps of the whole analytical procedure, from sampling to calculation of results. Several techniques of activation analysis were developed and applied to the determination of trace element content in standard reference materials and in samples chosen for intercomparison among laboratories. Emphasis was put on limiting the number of steps to improve the accuracy and on achieving the best of precision. Results are presented and discussed, together with the criteria for the choice of the most appropriate separation technique. Other sources of systematic errors, such as the reliability of the content of the reference standards and dead-time corrections when short-lived isotopes are involved, were taken into account and discussed.

  15. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  16. Conformal Array Pattern Synthesis and Activated Elements Selection Strategy Based on PSOGSA Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern synthesis and activated element selection for conformal array is investigated based on hybrid particle swarm optimization-gravitational search algorithm (PSOGSA in this paper. With the introduction of PSOGSA algorithm which is a novel hybrid optimization technique, the element excitations are optimized to obtain the desired pattern for conformal array in the case of considering uncoupled and coupled element pattern. Numerical simulation and full-wave electromagnetic calculation verify the advantage and efficiency of our method. Then, a novel strategy of activated element selection based on PSOGSA algorithm is proposed for saving the energy consumption in conformal array.

  17. An active piggyBac-like element in Macdunnoughia crassisigna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wu; Zhi-Chan Sun; Chun-Lin Hu; Gu-Feng Zhang; Zhao-Jun Han

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a highly conserved piggyBac-like sequence.designated as McrPLE was cloned from a lepidopteran insect,Macdunnoughia crassisigna.It is 2 472 bp long in full length with a single open reading frame and encodes a 595 amino acid transPOsase.It shares identical terminal and sub-terminal repeats with T. ni IFP2 and iS flanked by the typical TTAA target-site duplications.Alignment and phylogeneric analysis revealed that McrPLE had greater than 99.5%identity and appeared to be the closest one in phylogeny to IFP2 among the PLEs so far found in various species.Plasmid.based excision and transposition assay proved it Was mobile in cell culture.Otherwise.McPLE element and all other highly conserved IFP2 sequences reported previously were found to share three corrution nucleotide substitutions.This suggests that the original IFP2 may be a related variant of a predecessor element that became widespread.The existence of nearly identical piggyBac sequence in reproductively isolated species Was thought also a strong indication of horizontal transmission,which raises important considerations for the stability and practical use of piggyBac transformation vectors.

  18. Exercise and Activity: Key Elements in the Management of OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in both children and adults. Research indicates that physical activity is important because it promotes: general health through cardiovascular fitness mental alertness weight control improved sleep quality ...

  19. Symmetric Encryption Based Privacy using Lightweight Cryptography for RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    RFID technology emerged as the promising technology for its ease of use and implementation in the ubiquitous computing world. RFID is deployed widely in various applications that use automatic identification and processing for information retrieval. The primary components of an RFID system are the RFID tag (active and passive), the reader and the back-end server (database). Cost is the main factor that drove RFID tags to its immense utilization in which passive tags dominate in...

  20. A Personalized Tag-Based Recommendation in Social Web Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. In this paper, we present a tag...... to study and evaluate the recommender system, we have conducted an experiment involving 38 people from 12 countries using data from Del.icio.us , a social bookmarking web system on which users can share their personal bookmarks...

  1. Influences of V5-epitope tag on the metabolic activation of AFB1 by human cytochrome P450 2A13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shoulin Wang; Xiaoyang He; Xinru Wang; Junyan Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the impact of V5-epitope tag inserted in the commercial pcDNA5/FRT/V5-His TOPO expression vector on the metabolic activation of AFB1 by human CYP2A13. Methods: A C-terminal 6×Histag was first introduced into CYP2A13 cDNA by PCR and subsequently transferred into the expressing vector pcDNA5/FRT. Another commercial pcDNA5/FRT/V5-His TOPO expression vector was used to develop the construct directly via PCR. Both of the constructs were then transfected into Flp-In CHO and allowed for the stable expression of CYP2A13. The mouse CYP2A5 and the vector alone were used as positive and negative control, respectively. The presence of CYP2A5 and CYP2A13 cDNA and their protein expression in the stable transfectant cells were determined by immunoblotting assay using a monoclonal antibody against 6×Histag. The AFB1-induced cytotoxicity in these tranfected CHO cells were conducted by MTS assay and the IC50 of cell viability was used to compare the CYP enzyme metabolic activity in AFB1 metabolism among these cells. Results: In accordance with the Flp-In system working mechanism, all the transfectant cells presented same protein expression level. The CHO cells expressing CYP2A5 was more sensitive to AFB1 treatment than those cells expressing CYP2A13, there was about 30-fold IC50 difference between the two cells (2.1 nmol/L vs 58 nmol/L). Interestingly, CYP2A13 fused with V5-Histag had the lost of metabolic activity to AFB1 than that fused with Histag alone, the IC50 of the viability in CHO-2A13-His-V5 cells was about 20-fold less than CHO-2A13-His (>1 000 nmol/L vs 58 nmol/L). However, there was no change between CYP2A5 fused with V5-Histag and Histag alone (2.4 nmol/L vs 2.1 nmol/L). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that CYP2A13 fused with V5-epitope has a significant impact on its metabolic activation to AFB1, which indicated that it should be careful to select a new expressing vector for evaluating the enzyme activity in carcinogen metabolism.

  2. Idefix insulator activity can be modulated by nearby regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Brasset, E; Bantignies, F.; Court, F. (Franck); Cheresiz, S.; C. Conte; Vaury, C.

    2007-01-01

    Insulators play important roles in controlling gene activity and maintaining regulatory independence between neighbouring genes. In this article, we show that the enhancer-blocking activity of the insulator present within the LTR retrotransposon Idefix can be abolished if two copies of the region containing the insulator—specifically, the long terminal repeat (LTR)—are fused to the retrotransposon's 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). The presence of this combination of two [LTR-5′ UTR] modules ...

  3. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  4. Roles of metal/activated carbon hybridization on elemental mercury adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyong-Min; Kim, Byung-Joo; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo-Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the elemental mercury removal behavior of metal (copper or nickel)/activated carbon hybrid materials were investigated. The pore structures and total pore volumes of the hybrid materials were analyzed using the N2/77 K adsorption isotherms. The microstructure and surface morphologies of the hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. In the experimental results, the elemental mercury adsorption capacities of all copper/activated carbon hybrid materials were higher than that of the as-received material despite the decrease in specific surface areas and total pore volumes after the metal loading. All the samples containing the metal particles showed excellent elemental mercury adsorption. The Ni/ACs exhibited superior elemental mercury adsorption to those of Cu/ACs. This suggests that Ni/ACs have better elemental mercury adsorption due to the higher activity of nickel.

  5. From the Cover: Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattuto, C.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag co-occurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory - or aging of resources - in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features, with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users, who - despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity - appear to follow simple activity patterns.

  6. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  7. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  8. A method for making an active cathode mass for an element with a liquid, anhydrous electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indzima, T.; Morita, A.

    1983-07-14

    Powder of fluorinated carbon, produced as a result of a reaction between gaseous F2 and carbon powder in the presence of gaseous 02, is used as the active cathode mass in the element. The bulk volume of 02 is 3 percent with respect to the gaseous F2. The element with the lithium anode has good discharge characteristics.

  9. [Transposition of the maize transposable element dSpm in transgenic sugar beets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic sugar beet plants carrying maize Spmn/dSpm transposable elements system have been constructed. Heterologous system of maize transposable elements Spm/dSpm was active in transgenic sugar beets that permits transposon-based gene tagging and obtaining of marker-free transgenic sugar beet.

  10. Recommending Tags for New Resources in Social Bookmarking Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Yagnik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Social bookmarking system is a web-based resource sharing system that allows users to upload, share and organize their resources i.e. bookmarks and publications. The system has shifted the paradigm of bookmarking from an individual activity limited to desktop to a collective activity on the web. It also facilitates user to annotate his resource with free form tags that leads to large communities of users to collaboratively create accessible repositories of web resources. Tagging process has its own challenges like ambiguity, redundancy or misspelled tags and sometimes user tends to avoid it as he has to describe tag at his own. The resultant tag space is noisy or very sparse and dilutes the purpose of tagging. The effective solution is Tag Recommendation System that automatically suggests appropriate set of tags to user while annotating resource. In this paper, we propose a framework that does not depend on tagging history of the resource or user and thereby capable of suggesting tags to the resources which are being submitted to the system first time. We model tag recommendation task as multi-label text classification problem and use Naive Bayes classifier as the baselearner of the multilabel classifier. We experiment with Boolean, bag-of-words and term frequency-inverse document frequency (TFIDF representation of the resources and fit appropriate distribution to the data based on the representation used. Impact of featureselection on the effectiveness of the tag recommendation is also studied. Effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated through precision, recall and f-measure metrics.

  11. Prudential regulation and surveillance - essential elements of the banking activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Without being an exhaustive study, the analysis aims to identify the intrinsic correlations of essential notions for the banking field - prudence, prudential supervision, international publishing and sanctions, quartered obviously in risk area. We mention that risk, as related to surveillance and caution, represents the possibility of potential, expected or unexpected events to have a negative impact on the bank capital or the bank revenue. We will not use the notion of control, which seems included in that broader surveillance, but we remind that a prudential supervision aims at preventing internal or external risk at a credit institution level, and at avoiding their spread. Macroeconomic prudential supervision is an internal management activity, given the evolution of constraints that come from outside, the change of activity place or the redefinition of prudential rules at national and international level.

  12. Tag-elese or The Language of Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Simons

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The core "meme" of Web 2.0 from which almost all other memes radiated was: 'You control your own data' (O'Reilly, 2005, 3. Key instruments for this user control are tagging systems that allow users to freely assign keywords of their own choosing to Internet resources of their own making as well as to documents produced by others. Of course, freely chosen keywords tags do not necessarily follow prefixed taxonomies or classification systems. But going by the maxim that interaction creates similarity and similarity creates interaction, the idea - or hope - is, however, that the tagging practices of individual users will eventually converge into an emergent common vocabulary or folksonomy (Merholz, 2004; Shirky, 2005; Vander Wal, 2005b; Mika, 2007. It is far from clear, however, that free tagging systems will eventually yield controlled vocabularies, and there are many incentives for idiosyncratic, ambiguous, and inconsistent uses of tags. Left to themselves, free tagging systems seem to be too wild and too chaotic for any order to emerge. But are these free tagging systems really as "feral" as they seem to be, or do they only look uncontrolled because one has been looking for order in the wrong place? I have done a quick-and-dirty" analysis of Flickr's tag cloud. The concept was: if folksonomies encourage users to tap on their own vernacular, everyday natural language must somehow "guide" the tagging practices of users of tagging systems. Flickr's tag cloud has been choosen because it may teach us something about tagging systems and folksonomies, and not - or not primarily - because of what tags may tell us about pictures.

  13. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  14. Transposon display supports transpositional activity of elements in species of the saltans group of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nathalia De Setta; Ana Paula Pimentel Costa; Fabrício Ramon Lopes; Marie-Anne Van Sluys; Cláudia Márcia Aparecida Carareto

    2007-01-01

    Mobilization of two element subfamilies (canonical and O-type) from Drosophila sturtevanti and D. saltans was evaluated for copy number and transposition activity using the transposon display (TD) technique. Pairwise distances between strains regarding the insertion polymorphism profile were estimated. Amplification of the element based on copy number estimates was highly variable among the strains (D. sturtevanti, canonical 20.11, O-type 9.00; D. saltans, canonical 16.4, O-type 12.60 insertions, on average). The larger values obtained by TD compared to our previous data by Southern blotting support the higher sensitivity of TD over Southern analysis for estimating transposable element copy numbers. The higher numbers of the canonical element and the greater divergence in its distribution within the genome of D. sturtevanti (24.8%) compared to the O-type (16.7%), as well as the greater divergence in the distribution of the canonical P element, between the D. sturtevanti (24.8%) and the D. saltans (18.3%) strains, suggest that the canonical element occupies more sites within the D. sturtevanti genome, most probably due to recent transposition activity. These data corroborate the hypothesis that the O-type is the oldest subfamily of elements in the saltans group and suggest that the canonical element is or has been transpositionally active until more recently in D. sturtevanti.

  15. SYNTHESIS METHODOLOGY FOR ACTIVE ELEMENT USING IMPEDANCES –BASED BOND GRAPH METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasta TANASESCU

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a synthesis methodology for active elements within systems that uses frequency response function as a basis for describing required behavior. The method is applicable in the design of a new system or in the retrofit of an existing system in which an active element is required or desired. The two basis principles of bond graph modeling are the “reticulation principle” which decomposes a physical into elemental physical laws represented as network elements interacting through ports and the “power postulate” which assembles the complete model through a network of power flows representing the exchange of energy between the elements. Moreover the bond graph model leads to a rigorous definitions of the structure of the associated dynamical equations.

  16. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  17. 物联网应用中有源RFID标签的EAL4安全要求%Assurance level 4 security requirements of active radio frequency identification tags in the Internet of Things

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金萍; 石竑松; 王宇航; 杨永生; 张翀斌

    2012-01-01

    A framework is given for evaluation assurance level 4(EAL4) security requirements for radio frequency identification(RFID) active tags in applications for the Internet of Things(IOT).The evaluation assurance level and the security assurance requirements are chosen based on ISO/IEC standard 15 408 and an analysis of the asset value and potential threat.Then,the potential threats are related to the active tags to set security objectives for the target to resist potential attacks.A minimal set of security function requirements is given to specify the functionality of active tags.Finally,the consistency between the Abstractions is analyzed to justify the rationale behind the framework.This work provides a reference for designers of security mechanisms for active tags and a basis for the evaluation and procurement of active tags.%该文为物联网应用中安全要求较高的有源RFID标签类产品建立了一套满足评估保证级(EAL)4级的一组安全要求。此安全要求的建立,以通用评估准则(ISO15408)为依据,通过对有源标签保护的资产价值和潜在威胁的分析,为有源标签界定了合理的评估保证级别及相应的安全保证要求,并通过分析其在物联网应用中可能面临的潜在威胁,导出了有源标签需要满足的安全目的,进一步得出了需要满足的最小安全功能要求,并论证了它们之间的对应性。建立的安全要求框架可以作为指引研发者对有源标签进行全面安全性设计考量的重要参考,也可以为有源标签类产品的采购、测评提供依据。

  18. Active Elements for Analog Signal Processing: Classification, Review, and New Proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kolka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, an analysis of the state-of-the-art of active elements for analog signal processing is presented which support – in contrast to the conventional operational amplifiers – not only the voltage-mode but also the current- and mixed-mode operations. Several problems are addressed which are associated with the utilization of these elements in linear applications, particularly in frequency filters. A methodology is proposed which generates a number of fundamentally new active elements with their potential utilization in various areas of signal processing.

  19. Elemental geochemical records of seafloor hydrothermal activities in the sediments from the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Shikui; YU Zenghui; DU Tongjun

    2007-01-01

    The major and minor element contents in the sediment core H9 from the hydrothermal fields of the Okinawa Trough show a sharp change at the depth of 80 cm. The elements enriched in the upper 80 cm core are those enriched in the hydrothermal deposits and in the surface sediments recovered from the hydrothermal fields in the trough, which indicates the input of hydrothermal materials. Comparing with other hydrothermal sediments from Mid-ocean Ridges or the Lau Basin, the degree of the enrichment of elements iron, copper, cobalt, and nickel is relatively low. However, the enrichment of elements manganese, lead, arsenic, antimony and mercury is remarkable. The average contents of these elements in the upper 80 cm core sediments are three to six times those in the lower section, and 3 ~ 12 times those in the surface sediments which are not influenced by hydrothermal activities. Hydrothermal activities have contributed significant manganese, lead, arsenic, antimony and mercury to the sediments, and these elements are distinct indicators for the hydrothermal activity in the Okinawa Trough. The significant enrichment of these elements in Core H9 upward from the depth 80 cm indicates the start or the significant enhancing of the hydrothermal activity in this area at about 5 740 aB. P. The average accumulation rate of manganese during this period is about 40 461 μg/( cm2 · ka), which is similar to the hydrothermal sediments in the Lau Basin or the East Pacific Rise.

  20. Efficient LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN expression requires two neighboring RY elements on its promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As the main structural protein of oil body,OLEOSIN is highly expressed only during seed development. OLEOSIN promoter is a very useful tool for seed-specific gene engineering and seed bioreactor designing. The B3 domain transcription factor leafy cotyledon2 (LEC2) plays an important role in regulating seed development and seed-specific gene expression. Here,we first report how seed-specific B3 domain transcription factor leafy cotyledon2 (LEC2) efficiently activates OLEOSIN expression. The central promoter region of OLEOSIN,responsible for seed specificity and LEC2 activation,was determined by 5’-deletion analysis. Binding experiments in yeast cells and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that LEC2 specifically bound to two conserved RY elements in this region. In transient expression assays,mutation in either RY element dramatically reduced LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN promoter activity,while double mutation abolished it. Analysis of the distribution of RY elements in seed-specific genes activated by LEC2 also supported the idea that genes containing neighboring RY elements responded strongly to LEC2 activation. Therefore,we conclude that two neighboring RY elements are essential for efficient LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN expression. These findings will help us better utilize seed-specific promoter activity.

  1. Efficient LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN expression requires two neighboring RY elements on its promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE NanYing; YANG Yang; LI YanDong; WANG LiLi; HUANG Ping; GAO Yin; An ChengCai

    2009-01-01

    As the main structural protein of oil body, OLEOSIN is highly expressed only during seed development. OLEOSIN promoter is a very useful tool for seed-specific gene engineering and seed bioreactor designing. The B3 domain transcription factor leafy cotyledon2 (LEC2) plays an important role in regulating seed development and seed-specific gene expression. Here, we first report how seed-specific B3 domain transcription factor leafy cotyledon2 (LEC2) efficiently activates OLEOSIN expression. The central promoter region of OLEOSIN, responsible for seed specificity and LEC2 activation, was determined by 5'-deletion analysis. Binding experiments in yeast cells and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that LEC2 specifically bound to two conserved RY elements in this region, in transient expression assays, mutation in either RY element dramatically reduced LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN promoter activity, while double mutation abolished it. Analysis of the distribution of RY elements in seed-specific genes activated by LEC2 also supported the idea that genes containing neighboring RY elements responded strongly to LEC2 activation. Therefore, we conclude that two neighboring RY elements are essential for efficient LEC2 activation of OLEOSIN expression. These findings will help us better utilize seed-specific promoter activity.

  2. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  3. Investigation of distribution of elements in a Korean ginseng by using a neutron activation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Na; Sun, Gwang Min; Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The Distinction of production areas of Korean ginsengs has been tried by using neutron activation techniques such as an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and a prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). This study was done as a part of those efforts. As is well known, the distribution of elements varies according to the part of plant due to the difference of enrichment effect and influence from a soil where the plants have been grown. So a correlation study between plants and soil is an important issue. In this study, the distribution of trace elements within a Korean ginseng was investigated by using an instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  4. Quantitative estimation of activity and quality for collections of functional genetic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutalik, Vivek K; Guimaraes, Joao C; Cambray, Guillaume; Mai, Quynh-Anh; Christoffersen, Marc Juul; Martin, Lance; Yu, Ayumi; Lam, Colin; Rodriguez, Cesar; Bennett, Gaymon; Keasling, Jay D; Endy, Drew; Arkin, Adam P

    2013-04-01

    The practice of engineering biology now depends on the ad hoc reuse of genetic elements whose precise activities vary across changing contexts. Methods are lacking for researchers to affordably coordinate the quantification and analysis of part performance across varied environments, as needed to identify, evaluate and improve problematic part types. We developed an easy-to-use analysis of variance (ANOVA) framework for quantifying the performance of genetic elements. For proof of concept, we assembled and analyzed combinations of prokaryotic transcription and translation initiation elements in Escherichia coli. We determined how estimation of part activity relates to the number of unique element combinations tested, and we show how to estimate expected ensemble-wide part activity from just one or two measurements. We propose a new statistic, biomolecular part 'quality', for tracking quantitative variation in part performance across changing contexts.

  5. Towards an "Intelligent" Tagging Tool for Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Juraj; Motschnig, Renate; Homola, Martin

    Tagging allows people to effectively organize web resources such as images, bookmarks or blog articles. Things are found easier by browsing tag clouds relying on the tags that have been assigned before. The success is by large determined by the quality and relevance of tags assigned to content - and so it is dependent on people who do the tagging. We investigate mental processes that underlie tagging. In order to improve quality of tagging, we provide guidelines for users of tagging systems and in addition we suggest features that an "intelligent" tagging tool should bear in order to facilitate the tagging process.

  6. A single heterochromatin boundary element imposes position-independent antisilencing activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae minichromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita A Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Chromatin boundary elements serve as cis-acting regulatory DNA signals required to protect genes from the effects of the neighboring heterochromatin. In the yeast genome, boundary elements act by establishing barriers for heterochromatin spreading and are sufficient to protect a reporter gene from transcriptional silencing when inserted between the silencer and the reporter gene. Here we dissected functional topography of silencers and boundary elements within circular minichromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that both HML-E and HML-I silencers can efficiently repress the URA3 reporter on a multi-copy yeast minichromosome and we further showed that two distinct heterochromatin boundary elements STAR and TEF2-UASrpg are able to limit the heterochromatin spreading in circular minichromosomes. In surprising contrast to what had been observed in the yeast genome, we found that in minichromosomes the heterochromatin boundary elements inhibit silencing of the reporter gene even when just one boundary element is positioned at the distal end of the URA3 reporter or upstream of the silencer elements. Thus the STAR and TEF2-UASrpg boundary elements inhibit chromatin silencing through an antisilencing activity independently of their position or orientation in S. cerevisiae minichromosomes rather than by creating a position-specific barrier as seen in the genome. We propose that the circular DNA topology facilitates interactions between the boundary and silencing elements in the minichromosomes.

  7. Multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmazio, Ilza; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Reator e Tecnicas Analiticas. Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica

    2011-07-01

    Recent works have shown that analysis in cosmetics and beauty products from the European and Asian markets indicate the presence of U, Th and rare earths besides other trace elements. Considering these previous findings and health issues, it would be valuable to obtain information on elements in cosmetics available in the Brazilian market. The purpose of this study was to acquire a multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products of diverse brands. Samples of eye shadow, liquid base, facial concealer, lipstick, and compact face powder were analyzed applying neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0}-standardization method at CDTN/CNEN, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 research reactor. Concentrations of more than 30 elements in samples are presented and it was found elements included in Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency prohibitive list, rare earths, Th and U in a minimum of two cosmetic samples. (author)

  8. Multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmazio, Ilza; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Reator e Tecnicas Analiticas. Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica

    2011-07-01

    Recent works have shown that analysis in cosmetics and beauty products from the European and Asian markets indicate the presence of U, Th and rare earths besides other trace elements. Considering these previous findings and health issues, it would be valuable to obtain information on elements in cosmetics available in the Brazilian market. The purpose of this study was to acquire a multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products of diverse brands. Samples of eye shadow, liquid base, facial concealer, lipstick, and compact face powder were analyzed applying neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0}-standardization method at CDTN/CNEN, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 research reactor. Concentrations of more than 30 elements in samples are presented and it was found elements included in Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency prohibitive list, rare earths, Th and U in a minimum of two cosmetic samples. (author)

  9. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deland, Sharon M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  10. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  12. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  13. EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON ADSORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses experiments using activated carbon to capture elemental mercury (Hgo), and a bench-scale dixed-bed reactor and a flow reactor to determine the role of surface moisture in Hgo adsorption. Three activated-carbon samples, with different pore structure and ash co...

  14. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt

    2016-01-01

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak...

  15. Elemental analysis of soil and hair sample by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Quraishi, Shamshad Begum; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Yeoil; Kang, Sang Hoon; Lim, Jong Myoung; Cho, Hyun Je; Kim, Young Jin

    2004-03-01

    Myanmar soil sample was analyzed by using the instrumental neutron activation analysis. The elemental concentrations in the sample, altogether 34 elements, Al As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Ga, Gd, Hf, Ir, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Ti, V, Yb, Zn and Zr were determined. The concentration of 17 elements (Al, Au, Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Mn, Mg, Sb, Se, Zn) in human hair samples were determined by INAA For quality control of analytical method, certified reference material was used.

  16. Finite element crash simulations of the human body: Passive and active muscle modelling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mukherjee; A Chawla; B Karthikeyan; A Soni

    2007-08-01

    Conventional dummy based testing procedures suffer from known limitations. This report addresses issues in finite element human body models in evaluating pedestrian and occupant crash safety measures. A review of material properties of soft tissues and characterization methods show a scarcity of material properties for characterizing soft tissues in dynamic loading. Experiments imparting impacts to tissues and subsequent inverse finite element mapping to extract material properties are described. The effect of muscle activation due to voluntary and non-voluntary reflexes on injuries has been investigated through finite element modelling.

  17. Concentration of 17 Elements in Subcellular Fractions of Beef Heart Tissue Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, P.O.

    1964-12-15

    Subcellular fractions of beef heart tissue are investigated, by means of neutron activation analysis, with respect to their concentration of 17 different elements. A recently developed ion-exchange technique combined with gamma spectrometry is used. The homogeneity of the subcellular fractions is examined electron microscopically. The following elements are determined: As, Ba, Br, Cas Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, P, Rb, Se, Sm, W and Zn. The determination of Ag, Au, Cd, Ce, Cr, Sb and Sc is omitted, in view of contamination. Reproducible and characteristic patterns of distribution are obtained for all elements studied.

  18. Determination of Interesting Toxicological Elements in PM2.5 by Neutron and Photon Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Avino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human activities introduce compounds increasing levels of many dangerous species for environment and population. In this way, trace elements in airborne particulate have a preeminent position due to toxic element presence affecting the biological systems. The main problem is the analytical determination of such species at ultratrace levels: a very specific methodology is necessary with regard to the accuracy and precision and contamination problems. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis assure these requirements. A retrospective element analysis in airborne particulate collected in the last 4 decades has been carried out for studying their trend. The samples were collected in urban location in order to determine only effects due to global aerosol circulation; semiannual samples have been used to characterize the summer/winter behavior of natural and artificial origin. The levels of natural origin element are higher than those in other countries owing to geological and meteorological factors peculiar to Central Italy. The levels of artificial elements are sometimes less than those in other countries, suggesting a less polluted general situation for Central Italy. However, for a few elements (e.g., Pb the levels measured are only slight lower than those proposed as air ambient standard.

  19. [Archival tags and geolocation methods for marine animals: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-feng; Fan, Wei; Dai, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Archival tags, a group of data storable electronic tags, are widely used as strong tools for obtaining long term and large scale activity information of marine animals, specifically highly migratory oceanic fishes, and corresponding environmental data. Though retrieving tags is an indispensable step for obtaining data, which is a shortage of archival tags, a series of achievements have been made on marine animals by using archival tags since the 1990s. With the appearance of pop-up satellite tag, which solved the problem of data retrieving and was fully independent of the fishing, both breadth and depth of marine animals' studies are extended by the end of the 1990s. Geolocation based on light intensity is the key to estimate marine animals' movement and has achieved some progress in the past 20 years. However, the accuracy of geolocation for latitude is not high enough, and there is still much room for improvement. To date, most geolocation methods that use ambient daylight involve identifying the times when the sun is at a precisely known zenith angle (e.g., sunrise and sunset). The problem of estimating longitude has been proved easy to solve, but accurate latitude estimates remain elusive. This paper mainly introduced two tags, i. e., archival tags and pop-up tags, and three geolocation methods, i.e. , 1) the "fixed reference" method, 2) the "variable reference" method, and 3) the "reflection" method. We also presented a prospect analysis on archival tags and possible research direction of geolocation methods. We believed that miniaturization and multi-sensor integration are the trends for electronic tags while more environmental factors such as depth, SST (sea surface temperature) or magnetic field intensity, instead of single factor, as auxiliary parameters would be used for improving the geolocation accuracy in the future.

  20. LHCb Tag Collector

    CERN Document Server

    Fuente Fernàndez, P; Cousin, N

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with software management and Nightly Build programs is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  1. Tagging for Subject Access: A Glimpse into Current Practice by Vendors, Libraries, and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sharon Q.

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the 307 Koha libraries listed in Breeding's Library Technology Guides. Since all the tag clouds in Koha are user-contributed, their adoption and usage can shed light on the extent to which libraries are supporting user tagging. The research also revealed that public library users are more actively involved in tagging than…

  2. Tagging for Subject Access: A Glimpse into Current Practice by Vendors, Libraries, and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sharon Q.

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the 307 Koha libraries listed in Breeding's Library Technology Guides. Since all the tag clouds in Koha are user-contributed, their adoption and usage can shed light on the extent to which libraries are supporting user tagging. The research also revealed that public library users are more actively involved in tagging than…

  3. An Overview of Social Tagging and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish; Li, Rui; Yin, Zhijun; Han, Jiawei

    Social tagging on online portals has become a trend now. It has emerged as one of the best ways of associating metadata with web objects. With the increase in the kinds of web objects becoming available, collaborative tagging of such objects is also developing along new dimensions. This popularity has led to a vast literature on social tagging. In this survey paper, we would like to summarize different techniques employed to study various aspects of tagging. Broadly, we would discuss about properties of tag streams, tagging models, tag semantics, generating recommendations using tags, visualizations of tags, applications of tags, integration of different tagging systems and problems associated with tagging usage. We would discuss topics like why people tag, what influences the choice of tags, how to model the tagging process, kinds of tags, different power laws observed in tagging domain, how tags are created and how to choose the right tags for recommendation. Metadata generated in the form of tags can be efficiently used to improve web search, for web object classification, for generating ontologies, for enhanced browsing etc. We would discuss these applications and conclude with thoughts on future work in the area.

  4. Lightweight Mutual Authentication Protocol for Low Cost RFID Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Eslam Gamal; Hashem, Mohamed; 10.5121/ijnsa.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology one of the most promising technologies in the field of ubiquitous computing. Indeed, RFID technology may well replace barcode technology. Although it offers many advantages over other identification systems, there are also associated security risks that are not easy to be addressed. When designing a real lightweight authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags, a number of challenges arise due to the extremely limited computational, storage and communication abilities of Low-cost RFID tags. This paper proposes a real mutual authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags. The proposed protocol prevents passive attacks as active attacks are discounted when designing a protocol to meet the requirements of low cost RFID tags. However the implementation of the protocol meets the limited abilities of low cost RFID tags.

  5. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R(2) = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community.

  6. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu eÜnal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After seven days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2=0.95. Metabolically-active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of coal bed methane production and alter the composition of the active

  7. Variable transposition of eight maize activator (ac) elements located on the short arm of chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, William F

    2011-09-01

    Eight Activator (Ac) transposable elements mapped to the maize chromosome arm 1S were assessed for Ac transposition rates. For each of the Ac stocks, plants homozygous for the single Ac element and the Ds reporter r1-sc:m3 on chromosome 10 were crossed as females by a homozygous r1-sc:m3 tester color-converted W22 line. The resulting ears produced mostly coarsely spotted kernels and a low frequency of either near-colorless fine-spotted kernels or nonspotted kernels. The relative frequency of these two types of near-colorless kernels differed among the eight Ac stocks. The extent to which increased Ac dosage results in nonspotted kernels may be Ac-specific. Although all of the Ac elements are in near-isogenic inbred W22 lines, they varied to a large extent in their transposition frequency. These differences might possibly result from structural differences among the Ac elements. Because one pair of Ac elements derived from Ac33 on chromosome arm 5S differed about 13-fold in transposition frequency and a second pair of Ac elements derived from Ac12 on chromosome arm 1S differed about 3-fold in transposition frequency, this is not a likely explanation for all eight Ac elements. The data presented here support the notion that the differences in transposition frequency of the eight Ac elements may be a reflection of variability in Ac transcription or accessibility of the transposase to the Ac element, resulting from differences in the chromatin environments wherein the Ac elements are located. This is the first report of variability in transposition rates among different Ac donor lines.

  8. Keep on Blockin’ in the Free World: Personal Access Control for Low-Cost RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    Rieback, Melanie; Crispo, Bruno; Tanenbaum, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an off-tag RFID access control mechanism called “Selective RFID Jamming”. Selective RFID Jamming protects low-cost RFID tags by enforcing access control on their behalf, in a similar manner to the RFID Blocker Tag. However, Selective RFID Jamming is novel because it uses an active mobile device to enforce centralized ACL-based access control policies. Selective RFID Jamming also solves a Differential Signal Analysis attack to which the RFID Blocker Tag is susceptible.

  9. Keep on Blockin’ in the Free World: Personal Access Control for Low-Cost RFID Tags

    OpenAIRE

    Rieback, Melanie; Crispo, Bruno; Tanenbaum, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an off-tag RFID access control mechanism called “Selective RFID Jamming”. Selective RFID Jamming protects low-cost RFID tags by enforcing access control on their behalf, in a similar manner to the RFID Blocker Tag. However, Selective RFID Jamming is novel because it uses an active mobile device to enforce centralized ACL-based access control policies. Selective RFID Jamming also solves a Differential Signal Analysis attack to which the RFID Blocker Tag is susceptible.

  10. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services a...

  11. Availability of essential trace elements in Ayurvedic Indian medicinal herbs using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, V.; Garg, A.N. [Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Specific parts of several plants (fruits, leaves, stem, bark and roots) often used as medicines in the Indian Ayurvedic system have been analysed for 20 elements (As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr and Zn) by employing instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor and the induced activity was counted using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. Most of the medicinal herbs have been found to be rich in one or more of the elements under study. (Author).

  12. Prospecting for chemical tags among open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, David L

    2016-01-01

    Determinations of the chemical composition of red giants in a large sample of open clusters show that the abundances of the heavy elements La, Ce, Nd and Sm but not so obviously Y and Eu vary from one cluster to another across a sample all having about the solar metallicity. For La, Ce, Nd and Sm the amplitudes of the variations at solar metallicity scale approximately with the main s-process contribution to solar system material. Consideration of published abundances of field stars suggest that such a spread in heavy element abundances is present for the thin and thick disk stars of different metallicity. This new result provides an opportunity to chemically tag stars by their heavy elements and to reconstruct dissolved open clusters from the field star population.

  13. Electrically active light-element complexes in silicon crystals grown by cast method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kuniyuki; Ogura, Atsushi; Ono, Haruhiko

    2016-09-01

    Electrically active light-element complexes called thermal donors and shallow thermal donors in silicon crystals grown by the cast method were studied by low-temperature far-infrared absorption spectroscopy. The relationship between these complexes and either crystal defects or light-element impurities was investigated by comparing different types of silicon crystals, that is, conventional cast-grown multicrystalline Si, seed-cast monolike-Si, and Czochralski-grown Si. The dependence of thermal and the shallow thermal donors on the light-element impurity concentration and their annealing behaviors were examined to compare the crystals. It was found that crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries did not affect the formation of thermal or shallow thermal donors. The formation of these complexes was dominantly affected by the concentration of light-element impurities, O and C, independent of the existence of crystal defects.

  14. Elemental analysis of some Egyptian ores and industrial iron samples by neutron activation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Elemental analysis of iron ore samples and first industrial iron production prepared by the Egyptian Iron and Steel Company of Helwan near Cairo were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. Five samples from each kind were irradiated for a 48 hours at a thermal neutron flux of 4x1012 n/(cm2.s) in the first Egyptian research reactor ET-PP-1. Also the pneumatic irradiation rabbit system (PIRS) attached to the reactor in Inshass, was used to measure the elements of short-life time.The gamma-ray spectra were recorded by means of the hyper pure germanium detection system. The concentration percentage values of major, minor and trace elements are presented. The long and short lived isotopes were considered. A comparative study and a discussion on the elemental concentration values are given.

  15. Elemental analysis of two Egyptian iron ores and produced industrial iron samples by neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroo, A; Abdel-Basset, N; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Hassan, A M

    2001-03-01

    Elemental analysis of two iron ores and initial industrial iron production prepared by the Egyptian Iron and Steel Company of Helwan near Cairo were performed by the instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. Five samples of each type were irradiated for 48 h in a thermal neutron flux of 4 x 10(12) n/cm2 s in the first Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-1. Also, the Pneumatic Irradiation Rabbit System (PIRS), attached to the reactor ET-RR-1 in Inshass, was used to measure short-life elements. The gamma-ray spectra were obtained with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The concentration percentage values of major, minor and trace elements are presented. Implications of the elemental concentration values obtained are presented.

  16. Elemental analysis of two Egyptian iron ores and produced industrial iron samples by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroor, A.; Abdel-Basset, N.; Abdel-Haleem, A.S.; Hassan, A.M

    2001-03-01

    Elemental analysis of two iron ores and initial industrial iron production prepared by the Egyptian Iron and Steel Company of Helwan near Cairo were performed by the instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. Five samples of each type were irradiated for 48 h in a thermal neutron flux of 4x10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} s in the first Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-1. Also, the Pneumatic Irradiation Rabbit System (PIRS), attached to the reactor ET-RR-1 in Inshass, was used to measure short-life elements. The {gamma}-ray spectra were obtained with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The concentration percentage values of major, minor and trace elements are presented. Implications of the elemental concentration values obtained are presented.

  17. Elemental analysis of some Egyptian ores and industrial iron samples by neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srror, A; Abdel-Basset, N; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Hassan, A M

    2001-01-01

    Elemental analysis of iron ore samples and first industrial iron production prepared by the Egyptian Iron and Steel Company of Helwan near Cairo were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. Five samples from each kind were irradiated for a 48 hours at a thermal neutron flux of 4 x 10(12) n/(cm2.s) in the first Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-1. Also the Pneumatic irradiation Rabbit system (PIRS) attached to the reactor in Inshass, was used to measure the elements of short-life time. The gamma-ray spectra were recorded by means of the hyper pure germanium detection system. The concentration percentage values of major, minor and trace elements are presented. The long and short lived isotopes were considered. A comparative study and a discussion on the elemental concentration values are given.

  18. Trace element water improves the antioxidant activity of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ling; Chen, Yih-Shyuan; Yang, Joan-Hwa; Chiang, Been-Huang; Hsu, Cheng-Kuang

    2007-10-31

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) was grown in trace element water (TEW) (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm) and deionized water (DIW) to evaluate whether the beneficial effects of trace elements on the antioxidant activity could be accomplished with the supplement of TEW. At 300 ppm, TEW significantly increased the Cu, Zn, Mn, and Fe contents in buckwheat sprout but not the Se content. However, the levels of rutin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin did not differ between buckwheat sprouts grown in TEW and DIW. The ethanolic extract from buckwheat sprout grown in 300 ppm of TEW showed higher ferrous ion chelating activity and inhibitory activity toward lipid peroxidation than that grown in DIW. The extract in the TEW group also enhanced intracellular superoxide dismutase activity and lowered reactive oxygen species and superoxide anion in the human Hep G2 cell. It was concluded that TEW could increase the antioxidant activities of buckwheat sprouts.

  19. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT

  20. Effects of Rare Earth Element Lan on the Activities of Earthworm Enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Dongmei; Liu Wenli; Liu Weiping

    2007-01-01

    The effects of Rare Earth Element Lan on the activities of cellulose, catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutasein in earthworm were carried out by natural soil test. The results indicated that Lan can significantly suppress the activity of cellulose. The responses of three enzymes in earthworm to Lan were different, Lan mostly affects catalase activity and inhibited catalase activity throughout the experiment. Peroxidase activity tend to "promote weakly and inhibited strongly" when short term of exposure to Lan, while "inhibited weakly and promote strongly" as a function of time. In comparison, Lan had little influence on the activity of superoxide dismutase. The variance analysis results showed that the concentration of Lan significantly affected the activities of cellulose and CAT but had no obvious influence on the activities of SOD and POD. The treatment time and the interactive effect between treatment concentrations and time had very significant effect on the activities of cellulose, SOD, CAT and POD.

  1. Elemental analysis of rain- and fresh water by neutron activation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of rain-and fresh water for trace constituents is a manda tory part of environmental monitoring. This text gives a survey of neutron activation analysis (NAA) within the framework of current environmental water research pro grammes, based on the practice developed in co-operation with the Dutch Energy Research Centre at Petten (ECN). While the procedures reported in literature cover about thirty five elements, our routine procedures of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is limited to ten to fifteen elements. The use of some dedicated ra diochemical separations (RNAA) adds another six, some of which are speciated as well. Current contributions of NAA to water analysis center on determination and speciation of anionic trace elements, notably Br, I, As. and Se, on the assay of some ultra traces like Ag, Au and Hg and on validation.

  2. Overabundance of s-process elements in the atmosphere of the active red giant

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhomov, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Based on high-resolution (R=60000) spectra taken with the NES spectrograph (the 6-m BTA telescope, the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Science), we have determined the abundances of 26 elements, from lithium to europium, in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon, which belongs to the class of RS CVn variable stars, by the method of model stellar atmospheres. We have taken into account the hyperfine splitting, the isotopic shift, and the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis of our data has revealed an overabundance of lithium and neutron-capture elements compared to normal red giants. For lithium, this is explained by the activity of the star, while the overabundance of s-elements is presumably similar in nature to that in moderate barium stars.

  3. Production of building elements based on alkali-activated red clay brick waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Andres Robayo-Salazar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the feasibility of reusing a red clay brick waste (RCBW in order to produce building elements such as blocks, pavers and tiles, by using the technique of alkaline activation. The production of these building elements was based on the design of a hybrid mortar with 48.61 MPa of compressive strength, at 28 curing days at room temperature (25 °C. The hybrid mortar was synthesized by adding 10% by weight of Portland cement (OPC to the RCBW, Red Clay Brick Waste. As alkaline activators were used commercial industrial grade sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. Building elements were physically and mechanically characterized, according to Colombian Technical Standards (NTC. This technology process is presented as an alternative for the reuse of RCBW and its contribution to the environmental sustainability.

  4. High Resolution Ultrasound Imaging Using Adaptive Beamforming with Reduced Number of Active Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    is proposed. By reducing the number of active sensor elements, an increased resolution can be obtained with the MV beamformer. This observation is directly opposite the well-known relation between the spatial extent of the aperture and the achievable resolution. The investigations are based on Field II...

  5. Finite element based design of software for integrated passive and active vibration control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Presents the design scheme developed for design of software forIntegrated Passive and Active Vibration Control(IPAVC) and the coding of a prototyne system, and the selection of the famous finite element program MSC/NASTRAN as an important module of software to deal with large and complicated structures and systems with an example to demonstrate the prototype system.

  6. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  7. Exterior optical cloaking and illusions by using active sources: A boundary element perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H. H.; Xiao, J. J.; Lai, Y.; Chan, C. T.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that active sources can be used to cloak any objects that lie outside the cloaking devices [F. Guevara Vasquez, G. W. Milton, and D. Onofrei, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 073901 (2009)]. Here, we propose that active sources can create illusion effects so that an object outside the cloaking device can be made to look like another object. Invisibility is a special case in which the concealed object is transformed to a volume of air. From a boundary element perspective, we show that active sources can create a nearly “silent” domain which can conceal any objects inside and at the same time make the whole system look like an illusion of our choice outside a virtual boundary. The boundary element method gives the fields and field gradients, which can be related to monopoles and dipoles, on continuous curves which define the boundary of the active devices. Both the cloaking and illusion effects are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  8. A Simple Grammar Defines Activating and Repressing cis-Regulatory Elements in Photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. White

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors often activate and repress different target genes in the same cell. How activation and repression are encoded by different arrangements of transcription factor binding sites in cis-regulatory elements is poorly understood. We investigated how sites for the transcription factor CRX encode both activation and repression in photoreceptors by assaying thousands of genomic and synthetic cis-regulatory elements in wild-type and Crx−/− retinas. We found that sequences with high affinity for CRX repress transcription, whereas sequences with lower affinity activate. This rule is modified by a cooperative interaction between CRX sites and sites for the transcription factor NRL, which overrides the repressive effect of high affinity for CRX. Our results show how simple rearrangements of transcription factor binding sites encode qualitatively different responses to a single transcription factor and explain how CRX plays multiple cis-regulatory roles in the same cell.

  9. Trace Elements in Human Myocardial Infarction Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, P.O.

    1965-05-15

    By means of neutron activation analysis, injured and adjacent uninjured human heart tissue from 12 autopsy cases with myocardial infarction are investigated with respect to the concentration of 23 trace elements. The bulk elements K, Na and P are also determined. A recently developed ion-exchange technique, combined with subsequent y-spectrometry, is used. The following trace elements are determined: Ag, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Zn and W. In the injured tissue compared to the uninjured, calculation on a wet weight basis showed a decrease in Co, Cs, K, Mo, P, Rb and Zn, and an increase in Br, Ca, Ce, La, Na, Sb and Sm. The differences in Ca, La, Mo, P and Zn are dependent on the age of the myocardial infarction, and the regression lines for these elements are given. The concentration of the trace elements in uninjured tissue from infarcted hearts is compared to the concentration of these elements in normal heart tissue, determined in a previous study. In the uninjured tissue from infarcted hearts a decrease is found in Cu and Mo, and an increase in As and Ce.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity and Elemental Composition of Sarcocephalus latifolius Fruits: An Ethnopharmacological Based Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Alsiddig Osama; Sufyan Awadelkarim; Mai Omer; Saga Yasser; Yousra Basher; Thoyba Elmabrouk; Afnan Abdalmaged

    2017-01-01

    Sarcocephalus latifolius have been part of Sudanese ethnomedicine since long time. The current study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Sarcocephalus latifolius fruits and to investigate its elemental composition. The antimicrobial activities of the ethanolic crude extract and solvents fractions (hexane chloroform, acetone and aqua’s) were investigated by the disk diffusion method. These fractions were further screened for the presence of eight secondary metabolites using...

  11. Bio-active trace elements (cd, cu, fe, ni) in the oligotrophic south china sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, L.-S.; Jiann, K.-T.; Liu, K.-K.

    2003-04-01

    Bio-active trace elements (Cu, Ni, Cd, Fe) in seawater play a critical role in regulating oceanic phytoplankton growth and, hence, may influence global carbon cycle. However, their in-situ speciation and bio-reactivity are poorly understood. Dissolved copper and nickel are believed to be present in seawater predominantly as low molecular weight soluble organic complexes which are readily available to marine organism and immune from particle scavenging. Dissolved iron is believed to exist predominantly as high molecular weight colloidal species. Using ultraclean ultrafiltration and ion exchange/affinity chelating chemistry, we demonstrate that in the oligotrophic ocean waters, these four bio-active elements have distinctive characteristics of speciation and reactivity, even though they display similar nutrient-type distributions. For dissolved Cu, the concentration increased from 0.9 nM in the surface water to 3 nM at depths below 500 m; for dissolved Ni, 2˜9 nM; for dissolved Cd, 0.01˜0.9 nM; for dissolved Fe, 0.1˜0.6 nM. All four elements showed a subsurface minimum around 60 m deep, which corresponded to the subsurface Chl a maximum, indicating strong biological interactions with these elements. Detailed analysis revealed distinct size distribution and chemical reactivity for each element. For Cu, more than 50% in surface water was in smaller than 1kDa labile forms; the strongly complexed inert form increased from 28% at surface to 50% below 500 meter; the colloidal form Cu decreased from 12% at surface to a minimum of 6% at 60 meter, and then gradually increased to 16% in deeper water. For Ni, more than 80% was in smaller than 1kDa labile form, and very small fraction (˜5%) in colloidal from. For Cd, almost all dissolved fraction was in smaller than 1kDa labile form. As for Fe, its dynamic nature in water column caused by complicated bio-interactions was evident. This study indicated that, with preferential uptake of trace elements by different phytoplankton

  12. Pin1 associates with and induces translocation of CRTC2 to the cytosol, thereby suppressing cAMP-responsive element transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Ono, Hiraku; Fujishiro, Midori; Horike, Nanao; Yoneda, Masayasu; Ohno, Haruya; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Kamata, Hideaki; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitomo; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kurihara, Hiroki; Uchida, Takafumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2010-10-22

    Pin1 is a unique regulator, which catalyzes the conversion of a specific phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro-containing motif in target proteins. Herein, we identified CRTC2 as a Pin1-binding protein by overexpressing Pin1 with Myc and FLAG tags in mouse livers and subsequent purification of the complex containing Pin1. The association between Pin1 and CRTC2 was observed not only in overexpression experiments but also endogenously in the mouse liver. Interestingly, Ser(136) in the nuclear localization signal of CRTC2 was shown to be involved in the association with Pin1. Pin1 overexpression in HepG2 cells attenuated forskolin-induced nuclear localization of CRTC2 and cAMP-responsive element (CRE) transcriptional activity, whereas gene knockdown of Pin1 by siRNA enhanced both. Pin1 also associated with CRTC1, leading to their cytosol localization, essentially similar to the action of CRTC2. Furthermore, it was shown that CRTC2 associated with Pin1 did not bind to CREB. Taken together, these observations indicate the association of Pin1 with CRTC2 to decrease the nuclear CBP·CRTC·CREB complex. Indeed, adenoviral gene transfer of Pin1 into diabetic mice improved hyperglycemia in conjunction with normalizing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA expression levels, which is regulated by CRE transcriptional activity. In conclusion, Pin1 regulates CRE transcriptional activity, by associating with CRTC1 or CRTC2.

  13. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  14. An upstream activation element exerting differential transcriptional activation on an archaeal promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Nan; Xia, Qiu; Chen, Zhengjun

    2009-01-01

    Summary Microorganisms can utilize different sugars as energy and carbon sources and the genes involved in sugar metabolism often exhibit highly regulated expression. To study cis-acting elements controlling arabinose-responsive expression in archaea, the promoter of the Sulfolobus solfataricus a...

  15. A Study of HTML Title Tag Creation Behavior of Academic Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noruzi, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    The HTML title tag information should identify and describe exactly what a Web page contains. This paper analyzes the "Title element" and raises a significant question: "Why is the title tag important?" Search engines base search results and page rankings on certain criteria. Among the most important criteria is the presence of the search keywords…

  16. A Study of HTML Title Tag Creation Behavior of Academic Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noruzi, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    The HTML title tag information should identify and describe exactly what a Web page contains. This paper analyzes the "Title element" and raises a significant question: "Why is the title tag important?" Search engines base search results and page rankings on certain criteria. Among the most important criteria is the presence of the search keywords…

  17. Sun-tracking optical element realized using thermally activated transparency-switching material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoleris, Harry; Stefancich, Marco; Lilliu, Samuele; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-07-27

    We present a proof of concept demonstration of a novel optical element: a light-responsive aperture that can track a moving light beam. The element is created using a thermally-activated transparency-switching material composed of paraffin wax and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Illumination of the material with a focused beam causes the formation of a localized transparency at the focal spot location, due to local heating caused by absorption of a portion of the incident light. An application is proposed in a new design for a self-tracking solar collector.

  18. DMPD: Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1492121 Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements ...html) (.csml) Show Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting ...DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. PubmedID 1492121 Title Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role

  19. Writingmatrix: Connecting Students with Blogs, Tags, and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Vance; Quintana, Nelba; Zeinstejer, Rita; Sirk, Sasa; Molero, Doris; Arena, Carla

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an extensive online project, Writingmatrix [http://writingmatrix.wikispaces.com], involving several key elements essential to collaboration in Web 2.0, such as aggregation, tagging, and social networking. Participant teachers in several different countries--Argentina, Venezuela, and Slovenia--had their adult students at…

  20. Tagging behaviour with support from controlled vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Høj, Anne Lyhne; Madsen, Line Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags) and an enha......The paper investigates how knowledge structures from a controlled vocabulary affect tagging. The study is a comparative analysis of tags assigned in two tagging systems, a simple tagging system (control system) that provides suggestions from two tag clouds (all users tags and my tags...... vocabulary might help taggers in being more specific in their tagging, allowing more precise information searching based on user tags. In addition, the results indicate that structured controlled suggestions might encourage taggers to add synonym variations enhancing the variety and number of access points....... Furthermore, controlled vocabularies might be useful for automatic spell checking. Future study should explore in what direction the different kinds of suggestions lead the tagger and whether it is possible to identify scope or patterns between related tags from the two systems....

  1. Finite element analysis and validation of dielectric elastomer actuators used for active origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Kevin; Ahmed, Saad; Frecker, Mary; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    2014-09-01

    The field of active origami explores the incorporation of active materials into origami-inspired structures in order to serve as a means of actuation. Active origami-inspired structures capable of folding into complex three-dimensional (3D) shapes have the potential to be lightweight and versatile compared to traditional methods of actuation. This paper details the finite element analysis and experimental validation of unimorph actuators. Actuators are fabricated by adhering layers of electroded dielectric elastomer (3M VHB F9473PC) onto a passive substrate layer (3M Magic Scotch Tape). Finite element analysis of the actuators simulates the electromechanical coupling of the dielectric elastomer under an applied voltage by applying pressures to the surfaces of the dielectric elastomer where the compliant electrode (conductive carbon grease) is present. 3D finite element analysis of the bending actuators shows that applying contact boundary conditions to the electroded region of the active and passive layers provides better agreement to experimental data compared to modeling the entire actuator as continuous. To improve the applicability of dielectric elastomer-based actuators for active origami-inspired structures, folding actuators are developed by taking advantage of localized deformation caused by a passive layer with non-uniform thickness. Two-dimensional analysis of the folding actuators shows that agreement to experimental data diminishes as localized deformation increases. Limitations of using pressures to approximate the electromechanical coupling of the dielectric elastomer under an applied electric field and additional modeling considerations are also discussed.

  2. Compilation of HPSG to TAG

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, R; Netter, K; Vijay-Shanker, K; Kasper, Robert; Kiefer, Bernd; Netter, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    We present an implemented compilation algorithm that translates HPSG into lexicalized feature-based TAG, relating concepts of the two theories. While HPSG has a more elaborated principle-based theory of possible phrase structures, TAG provides the means to represent lexicalized structures more explicitly. Our objectives are met by giving clear definitions that determine the projection of structures from the lexicon, and identify maximal projections, auxiliary trees and foot nodes.

  3. EXPRESSION OF SV40 Tag AND FORMATION Tag-p53 AND Tag-Rb COMPLEXES IN CHINESE BRAIN TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of SV40 Tag andformation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes in Chinese brain tumors. Methods: SV40 large tumor antigen (Tag) were investigated by immunoprecipitation, silver staining and Western blot in 65 cases of Chinese brain tumors and 8 cases of normal brain tissues. Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes were screened by the same way in 20 and 15 Tag positive tumor tissues respectively. Results: Tag was found in all of 8 ependymomas and 2 choroid plexus papillomas, 90% (9/10) of pituitary adenomas, 73% (11/15) of astrocytomas, 70% (7/10) of meningiomas, 50% (4/8) of glioblastoma multiform, 33% (2/6) of medulloblastomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 1 pineocytoma and 8 normal brain tissues were negative for Tag. Tag-p53 complex was detected in all of 20 Tag positive tumors as well as Tag-Rb complex in all of 15 Tag positive tumors. Conclusion: SV40 Tag is not only expressed in human brain tumors, but also it can form specific complexes with tumor suppressors p53 and Rb. SV40 is correlated to human brain tumorigenesis. The inactivation of p53 and Rb due to the formation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes is possibly an important mechanism in the etiopathogenesis of human brain tumors.

  4. Active Vibration Control of a Railway Vehicle Carbody Using Piezoelectric Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molatefi, Habibollah; Ayoubi, Pejman; Mozafari, Hozhabr

    2017-07-01

    In recent years and according to modern transportation development, rail vehicles are manufactured lighter to achieve higher speed and lower transportation costs. On the other hand, weight reduction of rail vehicles leads to increase the structural vibration. In this study, Active Vibration Control of a rail vehicle using piezoelectric elements is investigated. The optimal control employed as the control approach regard to the first two modes of vibration. A simplified Car body structure is modeled in Matlab using the finite element theory by considering six DOF beam element and then the Eigen functions and mode shapes are derived. The surface roughness of different classes of rail tracks have been obtained using random vibration theory and applied to the secondary suspension as the excitation of the structure; Then piezoelectric mounted where the greatest moments were captured. The effectiveness of Piezoelectric in structural vibrations attenuation of car body is demonstrated through the state space equations and its effect on modal coefficient.

  5. Neutron activation analysis for assessing the concentrations of trace elements in laboratory detergents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, F.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to assess the concentration of 20 elements in the following laboratory detergents: Micro, Cavi-Clean liquid, RBS-35, Liqui-Nox, Treg-A-Zyme, Alcojet, Alconox, Alcotabs and Radiacwash: and a detergent additive: CaviClean additive. The upper detected limits or the concentration ranges for the detergents are (element concentration in ..mu..g/g): Ba, <20; Ce, <0.8; Cl, 27-10000; Co, <0.1; Cr, <1; Cs, <0.6; Eu, <0.009; Fe, <3-45; Hf, <0.07; Mn, <10; Ni, <5; Rb, <0.08-0.89; Sb, <0.006-1.8; Sc, <0.0003-0.008; Se, <0.05; Sr <30; Th, <0.6; U, <0.1; V, <10; Zn, <0.2-2.0. The concentrations of trace elements in the examined laboratory detergents are below those reported in the literature for household detergents.

  6. Routine determination of trace elements in fly ashes by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szopa, Z.; Dybczynski, R.; Kulisa, K.; Sterlinski, S. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    A method making possible routine determination of 24 trace elements in fly ashes by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is described. The method employs elemental standards, and the correction for neutron flux gradient in the irradiation package is performed with the aid of Au flux monitors. Important features of the method as: detectability, precision and accuracy are discussed in detail. Reliability of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of several certified reference materials (CRMs). Special attention was devoted to comparison of the experimentally obtained detection limits with those predicted by computer spectra simulation (CSS) method. The elemental enrichment factors calculated for Polish coal fly ash were compared with those typical for Chinese and Canadian fly ashes. (author). 21 refs, 7 figs.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of a Fluid Filled Cylindrical Shell with Active Constrained Layer Damping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; ZHANG Zhi-yi; TONG Zong-peng; HUA Hong-xing

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the piezoelectric theory, Mindlin plate theory, viscoelastic theory and ideal fluid equa tion, the finite element modeling of a fluid-filled cylindrical shell with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) was discussed. Energy methods and Lagrange's equation were used to obtain dynamic equations of the cylindrical shell with ACLD treatments, which was modeled as well with the finite element method. The GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method was applied to model the frequency dependent damping of viscoelastic material. Ideal and incompressible fluid was considered to establish the dynamic equations of the fluid-filled cylindrical shell with ACLD treatments, Numerical results obtained from the finite element analysis were compared with those from an experiment. The comparison shows that the proposed modeling method is accurate and reliable.

  8. Elemental characterization of the Avogadro silicon crystal WASO 04 by neutron activation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Giordani, Laura; Mana, Giovanni; Massa, Enrico; Oddone, Massimo; 10.1088/0026-1394/49/6/696

    2013-01-01

    Analytical measurements of the 28Si crystal used for the determination of the Avogadro constant are essential to prevent biased results or under-estimated uncertainties. A review of the existing data confirms the high-purity of silicon with respect to a large number of elements. In order to obtain a direct evidence of purity, we developed a relative analytical method based on neutron activation. As a preliminary test, this method was applied to a sample of the Avogadro crystal WASO 04. The investigation concerned twenty-nine elements. The mass fraction of Au was quantified to be 1.03(18) x 10-12. For the remaining twenty-eight elements, the mass fractions are below the detection limits, which range between 1 x 10-12 and 1 x 10-5.

  9. High-Performance Annotation Tagging over Solr Full-text Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we focus on the problem of “annotation tagging” over Information Spaces of objects stored in a full-text index. In such a scenario, tags are assigned to objects by “data curator” users with the purpose of classification, while generic end-users will perceive tags as searchable and browsable object properties. To carry out their activities, data curators need “annotation tagging tools” which allow them to “bulk” tag or untag large sets of objects in temporary work sessions, where they can “virtually” and in “real-time” experiment the effect of their actions before making the changes visible to end-users. The implementation of these tools over full-text indexes is a challenge, since bulk object updates in this context are far from being real-time and in critical cases may slow down index performance. We devised TagTick, a tool which offers to data curators a fully functional annotation tagging environment over the full-text index Apache Solr, regarded as a “de-facto standard” in this area. TagTick consists of a TagTick Virtualizer module, which extends the APIs of Solr to support real-time, virtual, bulk-tagging operations, and a TagTick User Interface module, which offers end-user functionalities for annotation tagging. The tool scales optimally with the number and size of bulk tag operations, without compromising index performance.

  10. Simplified, Enhanced Protein Purification Using an Inducible, Autoprocessing Enzyme Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Aimee; Lupardus, Patrick J.; Morell, Montse; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Sadaghiani, A. Masoud; Garcia, K. Christopher; Bogyo, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new method for purifying recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria using a highly specific, inducible, self-cleaving protease tag. This tag is comprised of the Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin cysteine protease domain (CPD), an autoprocessing enzyme that cleaves exclusively after a leucine residue within the target protein-CPD junction. Importantly, V. cholerae CPD is specifically activated by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), a eukaryotic-specific small molecule that is absent from the bacterial cytosol. As a result, when His6-tagged CPD is fused to the C-terminus of target proteins and expressed in Escherichia coli, the full-length fusion protein can be purified from bacterial lysates using metal ion affinity chromatography. Subsequent addition of InsP6 to the immobilized fusion protein induces CPD-mediated cleavage at the target protein-CPD junction, releasing untagged target protein into the supernatant. This method condenses affinity chromatography and fusion tag cleavage into a single step, obviating the need for exogenous protease addition to remove the fusion tag(s) and increasing the efficiency of tag separation. Furthermore, in addition to being timesaving, versatile, and inexpensive, our results indicate that the CPD purification system can enhance the expression, integrity, and solubility of intractable proteins from diverse organisms. PMID:19956581

  11. Simplified, enhanced protein purification using an inducible, autoprocessing enzyme tag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    Full Text Available We introduce a new method for purifying recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria using a highly specific, inducible, self-cleaving protease tag. This tag is comprised of the Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin cysteine protease domain (CPD, an autoprocessing enzyme that cleaves exclusively after a leucine residue within the target protein-CPD junction. Importantly, V. cholerae CPD is specifically activated by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6, a eukaryotic-specific small molecule that is absent from the bacterial cytosol. As a result, when His(6-tagged CPD is fused to the C-terminus of target proteins and expressed in Escherichia coli, the full-length fusion protein can be purified from bacterial lysates using metal ion affinity chromatography. Subsequent addition of InsP(6 to the immobilized fusion protein induces CPD-mediated cleavage at the target protein-CPD junction, releasing untagged target protein into the supernatant. This method condenses affinity chromatography and fusion tag cleavage into a single step, obviating the need for exogenous protease addition to remove the fusion tag(s and increasing the efficiency of tag separation. Furthermore, in addition to being timesaving, versatile, and inexpensive, our results indicate that the CPD purification system can enhance the expression, integrity, and solubility of intractable proteins from diverse organisms.

  12. Elemental characterization of Mt. Sinabung volcanic ash, Indonesia by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartini, I.; Syahfitri, W. Y. N.; Kurniawati, S.; Lestiani, D. D.; Santoso, M.

    2017-06-01

    Mount Sinabung is a volcano located in North Sumatera, Indonesia which has been recorded not erupted since 1600. However in 2013 it has been erupted and cause of black thick smog, rain sand and volcanic ash. Volcanic ash containing trace elements material that can be utilized in various applications but still has potential danger of heavy metals. In order to obtain an elemental composition data of volcanic ash, the characterization of volcanic ash were carried out using Neutron Activation Analysis. The volcanic ash was taken from Mt. Sinabung eruption. Samples were irradiated at the rabbit system in the reactor G.A Siwabessy facilities with neutron flux ˜ 1013 n.cm-2.s-1 and then counted using HPGe detector. Method validation was carried out by SRM NIST Coal Fly Ash 1633b and NIST 2711a Montana II Soil with recovery values were in the range of 96-108% and 95-106% respectively. The results showed that major elements; Al, Na, Ca and Fe, concentrations were 8.7, 1.05, 2.98 and 7.44 %, respectively, minor elements K, Mg, Mn, Ti, V and Zn were 0.87%, 0.78%, 0.18%, 0.62%, 197.13 ppm and 109.35 ppm, respectively, heavy metals; As, Cr, Co and Sb, contents were 4.48, 11.75, 17.13 and 0.35 ppm, respectively while rare earth elements such as Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Yb were 45.33, 1.22, 19.63, 20.34, 3.86, and 2.57 ppm respectively. The results of the elemental contents of volcanic ash that has been obtained can be used as the scientific based data for volcanic material utilization by considering the economic potential of elements contained and also the danger of the heavy metals content.

  13. GALAH Survey: Chemically Tagging the Thick Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J; Freeman, K

    2015-01-01

    The GALAH survey targets one million stars in the southern hemisphere down to a limiting magnitude of V = 14 at the Anglo- Australian Telescope. The project aims to measure up to 30 elemental abundances and radial velocities (~1 km/s accuracy) for each star at a resolution of R = 28000. These elements fall into 8 independent groups (e.g. alpha, Fe peak, r-process). For all stars, Gaia will provide distances to 1% and transverse velocities to 1 km/s or better, giving us a 14D set of parameters for each star, i.e. 6D phase space and 8D abundance space. There are many scientic applications but here we focus on the prospect of chemically tagging the thick disk and making a direct measurement of how stellar migration evolves with cosmic time.

  14. Elemental Characterization of Romanian Crop Medicinal Plants by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Radu Ioan; Savii, Cecilia; Dehelean, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The metallic elements concentrations of medicinal plants (coriander, dill, Echinacea, lavender, chamomile, mint, and plantain, used for phytopharmaceutical products), cultivated in unpolluted region, were analyzed by neutron activation analysis. The essential nutrients, macro-, micro-, and trace elements (K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Rb, Sr, and Zn), potentially toxic elements (Al, As, Ba, Co, Sb, Cr, and V), and rare earth elements were monitored and were compared with those presented in the literature. An estimation of their contributions to intake and toxicity for a person was made, which revealed that (a) teas prepared from the examined plants represent useful contribution to the food provided intake of three essential macronutrients (K, Ca, and Mg); (b) the Cu, Mn, Rb, Sr, Zn, and rare earths levels are normal or low; (c) the quantities of As, Ba, Co, Sb, Cr, and V do not represent toxicological concerns; (d) the examination of the estimated Al and Fe quantities recovered in infusions in the conditions of usual daily tea consumption is below the Tolerable Daily Intake values. The strategy of cultivation of medicinal plants in unpolluted areas is efficient and beneficial. However, individual plants ability to concentrate preferentially certain elements suggests controlling the contamination level of raw materials. PMID:28630784

  15. Determination of essential elements in herbal extracts by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisconi, Lucilaine S.; Goncalves, Rodolfo D.M.R.; Silva, Paulo S.C. da, E-mail: lfrancisconi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Different types of therapies have been introduced as an alternative treatment to various types of human disorders, among them,the use of herbal teas have been highlighted due to its low cost, easiness of acquisition and administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of the elements As, Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, K, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis in extracts of medicinal plants whose use is regulated by ANVISA. The relevance of this analysis is justified by the need of contributing to the recommendation of these plants as secure sources of mineral elements both for therapeutic and dietary purpose. The technique showed good sensitivity in determining the appropriate concentration of all the determined elements. Elements potentially toxic were found at concentration that do not present threats to the organism and the elements that present important roles in metabolism were determined at concentrations that can assist both therapeutic and nutritional purposes. (author)

  16. Oriented Immobilization of His-Tagged Protein on a Redox Active Thiol Derivative of DPTA-Cu(II Layer Deposited on a Gold Electrode—The Base of Electrochemical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of Aβ16–23' and Aβ1–40 peptides. The His-tagged V and VC1 domains of Receptor for Advanced Glycation end Products (RAGE immobilized on a gold electrode surface were used as analytically active molecules. The immobilization of His6–RAGE domains consists of: (i formation of a mixed layer of N-acetylcysteamine (NAC and the thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA; (ii complexation of Cu(II by DPTA; (iii oriented immobilization of His6–RAGE domains via coordination bonds between Cu(II sites from DPTA–Cu(II complex and imidazole nitrogen atoms of a histidine tag. Each modification step was controlled by cyclic voltammetry (CV, Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The applicability of the proposed biosensor was tested in the presence of human plasma, which had no influence on its performance. The detection limits for Aβ1–40 determination were 1.06 nM and 0.80 nM, in the presence of buffer and human plasma, respectively. These values reach the concentration level of Aβ1–40 which is relevant for determination of its soluble form in human plasma, as well as in brain. This indicates the promising future application of biosensor presented for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Time-Tag Generation Script

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan E.

    2010-01-01

    Time-Tag Generation Script (TTaGS) is an application program, written in the AWK scripting language, for generating commands for aiming one Ku-band antenna and two S-band antennas for communicating with spacecraft. TTaGS saves between 2 and 4 person-hours per every 24 hours by automating the repetitious process of building between 150 and 180 antenna-control commands. TTaGS reads a text database of communication satellite schedules and a text database of satellite rise and set times and cross-references items in the two databases. It then compares the scheduled start and stop with the geometric rise and set to compute the times to execute antenna control commands. While so doing, TTaGS determines whether to generate commands for guidance, navigation, and control computers to tell them which satellites to track. To help prevent Ku-band irradiation of the Earth, TTaGS accepts input from the user about horizon tolerance and accordingly restricts activation and effects deactivation of the transmitter. TTaGS can be modified easily to enable tracking of additional satellites and for such other tasks as reading Sun-rise/set tables to generate commands to point the solar photovoltaic arrays of the International Space Station at the Sun.

  18. Affinity Purification of Protein Complexes Using TAP Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    This protocol is used for the isolation and analysis of protein complexes using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag system. The protocol describes the purification of a protein fused to a TAP tag comprised of two protein A domains and the calmodulin binding peptide separated by a TEV cleavage site. This is a powerful technique for rapid purification of protein complexes and the analysis of their stoichiometric composition, posttranslational modifications, structure, and functional activities. PMID:26096502

  19. DEVICE FOR MEASURING OF THERMAL LENS PARAMETERS IN LASER ACTIVE ELEMENTS WITH A PROBE BEAM METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zakharova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a device for measuring of parameters of thermal lens (TL in laser active elements under longitudinal diode pumping. The measurements are based on the probe beam method. This device allows one to determine sign and optical power of the lens in the principal meridional planes, its sensitivity factor with respect to the absorbed pump power and astigmatism degree, fractional heat loading which make it possible to estimate integral impact of the photoelastic effect to the formation of TL in the laser element. The measurements are performed in a linearly polarized light at the wavelength of 532 nm. Pumping of the laser element is performed at 960 nm that makes it possible to study laser materials doped with Yb3+ and (Er3+, Yb3+ ions. The precision of measurements: for sensitivity factor of TL – 0,1 m-1/W, for astigmatism degree – 0,2 m-1/W, for fractional heat loading – 5 %, for the impact of the photoelastic effect – 0,5 × 10-6 K-1. This device is used for characterization of thermal lens in the laser active element from an yttrium vanadate crystal, Er3+,Yb3+:YVO .

  20. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from

  1. Finite element formulation and analysis for an arterial wall with residual and active stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Naoki; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-08-01

    In this study, for predicting arterial function and pathogenesis from a mechanical viewpoint, we develop a continuum mechanical model of an arterial wall that embodies residual and active stresses following a traditional anisotropic passive constitutive law. The residual and active stresses are incorporated into finite element methods based on a two-field variational principle described in the Lagrangian form. The linearisation of nonlinear weak-form equations derived from this variational principle is then described for developing an original finite element algorithm. Numerical simulations reveal the following: (i) residual stresses lead to a reduction in stress gradient regardless of the magnitude of external load; (ii) active stresses help homogenise stress distribution under physiological external load, but this homogeneity collapses under pathological external load; (iii) when residual and active stresses act together, the effect of the residual stresses is relatively obscured by that of the active stresses. We conclude that residual stresses have minor but persistent mechanical effects on the arterial wall under both physiological and pathological external loads; active stresses play an important role in the physiological functions and pathogenesis of arteries, and the mechanical effect of residual stresses is dependent on the presence/absence of active stresses.

  2. Semantic Analysis of Tag Similarity Measures in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cattuto, Ciro; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Social bookmarking systems allow users to organise collections of resources on the Web in a collaborative fashion. The increasing popularity of these systems as well as first insights into their emergent semantics have made them relevant to disciplines like knowledge extraction and ontology learning. The problem of devising methods to measure the semantic relatedness between tags and characterizing it semantically is still largely open. Here we analyze three measures of tag relatedness: tag co-occurrence, cosine similarity of co-occurrence distributions, and FolkRank, an adaptation of the PageRank algorithm to folksonomies. Each measure is computed on tags from a large-scale dataset crawled from the social bookmarking system del.icio.us. To provide a semantic grounding of our findings, a connection to WordNet (a semantic lexicon for the English language) is established by mapping tags into synonym sets of WordNet, and applying there well-known metrics of semantic similarity. Our results clearly expose differe...

  3. A Novel Triethylphosphonium Charge Tag on Peptides: Synthesis, Derivatization, and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Ward, Sarah A.; Reilly, James P.

    2017-09-01

    Charge tagging is a peptide derivatization process that commonly localizes a positive charge on the N-terminus. Upon low energy activation (e.g., collision-induced dissociation or post-source decay) of charge tagged peptides, relatively few fragment ions are produced due to the absence of mobile protons. In contrast, high energy fragmentation, such as 157 nm photodissociation, typically leads to a series of a-type ions. Disadvantages of existing charge tags are that they can produce mobile protons or that they are undesirably large and bulky. Here, we investigate a small triethylphosphonium charge tag with two different linkages: amide (158 Da) and amidine bonds (157 Da). Activation of peptides labeled with a triethylphosphonium charge tag through an amide bond can lead to loss of the charge tag and the production of protonated peptides. This enables low intensity fragment ions from both the protonated and charge tagged peptides to be observed. Triethylphosphonium charge tagged peptides linked through an amidine bond are more stable. Post-source decay and photodissociation yield product ions that primarily contain the charge tag. Certain amidine induced fragments are also observed. The previously reported tris(trimethoxyphenyl) phosphonium acetic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester charge tag shows a similar fragment ion distribution, but the mass of the triethylphosphonium tag label is 415 Da smaller. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  5. Luminous exothermic hollow optical elements for enhancement of biofilm growth and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Zhong, Lianchao; Li, Shan; Luo, Binbin; Tang, Bin; Song, Tao; Shi, Shenghui; Hu, Xinyu; Xin, Xin; Wu, Ruohua; Cen, Yanyan; Wang, Zhengkun

    2017-03-20

    In this work, we present a luminous-exothermic hollow optical element (LEHOE) that performs spectral beam splitting in the visible spectral range for the enhancement of biofilm growth and activity. The LEHOE is composed of a four-layer structure with a fiber core (air), cladding (SiO2), coating I (LaB6 film), and coating II (SiO2-Agarose-Medium film). To clarify the physical, optical and photothermal conversion properties of the LEHOE, we determined the surface morphology and composition of the coating materials, and examined the luminous intensity and heating rate at the LEHOE surface. The biofilm activity on the biocompatible LEHOE is far greater than that of commercial fibers, and the biofilm weight on the LEHOE is 4.5 × that of the uncoated hollow optical element.

  6. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Los, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Pena, C.; Presutti, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-08-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  7. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  8. Biochar application to hardrock mine tailings: Soil quality, microbial activity, and toxic element sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Charlene N.; Peltz, Christopher D.; Stanton, Mark R.; Rutherford, David W.; Rostad, Colleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Waste rock piles from historic mining activities remain unvegetated as a result of metal toxicity and high acidity. Biochar has been proposed as a low-cost remediation strategy to increase soil pH and reduce leaching of toxic elements, and improve plant establishment. In this laboratory column study, biochar made from beetle-killed pine wood was assessed for utility as a soil amendment by mixing soil material from two mine sites collected near Silverton, Colorado, USA with four application rates of biochar (0%, 10%, 20%, 30% vol:vol). Columns were leached seven times over 65 days and leachate pH and concentration of toxic elements and base cations were measured at each leaching. Nutrient availability and soil physical and biological parameters were determined following the incubation period. We investigated the hypotheses that biochar incorporation into acidic mine materials will (1) reduce toxic element concentrations in leaching solution, (2) improve soil parameters (i.e. increase nutrient and water holding capacity and pH, and decrease compaction), and (3) increase microbial populations and activity. Biochar directly increased soil pH (from 3.33 to 3.63 and from 4.07 to 4.77 in the two materials) and organic matter content, and decreased bulk density and extractable salt content in both mine materials, and increased nitrate availability in one material. No changes in microbial population or activity were detected in either mine material upon biochar application. In leachate solution, biochar increased base cations from both materials and reduced the concentrations of Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in leachate solution from one material. However, in the material with greater toxic element content, biochar did not reduce concentrations of any measured dissolved toxic elements in leachate and resulted in a potentially detrimental release of Cd and Zn into solution at concentrations above that of the pure mine material. The length of time of effectiveness and specific

  9. Tempting To Tag: An Experimental Comparison Of Four Tagging Input Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Melenhorst

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagging helps achieve improved indexing and recommendation of resources (e.g., videos or pictures in large data collections. In order to reap the benefits of tagging, people must be persuaded to label the resources they consume. This paper reports on a study in which four different tagging input mechanisms and their effect on users' motivation to tag were compared. The mechanisms consisted of a standard tag input box, a chatbot-like environment, a bookmarking mechanism, and a "tag and vote" game. The results of our experiment show that the use of the nonstandard tagging input mechanisms does not affect users' motivation to tag. In some instances tagging mechanisms were found to distract users from their primary task: consuming resources. Persuading people to tag might be accomplished more effectively by using other motivating tagging mechanisms (e.g., tagging games, or motivation could be created by explaining the usefulness of tagging.

  10. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare earth elements in peridotitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joron, J.L. (Laboratoire d' Analyse par Activation Pierre Sue, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Ottonello, G. (Consiglio Nationale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Ist. di Petrografia)

    1985-02-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation analytical method based on various methods published earlier was used to determine rare earth elements (REE). The method involves a post-irradiation sample fusion, two separate ion-exchange chromatographic stages, and, finally, a fluoride precipitation. The RNAA procedure is capable of providing very precise REE data for peridotitic samples and was used for the analysis of rocks from several geodynamic environments.

  11. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A., E-mail: ronzhin@fnal.gov [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Los, S.; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kim, H. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  12. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M; Yeo, Gene W; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2012-09-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration.

  13. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  14. Extended-Range Passive RFID and Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Lin, Gregory Y.; Barton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Extended-range passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and related sensor tags are undergoing development. A tag of this type incorporates a retroreflective antenna array, so that it reflects significantly more signal power back toward an interrogating radio transceiver than does a comparable passive RFID tag of prior design, which does not incorporate a retroreflective antenna array. Therefore, for a given amount of power radiated by the transmitter in the interrogating transceiver, a tag of this type can be interrogated at a distance greater than that of the comparable passive RFID or sensor tag of prior design. The retroreflective antenna array is, more specifically, a Van Atta array, named after its inventor and first published in a patent issued in 1959. In its simplest form, a Van Atta array comprises two antenna elements connected by a transmission line so that the signal received by each antenna element is reradiated by the other antenna element (see Figure 1). The phase relationships among the received and reradiated signals are such as to produce constructive interference of the reradiated signals; that is, to concentrate the reradiated signal power in a direction back toward the source. Hence, an RFID tag equipped with a Van Atta antenna array automatically tracks the interrogating transceiver. The effective gain of a Van Atta array is the same as that of a traditional phased antenna array having the same number of antenna elements. Additional pairs of antenna elements connected by equal-length transmission lines can be incorporated into a Van Atta array to increase its directionality. Like some RFID tags here-to-fore commercially available, an RFID or sensor tag of the present developmental type includes one-port surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices. In simplified terms, the mode of operation of a basic one-port SAW device as used heretofore in an RFID device is the following: An interrogating radio signal is converted, at an input end, from

  15. Construction and Application of Efficient Ac-Ds Transposon Tagging Vectors in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohong Qu; Jong-Seong Jeon; Pieter B.F.Ouwerkerk; Maria Bellizzi; Jan Leach; Pamela Ronald; Guo-Liang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Transposons are effective mutagens alternative to T-DNA for the generation of insertional mutants in many plant species including those whose transformation is inefficient. The current strategies of transposon tagging are usually slow and labor-intensive and yield low frequency of tagged lines. We have constructed a series of transposon tagging vectors based on three approaches: (ⅰ) AcTPase controlled by glucocorticoid binding domainNP16 acidic activation domain/Gal4 DNA-binding domain (GVG) chemical-inducible expression system; (ⅱ) deletion of AcTPase via Cre-lox site-specific recombination that was initially triggered by Ds excision; and (ⅲ) suppression of early transposition events in transformed rice callus through a dual.functional hygromycin resistance gene in a novel Ds element (HPT-Ds). We tested these vectors in transgenic rice and characterized the transposition events. Our results showed that these vectors are useful resources for functional genomics of rice and other crop plants. The vectors are freely available for the community.

  16. Quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri: essential elements for activation of the luminescence genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A M; Greenberg, E. P.

    1997-01-01

    LuxR is required for cell density-dependent activation of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence (lux) genes. It has not been possible to study full-length LuxR in vitro, but a polypeptide containing the C-terminal transcriptional-activator domain of LuxR (LuxRdeltaN) has been purified, and its binding to lux regulatory DNA has been investigated. By itself, LuxRdeltaN interacts with a region of lux regulatory DNA that is upstream of the lux box, which is a 20-bp element that is required for LuxR ac...

  17. Studies of depredating sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) off Sitka, AK, using videocameras, tags, and long-range passive acoustic tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Delphine

    This dissertation uses videocameras, tags and acoustic recorders to investigate the diving and acoustic behavior of sperm whales in the Gulf of Alaska during natural and depredation foraging conditions. First, underwater videocamera footage of a sperm whale attacking a fisherman's longline at 100 m depth was used to examine its acoustic behavior at close range and to estimate its size both acoustically and visually. Second, bioacoustic tagging data demonstrated that the same individuals displayed different acoustic behaviors during natural and depredation foraging states. Two broad categories of depredation, "shallow" and "deep," were also identified. These results suggest that passive acoustic monitoring at close ranges may yield useful metrics for quantifying depredation activity. Third, the behavioral reactions of depredating sperm whales to a variety of acoustic playbacks generated at relatively low source levels were investigated using bioacoustic tags. Finally, bioacoustic and satellite tag data were used to develop passive acoustic techniques for tracking sperm whales with a short-aperture two-element vertical array. When numeric sound propagation models were exploited, localization ranges up to 35 km were obtained. The tracking methods were also used to estimate the source levels of sperm whale "clicks" and "creaks", predict the maximum detection range of the signals as a function of sea state, and measure the drift of several whales away from a visual decoy.

  18. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Viola, Haydée

    2015-01-01

    Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT) made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans. PMID:26380117

  19. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Moncada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans.

  20. Comparative measurement of inorganic elements in Korean space foods using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Ryel; Sun, Gwang Min; Moon, Jong Hwa; Choi, Jong Il; Lee, Joo Eun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In April 2008, Korea's first astronaut became a crew member of the international space station and she brought special space versions of traditional Korean dishes such as kimchi, boiled rice, hot red pepper paste, soybean paste soup, ginseng tea, green tea, and ramyun. To date, seventy kinds of Korean space foods (KSFs) have been developed by KAERI. The information and role of trace mineral elements from an intake of created and processed foodstuff are important as a indicator of human health and nutrition, as well as a quality control of food and diet. In particular, special food created for consumption by astronauts in outer space may differ with common food on the earth to compensate a decrease in taste and nutrition by hygienic sterilization processing as well as strong cosmic rays, a state of non gravitation, low pressure, and an enclosed space environment. An accurate quantitative analysis of trace elements in various kinds of biological samples is serious work for analytical data quality. An neutron activation analysis is a sensitive, non destructive, multi elemental analytical method without loss and contamination of a sample by chemical pre treatment. The aim of this study is to identify and to compare the distribution of concentrations for essential and functional inorganic elements in six kinds of Korean space foods developed by KAERI in 2011 using INAA.

  1. Elemental Composition of Different Slovenian Honeys Using k0- Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Urška; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Jaćimović, Radojko; Bertoncelj, Jasna; Golob, Terezija; Korošec, Mojca

    2017-07-01

    The botanical origin of seven types of Slovenian honey was investigated by analysis of their elemental content using k0-instrumental neutron activation analysis. A total of 28 representative samples were collected from beekeepers all over Slovenia in 2 consecutive years. Nineteen of the 37 elements measured were present in amounts above their LOD. The present study suggests that the determination of only alkali elements might be sufficient for the classification of Slovenian honeys according to their botanical origin. Linden and multifloral honeys can be differentiated on the basis of Na content. The differentiation of forest, spruce, and fir honeys is possible on the basis of differences in Cs, K, and Rb content. The difference between Na and Rb content can be used as a discriminating tool between light and dark honeys, because light honeys (black locust, linden, and multifloral) contained more Na than Rb, whereas it was the opposite for dark honeys (chestnut, forest, spruce, and fir). Statistically significant correlations were found between K and Rb and between K and Cs content. This study represents a considerable step in filling the knowledge gap concerning both the determination of elements present in low concentrations and the botanical origin of Slovenian honey.

  2. Determination of Trace Elements in Ghanaian Shea Butter and Shea Nut by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Alhassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to determine the concentrations of trace elements in Ghanaian shea nut and shea butter. As part of the study, measurements of the elemental composition of shea butter and shea nut samples were carried out by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA using the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1. Samples collected from local markets in the Northern region of Ghana and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1547 Peach leaves were irradiated at the GHARR-1 facility. Validation of the method was done using NIST SRM Orchard Leaves (1571 under the same experimental conditions. Six trace elements (Na, Mn, Al, Cl, Ca and K were detected with maximum concentration of Na found to be 15±1 mg/kg in SN5, Mn; 7.4±0.8 mg/kg in SN6, Al; 259±3 mg/kg in SN1, Cl; 666±27 mg/kg in SN1, Ca; 0.21±0.04 wt.% in SN4, K; 2.0±0.04 wt.% in SN1, Ce; 3.2±0.06 mg/kg in SN2, Se; 0.12±0.004 mg/kg in SN4, and Sc; 0.40±0.02 mg/kg in SN2 . The concentrations of the trace elements were within the limit laid down for safe human consumption.

  3. Trace Elements in the Conductive Tissue of Beef Heart Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, P.O.

    1965-08-15

    By means of neutron activation analysis, samples of four beef hearts taken from the bundle of His and adjacent ventricular muscle, the AV node and adjacent atrial muscle are investigated with respect to the concentration of 23 trace elements. The bulk elements K, Na and P are also determined. A recently developed ion-exchange technique, combined with subsequent {gamma}-spectrometry, is used. The following trace elements are determined: Ag, As, Au, Ba, Br, .Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, W and Zn. In the conductive tissue compared to adjacent muscle tissue, calculations on a wet weight basis show a lower concentration of Cs, Cu, Fe, K, P, Rb and Zn in the former, and a higher concentration of Ag, Au, Br, Ca and Na. The mean differences ({mu}g/g wet tissue), as well as their degree of significance, between the bundle of His and adjacent tissue from the ventricular septum, between the AV node and adjacent atrial muscle, between the ventricular septum and the right atrium, and between the bundle of His and the AV node are given for the elements Cu, Fe, K, Na, P and Zn.

  4. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis harbors multiple lineages of transcriptionally active Mutator-like elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Gonçalo AG

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For three decades the Mutator system was thought to be exclusive of plants, until the first homolog representatives were characterized in fungi and in early-diverging amoebas earlier in this decade. Results Here, we describe and characterize four families of Mutator-like elements in a new eukaryotic group, the Parabasalids. These Trichomonas vaginalis Mutator- like elements, or TvMULEs, are active in T. vaginalis and patchily distributed among 12 trichomonad species and isolates. Despite their relatively distinctive amino acid composition, the inclusion of the repeats TvMULE1, TvMULE2, TvMULE3 and TvMULE4 into the Mutator superfamily is justified by sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses. In addition, we identified three new TvMULE-related sequences in the genome sequence of Candida albicans. While TvMULE1 is a member of the MuDR clade, predominantly from plants, the other three TvMULEs, together with the C. albicans elements, represent a new and quite distinct Mutator lineage, which we named TvCaMULEs. The finding of TvMULE1 sequence inserted into other putative repeat suggests the occurrence a novel TE family not yet described. Conclusion These findings expand the taxonomic distribution and the range of functional motif of MULEs among eukaryotes. The characterization of the dynamics of TvMULEs and other transposons in this organism is of particular interest because it is atypical for an asexual species to have such an extreme level of TE activity; this genetic landscape makes an interesting case study for causes and consequences of such activity. Finally, the extreme repetitiveness of the T. vaginalis genome and the remarkable degree of sequence identity within its repeat families highlights this species as an ideal system to characterize new transposable elements.

  5. The effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Scaramal da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthracene is a highly toxic organic compound capable of contaminating water and soils, and biodegradation is an important tool for remediating polluted environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on the activity of the protocatechol 3,4-dioxygenase (P3,4O enzyme produced by the isolate Leifsonia sp. in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The isolate was grown in Luria Bertani broth medium (LB amended with 250 mg L-1 of phenanthrene. Various levels of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-80 °C, time (0-90 min, trace elements (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, and cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, K+ and NH4+ were tested to determine which conditions optimized enzyme activity. In general, the immobilized extract exhibited higher enzyme activity than the cell-free extract in the presence of trace elements and cations. Adding iron yielded the highest relative activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 16 and 99 %, respectively. Copper also increased enzyme activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 8 and 44 %, respectively. Enzyme activity in the phosphate buffer was high across a wide range of pH, reaching 80 % in the pH range between 6.5 and 8.0. The optimum temperatures for enzyme activity differed for cell-free and immobilized extracts, with maximum enzyme activity observed at 35 ºC for the cell-free extract and at 55 ºC for the immobilized extract. The cell-free extract of the P3,4O enzyme exhibited high activity only during the first 3 min of incubation, when it showed 50 % relative activity, and dropped to 0 % after 60 min of incubation. By contrast, activity in the immobilized extract was maintained during 90 min of incubation. This isolate has important characteristics for phenanthrene biodegradation, producing high quantities of the P3,4O enzyme that forms part of the most important pathway for PAH biodegradation.

  6. Analysis of the impact of financial system elements of Ukraine at objects of innovation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Fedyshyn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the influence of the elements of the financial system at objects of innovation activity in Ukraine. The definition of the financing system of innovative activity and characteristics of its basic elements: financing facilities, government institutions and funds at national, regional and local significance and non-state agents are given. The forms of public funding of innovation activities (direct and indirect methods of financial incentives are analyzed. In the article the features of functioning of joint investment institutions and the effectiveness of investments of venture capital funds into innovative activities in Ukraine are viewed. It was found that venture capital is not a basic or sufficient to stimulate high-tech development in Ukraine, since venture capital funds tend to invest in construction, recycling of agricultural production, food processing, retail trade. The analysis of the proportion of funding sources of innovation for 2013-2014 years is made. Proposals for improvement of methods application and means of financing of innovative activity in Ukraine are given.

  7. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  8. Natural tags and markers for tracking and identifying fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Campana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A winning feature of naturally-induced fish tags is their simultaneous appearance on the entire group or population, at no expense to the researcher. The challenge then becomes the search for a marker that is sufficiently distinct that it will allow clear identification of the group of interest. Elemental and isotopic fingerprints, genetic markers, growth patterns recorded in otoliths, and parasites are all examples of natural tags with demonstrated success in identifying and tracking sub-populations, groups and even individuals of teleost fishes. Far less explored are similar applications involving sharks and crustaceans such as lobsters, yet many of the same powerful tracking and identification applications appear to exist for these animals as well. In this talk, I will briefly review some of the established natural tags with proven track records for monitoring the movement of aquatic organisms, before exploring some exciting new possibilities.

  9. Creative elements: network-based predictions of active centres in proteins, cellular and social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Active centres and hot spots of proteins have a paramount importance in enzyme action, protein complex formation and drug design. Recently a number of publications successfully applied the analysis of residue networks to predict active centres in proteins. Most real-world networks show a number of properties, such as small-worldness or scale-free degree distribution, which are rather general features of networks from molecules to the society. Based on extensive analogies I propose that the existing findings and methodology enable us to detect active centres in cells, social networks and ecosystems. Members of these active centres are creative elements of the respective networks, which may help them to survive unprecedented, novel challenges, and play a key role in the development, survival and evolvability of complex systems.

  10. Tag Based Audio Search Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran Vellachu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The volume of the music database is increasing day by day. Getting the required song as per the choice of the listener is a big challenge. Hence, it is really hard to manage this huge quantity, in terms of searching, filtering, through the music database. It is surprising to see that the audio and music industry still rely on very simplistic metadata to describe music files. However, while searching audio resource, an efficient "Tag Based Audio Search Engine" is necessary. The current research focuses on two aspects of the musical databases 1. Tag Based Semantic Annotation Generation using the tag based approach.2. An audio search engine, using which the user can retrieve the songs based on the users choice. The proposed method can be used to annotation and retrieve songs based on musical instruments used , mood of the song, theme of the song, singer, music director, artist, film director, instrument, genre or style and so on.

  11. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector.

  12. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  13. Probabilistic seismic hazard study based on active fault and finite element geodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We present a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) that is exclusively based on active faults and geodynamic finite element input models whereas seismic catalogues were used only in a posterior comparison. We applied the developed model in the External Dinarides, a slow deforming thrust-and-fold belt at the contact between Adria and Eurasia.. is the Our method consists of establishing s two earthquake rupture forecast models: (i) a geological active fault input (GEO) model and, (ii) a finite element (FEM) model. The GEO model is based on active fault database that provides information on fault location and its geometric and kinematic parameters together with estimations on its slip rate. By default in this model all deformation is set to be released along the active faults. The FEM model is based on a numerical geodynamic model developed for the region of study. In this model the deformation is, besides along the active faults, released also in the volumetric continuum elements. From both models we calculated their corresponding activity rates, its earthquake rates and their final expected peak ground accelerations. We investigated both the source model and the earthquake model uncertainties by varying the main active fault and earthquake rate calculation parameters through constructing corresponding branches of the seismic hazard logic tree. Hazard maps and UHS curves have been produced for horizontal ground motion on bedrock conditions VS 30 ≥ 800 m/s), thereby not considering local site amplification effects. The hazard was computed over a 0.2° spaced grid considering 648 branches of the logic tree and the mean value of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years hazard level, while the 5th and 95th percentiles were also computed to investigate the model limits. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to control which of the input parameters influence the final hazard results in which measure. The results of such comparison evidence the deformation model and

  14. The HaloTag: Improving Soluble Expression and Applications in Protein Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Peterson, Scott; Kwon, Keehwan

    2012-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances have been critical for the rapidly evolving field of proteomics. The development of fusion tag systems is essential for purification and analysis of recombinant proteins. The HaloTag is a 34 KDa monomeric protein derived from a bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase. The majority of fusion tags in use today utilize a reversible binding interaction with a specific ligand. The HaloTag system is unique in that it forms a covalent linkage to its chloroalkane ligand. This linkage permits attachment of the HaloTag to a variety of functional reporters, which can be used to label and immobilize recombinant proteins. The success rate for HaloTag expression of soluble proteins is very high and comparable to maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. Furthermore, cleavage of the HaloTag does not result in protein insolubility that often is observed with the MBP tag. In the present report, we describe applications of the HaloTag system in our ongoing investigation of protein-protein interactions of the Y. pestis Type 3 secretion system on a custom protein microarray. We also describe the utilization of affinity purification/mass spectroscopy (AP/MS) to evaluate the utility of the Halo Tag system to characterize DNA binding activity and protein specificity.

  15. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower

  16. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower

  17. Soil pollution with trace elements at selected sites in Romania studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Magurele, Ilfov County (Romania); Carmo Freitas, M. do [Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal); Ene, A. [Dunarea de Jos Univ. of Galati (Romania). Dept. of Chemistry, Physics and Environment; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-03-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine concentrations of 42 elements in samples of surface soil collected at seven sites polluted from various anthropogenic activities and a control site in a relatively clean area. Elements studied were Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Gd, Hf, Hg, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V, W, Yb, Zn, and Zr. The results are compared with data for trace elements atmospheric deposition in lichen transplants from the same sites. The most severe soil contamination was observed at Copsa Mica from non-ferrous metallurgy. Appreciable soil contamination was also indicated at Baia Mare (non-ferrous mining and metallurgy), Deva (coal-fired power plant, cement and building materials industry), Galati (ferrous metallurgy), Magurele and Afumati (general urban pollution), and Oradea (chemical and light industries). In most cases excessive levels of toxic metals in soils matched correspondingly high values in lichen transplants. Compared to Romanian norms, legal upper limits were exceeded for Zn and Cd at Copsa Mica. Also, As and Sb occurred in excessive levels at given sites. (orig.)

  18. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  19. Tagging, Encoding, and Jones Optimality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Lopez, Pablo E. Martinez

    2003-01-01

    A partial evaluator is said to be Jones-optimal if the result of specializing a self-interpreter with respect to a source program is textually identical to the source program, modulo renaming. Jones optimality has already been obtained if the self-interpreter is untyped. If the selfinterpreter...... is typed, however, residual programs are cluttered with type tags. To obtain the original source program, these tags must be removed. A number of sophisticated solutions have already been proposed. We observe, however, that with a simple representation shift, ordinary partial evaluation is already Jones-optimal...

  20. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  1. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jose Echevarria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.. This work presents a novel solution (WebTag for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  2. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Álvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  3. Social image tagging with diverse semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Tang, Yuan Yan; Mei, Tao

    2014-12-01

    We have witnessed the popularity of image-sharing websites for sharing personal experiences through photos on the Web. These websites allow users describing the content of their uploaded images with a set of tags. Those user-annotated tags are often noisy and biased. Social image tagging aims at removing noisy tags and suggests new relevant tags. However, most existing tag enrichment approaches predominantly focus on tag relevance and overlook tag diversity problem. How to make the top-ranked tags covering a wide range of semantic is still an opening, yet challenging, issue. In this paper, we propose an approach to retag social images with diverse semantics. Both the relevance of a tag to image as well as its semantic compensations to the already determined tags are fused to determine the final tag list for a given image. Different from existing image tagging approaches, the top-ranked tags are not only highly relevant to the image but also have significant semantic compensations with each other. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-ACTIVE ELEMENTS ON FLUID FLOW OF MIG WELDPOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.Sun; J.Q.Gao; Y.Fcng; Y.W.Luan

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the behavior of metal inert gas(MIG)welding is formulated in the paper.By means of numerical simulation,the influence of surfaceactive elements on fluid flow of MIG weldpool is studied.The calculation results show that by adding surface-active elements,the fluid flow behavior is drastically changed and the flow fluid flows from lower to upper in vertical direction at the rear of weldpool(w>0).The physical phenomenon is explained from the viewpoint of fluid flow behavior of weldpool that the properties of weld metal is greatly improved and the content of diffused hydrogen is reduced,thus providing a basis for developing new welding materials.

  5. Finite element simulation of rate-dependent magneto-active polymer response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, K.; Kiefer, B.; Menzel, A.

    2016-10-01

    This contribution is concerned with the embedding of constitutive relations for magneto-active polymers (MAP) into finite element simulations. To this end, a recently suggested, calibrated, and validated material model for magneto-mechanically coupled and rate-dependent MAP response is briefly summarized in its continuous and algorithmic settings. Moreover, the strongly coupled field equations of finite deformation magneto-mechanics are reviewed. For the purpose of numerical simulation, a finite element model is then established based on the usual steps of weak form representation, discretization and consistent linearization. Two verifying inhomogeneous numerical examples are presented in which a classical ‘plate with a hole’ geometry is equipped with MAP properties and subjected to different types of time-varying mechanical and magnetic loading.

  6. Finite Element Based Solution of Laplace's Equation Applied to Electrical Activity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab T. Baqer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer models are used in the study of electrocardiography to provide insight into physiological phenomena that are difficult to measure in the lab or in a clinical environment. The electrocardiogram is an important tool for the clinician in that it changes characteristically in a number of pathological conditions. Many illnesses can be detected by this measurement. By simulating the electrical activity of the heart one obtains a quantitative relationship between the electrocardiogram and different anomalies. Because of the inhomogeneous fibrous structure of the heart and the irregular geometries of the body, finite element method is used for studying the electrical properties of the heart. This work describes the implementation of the Conjugate Gradient iterative method for the solution of large linear equation systems resulting from the finite element method. A diagonal Jacobi preconditioner is used in order to accelerate the convergence. Gaussian elimination is also implemented and compared with the Precondition Conjugate Gradient (PCG method and with the iterative method. Different types of matrix storage schemes are implemented such as the Compressed Sparse Row (CSR to achieve better performance. In order to demonstrate the validity of the finite element analysis, the technique is adopted to solve Laplace's equation that describes the electrical activity of the human body with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. An automatic mesh generator is built using C++ programming language. Initially a complete finite element program is built to solve Laplace's equation. The same accuracy is obtained using these methods. The results show that the CSR format reduces computation time compared to the order format. The PCG method is better for the solution of large linear system (sparse matrices than the Gaussian Elimination and back substitution method, while Gaussian elimination is better than iterative method.

  7. Tagging the European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.) with coded wire tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, S.; Pedersen, Michael Ingemann; Holdensgaard, G.

    2000-01-01

    The coded wire tag (CWT) system was examined as a possible tool for tagging European eels (Anguilla anguilla). Two size groups of eels (3.8 and 10.2 g) were tagged with CWTs in the dorsal musculature, Tag loss 28 days after tagging was 3.1% for the small and 0.7% for the large groups of eels....... Of the tag loss in the small eels, 61% were lost during the first 2 h after tagging. In the small group, eels that lost tags were significantly (P...

  8. Graph based techniques for tag cloud generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leginus, Martin; Dolog, Peter; Lage, Ricardo Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Tag cloud is one of the navigation aids for exploring documents. Tag cloud also link documents through the user defined terms. We explore various graph based techniques to improve the tag cloud generation. Moreover, we introduce relevance measures based on underlying data such as ratings or citat......Tag cloud is one of the navigation aids for exploring documents. Tag cloud also link documents through the user defined terms. We explore various graph based techniques to improve the tag cloud generation. Moreover, we introduce relevance measures based on underlying data such as ratings...

  9. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  10. Effect of Nano Red Elemental Selenium on GPx Activity of Broiler Chick Kidney Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuBao-hua; XuZi-rong; XiaMei-sheng; HuCai-hong; DengYue-song; XiongLi

    2003-01-01

    A new selenium source, Nano red elemental selenium (Nano-Se) was used to study the effect on the GPx activity of broiler chick kidney cells (BCKC) in vitro, Sodium selenite (Na2 Se()3 ) and seleno-l-methionine (Se-Met) were used as the controls. The results showed that the effects of three kinds of Se forms on the GPx activity of BCKC were accordant(p>0. 05) compared with each other at 0.01,0.05 and 0. 10 /zmol/L Se concentrations treatments. In the range of 0. 00-0. 10μmol/L Se concentrations, the GPx activity increased with elevation of Se concentrations in medium. For the three kinds of Se forms, the GPx activity reached the climax at 0.10μmol/L Se concentration. At 0. 20 and 0. 30μmol/L Se concentrations,the influnces of three kinds of Se forms were not accordant with one another. For Nano-Se, the GPx activity at 0. 20 and 0. 30μmol/L Se concentrations remained the same as that at 0. 10μmol/L Se concentration treatment. For Se-Met, the GPx activity at 0. 20μmol/L Se concentration treatment remained the same with 0. 10μmol/L treatment; the GPx activity at 0.30μmol/L Se concentration treatment was declined significantly(pSe-Met>Na2SeO3.

  11. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  12. Genetic tagging of humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsbøll, P J; Allen, J; Bérubé, M; Clapham, P J; Feddersen, T P; Hammond, P S; Hudson, R R; Jørgensen, H; Katona, S; Larsen, A H; Larsen, F; Lien, J; Mattila, D K; Sigurjónsson, J; Sears, R; Smith, T; Sponer, R; Stevick, P; Oien, N

    1997-08-21

    The ability to recognize individual animals has substantially increased our knowledge of the biology and behaviour of many taxa. However, not all species lend themselves to this approach, either because of insufficient phenotypic variation or because tag attachment is not feasible. The use of genetic markers ('tags') represents a viable alternative to traditional methods of individual recognition, as they are permanent and exist in all individuals. We tested the use of genetic markers as the primary means of identifying individuals in a study of humpback whales in the North Atlantic Ocean. Analysis of six microsatellite loci among 3,060 skin samples collected throughout this ocean allowed the unequivocal identification of individuals. Analysis of 692 'recaptures', identified by their genotype, revealed individual local and migratory movements of up to 10,000 km, limited exchange among summer feeding grounds, and mixing in winter breeding areas, and also allowed the first estimates of animal abundance based solely on genotypic data. Our study demonstrates that genetic tagging is not only feasible, but generates data (for example, on sex) that can be valuable when interpreting the results of tagging experiments.

  13. Genetic tagging of humpback whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palsboll, PJ; Allen, J; Berube, M; Clapham, PJ; Feddersen, TP; Hammond, PS; Hudson, RR; Jorgensen, H; Katona, S; Larsen, AH; Larsen, F; Lien, J; Mattila, DK; Sigurjonsson, J; Sears, R; Smith, T; Sponer, R; Stevick, P; Oien, N

    1997-01-01

    The ability to recognize individual animals has substantially increased our knowledge of the biology and behaviour of many taxa(1). However, not all species lend themselves to this approach, either because of insufficient phenotypic variation or because tag attachment is not feasible. The use of gen

  14. Interspecies insertion polymorphism analysis reveals recent activity of transposable elements in extant coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fish represented by two extant species, Latimeria chalumnae in South Africa and Comoros and L. menadoensis in Indonesia. Due to their intermediate phylogenetic position between ray-finned fish and tetrapods in the vertebrate lineage, they are of great interest from an evolutionary point of view. In addition, extant specimens look similar to 300 million-year-old fossils; because of their apparent slowly evolving morphology, coelacanths have been often described as « living fossils ». As an underlying cause of such a morphological stasis, several authors have proposed a slow evolution of the coelacanth genome. Accordingly, sequencing of the L. chalumnae genome has revealed a globally low substitution rate for protein-coding regions compared to other vertebrates. However, genome and gene evolution can also be influenced by transposable elements, which form a major and dynamic part of vertebrate genomes through their ability to move, duplicate and recombine. In this work, we have searched for evidence of transposition activity in coelacanth genomes through the comparative analysis of orthologous genomic regions from both Latimeria species. Comparison of 5.7 Mb (0.2%) of the L. chalumnae genome with orthologous Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clones from L. menadoensis allowed the identification of 27 species-specific transposable element insertions, with a strong relative contribution of CR1 non-LTR retrotransposons. Species-specific homologous recombination between the long terminal repeats of a new coelacanth endogenous retrovirus was also detected. Our analysis suggests that transposon activity is responsible for at least 0.6% of genome divergence between both Latimeria species. Taken together, this study demonstrates that coelacanth genomes are not evolutionary inert: they contain recently active transposable elements, which have significantly contributed to post-speciation genome divergence in Latimeria.

  15. Interspecies insertion polymorphism analysis reveals recent activity of transposable elements in extant coelacanths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Naville

    Full Text Available Coelacanths are lobe-finned fish represented by two extant species, Latimeria chalumnae in South Africa and Comoros and L. menadoensis in Indonesia. Due to their intermediate phylogenetic position between ray-finned fish and tetrapods in the vertebrate lineage, they are of great interest from an evolutionary point of view. In addition, extant specimens look similar to 300 million-year-old fossils; because of their apparent slowly evolving morphology, coelacanths have been often described as « living fossils ». As an underlying cause of such a morphological stasis, several authors have proposed a slow evolution of the coelacanth genome. Accordingly, sequencing of the L. chalumnae genome has revealed a globally low substitution rate for protein-coding regions compared to other vertebrates. However, genome and gene evolution can also be influenced by transposable elements, which form a major and dynamic part of vertebrate genomes through their ability to move, duplicate and recombine. In this work, we have searched for evidence of transposition activity in coelacanth genomes through the comparative analysis of orthologous genomic regions from both Latimeria species. Comparison of 5.7 Mb (0.2% of the L. chalumnae genome with orthologous Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clones from L. menadoensis allowed the identification of 27 species-specific transposable element insertions, with a strong relative contribution of CR1 non-LTR retrotransposons. Species-specific homologous recombination between the long terminal repeats of a new coelacanth endogenous retrovirus was also detected. Our analysis suggests that transposon activity is responsible for at least 0.6% of genome divergence between both Latimeria species. Taken together, this study demonstrates that coelacanth genomes are not evolutionary inert: they contain recently active transposable elements, which have significantly contributed to post-speciation genome divergence in Latimeria.

  16. Determination of essential elements in commercial infant foods by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallinoto, Priscila; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: pvallinoto@ipen.br, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Eating habits are important determinants of health conditions during childhood. Commercial infant food is an important part of the diet for many babies. As such it is necessary that such food contain sufficient amounts of essential elements. Inadequate complementary feeding is a major cause of high rates of malnutrition throughout the world. Commercial infant food is classified into four different stages: Stages 1 and 2 are adequate for babies older than 6 months, but new flavors and food are introduced in stage 2; Stage 3 is offered to 8 month old babies; Junior Stage is recommended to children over 1 year old. In this study, essential elements: Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Fe K, Mg, Mn, Na, Se and Zn were determined in commercial infant food samples by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Twenty-seven infant food samples were bought in stores around Sao Paulo city during 2011. These samples were freeze-dried and homogenized before analysis. The powdered samples were irradiated in the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. For validation of the methodology, INCT MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST-SRM 1577b Bovine Liver reference materials were analyzed. Most of the concentration results were below the World Health Organization's recommended daily intake for infants from 6 to 12 months old. These low essential element concentration results in commercial infant foods obtained in our study indicate that infants should not only be fed with commercial baby foods. (author)

  17. Photon activation analysis of trace elements in several kinds of invertebrate animals. 1. Arthropoda crustacea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Michiko; Tamate, Hidetoshi [Ishinomaki Senshu Univ., Miyagi (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of trace elements was made for marine mollusca by light quantum activation method. Crustacea which is likely to be well reflecting the environment of ocean floor was used as the subjects. Various kinds of these animals including Carcinus Portunus. Palinurus, Panulirus, Squilla etc. were collected from the sea off Japan to determine the concentrations of 15 kinds of elements in the gills, muscles, head/thorax region and viceraneous organs. The concentration of As was found markedly high in either of gills, muscles or viceraneous organs of Palinurus taken from the sea near Okinawa. It was found that there are no difference in the concentrations of As, Fe, Mn and Pb among the species studied and Fe, Mn and Pb were detected at high levels in the gills of Carcinus, whereas the Fe and Mn concentrations in the gills of Palinurus were considerably lower than other species tested. Thus, the element concentration was different among the regions studied and also species. (M.N.)

  18. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis of Trace Elements in Some Food Spices Consumed In Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali asghar fathivand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There is a growing interest in determining the concentration of various elements in food spices. In the present study, the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA was employed to measure the trace elements in 11 commonly food spices consumed in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods The levels of K, Mn, Na, Cl, V, Br, Al, and As were determined and their effects on human health were discussed. The results were compared with the values reported in the literature. The accuracy and precision of the analytical procedure was estimated by analyzing the Lichen (IAEA-336 reference material. Results The concentrations of the measured elements in the spices were 3850-29157, 10-335, 153-2849, 186-3063, 0.2-2.8, 2.1-58.7, and 72-2102 ppm for K, Mn, Na, Cl, V, Br, and Al, respectively. As was only detected in thyme (0.8 ppm and plantain (0.42 ppm. Conclusion As the findings of the present study indicated, the concentrations of K and Na in the black pepper, garlic, and ginger were significantly higher than the values reported in other countries. The Mn levels in the black pepper and garlic consumed in Tehran were comparable with those in Poland. Furthermore, the concentration of As in these spices were lower than the maximum permissible limit.

  19. Essential elements in different types of eggs by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrogi, Jessica B.; Gomes, Bruna G.; Avegliano, Roseane P.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: jessica.ambrogi@hotmail.com, E-mail: brunagabrielegomes@gmail.com, E-mail: avegliano@uol.com.br, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Eggs are excellent sources of protein and provide essential nutrients to human nutrition. Neither the color of the shell nor that of the yolk affects the egg nutritive value, even though this value can vary according to the eggs from different poultries, and as well as according to the feed given to them. The egg consumption of the Brazilian southeastern population is 9.9 g/day, which represents 0.61% of the daily food consumption per capita. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the elements Br, Ca, Cr, Cs, Fe, Na, Rb, Se, Sc and Zn in three types of eggs (hen, free-range and quail eggs). The edible parts of the eggs (egg white and egg yolks) were analyzed Hard-boiled and Raw. The Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was applied to determine the element concentrations. The samples were irradiated for approximately eight hours in flux of 4.5-5.5 10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, at nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, Brazil. There was variation in the elements concentrations among the types of eggs and between Hard-boiled and Raw eggs. (author)

  20. Multi-element determination in medicinal Juniper tree (Juniperus phoenicea by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzid Nedjimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Red Juniper (Juniperus phoenicea, a local medicinal tree was collected and analyzed for 18 essential, non-essential and toxic elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA. The GBW 07605 (GSV-4 standard reference material was analyzed simultaneously with the plant samples, the results shown a good recovery and reproducibility of the method. Ca, K and Fe have been detected in good levels in this plant clarifying their possible contribution to curative properties. The data obtained in the present work will be helpful in the synthesis of new synthetic drugs which can be used for medicinal purpose.

  1. Finite element formulation of active constraining layer damping plate using laminate theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓年春; 邹振祝; 黄文虎

    2004-01-01

    A new finite element modeling method has been developed using laminate theory in a virlual work principle for active constraining layer damping plate. The frequency dependent modulus of viscoelastic material is described by introducing a few dissipation coordinates, known as GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, a standard linear system with constant coefficient. The effectiveness of this method is validated by experimental model. Compared with conventional methods, this method can reduce a number of degrees of freedom and improve accuracy, provides a good model for analogous configurations.

  2. LAS0811: From Combinatorial Chemistry to Activation of Antioxidant Response Element

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Zhu; Hyounggee Baek; Ruiwu Liu; Aimin Song; Kit Lam; Derick Lau

    2009-01-01

    The antioxidant response element (ARE) and its transcription factor, nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), are potential targets for cancer chemoprevention. We sought to screen small molecules synthesized with combinatorial chemistry for activation of ARE. By high-throughput screening of 9400 small molecules from 10 combinatorial chemical libraries using HepG2 cells with an ARE-driven reporter, we have identified a novel small molecule, 1,2-dimethoxy-4,5-dinitrobenzene (LAS0...

  3. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  4. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction.

  5. Dynamics of elements in soil treated with increasing doses sewage sludge for instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Helder de; Mortatti, Jefferson; Vendramini, Diego; Lopes, Renato A.; Nolasco, Murilo M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: helder@cena.usp.br; Sarries, Gabriel A. [Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas]. E-mail: gabriel@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; Furlan, Adriana [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Petrologia e Metalogenia]. E-mail: adriana_furlangumiere@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work the dynamics of the elements was analyzed The, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, In the, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Th, U, Yb and Zn in a profile of a red-yellow latossolo, in the depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-30 and 30-50 cm, and dose of the biosolid of 0, 25, 124 and 375 t ha{sup -1}, of the station of treatment of sewer of Barueri, Sao Paulo. The experiment was carried out in areas of 3,05 m{sup 2} in the times of 2,2; 4,0; 6,6; 14,3 and 21 months. For analysis of the elementary composition, it was used of the analysis technique by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The experiment was submitted under normal tropical conditions in a forest station in Itatinga, Sao Paulo, of the University of Sao Paulo. For better details, the factors depth, doses and times statistical analyses of the results of the elementary composition of the soil samples were made. For all the biossolid doses conditioned with polymeric and applied in the soil, the composition of 17 of the 18 elements in the soil were not altered, with exception for Cr in the studied times. The elements As, Br, Ce, Co, Fe, Hf, La, Sm, Ta, Th, U and Yb presented higher levels in the deepest layers of soil; already the elements Cr, In the, Sb and Zn presented higher concentrations in the superficial layers. (author)

  6. Quantifying Visual-Representativeness of Social Image Tags Using Image Tag Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixin; Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Tags associated with images in various social media sharing web sites are valuable information source for superior image retrieval experiences. Due to the nature of tagging, many tags associated with images are not visually descriptive. In this chapter, we propose Image Tag Clarity to evaluate the effectiveness of a tag in describing the visual content of its annotated images, which is also known as the image tag visual-representativeness. It is measured by computing the zero-mean normalized distance between the tag language model estimated from the images annotated by the tag and the collection language model. The tag/collection language models are derived from the bag of visual-word local content features of the images. The visual-representative tags that are commonly used to annotate visually similar images are given high tag clarity scores. Evaluated on a large real-world dataset containing more than 269K images and their associated tags, we show that the image tag clarity score can effectively identify the visual-representative tags from all tags contributed by users. Based on the tag clarity scores, we have made a few interesting observations that could be used to support many tag-based applications.

  7. LAS0811: From Combinatorial Chemistry to Activation of Antioxidant Response Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant response element (ARE and its transcription factor, nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2, are potential targets for cancer chemoprevention. We sought to screen small molecules synthesized with combinatorial chemistry for activation of ARE. By high-throughput screening of 9400 small molecules from 10 combinatorial chemical libraries using HepG2 cells with an ARE-driven reporter, we have identified a novel small molecule, 1,2-dimethoxy-4,5-dinitrobenzene (LAS0811, as an activator of the ARE. LAS0811 upregulated the activity of NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, a representative antioxidative enzyme regulated by ARE. It enhanced production of an endogenous reducing agent, glutathione (GSH. In addition, LAS0811 induced expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO1, which is an ARE-regulated enzyme with anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, LAS0811 reduced cell death due to the cytotoxic stress of a strong oxidant, t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH. Mechanistically, LAS0811 upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and promoted its translocation into the nuclei leading to subsequent ARE activation. Taken together, LAS0811 is a novel activator of the ARE and its associated detoxifying genes and, thus, a potential agent for cancer chemoprevention.

  8. A CYCLIC-AMP RESPONSE ELEMENT IS INVOLVED IN RETINOIC ACID-DEPENDENT RAR-BETA-2 PROMOTER ACTIVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRUYT, FAE; FOLKERS, G; VANDENBRINK, CE; VANDERSAAG, PT; Kruyt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    Activation of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta2 promoter is known to be mediated by a RA response element located in the proximity of the TATA-box. By deletion studies in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells we have analyzed the RARbeta2 promoter for the presence of additional regulatory elements. We

  9. 25 years of N-heterocyclic carbenes: activation of both main-group element-element bonds and NHCs themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtemberger-Pietsch, Sabrina; Radius, Udo; Marder, Todd B

    2016-04-14

    N-Heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) are widely used ligands and reagents in modern inorganic synthesis as well as in homogeneous catalysis and organocatalysis. However, NHCs are not always innocent bystanders. In the last few years, more and more examples were reported of reactions of NHCs with main-group elements which resulted in modification of the NHC. Many of these reactions lead to ring expansion and the formation of six-membered heterocyclic rings involving insertion of the heteroatom into the C-N bond and migration of hydrides, phenyl groups or boron-containing fragments. Furthermore, a few related NHC rearrangements were observed some decades ago. In this Perspective, we summarise the history of NHC ring expansion reactions from the 1960s till the present.

  10. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  11. The Complex Dynamics of Collaborative Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, H.; Robu, V.; Shepherd, H.

    2007-01-01

    The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including wheth

  12. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Tag Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all tags applied to Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These tags were applied by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of...

  13. Satellite Tags- Guam/CNMI EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  14. Delay-Modulated RF Tag System Concept Using Ultrawideband Noise Radar Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tags have been widely used in inventory tracking, environmental monitoring, battlefield situational awareness, and combat identification due to their low cost, small size, and wireless functionality. This paper explores the application of active RF tags in outdoor environments responding to random noise radar interrogations with predetermined messages. A conceptual system design for communication between radar and RF tags using ultrawideband (UWB) noise waveforms is propo...

  15. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  16. Multilabel Learning for Automatic Web Services Tagging

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha AZNAG; Mohamed QUAFAFOU; Jarir, Zahi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, some web services portals and search engines as Biocatalogue and Seekda!, have allowed users to manually annotate Web services using tags. User Tags provide meaningful descriptions of services and allow users to index and organize their contents. Tagging technique is widely used to annotate objects in Web 2.0 applications. In this paper we propose a novel probabilistic topic model (which extends the CorrLDA model - Correspondence Latent Dirichlet Allocation-) to automatically tag we...

  17. ON THE INTERACTIVE FUNCTIONS OF TAG QUESTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Tag questions are a distinctive feature in spokenEnglish,but seldom used by the non-native speakers.Studies show that tags are employed by native speakersmainly to express their interactive and interpersonalmeaning.In this paper,the writer explores the natureof tag questions,mainly their interactive and inter-personal functions in daily coversation.Suggestionsare made with regard to the teaching of tags in theclassroom.

  18. Active magnetic bearings used as exciters for rolling element bearing outer race defect diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanping; Di, Long; Zhou, Jin; Jin, Chaowu; Guo, Qintao

    2016-03-01

    The active health monitoring of rotordynamic systems in the presence of bearing outer race defect is considered in this paper. The shaft is assumed to be supported by conventional mechanical bearings and an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is used in the mid of the shaft location as an exciter to apply electromagnetic force to the system. We investigate a nonlinear bearing-pedestal system model with the outer race defect under the electromagnetic force. The nonlinear differential equations are integrated using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the characteristic signal of outer race incipient defect is significantly amplified under the electromagnetic force through the AMBs, which is helpful to improve the diagnosis accuracy of rolling element bearing׳s incipient outer race defect. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Cl-impregnated activated carbon for entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorishi, S.B.; Keeney, R.M.; Serre, S.D.; Gullett, B.K.; Jozewicz, W.S. [ARCADIS, Durham, NC (USA)

    2002-10-15

    Elemental mercury is present in considerable concentrations in emissions from some coal-fired plants and its removal presents more of a challenge than the capture of oxidized forms of mercury. Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional group on the adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to increases in fixed-bed capture of these mercury species. A commercially available activated carbon (DARCO FGD, NORIT Americas Inc. (FGD)) was Cl-impregnated (Cl-FGD) (5 lb (2.3 kg) per batch) and tested for entrained-flow, short-time-scale capture of Hg{sup 0}. In an entrained flow reactor, the Cl-DFGD was introduced in Hg{sup 0}-laden flue gases of various compositions with gas/solid contact times of about 3-4 s, resulting in significant Hg{sup 0} removal (80-90%), compared to virgin FGD (10-15%). These levels of Hg{sup 0} removal were observed across a wide range of very low carbon-to-mercury weight ratios (1000-5000). The experimental conditions simulated those common in the flue gas of coal-fired boilers burning western subbituminous or lignite coal containing less than 1 ppm HCl. Variation of the natural gas combustion flue gas composition, by doping with nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, and the flow reactor temperature (100-200{degree}C) had minimal effects on Hg{sup 0} removal by the Cl-FGD in these carbon-to-mercury weight ratios. These results demonstrate significant enhancement of activated carbon reactivity with minimal treatment and are applicable to combustion facilities equipped with downstream particulate matter removal such as an electrostatic precipitator. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Quantitative measurements of trace elements with large activation cross section for concrete materials in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A.; Iida, T.; Moriizumi, J.; Kameyama, T. [Nuclear Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sakuma, Y. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Takada, J.; Yamasaki, K.; Yoshimoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2000-05-01

    It is expected that some nuclear power reactors are decommissioned successively in the near future, since the nuclear power technology matures in Japan. Then, what proportion of the massive concrete waste materials is regarded as radioactive waste materials? It is a serious problem. Suzuki et at., have measured specific activities for concrete materials in Japan. In present study, we have measured quantitatively microelements with large activation cross section in concrete materials, and furnish basic data for the guiding principle of concrete waste materials. We have collected 158 samples of concrete materials in Japan. The samples were ground into pieces of 100 to 200 meshes. The amount of 100 mg in each sample was exposed to neutrons for 1 h in the nuclear reactor of KUR. We have measured radioactive elements of medium life time (La-140, Np-239, etc.) one week later, and radioactive elements of long life time (Co-60, Eu-152, etc.) one month later with Ge detector. Nineteen microelements with large activation cross section were detected. The distribution of Co-60 and Eu-152 concentrations was obtained. The mean concentration of Co-60 is 15.7 ppm, and gabbros, peridotites and basalts have high Co-60 concentrations. The mean value of Eu-152 is 8.8 x 10{sup -1} ppm. Andesites, basalts, sandstones and shales have high Eu-152 concentrations. The activated concentrations for cement depend on the place of the origin. Since the concrete materials with low natural radioactivities as gabbros and peridotites have a tendency to activation, it is necessary to pay attention for concrete materials in nuclear power plant. The natural specific activities included in concrete materials in Japan are 556.2 (16.0-896.0) Bq/kg for K-40, 33.8 (2.96-87.6) Bq/kg for U-238 and 29.1 (2.63-48.4)Bq/kg for Th-232{approx_equal} Ra-228. The quantities of microelements with large activation cross section depend on the species of rocks and the level of the weathering. If we could collect many

  1. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is inductively

  2. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is inductively

  3. Towards EPC compatible plastic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    A target application for plastic RFID tags is Electronic Product Coding (EPC). The EPC-specifications set some demanding requirements for RFID tags. In this work, we review the work that has been done to fulfill some of these specifications. We describe a complete 64-bit RFID tag that is

  4. Elemental characterization of superficial waters contaminated by an abandoned sulfide-mining area, through neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canha, N.; Freitas, M.C.; Dionisio, I.; Anawar, H.M. [URSN-ITN, Sacavem (Portugal). Technological and Nuclear Inst.; Pacheco, A.M.G. [Technical Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). CERENA-IST

    2011-07-01

    In this work, superficial waters of two small rivers flowing in the Sao Domingos' abandoned mining area were analyzed in order to infer on soil-water transfer of the elements determined. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for elemental concentration assessment. The following elements were found at the mg L{sup -1} level: As, Ba, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Na and Zn. The dry-mass residues varied between 70 mg and 1 g in 20-mL volumes. High enrichment relative to soil was found for most elements. Good statistical associations between Br and Na, between Cr and Sc, and between Ce, Co, Fe, Yb, and Zn, were found, suggesting a similar mechanism of soil-water, elemental transfer. Both the superficial waters' composition and their elemental levels indicate a potential risk of contamination of the underground waters and an actual health risk for the resident populations. (orig.)

  5. Liver X receptor regulates hepatic nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Fan, Qiong; Nørgaard, Rikke C;

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR)α and LXRβ play key roles in hepatic de novo lipogenesis through their regulation of lipogenic genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP). LXRs activate lipogenic gene transcription...... metabolic sensors upstream of ChREBP by modulating GK expression, nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling, and ChREBP expression and activity....

  6. Digital magnetic tagging for multiplexed suspension-based biochemical assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrelias, T.; Trypiniotis, T.; Palfreyman, J. J.; Hong, B.; Vyas, K.; Hayward, T. J.; Llandro, J.; Kopper, K. P.; Bland, J. A. C.; Robertson, P. A.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2009-04-01

    Microarrays and suspension (or bead)-based technologies have attracted significant interest for their broad applications in high throughput molecular biology. However, the throughput of microarrays will always be limited by the array density and the slow diffusion of molecules to their binding sites. Suspension-based technologies, in which all the reactions take place directly on the surface of microcarriers functionalized with molecular probes, could offer true multiplexing due to the possibility of extending their detection capability by a straightforward expansion of the size of the chemical library of probes. To fully exploit their potential, the microcarriers must be tagged, but the number of distinct codes available from spectrometric/graphical/physical encoding methods is currently fairly limited. A digital magnetic tagging method based on magnetic microtags, which have been anisotropy engineered to provide stable magnetization directions which correspond to digital codes, is reported. The tags can be suspended in solution and functionalized with a variety of biological molecular probes. Magnetic tagging offers several benefits compared to the traditional optical encoding techniques currently employed. It offers minimal background signals, potential for a large number of distinct codes, miniaturization of devices, and the ability to write a code in situ. Experimental data showing the reading of individual magnetic microbars from samples comprising 50×20 μm2 Ni elements, as well as micromagnetic simulations that show the feasibility of stray field detection, are presented. The stray fields of the magnetic microbars spanning a range of 60 mOe were detected by a microfabricated fluxgate sensor scanned in a raster fashion over the sample that was placed about 70 μm away. Free floating tags have also been fabricated for use in microfluidic systems. A magnetic lab-on-a-chip device could be used for tagging biomolecular probes for applications in genome

  7. Radiation effects on communication performance of radio frequency identification tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuyuki; Meng, Zhaowu; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Kataoka, Yasuhide; Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Deji, Shizuhiko; Ito, Shigeki; Saze, Takuya; Hirota, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2010-11-01

    Radioactive materials (sources) are managed by bookkeeping and stocktaking. The radiation protection section staffs should check the sources manually. Annual effective dose concerning stocktaking of them are estimated at some mSv concerning fingers. A radio frequency identification (RFID) tag's absorbed dose is estimated at some dozen Gy. RFID for stocktaking automatically was devised. Radiation effects on the communication performance of RFID tags were investigated by using response times and read ranges as indices. The RFID system was composed of a computer, a detector, and transponders (tag) consisting of an integrated circuit chip and an antenna. The tag is joined to the source for identification. The tags were irradiated at doses between 5 and 5,000 Gy by an x-ray irradiator. The response times and the read ranges were tracked from 40 to 23,200 min after irradiation. Relative read ranges fluctuated between 0.9 and 1.1 in the dose region less than 2,000 Gy, but fluctuated greatly in the dose region beyond 2,000 Gy. Malfunctioning tags appeared from 3,000 Gy, and all tags malfunctioned in the dose region over 4,500 Gy. The threshold dose leading to malfunction was determined to be 2,100 Gy. Time variation of relative read ranges was classified into four patterns. The pattern shifted from pattern 1 to 4 when the dose was increased. The relative read ranges lengthened in pattern 1. The relative read rages were approximately 1.0 in pattern 2. The read ranges tentatively shortened, then recovered in pattern 3. The tags malfunctioned in pattern 4. Once the tags malfunctioned, they never recovered their performance. Radiation enhances or deteriorates communication performance depending on dosage. Tags can spontaneously recover from radiation deterioration. The time variation of the read ranges can be illustrated by enhancement, deterioration, and recovery. The mechanism of four patterns is explained based on the variation of the frequency harmonization strength and

  8. Predicting competitive adsorption behavior of major toxic anionic elements onto activated alumina: a speciation-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tingzhi; Guan, Xiaohong; Tang, Yulin; Gu, Guowei; Wang, Jianmin

    2010-04-15

    Toxic anionic elements such as arsenic, selenium, and vanadium often co-exist in groundwater. These elements may impact each other when adsorption methods are used to remove them. In this study, we investigated the competitive adsorption behavior of As(V), Se(IV), and V(V) onto activated alumina under different pH and surface loading conditions. Results indicated that these anionic elements interfered with each other during adsorption. A speciation-based model was developed to quantify the competitive adsorption behavior of these elements. This model could predict the adsorption data well over the pH range of 1.5-12 for various surface loading conditions, using the same set of adsorption constants obtained from single-sorbate systems. This model has great implications in accurately predicting the field capacity of activated alumina under various local water quality conditions when multiple competitive anionic elements are present.

  9. Predicting competitive adsorption behavior of major toxic anionic elements onto activated alumina: A speciation-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Tingzhi [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Guan Xiaohong [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang Yulin [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Gu Guowei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang Jianmin, E-mail: wangjia@mst.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Toxic anionic elements such as arsenic, selenium, and vanadium often co-exist in groundwater. These elements may impact each other when adsorption methods are used to remove them. In this study, we investigated the competitive adsorption behavior of As(V), Se(IV), and V(V) onto activated alumina under different pH and surface loading conditions. Results indicated that these anionic elements interfered with each other during adsorption. A speciation-based model was developed to quantify the competitive adsorption behavior of these elements. This model could predict the adsorption data well over the pH range of 1.5-12 for various surface loading conditions, using the same set of adsorption constants obtained from single-sorbate systems. This model has great implications in accurately predicting the field capacity of activated alumina under various local water quality conditions when multiple competitive anionic elements are present.

  10. Active moss biomonitoring applied to an industrial site in Romania: relative accumulation of 36 elements in moss-bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culicov, O A; Mocanu, R; Frontasyeva, M V; Yurukova, L; Steinnes, E

    2005-09-01

    Active moss biomonitoring using the species Sphagnum girgensohnii was tested at a strongly polluted site in Romania (Baia Mare) according to a novel sampling design. Nine moss transplants from each of the two background areas (Dubna, Russia and Vitosha Mountain, Bulgaria) were deployed in parallel on balconies about 24 m above street level for 4 months. The samples were analyzed for 36 elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Based on the results obtained the sampling variability is discussed in relation to the analytical variability, and the relative uptake of the different elements is assessed. The moss-bags using Sphagnum girgensohnii demonstrate a high or a very high relative uptake for a majority of the 36 investigated elements, but the values depend on the initial element concentration in the moss. Moss leaves analyzed separately showed somewhat higher levels than stems for many elements. Practical considerations however still speak in favor of using the whole moss for transplants.

  11. ATLAS boosted object tagging 2

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Julien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study into the optimal techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. Various algorithms for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets are compared for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 8 TeV data and 8 TeV and 13 TeV MC simulations. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons. The modeling of the tagging variables used in this technique is studied using 8 TeV pp collision data and systematic uncertainties for the tagger efficiency and fake rates are evaluated.

  12. Involvement of multiple elements in FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of FGF19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal endocrine hormone human fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is involved in the regulation of not only hepatic bile acid metabolism but also carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the present study, bile acid/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) responsiveness in the FGF19 promoter region was investigated by a reporter assay using the human colon carcinoma cell line LS174T. The assay revealed the presence of bile acid/FXR-responsive elements in the 5'-flanking region up to 8.8 kb of FGF19. Deletion analysis indicated that regions from -1866 to -1833, from -1427 to -1353, and from -75 to +262 were involved in FXR responsiveness. Four, four, and two consecutive half-sites of nuclear receptors were observed in the three regions, respectively. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer binding in these three regions. EMSA and reporter assays using mutated constructs indicated that the nuclear receptor IR1, ER2, and DR8 motifs in the 5'-flanking region were involved in FXR responsiveness of FGF19. Lithocholic acid (LCA) (10 μM), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (10 μM), or GW4064 (0.1 μM) treatment increased reporter activity in a construct including the three motifs under FXR-expressing conditions whereas LCA and not CDCA or GW4064 treatment increased the reporter activity under pregnane X receptor (PXR)-expressing conditions. These results suggest that FGF19 is transcriptionally activated through multiple FXR-responsive elements in the promoter region.

  13. POS Tagging Using Relaxation Labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Padro, L

    1995-01-01

    Relaxation labelling is an optimization technique used in many fields to solve constraint satisfaction problems. The algorithm finds a combination of values for a set of variables such that satisfies -to the maximum possible degree- a set of given constraints. This paper describes some experiments performed applying it to POS tagging, and the results obtained. It also ponders the possibility of applying it to word sense disambiguation.

  14. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two b-tagged jets in the final state in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Piqueras, D Álvarez; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethani, A; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Billoud, T R V; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bisanz, T; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blue, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossio Sola, J D; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; 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Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Nedden, M Zur; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton-proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge [Formula: see text] pair and two b-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, [Formula: see text]. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the [Formula: see text] threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the [Formula: see text] system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-quark decays are described well, the generators show differing levels of agreement with the measurements of observables that depend on the production of additional jets.

  15. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two b-tagged jets in the final state in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-04-15

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton-proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge eμ pair and two b-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, p{sub T}. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the p{sub T} threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the eμb anti b system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-quark decays are described well, the generators show differing levels of agreement with the measurements of observables that depend on the production of additional jets. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of jet activity produced in top-quark events with an electron, a muon and two $b$-tagged jets in the final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

    2017-04-07

    Measurements of jet activity in top-quark pair events produced in proton--proton collisions are presented, using 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are chosen by requiring an opposite-charge $e\\mu$ pair and two $b$-tagged jets in the final state. The normalised differential cross-sections of top-quark pair production are presented as functions of additional-jet multiplicity and transverse momentum, $p_T$. The fraction of signal events that do not contain additional jet activity in a given rapidity region, the gap fraction, is measured as a function of the $p_T$ threshold for additional jets, and is also presented for different invariant mass regions of the $e\\mu b\\bar{b}$ system. All measurements are corrected for detector effects and presented as particle-level distributions compared to predictions with different theoretical approaches for QCD radiation. While the kinematics of the jets from top-qua...

  17. Safety of active implantable devices during MRI examinations: a finite element analysis of an implantable pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, Philippe; Simon, Anne; Burger, Jürgen; Ginggen, Alec; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Luechinger, Roger; Olsen, Sigbjørn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to propose a general numerical analysis methodology to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-safety of active implants. Numerical models based on the finite element (FE) technique were used to estimate if the normal operation of an active device was altered during MRI imaging. An active implanted pump was chosen to illustrate the method. A set of controlled experiments were proposed and performed to validate the numerical model. The calculated induced voltages in the important electronic components of the device showed dependence with the MRI field strength. For the MRI radiofrequency fields, significant induced voltages of up to 20 V were calculated for a 0.3T field-strength MRI. For the 1.5 and 3.0OT MRIs, the calculated voltages were insignificant. On the other hand, induced voltages up to 11 V were calculated in the critical electronic components for the 3.0T MRI due to the gradient fields. Values obtained in this work reflect to the worst case situation which is virtually impossible to achieve in normal scanning situations. Since the calculated voltages may be removed by appropriate protection circuits, no critical problems affecting the normal operation of the pump were identified. This study showed that the proposed methodology helps the identification of the possible incompatibilities between active implants and MR imaging, and can be used to aid the design of critical electronic systems to ensure MRI-safety.

  18. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  19. Trace elements in scalp hair of children chronically exposed to volcanic activity (Mt. Etna, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrica, D; Tamburo, E; Dongarrà, G; Sposito, F

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this survey was to use scalp hair as a biomonitor to evaluate the environmental exposure to metals and metalloids of schoolchildren living around the Mt. Etna area, and to verify whether the degree of human exposure to trace elements is subject to changes in local environmental factors. Twenty trace elements were determined in 376 samples of scalp hair from schoolboys (11-13 years old) of both genders, living in ten towns located around the volcanic area of Mt. Etna (Sicily). The results were compared with those (215 samples) from children living in areas of Sicily characterized by a different geological setting (reference site). As, U and V showed much higher concentrations at the volcanic site whereas Sr was particularly more abundant at the reference site. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) indicated an Etna factor, made up of V, U and Mn, and a second factor, concerning the reference site, characterized by Ni and Sr, and to a lesser extent by Mo and Cd. Significant differences in element concentrations were also observed among three different sectors of Mt. Etna area. Young people living in the Mt. Etna area are naturally exposed to enhanced intakes of some metals (V, U, Mn) and non-metals (e.g., As) than individuals of the same age residing in other areas of Sicily, characterized by different lithologies and not influenced by volcanic activity. The petrographic nature of local rocks and the dispersion of the volcanic plume explain the differences, with ingestion of water and local food as the most probable exposure pathways.

  20. Putative cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock genes activated during excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life

  1. Approximation properties of haplotype tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiseitl Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are locations at which the genomic sequences of population members differ. Since these differences are known to follow patterns, disease association studies are facilitated by identifying SNPs that allow the unique identification of such patterns. This process, known as haplotype tagging, is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem and analyzed in terms of complexity and approximation properties. Results It is shown that the tagging problem is NP-hard but approximable within 1 + ln((n2 - n/2 for n haplotypes but not approximable within (1 - ε ln(n/2 for any ε > 0 unless NP ⊂ DTIME(nlog log n. A simple, very easily implementable algorithm that exhibits the above upper bound on solution quality is presented. This algorithm has running time O((2m - p + 1 ≤ O(m(n2 - n/2 where p ≤ min(n, m for n haplotypes of size m. As we show that the approximation bound is asymptotically tight, the algorithm presented is optimal with respect to this asymptotic bound. Conclusion The haplotype tagging problem is hard, but approachable with a fast, practical, and surprisingly simple algorithm that cannot be significantly improved upon on a single processor machine. Hence, significant improvement in computatational efforts expended can only be expected if the computational effort is distributed and done in parallel.

  2. Predicting floods with Flickr tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Nataliya; Jarvis, Stephen; Procter, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, user generated content (UGC) in social media postings and their associated metadata such as time and location stamps are being used to provide useful operational information during natural hazard events such as hurricanes, storms and floods. The main advantage of these new sources of data are twofold. First, in a purely additive sense, they can provide much denser geographical coverage of the hazard as compared to traditional sensor networks. Second, they provide what physical sensors are not able to do: By documenting personal observations and experiences, they directly record the impact of a hazard on the human environment. For this reason interpretation of the content (e.g., hashtags, images, text, emojis, etc) and metadata (e.g., keywords, tags, geolocation) have been a focus of much research into social media analytics. However, as choices of semantic tags in the current methods are usually reduced to the exact name or type of the event (e.g., hashtags '#Sandy' or '#flooding'), the main limitation of such approaches remains their mere nowcasting capacity. In this study we make use of polysemous tags of images posted during several recent flood events and demonstrate how such volunteered geographic data can be used to provide early warning of an event before its outbreak.

  3. Statistical Properties of Inter-arrival Times Distribution in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Capocci, Andrea; Servedio, Vito D P; Loreto, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Folksonomies provide a rich source of data to study social patterns taking place on the World Wide Web. Here we study the temporal patterns of users' tagging activity. We show that the statistical properties of inter-arrival times between subsequent tagging events cannot be explained without taking into account correlation in users' behaviors. This shows that social interaction in collaborative tagging communities shapes the evolution of folksonomies. A consensus formation process involving the usage of a small number of tags for a given resources is observed through a numerical and analytical analysis of some well-known folksonomy datasets.

  4. Tag Clusters as Information Retrieval Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Knautz, Kathrin; Stock, Wolfgang G

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents our design of a next generation information retrieval system based on tag co-occurrences and subsequent clustering. We help users getting access to digital data through information visualization in the form of tag clusters. Current problems like the absence of interactivity and semantics between tags or the difficulty of adding additional search arguments are solved. In the evaluation, based upon SERVQUAL and IT systems quality indicators, we found out that tag clusters are perceived as more useful than tag clouds, are much more trustworthy, and are more enjoyable to use.

  5. b-tagging in DELPHI at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bates, M; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bibby, J; Biffi, P; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Couchot, F; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Almagne, B; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hernando, J A; Herr, H; Heuser, J M; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jalocha, P; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Kucewicz, W; Kurowska, J; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomerotski, A; Norman, A; Nygren, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stavitski, I; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The standard method used for tagging b-hadrons in the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP Collider is discussed in detail. The main ingredient of b-tagging is the impact parameters of tracks, which relies mostly on the vertex detector. Additional information, such as the mass of particles associated to a secondary vertex, significantly improves the selection efficiency and the background suppression. The paper describes various discriminating variables used for the tagging and the procedure of their combination. In addition, applications of b-tagging to some physics analyses, which depend crucially on the performance and reliability of b-tagging, are described briefly.

  6. EEG frequency tagging using ultra-slow periodic heat stimulation of the skin reveals cortical activity specifically related to C fiber thermonociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Elisabeth; Liberati, Giulia; Mouraux, André

    2017-01-01

    The recording of event-related brain potentials triggered by a transient heat stimulus is used extensively to study nociception and diagnose lesions or dysfunctions of the nociceptive system in humans. However, these responses are related exclusively to the activation of a specific subclass of nociceptive afferents: quickly-adapting thermonociceptors. In fact, except if the activation of Aδ fibers is avoided or if A fibers are blocked, these responses specifically reflect activity triggered by the activation of Type 2 quickly-adapting A fiber mechano-heat nociceptors (AMH-2). Here, we propose a novel method to isolate, in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), cortical activity related to the sustained periodic activation of heat-sensitive thermonociceptors, using very slow (0.2 Hz) and long-lasting (75 s) sinusoidal heat stimulation of the skin between baseline and 50°C. In a first experiment, we show that when such long-lasting thermal stimuli are applied to the hand dorsum of healthy volunteers, the slow rises and decreases of skin temperature elicit a consistent periodic EEG response at 0.2 Hz and its harmonics, as well as a periodic modulation of the magnitude of theta, alpha and beta band EEG oscillations. In a second experiment, we demonstrate using an A fiber block that these EEG responses are predominantly conveyed by unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors. The proposed approach constitutes a novel mean to study C fiber function in humans, and to explore the cortical processing of tonic heat pain in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27871921

  7. Determination of elemental composition in dietary supplements by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vitor I.; Saiki, Mitiko, E-mail: vitor.ito@outlook.com, E-mail: mitiko@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Dietary supplements intake has grown in the last years because of their potential health benefits. This supplementation is very common among athletes, elderly population and consumers that want to increase the total daily nutrient intake. Consequently, elemental composition evaluation in these supplements is of great interest due to its increasingly high consumption and the brand variety offered in the market. This study aimed to evaluate the elemental composition in three types of dietary supplements acquired in a pharmacy and drugstore in Sao Paulo city. Concentrations of As, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Na, Sb, Sc, Se and Zn were determined in these supplements by applying neutron activation analysis (NAA) followed by a gamma ray spectrometry. from the concentrations obtained in the dietary supplement analyses, the data obtained were compared to the values presented on the product label. These comparisons indicated in general, a good agreement of the data obtained and the values of the product label depending on the supplement. From the results obtained it can be concluded that NAA is an important tool for the analysis of this type of products due to its reliability of results and its multielemental character. (author)

  8. Staphylococcal SCCmec elements encode an active MCM-like helicase and thus may be replicative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Roman, Christina A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Misiura, Agnieszka [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Abbott Lab., North Chicago, IL (United States); Pigli, Ying Z. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Boyle-Vavra, Susan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). MRSA Research Center; Rice, Phoebe A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2016-08-29

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public-health threat worldwide. Although the mobile genomic island responsible for this phenotype, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC), has been thought to be nonreplicative, we predicted DNA-replication-related functions for some of the conserved proteins encoded by SCC. We show that one of these, Cch, is homologous to the self-loading initiator helicases of an unrelated family of genomic islands, that it is an active 3'-to-5' helicase and that the adjacent ORF encodes a single-stranded DNA–binding protein. Our 2.9-Å crystal structure of intact Cch shows that it forms a hexameric ring. Cch, like the archaeal and eukaryotic MCM-family replicative helicases, belongs to the pre–sensor II insert clade of AAA+ ATPases. Additionally, we found that SCC elements are part of a broader family of mobile elements, all of which encode a replication initiator upstream of their recombinases. Replication after excision would enhance the efficiency of horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Determination of essential elements in commercial baby foods by INAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallinoto, Priscila; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: pvallinoto@ipen.br, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that infants be breast feed exclusively at least six months after birth. After this period, it is recommended to introduce complementary foods, in order to meet nutritional amounts, minerals and energy needs of children. Commercial food products intended for infants form an important part of the diet for many babies, so it is very important that such food contains sufficient amounts of minerals. Inadequate complementary feeding is a major cause of high rates of malnutrition in developing countries. In this study, essential elements: Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Na and Zn levels were determined in seven different commercial food products samples by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The seven baby food samples were acquired in the markets of Sao Paulo city. After 8-hour irradiations in the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the essential elements were determined and the concentrations obtained were lower than the WHO requirements. For validation of the methodology, INCT MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST SRM 1577{sup b} Bovine Liver were analysed. (author)

  10. An Investigation onγinduced activation reactions on human essential elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕翠娟; 马春旺; 刘一璞; 张文岗; 左嘉旭

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, the energy of theγrays used could be larger than 10 MeV, which would potentially activate stable nucleus into a radioactive one. Theγinduced reactions on some of the human essential elements are studied to show the probability of changes of nuclei. The Talys 1.4 toolkit was adopted as the theoretical model for calculation. The reactions investigated include the (γ, n) and (γ, p) channels for the stable Na, Mg, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe isotopes, with the incident energy ofγranging from 1 to 30 MeV. It was found that the cross sections for the reactions are very low, and the maximum cross section is no larger than 100 mb. By considering the threshold energy of the channel, the half-life time of the residue nucleus, and the percentage of the element accounting for the weight and its importance in the body, it is suggested to track the radioactive nuclei 22Na, 41Ca, and 42,43K afterγtherapy. The results might be useful for medical diagnosis and disease treatment.

  11. REDISTRIBUTION OF ALKALINE ELEMENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH AQUEOUS ACTIVITY IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takuya [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yoneda, Shigekazu, E-mail: hidaka@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: s-yoneda@kahaku.go.jp [Department of Science and Engineering, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba 305-0005 (Japan)

    2015-12-10

    It is known that the Sayama meteorite (CM2) shows an extensive signature for aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body, and that most of the primary minerals in the chondrules are replaced with phyllosilicates as the result of the aqueous alteration. In this paper, it is confirmed from the observation of two-dimensional Raman spectra that a part of olivine in a chondrule collected from the Sayama chondrite is serperntinized. Ion microprobe analysis of the chondrule showed that alkaline elements such as Rb and Cs are heterogeneously redistributed in the chondrule. The result of higher Rb and Cs contents in serpentinized phases in the chondrule rather than in other parts suggested the selective adsorption of alkaline elements into the serpentine in association with early aqueous activity on the meteorite parent body. Furthermore Ba isotopic analysis provided variations of {sup 135}Ba/{sup 138}Ba and {sup 137}Ba/{sup 138}Ba in the chondrule. This result was consistent with our previous isotopic data suggesting isotopic evidence for the existence of the presently extinct nuclide {sup 135}Cs in the Sayama meteorite, but the abundance of {sup 135}Cs in the solar system remains unclear because of large analytical uncertainties.

  12. Major and trace elements assessment in sediment from Ituparanga reservoir, by activation analysis and ICP OES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sharlleny A., E-mail: sharllenya@cetesbnet.sp.gov.br [Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental (CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Quimica Inorganica; Bevilacqua, Jose Eduardo [Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental (CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Tecnologia, Qualidade e Avaliacao Ambiental; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2011-07-01

    The Ituparanga reservoir was built to generate electric power by the LIGHT Company and started its operation in 1912. It is fed by the Una, Sorocamirim and Sorocabucu rivers. This reservoir supplies water to a population of 600.000. This water system is affected by irregular soil occupation and urban development which has caught CETESB's (Environmental Company of Sao Paulo State) attention. In this study four geo-referenced sampling points were used and bottom sediment samples were collected. The sediment samples were dried at 400 deg C, ground in an agate mortar, sieved (200 mesh) and again homogenized. The instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the sediment samples in order to determine some major elements (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Zn) and rare earth (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb) elements. By using ICP OES metals determination for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni was undertaken after digestion procedure according to the 3051 method from US EPA. The methodology validation for precision and accuracy was carried out by reference material analyses. For metals Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni the concentration values were compared to the oriented values from Environmental Canada (TEL and PEL). The Enrichment Factor (EF) was calculated for sediment contamination assessment. (author)

  13. A new active piggyBac-like element in Aphis gossypii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guana-Hua Luo; Min Wu; Xiao-Fang Wang; Wei Zhang; Zhao-Jun Han

    2011-01-01

    Nine piggyBac-like elements (PLEs) were identified from the cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover.All the PLEs shared high sequence similarity with each other.However,eight of the nine PLEs were unlikely to encode functional transposase due to the existence of disruptive mutations within the coding regions.The other one PLE contained major characteristics of members in the piggyBac family,including TTAA target site duplications,inverted terminal repeats (ITRs),and an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a transposase with a putative DDD domain.This one with an intact transposase ORF was named AgoPLE1.1.The predicted transposase shared 47% similarity with that of Trichoplusia ni piggyBac IFP2.Phylogenetic analyses showed that AgoPLE1.1 was most related to the Heliothis virescens PLEl.1 (HvPLEl.1) element,with 45% and 60% similarity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels,respectively.A functional assay demonstrated that AgoPLEl.1 encoded a functional transposase and was able to cause precise excision in cell cultures.On the other hand,few genomic insertion polymorphisms of AgoPLE1 were observed in the genome of the cotton aphid.These observations suggested that AgoPLEl.1 was a PLE that invaded the cotton aphid genome in recent periods and retained its activity.

  14. Analysis of Essential Elements for Plants Growth Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Njinga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a total of ten essential elements for plants growth in the Guinea savanna region of Niger State in Northern Nigeria have been identified in the soils using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The experimental results show good agreement with certified or literature values within the agreed percentage range of ±2.35% to ±8.69%. However, the concentration distributions of the ten identified elements in the soil samples within the studied area for plants growth revealed the following: Fe (123.4 ppm, Mn (2100.7 ppm, K (5544.3 ppm, Al (54752.4 ppm, Ti (3082.9 ppm, Ca (4635 ppm, V (54.3 ppm, Na (857.5 ppm, Mg (13924.1 ppm, and Dy (12.1 ppm. A further analysis of the two fundamental soil physical parameters for healthy growth of some common crops like egusimelon, groundnut, rice, yams, soybeans, cassava, and potato analyzed in this work revealed a pH range of 4.0 pH–8.0 pH and a temperature range of 28.0°C to 29.3°C, which are optimal for plant nutrients availability in the soils within the study area.

  15. Major and trace elements assessment in sediment samples from Rio Grande Reservoir, by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Robson L.; Ferreira, Francisco J., E-mail: robsonf@cetesbnet.sp.gov.b [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo(CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Quimica Inorganica e Radioatividade; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica; Bevilacqua, Jose Eduardo [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo(CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Qualidade das Aguas

    2009-07-01

    The Rio Grande Reservoir, Southeast of the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) supplies water for four counties (Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Caetano do Sul, Santo Andre and Diadema). It has been seriously affected by urban expansion, due to chaotic urban occupation and improper use of the surrounding areas. In this study bottom sediment samples were collected, by using a Van Veen sampler, during the dry and rainy seasons. Four sampling points were defined by using GPS and are located at the mouth of the Rio Grande and Ribeirao Pires Rivers, in the middle of the reservoir and near the catchment point of the water supply. The sediment samples were submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and the following elements were determined: As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U e Zn and the rare earth elements Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb, Yb. Short irradiation was also performed for total Hg determination by NAA using {sup 197}Hg radioisotope. This was possible due to the high Hg concentration levels in these sediments. The methodology validation was carried out by certified reference material analyses. The results obtained for multielemental concentrations in the sediment samples were compared to NASC (North American Shale Composite) values. The concentration values obtained for As and metals Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values) and adopted by CETESB. (author)

  16. Parsing of Myanmar sentences with function tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Thant, Win Win; Thein, Ni Lar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Naive Bayes to address the task of assigning function tags and context free grammar (CFG) to parse Myanmar sentences. Part of the challenge of statistical function tagging for Myanmar sentences comes from the fact that Myanmar has free-phrase-order and a complex morphological system. Function tagging is a pre-processing step for parsing. In the task of function tagging, we use the functional annotated corpus and tag Myanmar sentences with correct segmentation, POS (part-of-speech) tagging and chunking information. We propose Myanmar grammar rules and apply context free grammar (CFG) to find out the parse tree of function tagged Myanmar sentences. Experiments show that our analysis achieves a good result with parsing of simple sentences and three types of complex sentences.

  17. Enhancing Navigation on Wikipedia with Social Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, Arkaitz

    2012-01-01

    Social tagging has become an interesting approach to improve search and navigation over the actual Web, since it aggregates the tags added by different users to the same resource in a collaborative way. This way, it results in a list of weighted tags describing its resource. Combined to a classical taxonomic classification system such as that by Wikipedia, social tags can enhance document navigation and search. On the one hand, social tags suggest alternative navigation ways, including pivot-browsing, popularity-driven navigation, and filtering. On the other hand, it provides new metadata, sometimes uncovered by documents' content, that can substantially improve document search. In this work, the inclusion of an interface to add user-defined tags describing Wikipedia articles is proposed, as a way to improve article navigation and retrieval. As a result, a prototype on applying tags over Wikipedia is proposed in order to evaluate its effectiveness.

  18. Effect of Nano Red Elemental Selenium on GPx Activity of Broiler Chick Kidney Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Bao-hua; Xu Zi-rong; Xia Mei-sheng; Hu Cai-hong; Deng Yue-song; Xiong Li

    2003-01-01

    A new selenium source, Nano red elemental selenium (Nano-Se) was used to study the effect on the GPx activity of broiler chick kidney cells (BCKC) in vitro, Sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and seleno-1-methionine (Se-Met) were used as the controls. The results showed that the effects of three kinds of Se forms on the GPx activity of BCKC were accordant(p>0.05) compared with each other at 0.01,0.05 and 0.10 μmol/L Se concentrations treatments. In the range of 0.00-0.10 μmol/L Se concentrations, the GPx activity increased with elevation of Se concentrations in medium. For the three kinds of Se forms, the GPx activity reached the climax at 0.10 μmol/L Se concentration. At 0.20 and 0.30 μmol/L Se concentrations, the influnces of three kinds of Se forms were not accordant with one another. For Nano-Se, the GPx activity at 0.20 and 0.30 μmol/L Se concentrations remained the same as that at 0.10 μmol/L Se concentration treatment. For Se-Met, the GPx activity at 0.20 μmol/L Se concentration treatment remained the same with 0.10 μmol/L treatment; the GPx activity at 0.30 μmol/L Se concentration treatment was declined significantly(p<0.05) compared with 0.10 or 0.20 μmol/L treatment. For Na2SeO3, the GPx activity falled gradually with Se concentration increasing from 0.10 μmol/L to 0.30 μmol/L, and at 0.30 μmol/L Se concentration treatment, the GPx activity was less than the original of BCKC. The results implicated, on the GPx activity of BCKC in vitro, the ranking of width range of the most suitable Se concentration for nutrition curve of the three Se formes is Nano-Se>Se-Met>Na2SeO3.

  19. Neutron Activation Analysis of the Rare Earth Elements (REE) - With Emphasis on Geological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosch, Heinz-Günter

    2016-08-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been the analytical method of choice for rare earth element (REE) analysis from the early 1960s through the 1980s. At that time, irradiation facilitieswere widely available and fairly easily accessible. The development of high-resolution gamma-ray detectors in the mid-1960s eliminated, formany applications, the need for chemical separation of the REE from the matrix material, making NAA a reliable and effective analytical tool. While not as precise as isotopedilution mass spectrometry, NAA was competitive by being sensitive for the analysis of about half of the rare earths (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu). The development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry since the 1980s, together with decommissioning of research reactors and the lack of installation of new ones in Europe and North America has led to the rapid decline of NAA.

  20. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  1. Effect of Rare Earths on Composition and Activities of Rare Earth Elements Binding Glycoprotein in Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪东风; 李俊; 赵贵文; 王常红; 魏正贵; 尹明

    2001-01-01

    The effects of spraying rare earths(RE) on composition and activities of tea polysaccharide were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), gas chromatography(GC), amino acid analyzer and animal models. The results show that there are rare earth elements binding glycoprotein in tea (REE-TGP). The effects of RE on composition and content of saccharides in REE-TGP are not obvious. The contents of Hypro and Ser in REE-TGP are evidently enhanced in comparison with that in control (not treated with rare earth), but the content of Glu is smaller than that from control. The content of La in REE-TGP from the tea garden sprayed rare earth is 193% higher than that in control. REE-TGP declines content of blood sugar in mice and enhances immunization of rat, which are very evident when the animals are treated by REE-TGP from the tea garden sprayed RE.

  2. Assessment of Modeled Received Sound Pressure Levels and Movements of Satellite-Tagged Odontocetes Exposed to Mid-Frequency Active Sonar at the Pacific Missile Range Facility: February 2011 Through February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Brandon L. Southall3 1Cascadia Research Collective, 218 ½ W. 4th Avenue, Olympia, WA 98501 2Marine Mammal Scientific and Veterinary Support...location data from satellite tags and available acoustic recordings and selected a subset of data for which there was sufficient overlap. The MFAS...location data from satellite- tagged individuals and modeling to estimate received levels from acoustic recordings from the PMRF hydrophones is a viable and

  3. Chromatin modification contributes to the expression divergence of three TaGS2 homoeologs in hexaploid wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiaoli; Gao, Yingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Lijing; Su, Qiannan; Han, Jie; Zhang, Na; Cui, Fa; Ji, Jun; Tong, Yiping; Li, Junming

    2017-01-01

    Plastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) is responsible for ammonium assimilation. The reason that TaGS2 homoeologs in hexaploid wheat experience different selection pressures in the breeding process remains unclear. TaGS2 were minimally expressed in roots but predominantly expressed in leaves, and TaGS2-B had higher expression than TaGS2-A and TaGS2-D. ChIP assays revealed that the activation of TaGS2-B expression in leaves was correlated with increased H3K4 trimethylation. The transcriptional silencing of TaGS2 in roots was correlated with greater cytosine methylation and less H3K4 trimethylation. Micrococcal nuclease and DNase I accessibility experiments indicated that the promoter region was more resistant to digestion in roots than leaves, which indicated that the closed nucleosome conformation of the promoter region was important to the transcription initiation for the spatial-temporal expression of TaGS2. In contrast, the transcribed regions possess different nuclease accessibilities of three TaGS2 homoeologs in the same tissue, suggesting that nucleosome conformation of the transcribed region was part of the fine adjustment of TaGS2 homoeologs. This study provides evidence that histone modification, DNA methylation and nuclease accessibility coordinated the control of the transcription of TaGS2 homoeologs. Our results provided important evidence that TaGS2-B experienced the strongest selection pressures during the breeding process. PMID:28300215

  4. Multiple sequence elements facilitate Chp Rho GTPase subcellular location, membrane association, and transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, Emily J; Mitin, Natalia Y; Der, Channing J

    2006-07-01

    Cdc42 homologous protein (Chp) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases and shares significant sequence and functional similarity with Cdc42. However, unlike classical Rho GTPases, we recently found that Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than prenylation, for association with cellular membranes. Because palmitoylation alone is typically not sufficient to promote membrane association, we evaluated the possibility that other carboxy-terminal residues facilitate Chp subcellular association with membranes. We found that Chp membrane association and transforming activity was dependent on the integrity of a stretch of basic amino acids in the carboxy terminus of Chp and that the basic amino acids were not simply part of a palmitoyl acyltransferase recognition motif. We also determined that the 11 carboxy-terminal residues alone were sufficient to promote Chp plasma and endomembrane association. Interestingly, stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated only endomembrane-associated Chp. Finally, we found that Chp membrane association was not disrupted by Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitory proteins, which are negative regulators of Cdc42 membrane association and biological activity. In summary, the unique carboxy-terminal sequence elements that promote Chp subcellular location and function expand the complexity of mechanisms by which the cellular functions of Rho GTPases are regulated.

  5. Activation of Lineage Regulators and Transposable Elements across a Pluripotent Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A. Hackett

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs are characterized by the pluripotent capacity to generate all embryonic lineages. Here, we show that ESCs can occupy a spectrum of distinct transcriptional and epigenetic states in response to varied extrinsic conditions. This spectrum broadly corresponds to a developmental continuum of pluripotency and is coupled with a gradient of increasing global DNA methylation. Each pluripotent state is linked with activation of distinct classes of transposable elements (TEs, which in turn influence ESCs through generating chimeric transcripts. Moreover, varied ESC culture parameters differentially license heterogeneous activation of master lineage regulators, including Sox1, Gata4, or Blimp1, and influence differentiation. Activation of Blimp1 is prevalent in 2i (without LIF conditions, and marks a dynamic primordial germ cell (PGC-like sub-state that is directly repressed by Klf4 downstream of LIF/STAT3 signaling. Thus, extrinsic cues establish a spectrum of pluripotent states, in part by modulating sub-populations, as well as directing the transcriptome, epigenome, and TE.

  6. Activation of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes by roasted coffee extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazheng, Liu; Kitts, David D

    2012-09-01

    Coffee beans contain numerous bioactive components that exhibit antioxidant capacity when assessed using both chemical, cell free, and biological, cell-based model systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effects of coffee in biological systems are not totally understood and in some cases vary considerably from results obtained with simpler in vitro chemical assays. In the present study, the physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts were investigated in both cell free (ORAC(FL)) and cell-based systems. A profile of antioxidant gene expression in cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells treated with both roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts, respectively, was investigated using Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array technology. Results demonstrated that the mechanisms of the antioxidant activity associated with coffee constituents assessed by the ORAC(FL) assay were different to those observed using an intracellular oxidation assay with Caco-2 cells. Moreover, roasted coffee (both light and dark roasted) extracts produced both increased- and decreased-expressions of numerous genes that are involved in the management of oxidative stress via the antioxidant defence system. The selective and specific positive induction of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes, including gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPX2), sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), peroxiredoxin 4 (PDRX4) and peroxiredoxin 6 (PDRX6) were identified with the activation of the endogenous antioxidant defence system in Caco-2 cells.

  7. Drosophila gypsy insulator and yellow enhancers regulate activity of yellow promoter through the same regulatory element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Larisa; Kostuchenko, Margarita; Silicheva, Margarita; Georgiev, Pavel

    2008-04-01

    There is ample evidence that the enhancers of a promoterless yellow locus in one homologous chromosome can activate the yellow promoter in the other chromosome where the enhancers are inactive or deleted, which is indicative of a high specificity of the enhancer-promoter interaction in yellow. In this paper, we have found that the yellow sequence from -100 to -69 is essential for stimulation of the heterologous eve (TATA-containing) and white (TATA-less) promoters by the yellow enhancers from a distance. However, the presence of this sequence is not required when the yellow enhancers are directly fused to the heterologous promoters or are activated by the yeast GAL4 activator. Unexpectedly, the same promoter proximal region defines previously described promoter-specific, long-distance repression of the yellow promoter by the gypsy insulator on the mod(mdg4) ( u1 ) background. These finding suggest that proteins bound to the -100 to -69 sequence are essential for communication between the yellow promoter and upstream regulatory elements.

  8. Tag-Recommender gestützte Annotation von Web-Dokumenten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumauer, Andreas; Hochmeister, Martin

    In diesem Kapitel wird die zentrale Bedeutung der Annotation von Webdokumenten bzw. von Ressourcen in einem Semantischen Web diskutiert. Es wird auf aktuelle Methoden und Techniken in diesem Gebiet eingegangen, insbesondere wird das Phänomen Social Tagging" als zentrales Element eines Social Semantic Webs" beleuchtet. Weiters wird der Frage nachgegangen, welchen Mehrwert Tag Recommender" beim Annotationsvorgang bieten, sowohl aus Sicht des End-Users aber auch im Sinne eines kollaborativen Ontologieerstellungsprozesses. Schließlich wird ein Funktionsprinzip für einen semi-automatischen Tag-Recommender vorgestellt unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Anwendbarkeit in einem Corporate Semantic Web.

  9. OSIRIS-REx Touch-And-Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIES-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper will summarize the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and present analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and +-2 cms of the targeted contact velocity. The paper will describe some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  10. OSIRI-REx Touch and Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIS-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive maneuvers required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper also summarizes the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and presents analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and 2 cm/s of the targeted contact velocity. The paper describes some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  11. GALAH Survey: Chemical tagging and disk reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Sharma, S.

    2016-09-01

    The GALAH survey is now in its second year of a five-year campaign to observe roughly one million stars in the southern hemisphere down to a limiting magnitude of {V=14}. The project exploits the HERMES 400-fibre échelle spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope to measure up to 30 elemental abundances and radial velocities (≈1 km s-1 accuracy) for each star at a resolution of {R=28 000}. These elements fall into 8 independent groups (e.g. α, Fe peak, s-process). For all GALAH stars, Gaia will provide distances to 1% and transverse velocities to 1 km s-1 or better, giving us a 14D set of parameters for each star, i.e. 6D phase space and 8D abundance space. A few percent of GALAH stars will also have Kepler K2 seismological data. Here we focus on the prospect of chemically tagging the old stellar disk and making a direct measurement of how stellar migration evolves with cosmic time.

  12. The Collective Knowledge of Social Tags: Direct and Indirect Influences on Navigation, Learning, and Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ulrike; Held, Christoph; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tag clouds generated in social tagging systems can capture the collective knowledge of communities. Using as a basis spreading activation theories, information foraging theory, and the co-evolution model of cognitive and social systems, we present here a model for an "extended information scent," which proposes that both collective and individual…

  13. The Collective Knowledge of Social Tags: Direct and Indirect Influences on Navigation, Learning, and Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ulrike; Held, Christoph; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tag clouds generated in social tagging systems can capture the collective knowledge of communities. Using as a basis spreading activation theories, information foraging theory, and the co-evolution model of cognitive and social systems, we present here a model for an "extended information scent," which proposes that both collective and individual…

  14. Two essential regulatory elements in the human interferon gamma promoter confer activation specific expression in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, L; Weaver, W M; Pang, Y; Young, H A; Wilson, C B

    1993-11-01

    Like interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) is an early response gene in T cells and both are prototypical T helper cell type 1 (Th-1) lymphokines. Yet IL-2 and IFN-gamma production are independently regulated, as demonstrated by their differential expression in certain T cell subsets, suggesting that the regulatory elements in these two genes must differ. To explore this possibility, the 5' flank of the human IFN-gamma gene was analyzed. Expression of IFN-gamma promoter-driven beta-galactosidase reporter constructs containing 538 bp of 5' flank was similar to that by constructs driven by the IL-2 promoter in activated Jurkat T cells; expression nearly as great was observed with the construct containing only 108 bp of IFN-gamma 5' flank. These IFN-gamma promoter constructs faithfully mirrored expression of the endogenous gene, in that expression required activation both with ionomycin and PMA, was inhibited by cyclosporin A, and was not observed in U937 or THP-1 cells. The region between -108 and -40 bp in the IFN-gamma promoter was required for promoter function and contained two elements that are conserved across species. Deletion of 10 bp within either element reduced promoter function by 70%, whereas deletions in nonconserved portions of this region had little effect on promoter function. The distal conserved element (-96 to -80 bp) contained a consensus GATA motif and a potential regulatory motif found in the promoter regions of the GM-CSF and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) genes. Factors binding to this element, including GATA-3, were found in Jurkat nuclear extracts by electromobility shift assays and two of the three complexes observed were altered in response to activation. One or both of these motifs are present in the 5' flank of multiple, other lymphokine genes, including IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF, but neither is present in the promoter of the IL-2 gene. The proximal conserved element (-73 to -48 bp) shares homology with the NFIL-2

  15. Assessment of PIT tag retention and post-tagging survival in metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Lee G; Sotola, V Alex; Marsden, J Ellen; Miehls, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags have been used to document and monitor the movement or behavior of numerous species of fishes. Data on short-term and long-term survival and tag retention are needed before initiating studies using PIT tags on a new species or life stage. We evaluated the survival and tag retention of 153 metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus tagged with 12 mm PIT tags on three occasions using a simple surgical procedure. Results: Tag retention was 100% and 98.6% at 24 h and 28-105 d post-tagging. Of the lamprey that retained their tags, 87.3% had incisions sufficiently healed to prevent further loss. Survival was 100% and 92.7% at 24 h and 41-118 d post-tagging with no significant difference in survival between tagged and untagged control lamprey. Of the 11 lamprey that died, four had symptoms that indicated their death was directly related to tagging. Survival was positively correlated with Sea Lamprey length. Conclusions: Given the overall high level of survival and tag retention in this study, future studies can utilize 12 mm PIT tags to monitor metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey movement and migration patterns.

  16. Improving genetic evaluation using a multitrait single-step genomic model for ability to resume cycling after calving, measured by activity tags in Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Ahmed; Løvendahl, Peter; Fogh, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improvement of the accuracy of estimated breeding values for ability to recycle after calving by using information of genomic markers and phenotypic information of correlated traits. The traits in this study were the interval from calving to first...... to first high activity, and the genetic correlation between both traits was strong (0.87). Breeding values were obtained using 4 models: conventional single-trait BLUP; conventional multitrait BLUP with pedigree-based relationship matrix; single-trait single-step genomic BLUP; and multitrait single......-step genomic BLUP model with joint relationship matrix combining pedigree and genomic information. The results showed that reliabilities of estimated breeding values (EBV) from single-step genomic BLUP models were about 40% higher than those from conventional BLUP models for both traits. Furthermore, using...

  17. Efficient heterologous expression and one-step purification of fully active c-terminal histidine-tagged uridine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penpassakarn, Praweenuch; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has long been recognized as one of the most significant public health problems. Finding novel antituberculous drugs is always a necessary approach for controlling the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrH gene (Rv2883c) encodes for uridine monophosphate kinase (UMK), which is a key enzyme in the uridine nucleotide interconversion pathway. The enzyme is essential for M. tuberculosis to sustain growth and hence is a potential drug target. In this study, we have developed a rapid protocol for production and purification of M. tuberculosis UMK by cloning pyrH (Rv2883c) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv with the addition of 6-histidine residues to the C-terminus of the protein, and expressing in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIPL using an auto-induction medium. The enzyme was efficiently purified by a single-step TALON cobalt affinity chromatography with about 8 fold increase in specific activity, which was determined by a coupled assay with the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular mass of monomeric UMK was 28.2 kDa and that of the native enzyme was 217 kDa. The enzyme uses UMP as a substrate but not CMP and TMP and activity was enhanced by GTP. Measurements of enzyme kinetics revealed the kcat value of 7.6 +/- 0.4 U mg(-1) or 0.127 +/- 0.006 sec(-1).The protocol reported here can be used for expression of M. tuberculosis UMK in large quantity for formulating a high throughput target-based assay for screening anti-tuberculosis UMK compounds.

  18. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyan [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Peng [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Hou, Yongyong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Hao [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Hongzhi [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhou, Tong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Teng, Weiping [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jingbopi@gmail.com [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  19. Molecular biology of maize Ac/Ds elements: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarow, Katina; Doll, My-Linh; Kunze, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Maize Activator (Ac) is one of the prototype transposable elements of the hAT transposon superfamily, members of which were identified in plants, fungi, and animals. The autonomous Ac and nonautonomous Dissociation (Ds) elements are mobilized by the single transposase protein encoded by Ac. To date Ac/Ds transposons were shown to be functional in approximately 20 plant species and have become the most widely used transposable elements for gene tagging and functional genomics approaches in plants. In this chapter we review the biology, regulation, and transposition mechanism of Ac/Ds elements in maize and heterologous plants. We discuss the parameters that are known to influence the functionality and transposition efficiency of Ac/Ds transposons and need to be considered when designing Ac transposase expression constructs and Ds elements for application in heterologous plant species.

  20. Investigation of Kpong carbonatite as a potential source for rare earth elements (REEs) using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayford, M.S.; Akiti, T.T.; Serfor-Armah, Y.; Dampare, S.B. [Ghana Univ., Accra (Ghana). School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), Legon-Accra (Ghana). Nuclear Chemistry and Environmental Research Centre

    2013-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to investigate REEs in carbonatite from Kpong southeastern, Ghana. Total rare earth element (TREEs) obtain were in the range of 540 mg/kg to 705 mg/kg. The total number of rare earth elements (REEs) determined by INAA in the carbonatite rocks from Kpong were 11, namely; La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm, Yb, Lu. The INAA results from the carbonatite show a high enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREEs) deposits, marking the Kpong carbonatite as a potential REE source. (orig.)

  1. New Element Organic Frameworks Based on Sn, Sb, and Bi, with Permanent Porosity and High Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fritsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present new element organic frameworks based on Sn, Sb and Bi atoms connected via organic linkers by element-carbon bonds. The open frameworks are characterized by specific surface areas (BET of up to 445 m2 g-1 and a good stability under ambient conditions resulting from a highly hydrophobic inner surface. They show good performance as heterogeneous catalysts in the cyanosylilation of benzaldehyde as a test reaction. Due to their catalytic activity, this class of materials might be able to replace common homogeneous element-organic and often highly toxic catalysts especially in the food industry.

  2. Characteristic Elemental Composition of Oil Pigments using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Sun Ha; Sun, Gwang Min; Lim, Jong Myung; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung Jin; Song, Yu Na; Kim, Ken [National Museum of Contemporary Art, Gwacheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The principal aim of this study is to identify the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis as a non-destructive examination tool for the quantitative composition analysis associated with authentication, restoration, and conservation of art objects in the field of cultural heritage. Generally, the chemical composition of pigments are associated with the colors such as white, yellow, orange, red, green, blue and black, and it varies with raw materials of pigments. According to the colors of a different pigments, chemical compositions are as follows; for example, white pigments were used for a mixture of Pb(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}, PbSO{sub 4}, PbO, Pb(OH){sub 2}, ZnO, ZnS, TiO{sub 2}, BaSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, As{sub 2}S{sub 3}, etc.; black pigments were series of carbon black, borne ash, MnO+Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc.; red pigments were Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4}, HgS, PbMo{sub 4}, CdS+CdSe, etc.; brown and yellow pigments were PbCrO{sub 4}, ZnCrO{sub 4}, CdS-ZnS, K{sub 3}[Co(NO{sub 2}){sub 6}], Pb(SbO{sub 3}){sub 2}, C{sub 19}H{sub 16}O{sub 11}Mg, SrCrO{sub 4}, etc.; green pigments were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O(OH){sub 4}, Cu(C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sub 2})-2Cu(OH){sub 2}), Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CoO, etc.; blue pigments were Fe{sub 4}[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}, CoO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 8}-{sub 10}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24}S{sub 2-4}, etc. This first step is to obtain quantitative data on the concentrations of major, minor and trace elements in oil pigments and to explain pigment sources by statistical treatment as reported in many literatures. The determination of major, minor and micro elements in the subject materials are essential in many fields of basic science and technology as well as commercial and industrial fields. In particular, direct analysis of a sample offers a more effective investigation method in these fields. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has an inherent advantage of being a

  3. Atmospheric deposition of rare earth elements in Albania studied by the moss biomonitoring technique, neutron activation analysis and GIS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allajbeu, Sh; Yushin, N S; Qarri, F; Duliu, O G; Lazo, P; Frontasyeva, M V

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are typically conservative elements that are scarcely derived from anthropogenic sources. The mobilization of REEs in the environment requires the monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are present at trace level. The determination of 11 REEs in carpet-forming moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme) collected from 44 sampling sites over the whole territory of the country were done by using epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) at IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in Dubna. This paper is focused on REEs (lanthanides) and Sc. Fe as typical consistent element and Th that appeared good correlations between the elements of lanthanides are included in this paper. Th, Sc, and REEs were never previously determined in the air deposition of Albania. Descriptive statistics were used for data treatment using MINITAB 17 software package. The median values of the elements under investigation were compared with those of the neighboring countries such as Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia, as well as Norway which is selected as a clean area. Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. Geochemical behavior of REEs in moss samples has been studied by using the ternary diagram of Sc-La-Th, Spider diagrams and multivariate analysis. It was revealed that the accumulation of REEs in current mosses is associated with the wind-blowing metal-enriched soils that is pointed out as the main emitting factor of the elements under investigation.

  4. Santos estuarine sediments, Brazil - metal and trace element assessment by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Eduardo P.; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: ducamorim@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Berbel, Glaucia; Braga, Elisabete S., E-mail: edsbraga@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico. Lab. de Nutrientes, Micronutrientes e Tracos nos Oceanos (LABNUT)

    2009-07-01

    The Santos estuary system is an intricate pattern of tidal channels and small rivers originating from the adjacent Pre-Cambrian slopes. These two major estuaries share a common area in the upper portion of the region which interacts with each other. The largest harbor in Latin America is located at the eastern outlet of the Santos estuary. This intricate and sensitive ecosystem is highly susceptible to human impact from industrial activities, urban sewage and polluted solid wastes disposal. Due to its high vulnerability CETESB (Environmental Control Agency of the Sao Paulo State) sporadically monitors the contamination levels of water, sediment and marine organisms in this region. The present study reports results concerning the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements in the Santos estuarine marine sediments. Thirty two bottom sediment samples (SS0601 to SS0616 (summer) and SW0601 to SW0616 (winter) were collected in this estuary, including regions of Sao Vicente, Santos, Cubatao and Vicente de Carvalho, by a vanVeen sampler in the summer and winter of 2006. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The concentration values obtained for As and metals Cr and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values) and are adopted by CETESB. (author)

  5. Sampling and major element chemistry of the recent (A.D. 1631-1944) Vesuvius activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H.E.; Kilburn, C.R.J.; de Vivo, B.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed sampling of the Vesuvius lavas erupted in the period A.D. 1631-1944 provides a suite of samples for comprehensive chemical analyses and related studies. Major elements (Si, Ti, Al, Fetotal, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K and P), volatile species (Cl, F, S, H2O+, H2O- and CO2), and ferrous iron (Fe2+) were determined for one hundred and forty-nine lavas and five tephra from the A.D. 1631-1944 Vesuvius activity. The lavas represent a relatively homogeneous suite with respect to SiO2, TiO2, FeOtotal, MnO and P2O5, but show systematic variations among MgO, K2O, Na2O, Al2O3 and CaO. The average SiO2 content is 48.0 wt.% and the rocks are classified as tephriphonolites according to their content of alkalis. All of the lavas are silica-undersaturated and are nepheline, leucite, and olivine normative. There is no systematic variation in major-element composition with time, over the period A.D. 1631-1944. The inter-eruption and intra-eruption compositional differences are the same magnitude. The lavas are highly porphyritic with clinopyroxene and leucite as the major phases. Fractionation effects are not reflected in the silica content of the lavas. The variability of MgO, K2O, Na2O, and CaO can be modelled as a relative depletion or accumulation of clinopyroxene. ?? 1993.

  6. Control of electro-rheological fluid based resistive torque elements for use in active rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present control algorithms for novel electro-rheological fluid based resistive torque generation elements that will be used to drive the joint of a new type of portable and controllable active knee rehabilitation orthotic device (AKROD) for iso-inertial, isokinetic, and isometric exercising as well as gait retraining. The AKROD is composed of straps and rigid components for attachment to the leg, with a central hinge mechanism where a gear system is connected. The key features of AKROD include: a compact, lightweight design with highly tunable torque capabilities through a variable damper component, full portability with on-board power, control circuitry, and sensors (encoder and torque), and real-time capabilities for closed loop computer control for optimizing gait retraining. The variable damper component is achieved through an electro-rheological fluid (ERF) element that connects to the output of the gear system. Using the electrically controlled rheological properties of ERFs, compact brakes capable of supplying high resistive and controllable torques are developed. In this project, a prototype for the AKROD has been developed and tested. The AKROD's ERF resistive actuator was tested in laboratory experiments using a custom-made ERF testing apparatus (ETA). ETA provides a computer-controlled environment to test ERF brakes and actuators in various conditions and scenarios including emulating the interaction between human muscles involved with the knee and the AKROD's ERF actuators/brakes. The AKROD's ERF resistive actuator was tested in closed loop torque control experiments. A hybrid (non-linear, adaptive) proportional-integral (PI) torque controller was implemented to achieve this goal.

  7. Development of RAP Tag, a Novel Tagging System for Protein Detection and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuki; Kaneko, Mika K; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Nakamura, Takuro; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Honma, Ryusuke; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Affinity tag systems, possessing high affinity and specificity, are useful for protein detection and purification. The most suitable tag for a particular purpose should be selected from many available affinity tag systems. In this study, we developed a novel affinity tag called the "RAP tag" system, which comprises a mouse antirat podoplanin monoclonal antibody (clone PMab-2) and the RAP tag (DMVNPGLEDRIE). This system is useful not only for protein detection in Western blotting, flow cytometry, and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but also for protein purification.

  8. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  9. Roles of sulfuric acid in elemental mercury removal by activated carbon and sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Eric A; Kirk, Donald W; Jia, Charles Q; Morita, Kazuki

    2012-07-17

    This work addresses the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effects of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) on elemental Hg uptake by activated carbon (AC). H(2)SO(4) in AC substantially increased Hg uptake by absorption particularly in the presence of oxygen. Hg uptake increased with acid amount and temperature exceeding 500 mg-Hg/g-AC after 3 days at 200 °C with AC treated with 20% H(2)SO(4). In the absence of other strong oxidizers, oxygen was able to oxidize Hg. Upon oxidation, Hg was more readily soluble in the acid, greatly enhancing its uptake by acid-treated AC. Without O(2), S(VI) in H(2)SO(4) was able to oxidize Hg, thus making it soluble in H(2)SO(4). Consequently, the presence of a bulk H(2)SO(4) phase within AC pores resulted in an orders of magnitude increase in Hg uptake capacity. However, the bulk H(2)SO(4) phase lowered the AC pore volume and could block the access to the active surface sites and potentially hinder Hg uptake kinetics. AC treated with SO(2) at 700 °C exhibited a much faster rate of Hg uptake attributed to sulfur functional groups enhancing adsorption kinetics. SO(2)-treated carbon maintained its fast uptake kinetics even after impregnation by 20% H(2)SO(4).

  10. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulate Myelination in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Nishimura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS, and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation

  11. Onboard tagging for smart medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kejia; Warren, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Most medical devices are 'dumb:' their role is to acquire, display, and forward data. They make few if any operational decisions based on those data. Onboard tagging is a means whereby a device can embed information about itself, its data, and the sensibility of those data into its data stream. This diagnostic add-on offers a move toward 'smart' devices that will have the ability to affect changes in operational modes based on onboard contextual decision making, such as decisions to avoid needless wireless transmission of corrupt data. This paper presents a description of three types of onboard tags that relate to device hardware (type I tag), signal statistics (type II tag), and signal viability for the intended application (type III tag). A custom wireless pulse oximeter is presented as a use case to show how type II and III tags that convey photoplethysmogram (PPG) statistics and usability specifiers can be calculated and embedded into the data stream without degrading performance.

  12. Hypergraph model of social tagging networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of a new family of paradigms, so-called folksonomy, which allows users to freely associate tags to resources and efficiently manage them. In order to uncover the underlying structures and user behaviors in folksonomy, in this paper, we propose an evolutionary hypergrah model to explain the emerging statistical properties. The present model introduces a novel mechanism that one can not only assign tags to resources, but also retrieve resources via collaborative tags. We then compare the model with a real-world dataset: \\emph{Del.icio.us}. Indeed, the present model shows considerable agreement with the empirical data in following aspects: power-law hyperdegree distributions, negtive correlation between clustering coefficients and hyperdegrees, and small average distances. Furthermore, the model indicates that most tagging behaviors are motivated by labeling tags to resources, and tags play a significant role in effectively retrieving interesting resources and ...

  13. Building Tag Clouds in Perl and PHP

    CERN Document Server

    Bumgardner, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Tag clouds are everywhere on the web these days. First popularized by the web sites Flickr, Technorati, and del.icio.us, these amorphous clumps of words now appear on a slew of web sites as visual evidence of their membership in the elite corps of "Web 2.0." This PDF analyzes what is and isn't a tag cloud, offers design tips for using them effectively, and then goes on to show how to collect tags and display them in the tag cloud format. Scripts are provided in Perl and PHP. Yes, some have said tag clouds are a fad. But as you will see, tag clouds, when used properly, have real merits. More

  14. Understanding why users tag: A survey of tagging motivation literature and results from an empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Markus; Körner, Christian; Kern, Roman

    2012-01-01

    While recent progress has been achieved in understanding the structure and dynamics of social tagging systems, we know little about the underlying user motivations for tagging, and how they influence resulting folksonomies and tags. This paper addresses three issues related to this question. (1) What distinctions of user motivations are identified by previous research, and in what ways are the motivations of users amenable to quantitative analysis? (2) To what extent does tagging motivation vary across different social tagging systems? (3) How does variability in user motivation influence resulting tags and folksonomies? In this paper, we present measures to detect whether a tagger is primarily motivated by categorizing or describing resources, and apply these measures to datasets from seven different tagging systems. Our results show that (a) users’ motivation for tagging varies not only across, but also within tagging systems, and that (b) tag agreement among users who are motivated by categorizing resources is significantly lower than among users who are motivated by describing resources. Our findings are relevant for (1) the development of tag-based user interfaces, (2) the analysis of tag semantics and (3) the design of search algorithms for social tagging systems. PMID:23471473

  15. Learner Corpora without Error Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastelli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the possibility of adopting a form-to-function perspective when annotating learner corpora in order to get deeper insights about systematic features of interlanguage. A split between forms and functions (or categories is desirable in order to avoid the "comparative fallacy" and because – especially in basic varieties – forms may precede functions (e.g., what resembles to a "noun" might have a different function or a function may show up in unexpected forms. In the computer-aided error analysis tradition, all items produced by learners are traced to a grid of error tags which is based on the categories of the target language. Differently, we believe it is possible to record and make retrievable both words and sequence of characters independently from their functional-grammatical label in the target language. For this purpose at the University of Pavia we adapted a probabilistic POS tagger designed for L1 on L2 data. Despite the criticism that this operation can raise, we found that it is better to work with "virtual categories" rather than with errors. The article outlines the theoretical background of the project and shows some examples in which some potential of SLA-oriented (non error-based tagging will be possibly made clearer.

  16. Security Tagged Architecture Co-Design (STACD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    software that uses tagged information. We will develop a tag enabled Operating System (OS) that permits the simplification and reduction in size of...The Security Tagged Architecture Co-Design (STACD) initiative focuses on eliminating inherent software vulnerabilities by redesigning the underlying...hardware and the operating system to enforce software security policies and semantics. The new approach will use a metadata processing unit known as

  17. Carbon Nanostructures for Tagging in Electrochemical Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing demand for developing ultrasensitive electrochemical bioassays has led to the design of numerous signal amplification strategies. In this context, carbon-based nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be excellent tags for greatly amplifying the transduction of recognition events and simplifying the protocols used in electrochemical biosensing. This relevant role is due to the carbon-nanomaterials’ large surface area, excellent biological compatibility and ease functionalization and, in some cases, intrinsic electrochemistry. These carbon-based nanomaterials involve well-known carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene as well as the more recent use of other carbon nanoforms. This paper briefly discusses the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites for amplification through tagging in electrochemical biosensing platforms and provides an updated overview of some selected examples making use of labels involving carbon nanomaterials, acting both as carriers for signal elements and as electrochemical tracers, applied to the electrochemical biosensing of relevant (biomarkers.

  18. Effective Personalized Recommendation in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2009-01-01

    Recently, collaborative tagging systems have attracted more and more attention and have been widely applied in web systems. Tags provide highly abstracted information about personal preferences and item content, and are therefore potential to help in improving better personalized recommendations. In this paper, we propose a tag-based recommendation algorithm considering the personal vocabulary and evaluate it in a real-world dataset: Del.icio.us. Experimental results demonstrate that the usage of tag information can significantly improve the accuracy of personalized recommendations.

  19. Using Interference to Block RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Rasmus; Popovski, Petar; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag.......We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag....

  20. Using Interference to Block RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Rasmus; Popovski, Petar; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag.......We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag....

  1. An active hAT transposable element causing bud mutation of carnation by insertion into the flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Masaki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Itoh, Yoshio; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Toguri, Toshihiro; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying spontaneous bud mutations, which provide an important breeding tool in carnation, are poorly understood. Here we describe a new active hAT type transposable element, designated Tdic101, the movement of which caused a bud mutation in carnation that led to a change of flower color from purple to deep pink. The color change was attributed to Tdic101 insertion into the second intron of F3'H, the gene for flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase responsible for purple pigment production. Regions on the deep pink flowers of the mutant can revert to purple, a visible phenotype of, as we show, excision of the transposable element. Sequence analysis revealed that Tdic101 has the characteristics of an autonomous element encoding a transposase. A related, but non-autonomous element dTdic102 was found to move in the genome of the bud mutant as well. Its mobilization might be the result of transposase activities provided by other elements such as Tdic101. In carnation, therefore, the movement of transposable elements plays an important role in the emergence of a bud mutation.

  2. Determination of macro, micro nutrient and trace element concentrations in Indian medicinal and vegetable leaves using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, G.R.K.; Balaji, T. [Department of Chemistry, S.V. University, Tirupati (India); Denschlag, H.O.; Mauerhofer, E.; Porte, N. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    1999-05-01

    Leafy samples often used as medicine in the Indian Ayurvedic system and vegetables were analyzed for 20 elements (As, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cr, Cs, Co, Eu, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Th, Zn) by employing Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). The samples were irradiated at the 100 kW TRIGA-MAINZ nuclear reactor and the induced activities were counted by gamma ray spectrometry using an efficiency calibrated high resolution High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The concentration of the elements in the medicinal and vegetable leaves and their biological effects on human beings are discussed.

  3. THE IMPLICATIONS OF MARKETING ACTIVITY IN RISK ANALYSIS, CORE ELEMENT OF LENDING POLICY TO COMMERCIAL BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Florin-Mihai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present financial context first affected by the lack of trust generated by the important bankruptcies in the USA and secondly by the global economic crisis, financial institutions are more than ever focused on applying market research, customer segmentation procedures and based upon them adapted credit strategies. The process is based on the fundaments of the marketing mix, much more carefully than before in order to maximize efficiency and market position or to consolidate, increase market share by taking advantage of opportunities or diminishing the effects of the present unfavorable economic climate. Analysis procedures based on differential risk models can be identified, the starting point being precisely the involvement of marketing by the market segmentation process and the concepts of “customer centricity” and “client relationship management”, specific credit policies being based upon them. The present paper intends to bring forth the client segmentation criteria practiced by top Romanian commercial banks, as the right segmentation process will reflect on the typology of financing over time. Furthermore, client segmentation tends to influence banking management in order to administer the risks arising from the credit activities, as it is in strict connection to the elements and processes involved in determining a correct rating of the applicants for funding.

  4. The finite element analysis and experimental study of beams with active constrained layer damping treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yinming; Hua, Hongxing; Sol, Hugo

    2004-11-01

    Vibration control of structures is confronted with many problems like the proper selection of modelling methods, controllability and observability of models, model size and model reduction methods. In this paper a practical procedure is proposed to overcome technical problems of structure control due to a large model size. Firstly, an accurate numerical model is derived by using the finite element method. This model is verified by modal analysis experiments. Secondly, a new model reduction procedure is proposed to reduce considerably the full order model. This reduction makes the reduced order model controllable and observable. In a further step, a controller is designed based on the verified reduced order model. Finally, a real-time control system is set up. The controlled and uncontrolled impulse responses at the free tip of the cantilever beam with active constrained layer damping treatments are compared both in time domain and frequency domain. The results clearly show the efficiency of the proposed procedure. The procedure proposed in this paper can be extended towards more complex structures.

  5. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, N. V., E-mail: ktf@chnu.edu.ua; Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B. [Chernivtsy National University (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  6. Active millimeter-wave video rate imaging with a staring 120-element microbolometer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukanen, Arttu; Miller, Aaron J.; Grossman, Erich N.

    2004-08-01

    Passive indoors imaging of weapons concealed under clothing poses a formidable challenge for millimeter-wave imagers due to the sub-picowatt signal levels present in the scene. Moreover, video-rate imaging requires a large number of pixels, which leads to a very complex and expensive front end for the imager. To meet the concealed weapons detection challenge, our approach uses a low cost pulsed-noise source as an illuminator and an array of room-temperature antenna-coupled microbolometers as the detectors. The reflected millimeter-wave power is detected by the bolometers, gated, integrated and amplified by audio-frequency amplifiers, and after digitization, displayed in real time on a PC display. We present recently acquired videos obtained with the 120-element array, and comprehensively describe the performance characteristics of the array in terms of sensitivity, optical efficiency, uniformity and spatial resolution. Our results show that active imaging with antenna-coupled microbolometers can yield imagery comparable to that obtained with systems using MMIC amplifiers but with a cost per pixel that is orders of magnitude lower.

  7. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, pbone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  8. Effect of halide impregnation on elemental mercury removal of activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Yoon Ji; Park, Soo Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Activated carbons (ACs) were impregnated with potassium halides (KX) to enhance the removal efficiency of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}). In this work, the impregnation effect of potassium bromide (KBr) and potassium iodine (KI) were investigated. The surface properties of KX-ACs were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The pore structures and total pore volumes of the KX-ACs were analyzed using the N{sub 2} /77 K adsorption isotherms. The Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency of KBr-ACs and KI-ACs was studied under simulated flue gas conditions. The effects of KI and KBr loading, adsorption temperature, and flue gas components on Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency were also investigated. The results showed that the Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency of the ACs was significantly enhanced by KI or KBr impregnation, and KI-ACs showed higher Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency than KBr-ACs under the same conditions. An increase in KI or KBr loading and higher adsorption temperatures improved the Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency, indicating that chemisorption occurred due to the reaction between X− and Hg{sup 0}. The lower extent of Hg{sup 0} removal exhibited by the KBr-ACs than by the KI-ACs was due to the difficulty of Br{sub 2} formation on the surfaces.

  9. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício R Lopes

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs, many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  10. ETHICS AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE – KEY ELEMENTS REGARDING THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana TEREC-VLAD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the organizational culture within the business environment. The paper analyzes the ethical criteria of the entrepreneurs and the way they relate to the consumer, as well as the reinforcement of the moral values so that the final result of the economic activity is represented by sustainability and economic profit. We thought it would be important to point out that promoting an ethical firm can ensure the well-needed trust capital in a constantly changing society. In this context, corporate responsibility is a key element that ensures both the sustainability of the company as well as the sustainability of the relations with the business partners. In our view, a strong corporate culture must integrate ethics and responsibility in all its activities, since the focus is often laid on obtaining profit, not on the values ​​that should lead the organization towards success over a long period of time. Since our society provides both positive and negative information regarding any company or organization, the focus should be laid increasingly more on the ethics and responsibility of the human resources in regard to the external environment of the company. We thought it would be appropriate to bring up these issues since the issue of building an organizational culture is at a very early stage in our country, and most entrepreneurs only aim at obtaining short-term profit. The fees and taxes are high and the thick legislation often does not provide alternatives; therefore, one must take into account the fact that the real profit is not represented by the short-term benefits, but rather by the benefits obtained in a constant manner over medium-long periods of time.

  11. Evaluation of trace elements in chewing tobacco and snuff using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waheed, S.; Siddique, N.; Rahman, S. [Chemistry Div., Directorate of Science, Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Tech., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2009-07-01

    Nine samples of chewing tobacco, snuff, tobacco leaf and ash were analyzed using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff studied in this work contain substantial amounts of Mg, Mn, Na, K. V. Sc, Rb and Fe. Furthermore, varying amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co and Zn were also detected in all tobacco samples. Of the toxic elements which were determined using INAA. As, Sb and Hg were quantified in only few tobacco samples. However, other toxic elements, which were determined using AAS, such as Cu, Pb and Cd were detected in almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff. The concentration of majority of the detected elements is high in ash samples which imply that most elements in chewing tobacco and snuff may originate from the addition of ash. (orig.)

  12. Simultaneous multi-element determination in different seed samples of Dodonaea viscosa hopseed using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sweify, Fatma H.; El-Amir, Mahmoud A.; Mostafa, Mohamed; Ramadan, Hala E.; Rashad, Ghada M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Lab. Center

    2016-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was applied for nondestructive multi-element analysis of seed samples of the plant Dodonaea viscosa hopseed. This plant is distributed all over Egypt, because of its suitable properties. The samples were collected from some bushes grown at different sites in some governorates, in July of each year during the period from 2004 to 2011. The determined elements are: Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Rb, Sc, Se, Sr and Zn, under the chosen irradiation and cooling times. The content of some elements has been compared with data obtained from previous work on analysis of various kinds of seeds. The influence of some parameters on the determined elemental content is discussed. Standard reference materials IAEA-155 and IAEA-V-10 were used to assure quality control, accuracy and precision of the technique.

  13. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  14. Historic activity of mt. Vesuvius: major elements and volatile constituents of primary melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetti, A.; Marianelli, P.; Metrich, N.; Sbrana, A.

    2003-04-01

    Mt. Vesuvius experienced a three-century long period of semi-persistent activity, after the 1631 eruption and is presently in a phase of rest. During this period, several eruptions displayed composite style since they started with lava effusions and evolved towards explosive activity (lava fountains, phreatomagmatic explosions and occasionally steady columns). The tephrostratigraphic sequence of post-1631 activity is well reconstructed [1] on the basis of historical chronicles and field investigations, whereas information about the feeding system is still weak. We have selected samples related to energetic lava fountain activity that occurred during the 1794, 1822 and 1872 composite-style eruptions for investigating the deep feeding systems of Mt. Vesuvius, during the 1631--1944 period. We present data on melt inclusions and their host olivines. Major elements, S, Cl and F were obtained using the electron microprobe (SX50, Camparis), CO_2 and H_2O by Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy. Carbon was also analysed by nuclear reaction 12C(d,p)13C. The magma batches emitted during the 1794, 1822 and 1872 eruptions brought to the surface primitive olivines (Fo90.4-88.5) containing spinel (Cr/(Cr+Al) = 0.77--0.75). Their inclusions attest of crystallization at high pressure from K-rich (HK) parental magmas with K_2O varying from 4.3 to 6.0, high K_2O/H_2O (up to 2.4), Cl/H_2O (up to 0.25), Cl/F (up to 3) ratios, and H_2O content systematically high and variable from 2.3 to 4.9 wt.%. The most primitive compositions are recorded in melt inclusions from the oldest samples (1794 and 1822 eruptions). We propose a rather rapid transfer of HK-melts carrying olivine crystals from depth. This process is only detectable by the means of melt inclusions in Fo-rich olivines phenocrysts occurring only in the deposits related to the most powerful episodes of lava fountains while the whole rocks are cumulative with respect to clinopyroxene (± leucite). These new data, in addition to

  15. Elements of banking intermediation in the Algerian Banking system and the means to activate it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habbar Abderezak, Dr.

    2014-06-01

    Banking intermediation raises several interrelated issues for banks, the central bank and the Treasury. It is linked to the gross domestic product, money supply and bank liquidity, etc. These elements will be examined in this article to learn the elements of bank intermediation in the Algerian banking system and ways of strengthening it.

  16. Element failure correction for a large monopulse phased array antenna with active amplitude weighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.P.M.N.

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new method is introduced to synthesize low sidelobe patterns for planar array antennas with a periodic element arrangement. The method makes use of the property that for a planar array with periodic spacing of the elements, an inverse Fourier transform relationship exists between the arra

  17. Improving Recommendations in Tag-based Systems with Spectral Clustering of Tag Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tag as a useful metadata reflects the collaborative and conceptual features of documents in social collaborative annotation systems. In this paper, we propose a collaborative approach for expanding tag neighbors and investigate the spectral clustering algorithm to filter out noisy tag neighbors i...

  18. TagCombine:Recommending Tags to Contents in Software Information Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新宇; 夏鑫; David Lo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, software engineers use a variety of online media to search and become informed of new and interesting technologies, and to learn from and help one another. We refer to these kinds of online media which help software engineers improve their performance in software development, maintenance, and test processes as software information sites. In this paper, we propose TagCombine, an automatic tag recommendation method which analyzes objects in software information sites. TagCombine has three different components: 1) multi-label ranking component which considers tag recommendation as a multi-label learning problem; 2) similarity-based ranking component which recommends tags from similar objects; 3) tag-term based ranking component which considers the relationship between different terms and tags, and recommends tags after analyzing the terms in the objects. We evaluate TagCombine on four software information sites, Ask Different, Ask Ubuntu, Freecode, and Stack Overflow. On averaging across the four projects, TagCombine achieves recall@5 and recall@10 to 0.619 8 and 0.762 5 respectively, which improves TagRec proposed by Al-Kofahi et al. by 14.56% and 10.55% respectively, and the tag recommendation method proposed by Zangerle et al. by 12.08% and 8.16% respectively.

  19. Improving Recommendations in Tag-based Systems with Spectral Clustering of Tag Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tag as a useful metadata reflects the collaborative and conceptual features of documents in social collaborative annotation systems. In this paper, we propose a collaborative approach for expanding tag neighbors and investigate the spectral clustering algorithm to filter out noisy tag neighbors...

  20. Multilabel Learning for Automatic Web Services Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha AZNAG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some web services portals and search engines as Biocatalogue and Seekda!, have allowed users to manually annotate Web services using tags. User Tags provide meaningful descriptions of services and allow users to index and organize their contents. Tagging technique is widely used to annotate objects in Web 2.0 applications. In this paper we propose a novel probabilistic topic model (which extends the CorrLDA model - Correspondence Latent Dirichlet Allocation- to automatically tag web services according to existing manual tags. Our probabilistic topic model is a latent variable model that exploits local correlation labels. Indeed, exploiting label correlations is a challenging and crucial problem especially in multi-label learning context. Moreover, several existing systems can recommend tags for web services based on existing manual tags. In most cases, the manual tags have better quality. We also develop three strategies to automatically recommend the best tags for web services. We also propose, in this paper, WS-Portal; An Enriched Web Services Search Engine which contains 7063 providers, 115 sub-classes of category and 22236 web services crawled from the Internet. In WS-Portal, severals technologies are employed to improve the effectiveness of web service discovery (i.e. web services clustering, tags recommendation, services rating and monitoring. Our experiments are performed out based on real-world web services. The comparisons of Precision@n, Normalised Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCGn values for our approach indicate that the method presented in this paper outperforms the method based on the CorrLDA in terms of ranking and quality of generated tags.

  1. To tag or not to tag: animal welfare, conservation and stakeholder considerations in fish tracking studies that use electronic tags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Murchie, Karen J.; Thiem, Jason D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Hinch, Scott G.; Brown, Richard S.; Fisk, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    The advent and widespread adoption of electronic tags (including biotelemetry and biologging devices) for tracking animals has provided unprecedented information on the biology, management, and conservation of fish in the world’s oceans and inland waters. However, use of these tools is not without controversy. Even when scientific and management objectives may best be achieved using electronic tags, it is increasingly important to further consider other factors such as the welfare of tagged animals (i.e., the role of training and science-based surgical guidelines, anesthetic use, inability to maintain sterile conditions in field environments), the ethics of tagging threatened species vs. using surrogates, stakeholder perspectives on tagging (including aboriginals), as well as use of data emanating from such studies (e.g., by fishers to facilitate exploitation). Failure to do so will have the potential to create conflict and undermine scientific, management and public confidence in the use of this powerful tool. Indeed, there are already a number of examples of where tracking studies using electronic tags have been halted based on concerns raised by researchers, authorities, or stakeholders. Here we present a candid evaluation of several factors that should be considered when determining when to tag or not to tag fish with electronic devices. It is not our objective to judge the merit of previous studies. Rather, we hope to stimulate debate and discussion regarding the use of electronic tags to study fish. Relatedly, there is a need for more research to address these questions (e.g., what level of cleanliness is needed when conducting surgeries, what type of training should be required for fish surgery) including human dimensions studies to understand perspectives of different actors including society as a whole with respect to tagging and tracking studies.

  2. Finite element based model predictive control for active vibration suppression of a one-link flexible manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubay, Rickey; Hassan, Marwan; Li, Chunying; Charest, Meaghan

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a unique approach for active vibration control of a one-link flexible manipulator. The method combines a finite element model of the manipulator and an advanced model predictive controller to suppress vibration at its tip. This hybrid methodology improves significantly over the standard application of a predictive controller for vibration control. The finite element model used in place of standard modelling in the control algorithm provides a more accurate prediction of dynamic behavior, resulting in enhanced control. Closed loop control experiments were performed using the flexible manipulator, instrumented with strain gauges and piezoelectric actuators. In all instances, experimental and simulation results demonstrate that the finite element based predictive controller provides improved active vibration suppression in comparison with using a standard predictive control strategy. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a Method for Tissue Elasticity Imaging Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tomoki; Murase, Kenya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for tissue elasticity imaging using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). First, we developed a cyclic pressure device that used air to remotely transmit the power to generate cyclic deformation in an object. The pressure induced by the cyclic pressure device was measured by MRI-compatible force sensors. Second, we developed a software to calculate Young's modulus from tagged MRI data using the harmonic phase (HARP) method and the finite element method (FEM). We also developed a software to extract tag-cross points from tagged MRI data. Finally, we evaluated the usefulness of our method using three homogeneous silicone gel phantoms with different degrees of stiffness in comparison with Young's moduli measured by a material testing machine. The coefficient of variation of the pressure data measured by MRI-compatible force sensors was within 5 %, indicating that the reproducibility of the pressure generated by our cyclic pressure device was good. The Young's ...

  4. Investigating the Feasibility of Geo-Tagged Photographs as Sources of Land Cover Input Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyron Antoniou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geo-tagged photographs are used increasingly as a source of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI, which could potentially be used for land use and land cover applications. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the feasibility of using this source of spatial information for three use cases related to land cover: Calibration, validation and verification. We first provide an inventory of the metadata that are collected with geo-tagged photographs and then consider what elements would be essential, desirable, or unnecessary for the aforementioned use cases. Geo-tagged photographs were then extracted from Flickr, Panoramio and Geograph for an area of London, UK, and classified based on their usefulness for land cover mapping including an analysis of the accompanying metadata. Finally, we discuss protocols for geo-tagged photographs for use of VGI in relation to land cover applications.

  5. Harnessing Collective Knowledge Inherent in Tag Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, U.; Held, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tagging systems represent the conceptual knowledge of a community. We experimentally tested whether people harness this collective knowledge when navigating through the Web. As a within-factor we manipulated people's prior knowledge (no knowledge vs. prior knowledge that was congruent/incongruent to the collective knowledge inherent in the tags).…

  6. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  7. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  8. Towards EPC-compatible organic RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Smout, S.; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Furthner, F.; Putten, B. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, fully integrated organic RFID tags are demonstrated. These tags are inductively-coupled at a base frequency of 13.56 MHz and can be read out at distances up to 10 cm, which is the expected readout distance for proximity readers. We also demonstrate next generation transponder chips,

  9. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  10. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag`s unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  11. Smart-tag Based Data Dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe; Beaufour, Allan; Leopold, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring wide, hostile areas requires disseminating data between fixed, disconnected clusters of sensor nodes. It is not always possible to install long-range radios in order to cover the whole area. We propose to leverage the movement of mobile individuals, equipped with smart......-tags, to disseminate data across disconnected static nodes spread across a wide area. Static nodes and mobile smart-tags exchange data when they are in the vicinity of each other; smart-tags disseminate data as they move around. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for update propagation and a model for smart......-tag based data dissemination. We use simulation to study the characteristics of the model we propose. Finally, we present an implementation based on Bluetooth smart-tags....

  12. A DNA fingerprint probe from Mycosphaerella graminicola identifies an active transposable element

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, S.B.; Cavaletto, J.R.; Waalwijk, C.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting has been used extensively to characterize populations of Mycosphaerella graminicola, the Septoria tritici blotch pathogen of wheat. The highly polymorphic DNA fingerprints of Mycosphaerella graminicola were assumed to reflect the action of transposable elements. However, there was

  13. Application of Energy Finite Element Method in Active Vibration Control of Piezoelectric Intelligent Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the transmission and equilibrium relationship of vibration energy in beam-like structures, the Galerkin weighted residual method was applied to equation discretization. An equivalent transformation of feedback element was suggested to develop the Energy Finite Element model of a composite piezoelectric cantilever beam driven by harmonic excitation on lateral direction, with both systems with and without time delay being studied and the power input estimation of harmonic excitation was discussed for the resolution of Energy Finite Element function. Then the energy density solutions of the piezoelectric coupling beam through Energy Finite Element Method (EFEM and classical wave theory were compared to verify the EFEM model, which presented a good accordance. Further investigation was undertaken about the influence of control parameters including the feedback gain and arrangement of piezoelectric patches on characteristics of system energy density distribution.

  14. Teaching logic visually with a Raspberry Pi and NFC tags at TEDxCERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    This talk explains the BREAK THE CODE activity that ran during TEDxCERN 2015. It consisted of a simple web application and a NFC tag reader, that can be used to teach logic and deductive reasoning via physical interactions.

  15. A CMOS Pressure Sensor Tag Chip for Passive Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangming Deng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of −20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation.

  16. A CMOS pressure sensor tag chip for passive wireless applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-03-23

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of -20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation.

  17. Instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine inorganic elements in paddy soil and rice and evaluate bioconcentration factors in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapamon Seeprasert

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased anthropogenic activity, especially in thriving industries and mining activity, has led to the accumulation of inorganic elements in the soil. This study applied neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic element concentrations in paddy soils and quantified the nutrient value of paddy rice cultivated on various agricultural sites throughout Thailand. The determination accuracy of the elements—U, As, Sb, W, Mn, K, La, Cr, Hf, Cs, Sc, Fe, Co, Cd and Zn was assessed using National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials; the results were satisfactory, showing low relative error. High analytical precision was also observed. Cadmium was selected to check the linearity of the calibration curve against a Cd standard. For a calibration curve in the range 1–9 μg, a correlation coefficient of 0.997 was found. Trace amounts of U, As, Sb, W, Mn, K, La, Cr, Hf, Cs, Sc, Fe, Co, Zn and Cd were also found in the soil samples. However, the Co, Cd, and Zn concentrations were especially high in agricultural sites in Tak province. The elemental concentrations in rice followed the order K > Zn > Mn. The data obtained are of potential benefit for the development of trace element supplementation in food.

  18. Aberrant Proliferation of Differentiating Alveolar Cells Induces Hyperplasia in Resting Mammary Glands of SV40-TAg Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Quante, Timo; Wegwitz, Florian; Abe, Julia; Rossi, Alessandra; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter, which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signi...

  19. Aberrant proliferation of differentiating alveolar cells induces hyperplasia in resting mammary glands of SV40-TAg transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang eBohn; Timo eQuante

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the WAP promoter (Whey Acidic Protein) which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signif...

  20. Pop-up Archival Transmitting (PAT) fish tag data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The cooperative tagging center (CTC) began deploying electronic tags in 2002. To date over 300 tags have been deployed. The following species have been monitored:...

  1. Neutron activation analysis at the Livermore pool-type reactor for the environmental research program. [Identification of trace element contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaini, R.C.; Heft, R.E.; Garvis, D.

    1976-07-02

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis is a technique of trace analysis using measurements of radioactivity induced in the sample by exposure to a source of neutrons. The induced activity is measured by the emitted gamma radiation. Each gamma emitter can then be identified by the energy of the photopeaks produced as the nuclide decays and by the half-life of the neutron-induced activity. A complex computer program GAMANAL has been used to accomplish the major tasks of nuclide identification and quantification. The nuclide data output from GAMANAL is processed by a second computer code NADAC, which develops elemental abundance data from disintegration rates observed. The methods are those employed at the Livermore Pool-Type Reactor in support of the environmental research trace element analysis program. Among the procedures described and discussed are sample preparation, irradiation, analysis, and application of the technique.

  2. The Dac-tag, an affinity tag based on penicillin-binding protein 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David Wei; Peggie, Mark; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Gage, Zoe Olivia; Wood, Nicola; Schilde, Christina; Kurz, Thimo; Knebel, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5), a product of the Escherichia coli gene dacA, possesses some β-lactamase activity. On binding to penicillin or related antibiotics via an ester bond, it deacylates and destroys them functionally by opening the β-lactam ring. This process takes several minutes. We exploited this process and showed that a fragment of PBP5 can be used as a reversible and monomeric affinity tag. At ambient temperature (e.g., 22°C), a PBP5 fragment binds rapidly and specifically to ampicillin Sepharose. Release can be facilitated either by eluting with 10mM ampicillin or in a ligand-free manner by incubation in the cold (1-10°C) in the presence of 5% glycerol. The "Dac-tag", named with reference to the gene dacA, allows the isolation of remarkably pure fusion protein from a wide variety of expression systems, including (in particular) eukaryotic expression systems.

  3. Short-chain fluorescent tryptophan tags for on-line detection of functional recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepert Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    was increased. Antibodies with W-tags generated stronger signals than the untagged construct. Conclusions Our low-molecular-weight W-tags can be used to monitor the production of antibody fragments on-line. The binding specificity of the recombinant fusion protein is not affected, even though the binding activity decreases slightly with increasing number of tryptophan residues in the W-tags. Thus, the newly designed W-tags offer a versatile and generally applicable alternative to current fluorescent fusion tags.

  4. Enhanced UHF RFID tags for drug tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarinucci, Luca; Colella, Riccardo; De Blasi, Mario; Patrono, Luigi; Tarricone, Luciano

    2012-12-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is playing a crucial role for item-level tracing systems in healthcare scenarios. The pharmaceutical supply chain is a fascinating application context, where RFID can guarantee transparency in the drug flow, supporting both suppliers and consumers against the growing counterfeiting problem. In such a context, the choice of the most adequate RFID tag, in terms of shape, frequency, size and reading range, is crucial. The potential presence of items containing materials hostile to the electromagnetic propagation exasperates the problem. In addition, the peculiarities of the different RFID-based checkpoints make even more stringent the requirements for the tag. In this work, the performance of several commercial UHF RFID tags in each step of the pharmaceutical supply chain has been evaluated, confirming the expected criticality. On such basis, a guideline for the electromagnetic design of new high-performance tags capable to overcome such criticalities has been defined. Finally, driven by such guidelines, a new enhanced tag has been designed, realized and tested. Due to patent pending issues, the antenna shape is not shown. Nevertheless, the optimal obtained results do not lose their validity. Indeed, on the one hand they demonstrate that high performance item level tracing systems can actually be implemented also in critical operating conditions. On the other hand, they encourage the tag designer to follow the identified guidelines so to realize enhanced UHF tags.

  5. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed.

  6. Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghard, Brion J.; Skorpik, James R.

    2008-04-22

    One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

  7. Aberrations induced by anti-ASE cap on thin-disk active element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleknavičius, Aidas; Gabalis, Martynas; Michailovas, Andrejus; Girdauskas, Valdas

    2013-06-17

    Optical aberrations induced in thin-disk laser elements with an undoped layer, performing as an anti-ASE cap, are analyzed. A numerical model, used for calculations of the optical path difference (OPD) induced by temperature distribution inside the laser element and by deformation of surfaces, was confirmed experimentally. Results of numerical modeling manifest that adding an undoped layer on the thin-disk has detrimental effect on the reflected laser beam brightness and scaling. It is also shown that brightness of a thin-disk laser may be enhanced by the use of the Gaussian pump beam profile.

  8. Cloning and characterization of GST fusion tag stabilized large subunit of Escherichia coli acetohydroxyacid synthase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Liu, Nan; Wang, Wen-Ting; Wang, Ji-Yu; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-01-01

    There are three acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, EC 4.1.3.18) isozymes (I, II, and III) in the enterobacteria Escherichia coli among which AHAS I is the most active. Its large subunit (LSU) possesses full catalytic machinery, but is unstable in the absence of the small subunit (SSU). To get applicable LSU of AHAS I, we prepared and characterized in this study the polypeptide as a His-tagged (His-LSU) and a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged (GST-LSU) fusion protein, respectively. The results showed that the His-LSU is unstable, whereas the GST-LSU displays excellent stability. This phenomenon suggests that the GST polypeptide fusion tag could stabilize the target protein when compared with histidine tag. It is the first time that the stabilizing effect of the GST tag was observed. Further characterization of the GST-LSU protein indicated that it possesses the basic functions of AHAS I with a specific activity of 20.8 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) and a Km value for pyruvate of 0.95 mM. These observations imply that introduction of the GST fusion tag to LSU of AHAS I does not affect the function of the protein. The possible reasons that the GST fusion tag could make the LSU stable are initially discussed.

  9. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  10. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of

  11. Recommender Systems for Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Balby Marinho, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Social Tagging Systems are web applications in which users upload resources (e.g., bookmarks, videos, photos, etc.) and annotate it with a list of freely chosen keywords called tags. This is a grassroots approach to organize a site and help users to find the resources they are interested in. Social tagging systems are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. However, with the large popularity of these systems and the increasing amount of user-contributed content, information overload rapidly becomes an issue. Recommender Systems are well known appl

  12. Long-term effects of aided phytostabilisation of trace elements on microbial biomass and activity, enzyme activities, and composition of microbial community in the Jales contaminated mine spoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renella, Giancarlo; Landi, Loretta; Ascher, Judith; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Pietramellara, Giacomo; Mench, Michel; Nannipieri, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    We studied the effectiveness of remediation on microbial endpoints, namely microbial biomass and activity, microbial and plant species richness, of an As-contaminated mine spoil, amended with compost (C) alone and in combination with beringite (B) or zerovalent iron grit (Z), to increase organic matter content and reduce trace elements mobility, and to allow Holcus lanatus and Pinus pinaster growth. Untreated spoil showed the lowest microbial biomass and activity and hydrolase activities, and H. lanatus as sole plant species, whereas the presented aided phytostabilisation option, especially CBZ treatment, significantly increased microbial biomass and activity and allowed colonisation by several plant species, comparable to those of an uncontaminated sandy soil. Microbial species richness was only increased in spoils amended with C alone. No clear correlation occurred between trace element mobility and microbial parameters and plant species richness. Our results indicate that the choice of indicators of soil remediation practices is a bottleneck.

  13. Trace elements and activity of antioxidative enzymes in Cistus ladanifer L. growing on an abandoned mine area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Erika S; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Nabais, Cristina; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2009-10-01

    The Mediterranean shrub Cistus ladanifer grows naturally in São Domingos (Portugal), an abandoned copper mine. High levels of trace elements in plants can generate oxidative stress increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare As, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations and the activity of the soluble and cell wall ionically bounded forms of the enzymes catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in leaves of C. ladanifer, collected in spring and summer, growing on São Domingos mine and on a non-contaminated area (Pomarão). São Domingos soils showed high total concentrations of As (2.6 g kg(-1)) and Pb (7.3 g kg(-1)) however the available fraction represented less than 1.5% of the total. C. ladanifer population from mine showed tolerance to Pb and Zn, which attain in leaves concentrations considered toxic for plants. The enzymatic activity of catalase, peroxidise and superoxide dismutase varied with plant populations and seasons, although with no particular trend, being specific to each trace element and enzyme cell localization. Catalase activity was evenly distributed between the soluble and ionically bounded forms, whereas the ionically bounded form of peroxidase predominated relatively to total activity, and the opposite was observed for superoxide dismutase. Spring and summer leaves from the two areas presented enzymatic activities in both fractions except to peroxidase soluble activities in leaves collected in summer. C. ladanifer enzymatic activity seems to be related with the co-existence of different stress factors (trace elements concentration, temperature, UV radiation and drought). The survival and growth of this species on contaminated mining soils is due to the presence of effective antioxidant enzyme-based defence systems.

  14. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  15. Exploratory Analysis of the Main Characteristics of Tags and Tagging of Educational Resources in a Multi-lingual Context

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorikari, Riina; Ochoa, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Although social, collaborative classification through tagging has been the focus of recent research, the effect of multi-linguality is often overlooked. This work presents an exploratory study of the production and use of tags in multiple languages in a context of European Learning Resources Exchange. We describe a tagging tool used by teachers from 6 countries and study the main characteristics of tags and how users tag when multiple languages are presented. We find early indication that tag...

  16. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  17. Effects of acoustic tag implantation on lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens: lack of evidence for changes in behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondorp, Darryl W.; Holbrook, Christopher; Krueger, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    An assumption of studies using acoustic telemetry is that surgical implantation of acoustic transmitters or tags does not alter behavior of tagged individuals. Evaluating the validity of this assumption can be difficult for large fish, such as adult sturgeons, not amenable to controlled laboratory experimentation. The purpose of this study was to determine if and when this assumption was valid for adult lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens tagged with large (34 g) acoustic transmitters and released into the St. Clair River during 2011–2014. The hypothesis that activity and reach-scale distributions of tagged and untagged lake sturgeon did not differ was tested by comparing movement frequencies, movement rates (speed-over-ground), and location-specific detection probabilities between newly-tagged lake sturgeon and presumably fully-recovered conspecifics tagged and released in prior years.

  18. Controls on Fe(II)-Activated Trace Element Release from Goethite and Hematite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2012-03-26

    Electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides induces surface growth and dissolution that affects trace element fate and transport. We have recently demonstrated Ni(II) cycling through goethite and hematite (adsorbed Ni incorporates into the mineral structure and preincorporated Ni releases to solution) during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. However, the chemical parameters affecting net trace element release remain unknown. Here, we examine the chemical controls on Ni(II) and Zn(II) release from Ni- and Zn-substituted goethite and hematite during reaction with Fe(II). Release follows a rate law consistent with surface reaction limited mineral dissolution and suggests that release occurs near sites of Fe(III) reductive dissolution during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. Metal substituent type affects reactivity; Zn release is more pronounced from hematite than goethite, whereas the opposite trend occurs for Ni. Buildup of Ni or Zn in solution inhibits further release but this resumes upon fluid exchange, suggesting that sustained release is possible under flow conditions. Mineral and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations as well as pH strongly affect sorbed Fe(II) concentrations, which directly control the reaction rates and final metal concentrations. Our results demonstrate that structurally incorporated trace elements are mobilized from iron oxides into fluids without abiotic or microbial net iron reduction. Such release may affect micronutrient availability, contaminant transport, and the distribution of redox-inactive trace elements in natural and engineered systems.

  19. Research on the relationship between the elements and pharmacological activities in velvet antler using factor analysis and cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libing

    2017-04-01

    Velvet antler has certain effect on improving the body's immune cells and the regulation of immune system function, nervous system, anti-stress, anti-aging and osteoporosis. It has medicinal applications to treat a wide range of diseases such as tissue wound healing, anti-tumor, cardiovascular disease, et al. Therefore, the research on the relationship between pharmacological activities and elements in velvet antler is of great significance. The objective of this study was to comprehensively evaluate 15 kinds of elements in different varieties of velvet antlers and study on the relationship between the elements and traditional Chinese medicine efficacy for the human. The factor analysis and the factor cluster analysis methods were used to analyze the data of elements in the sika velvet antler, cervus elaphus linnaeus, flower horse hybrid velvet antler, apiti (elk) velvet antler, male reindeer velvet antler and find out the relationship between 15 kinds of elements including Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Cu, Mn, Al, Ba, Co, Sr, Cr, Zn and Ni. Combining with MATLAB2010 and SPSS software, the chemometrics methods were made on the relationship between the elements in velvet antler and the pharmacological activities. The first commonality factor F1 had greater load on the indexes of Ca, P, Mg, Co, Sr and Ni, and the second commonality factor F2 had greater load on the indexes of K, Mn, Zn and Cr, and the third commonality factor F3 had greater load on the indexes of Na, Cu and Ba, and the fourth commonality factor F4 had greater load on the indexes of Fe and Al. 15 kinds of elements in velvet antler in the order were elk velvet antler>flower horse hybrid velvet antler>cervus elaphus linnaeus>sika velvet antler>male reindeer velvet antler. Based on the factor analysis and the factor cluster analysis, a model for evaluating traditional Chinese medicine quality was constructed. These studies provide the scientific base and theoretical foundation for the future large-scale rational

  20. A highly specific pathogen-responsive promoter element from the immediate-early activated CMPG1 gene in Petroselinum crispum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, C; Logemann, E; Lippok, B; Schmelzer, E; Hahlbrock, K

    2001-04-01

    Within the complex signalling network from pathogen-derived elicitor perception to defense-related gene activation, some immediate-early responding genes may have pivotal roles in downstream transcriptional regulation. We have identified the parsley (Petroselinum crispum) ELI17 gene as a particularly fast-responding gene possessing a new type of W box-containing, elicitor-responsive promoter element, E17. Highly selective E17-mediated reporter gene expression at pathogen infection sites in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants demonstrated the potential of this promoter element for designing new strategies in resistance breeding as well as for further analysis of the early components of defense-related gene activation mechanisms. The protein encoded by the ELI17 gene exhibits various structural characteristics of established transcription factors and is designated as a CMPG protein according to the first four strictly conserved amino acids defining a newly emerging class of plant-specific proteins.