WorldWideScience

Sample records for activation state insights

  1. Inactive and active states and supramolecular organization of GPCRs: insights from computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; De Benedetti, Pier G.

    2006-08-01

    Herein we make an overview of the results of our computational experiments aimed at gaining insight into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR functioning either in their normal conditions or when hit by gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations. Molecular simulations of a number of GPCRs in their wild type and mutated as well as free and ligand-bound forms were instrumental in inferring the structural features, which differentiate the mutation- and ligand-induced active from the inactive states. These features essentially reside in the interaction pattern of the E/DRY arginine and in the degree of solvent exposure of selected cytosolic domains. Indeed, the active states differ from the inactive ones in the weakening of the interactions made by the highly conserved arginine and in the increase in solvent accessibility of the cytosolic interface between helices 3 and 6. Where possible, the structural hallmarks of the active and inactive receptor states are translated into molecular descriptors useful for in silico functional screening of novel receptor mutants or ligands. Computational modeling of the supramolecular organization of GPCRs and their intracellular partners is the current challenge toward a deep understanding of their functioning mechanisms.

  2. The relationship between insight and psychosis in state patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. State patients committed under the Mental Health Act must have insight into their illness and the crime they committed before they can be discharged. Patients with schizophrenia are described as having poor insight into the nature and severity of their disorder. Various factors influence insight, and in some studies ...

  3. Accelerated Learning Options: A Promising Strategy for States. Policy Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelau, Demaree

    2006-01-01

    This issue of Policy Insights draws on findings from WICHE's report Accelerated Learning Options: Moving the Needle on Access and Success, to lay out some of the important policy issues that decision makers might consider when adopting new state policy related to accelerated learning or modifying policies already in existence. The publication…

  4. Activating Welfare States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Jon

    This paper investigates how welfare states may actively contribute to promote employment opportunities, i.e. participation in the labour market through various operations and policies. The principal operations concern in particular the de-familiarisation of caring tasks through social services...

  5. New Insights into Modes of GPCR Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Qiao, Yuhui; Li, Zijian

    2018-01-30

    In classical G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation, GPCRs couple to a variety of heterotrimeric G proteins on the membrane and then activate downstream signaling pathways. More recently, GPCRs have been found to couple to different effector proteins, including different G protein subtypes and regulatory proteins, such as arrestins. Some novel modes of GPCR activation have been proposed to explain their complex behaviors. In this review, we summarize the main novel modes of GPCR activation, including biased activation, intracellular activation, dimerization activation, transactivation, and biphasic activation. In addition, we also discuss the relationship among the five modes to show the complex picture of GPCR activation. The complex activation modes regulate precisely GPCR downstream signaling, including physiological and pathological signaling. Thus, there is the potential to develop GPCR precision drugs that target precise GPCR activation modes to accurately strengthen their beneficial functions and block specific pathological processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural activity when people solve verbal problems with insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jung-Beeman

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available People sometimes solve problems with a unique process called insight, accompanied by an "Aha!" experience. It has long been unclear whether different cognitive and neural processes lead to insight versus noninsight solutions, or if solutions differ only in subsequent subjective feeling. Recent behavioral studies indicate distinct patterns of performance and suggest differential hemispheric involvement for insight and noninsight solutions. Subjects solved verbal problems, and after each correct solution indicated whether they solved with or without insight. We observed two objective neural correlates of insight. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (Experiment 1 revealed increased activity in the right hemisphere anterior superior temporal gyrus for insight relative to noninsight solutions. The same region was active during initial solving efforts. Scalp electroencephalogram recordings (Experiment 2 revealed a sudden burst of high-frequency (gamma-band neural activity in the same area beginning 0.3 s prior to insight solutions. This right anterior temporal area is associated with making connections across distantly related information during comprehension. Although all problem solving relies on a largely shared cortical network, the sudden flash of insight occurs when solvers engage distinct neural and cognitive processes that allow them to see connections that previously eluded them.

  7. The state of space science in Africa | Mhlahlo | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been an increase in the number of space science activities and facilities in Africa in the last 15 years. This increase, however, is not proportionate to the indigenous user community for these activities and facilities. In this paper, I discuss these activities and their benefits for the African region, and point out some of ...

  8. Platelet interaction with activated endothelium: mechanistic insights from microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Daniëlle M; Mastenbroek, Tom G; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2017-10-10

    Traditionally, in vitro flow chamber experiments and in vivo arterial thrombosis studies have been proven to be of vital importance to elucidate the mechanisms of platelet thrombus formation after vessel wall injury. In recent years, it has become clear that platelets also act as modulators of inflammatory processes, such as atherosclerosis. A key element herein is the complex crosstalk between platelets, the coagulation system, leukocytes and the activated endothelium. This review provides insight into the platelet-endothelial interface, based on in vitro flow chamber studies and cross referenced with in vivo thrombosis studies. The main mechanisms of platelet interaction with the activated endothelium encompass i) platelet rolling via interaction of platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX-V with endothelial-released von Willebrand factor with a supporting role for the P-selectin - P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 axis, followed by ii) firm platelet adhesion to the endothelium via interaction of platelet αIIbβ3 with endothelial αvβ3 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and iii) a stimulatory role for thrombin, the thrombospondin-1 - CD36 axis and cyclooxygenase 1 in subsequent platelet activation and stable thrombus formation. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying the stimulatory effect of platelets on leukocyte transendothelial migration, a key mediator of atheroprogression, are discussed. Throughout the review emphasis is placed on recommendations for setting up, reporting, interpreting and comparing endothelial-lined flow chamber studies and on suggestions for future studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  9. Building Capacity for Tracking Human Capital Development and Its Mobility across State Lines. Policy Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    This issue of "Policy Insights" provides a review of the past five years of the cost and value of higher education, which have gained increased policymaker, consumer, and media attention. The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has worked with four of its member states (Hawai'i, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington) to…

  10. X-ray-induced catalytic active-site reduction of a multicopper oxidase: structural insights into the proton-relay mechanism and O2 -reduction states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Centeno-Leija, Sara; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2015-11-26

    During X-ray data collection from a multicopper oxidase (MCO) crystal, electrons and protons are mainly released into the system by the radiolysis of water molecules, leading to the X-ray-induced reduction of O2 to 2H2O at the trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) of the enzyme. In this work, 12 crystallographic structures of Thermus thermophilus HB27 multicopper oxidase (Tth-MCO) in holo, apo and Hg-bound forms and with different X-ray absorbed doses have been determined. In holo Tth -MCO structures with four Cu atoms, the proton-donor residue Glu451 involved in O2 reduction was found in a double conformation: Glu451a (~7 Å from the TNC) and Glu451b (~4.5 Å from the TNC). A positive peak of electron density above 3.5σ in anFo-Fc map for Glu451a Oε2 indicates the presence of a carboxyl functional group at the side chain, while its significant absence in Glu451b strongly suggests a carboxylate functional group. In contrast, for apo Tth -MCO and in Hg-bound structures neither the positive peak nor double conformations were observed. Together, these observations provide the first structural evidence for a proton-relay mechanism in the MCO family and also support previous studies indicating that Asp106 does not provide protons for this mechanism. In addition, eight composite structures (Tth -MCO-C1–8) with different X-ray-absorbed doses allowed the observation of different O2-reduction states, and a total depletion of T2Cu at doses higher than 0.2 MGy showed the high susceptibility of this Cu atom to radiation damage, highlighting the importance of taking radiation effects into account in biochemical interpretations of an MCO structure.

  11. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkhandi, S.; Trinh, P.; Manohar, Aswin K.; Manivannan, A.; Balasubramanian, M.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Narayanan, S. R.

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  12. Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schwabe, Paul D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-23

    This brief is a compilation of data points and market insights that reflect the state of the project finance market for solar photovoltaic (PV) assets in the United States as of the third quarter of 2017. This information can generally be used as a simplified benchmark of the costs associated with securing financing for solar PV as well as the cost of the financing itself (i.e., the cost of capital). This work represents the second DOE sponsored effort to benchmark financing costs across the residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV markets, as part of its larger effort to benchmark the components of PV system costs.

  13. Membrane Active Antimicrobial Peptides: Translating Mechanistic Insights to Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Koh, Jun-Jie; Liu, Shouping; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Verma, Chandra S.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising next generation antibiotics that hold great potential for combating bacterial resistance. AMPs can be both bacteriostatic and bactericidal, induce rapid killing and display a lower propensity to develop resistance than do conventional antibiotics. Despite significant progress in the past 30 years, no peptide antibiotic has reached the clinic yet. Poor understanding of the action mechanisms and lack of rational design principles have been the two major obstacles that have slowed progress. Technological developments are now enabling multidisciplinary approaches including molecular dynamics simulations combined with biophysics and microbiology toward providing valuable insights into the interactions of AMPs with membranes at atomic level. This has led to increasingly robust models of the mechanisms of action of AMPs and has begun to contribute meaningfully toward the discovery of new AMPs. This review discusses the detailed action mechanisms that have been put forward, with detailed atomistic insights into how the AMPs interact with bacterial membranes. The review further discusses how this knowledge is exploited toward developing design principles for novel AMPs. Finally, the current status, associated challenges, and future directions for the development of AMP therapeutics are discussed. PMID:28261050

  14. Investigating the thermal and dynamic state of Mars using seismic data from the upcoming InSight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, R.; Hempel, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Wookey, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The surface of Mars exhibits convincing evidence for mantle flow. For example, the huge Tharsis volcanic province is widely believed to represent the surface expression of a stable, deep-seated mantle plume. Unlike the Earth, however, Mars does not have active tectonics, and much of the surface has been volcanically dead for billions of years. For this reason, the interior dynamics of the planet are very poorly understood. As planetary dynamics controls a range of important processes such as the rate of cooling of the interior, sources of volcanism and the preservation of geochemical reservoirs, new geophysical constraints have been eagerly awaited for several decades. In November 2018, NASA's InSight Mission will land on Mars. The lander will carry two three-component seismometers, a heat-flow probe and an accurate X-band radar ranging instrument. With these instruments, the mission will place new and exciting constraints on the deep Martian interior. In this study, we investigate InSight's ability to constrain the thermal and dynamic state of the planet. We create a series of interior structure models which are consistent with the mass, moment of inertia and tidal properties of the planet, and use these to create seismic synthetics similar to those which will be recorded by InSight's SEIS experiment. We discuss the features of these synthetics which are sensitive to the properties of the thermal boundary layers at the base of the lithosphere and core mantle boundary. We show that InSight will be able to place important new constraints on the temperature and rheology of Mars' mantle. We provide several diagnostic features which may be used even with limited data return from the mission.

  15. Triazoles: a valuable insight into recent developments and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jagdish K; Ganguly, Swastika; Kaushik, Atul

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, heterocyclic compounds, analogs, and derivatives have attracted strong interest due to their useful biological and pharmacological properties. The small and simple triazole nucleus is present in compounds aimed at evaluating new entities that possess anti-microbial, anti-tumor, antitubercular, anti-convulsant, anti-depressant, antimalarial, and anti-inflammatory activities. Triazoles display a broad range of biological activities and are found in many potent, biologically active compounds, such as trazodone (antidepressant drug), rizatriptan (antimigrane drug), hexaconazole (antifungal drug) and alprazolam (hyptonic, sedative and tranquilizer drug). So far, modifications of the triazole ring have proven highly effective with improved potency and lesser toxicity. The present review highlights the recently synthesized triazoles possessing important biological activities. Copyright © 2013 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Promoting physical activity in teen girls: insight from focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Deborah G

    2008-01-01

    To describe adolescent girls' views about physical activity and explore strategies that nurses can use to promote physical activity. A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews with 28 girls (12-18 years of age) recruited from schools and neighborhood health centers in a Midwest metropolitan area. An interview guide with 15 open-ended questions was used, and data were analyzed using content analysis. Most girls preferred the phrase "physical activity" over "exercise." The benefits most frequently mentioned included positive physical attributes, mental health benefits, and staying healthy. Three major themes were identified: autonomy (ask them what they like to do, and then provide choices), fun (being with friends, variation, and enjoyment), and body image (gaining weight, appearance, and self-confidence). Nursing interventions to promote physical activity and other healthy lifestyle changes that may prevent obesity should include active listening and a focus on the goals of the teen. Nurses need to evaluate their teaching and counseling approach, because the teens emphasized two points: "Don't tell me what to do" and "Don't put me down."

  17. Interferon Gamma Release Assays in active Tuberculosis: new medical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Pierdomenico

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since first presentation, Interferon γ Release Assays (IGRAs have had basic and wide application to LTBI, in accordance with international consensus and CDC recommendations, leaving their use in active TB to the field of study and research.We reviewed the results of 633 patients investigated from 2004 to 2008 targeting active TB, with the objective to highlight immunological data supporting test performances.We evaluated Quantiferon TB Gold (1st generation IGRA kit in association to Culture (MGIT 960 and Lowenstein Jensen and PCR (Probetec-ET having the positivity of culture plus clinical diagnosis as the standard true value to compare. QTB Gold was studied in 69 TB positive patients (42 pulmonary and 27 extra-pulmonary, with Sensitivity, Specificity, PPV and NPV average to 61.8%, 94.5%, 54.3% and 95.9% respectively, after indeterminate results discharging. Significant statistical differences didn’t emerge between pulmonary and extra-pulmonary infections (CI 95%.The overall indeterminate ratio arose up to 20.3% in patients with active TB vs 2.7% of global population (p<0.001. In 22% of patients with active pulmonary disease, IGRA conversed to positivity after 15 days in replicated tests, in spite of current treatment. 4 patients, with pulmonary TB and Quantiferon persistent negativities, underwent 18 months follow-up as not respondent although SIRE phenotypic susceptibilities and enough DOT compliance. Molecular DST documented hetero resistance for rpoB (MUT 1, MUT 3 plus wild lines and katG (MUT 1 plus wild in association to lack of inhA wild lines (Genotype MTBDR plus, Hain Lifescience. These reports suggest a mutational relationship between Rv3874 – 3875 cassette, encoding ESAT-6 / CFP-10, and rpoB, katG, inhA genes plausibly implying weak or absent selective clonal Th 1 activation to IGRA antigens. Our data seem to point out: 1 positive results are able to match true active TB in less than 50% of patients; 2 negative results could leave

  18. Insight into Nek2A activity regulation and its pharmacological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ambuj Kumar

    2012-11-28

    Nov 28, 2012 ... phatase 1 interaction, mitotic degradation, microtubule bind- ing, and centrosome localization [22]. ... congression and causes persistent activation of the spindle checkpoint [24]. Hec1 is shown to be an ... hydrogen bond and salt bridge formations whereas the entropy corresponds to regulating the losses of ...

  19. Structure of a nanobody-stabilized active state of the β(2) adrenoceptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Fung, Juan Jose

    2011-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit a spectrum of functional behaviours in response to natural and synthetic ligands. Recent crystal structures provide insights into inactive states of several GPCRs. Efforts to obtain an agonist-bound active-state GPCR structure have proven difficult due...

  20. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  1. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  2. Observation of Andreev bound states at spin-active interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Detlef; Wolf, Michael Johannes [KIT, Institut fuer Nanotechnologie (Germany); Huebler, Florian [KIT, Institut fuer Nanotechnologie (Germany); KIT, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (Germany); Loehneysen, Hilbert von [KIT, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (Germany); KIT, Physikalisches Institut (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We report on high-resolution differential conductance experiments on nanoscale superconductor/ferromagnet tunnel junctions with ultra-thin oxide tunnel barriers. We observe subgap conductance features which are symmetric with respect to bias, and shift according to the Zeeman energy with an applied magnetic field. These features can be explained by resonant transport via Andreev bound states induced by spin-active scattering at the interface. From the energy and the Zeeman shift of the bound states, both the magnitude and sign of the spin-dependent interfacial phase shifts between spin-up and spin-down electrons can be determined. These results contribute to the microscopic insight into the triplet proximity effect at spin-active interfaces.

  3. Metaproteomics provides functional insight into activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wilmes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR.A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis". When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming alpha-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid beta oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected.Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of "Accumulibacter" to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models.

  4. First Versus Second Order Latent Growth Curve Models: Some Insights From Latent State-Trait Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Christian; Keller, Brian; Lockhart, Ginger

    2013-07-01

    First order latent growth curve models (FGMs) estimate change based on a single observed variable and are widely used in longitudinal research. Despite significant advantages, second order latent growth curve models (SGMs), which use multiple indicators, are rarely used in practice, and not all aspects of these models are widely understood. In this article, our goal is to contribute to a deeper understanding of theoretical and practical differences between FGMs and SGMs. We define the latent variables in FGMs and SGMs explicitly on the basis of latent state-trait (LST) theory and discuss insights that arise from this approach. We show that FGMs imply a strict trait-like conception of the construct under study, whereas SGMs allow for both trait and state components. Based on a simulation study and empirical applications to the CES-D depression scale (Radloff, 1977) we illustrate that, as an important practical consequence, FGMs yield biased reliability estimates whenever constructs contain state components, whereas reliability estimates based on SGMs were found to be accurate. Implications of the state-trait distinction for the measurement of change via latent growth curve models are discussed.

  5. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  6. Political contexts and maternal health policy: insights from a comparison of south Indian states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie L

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 300,000 women die from pregnancy-related complications each year. One-fifth of these deaths occur in India. Maternal survival rose on India's national policy agenda in the mid-2000s, but responsibility for health policy and implementation in the federal system is largely devolved to the state level where priority for the issue and maternal health outcomes vary. This study investigates sources of variation in maternal health policy and implementation sub-nationally in India. The study is guided by four analytical categories drawn from policy process literature: constitutional, governing and social structures; political contexts; actors and ideas. The experiences of two south Indian states-Tamil Nadu a leader and Karnataka a relatively slow mover-are examined. Process-tracing, a case study methodology that helps to identify roles of complex historical events in causal processes, was employed to investigate the research question in each state. The study is informed by interviews with public health policy experts and service delivery professionals, observation of implementation sites and archival document analysis. Historical legacies-Tamil Nadu's non-Brahmin social movement and Karnataka's developmental disparities combined with decentralization-shape the states' political contexts, affecting variation in maternal health policy and implementation. Competition to advance consistent political priorities across regimes in Tamil Nadu offers fertile ground for policy entrepreneurship and strong public health system administration facilitates progress. Inconsistent political priorities and relatively weak public health system administration frustrate progress in Karnataka. These variations offer insights to the ways in which sub-national political and administrative contexts shape health policy and implementation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toward understanding the active SETI debate: Insights from risk communication and perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbitz, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Insights from the robust field of risk communication and perception have to date been almost totally absent from the policy debate regarding the relative risks and merits of Active SETI or Messaging to Extraterrestrial Intelligence (METI). For many years, the practice (or proposed practice) of Active SETI has generated a vigorous and sometimes heated policy debate within the scientific community. There have also been some negative reactions in the media toward the activities of those engaged in Active SETI. Risk communication is a scientific approach to communication regarding situations involving potentially sensitive or controversial situations in which there may be high public concern and low public trust. The discipline has found wide acceptance and utility in fields such as public health, industrial regulation and environmental protection. Insights from the scientific field of risk communication (such as omission bias, loss aversion, the availability heuristic, probability neglect, and the general human preference for voluntary over involuntary risks) may help those who have participated in either side of the debate over Active SETI to better understand why the debate has taken on this posture. Principles of risk communication and risk perception may also help those engaged in Active SETI to communicate more effectively with other scientists, the public, with the media, and with policy makers regarding their activities and to better understand and respond to concerns expressed regarding the activity.

  8. Modeling thermomechanical pulp and paper activated sludge treatment plants to gain insight to the causes of bulking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Jean-Martin; Comeau, Yves; Perrier, Michel; Stuart, Paul

    2010-04-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was chosen as the basis for model development and was modified to take into account the specific characteristics of pulp and paper effluents. The model was incorporated to the GPS-X simulation environment (Hydromantis, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) to study operating deficiencies and nutrient transformations, particularly in relation to bulking. The results show that the process of ammonification is not significant at the studied mill and that the process of phosphatification (transformation of soluble organic phosphorus into orthophosphates) seems to be related to settling problems, as indicated by the sludge volume index. The phosphatification rate and the standard oxygen-transfer efficiency were found to decrease as the system entered a bulking state. Understanding the behavior of pulp and paper activated sludge can be improved by the incorporation of industry-specific processes and components to comprehensive models. These models then can be used to gain insight to the causes of bulking.

  9. Wind Lidar Activities in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer; St. Pe, Alexandra; Iungo, G. Valerio; Wharton, Sonia; Herges, Tommy; Filippelli, Matthew; Pontbriand, Philippe; Osler, Evan

    2017-06-28

    IEA Wind Task 32 seeks to identify and mitigate the barriers to the adoption of lidar for wind energy applications. This work is partly achieved by sharing experience across researchers and practitioners in the United States and worldwide. This presentation is a short summary of some wind lidar-related activities taking place in the country, and was presented by Andrew Clifton at the Task 32 meeting in December 2016 in his role as the U.S. Department of Energy-nominated country representative to the task.

  10. Musical training induces functional plasticity in perceptual and motor networks: insights from resting-state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Luo

    Full Text Available A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory cortices were evaluated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in musicians and non-musicians. The results revealed that functional connectivity was significantly increased in the motor and multi-sensory cortices of musicians. Moreover, the Granger causality results demonstrated a significant increase outflow-inflow degree in the auditory cortex with the strongest causal outflow pattern of effective connectivity being found in musicians. These resting state fMRI findings indicate enhanced functional integration among the lower-level perceptual and motor networks in musicians, and may reflect functional consolidation (plasticity resulting from long-term musical training, involving both multi-sensory and motor functional integration.

  11. Musical training induces functional plasticity in perceptual and motor networks: insights from resting-state FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Guo, Zhi-wei; Lai, Yong-xiu; Liao, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Kendrick, Keith M; Yao, De-zhong; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory) cortices were evaluated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in musicians and non-musicians. The results revealed that functional connectivity was significantly increased in the motor and multi-sensory cortices of musicians. Moreover, the Granger causality results demonstrated a significant increase outflow-inflow degree in the auditory cortex with the strongest causal outflow pattern of effective connectivity being found in musicians. These resting state fMRI findings indicate enhanced functional integration among the lower-level perceptual and motor networks in musicians, and may reflect functional consolidation (plasticity) resulting from long-term musical training, involving both multi-sensory and motor functional integration.

  12. Secretomic Insight into Glucose Metabolism of Aspergillus brasiliensis in Solid-State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volke-Sepulveda, Tania; Salgado-Bautista, Daniel; Bergmann, Carl; Wells, Lance; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2016-10-07

    The genus Aspergillus is ubiquitous in nature and includes various species extensively exploited industrially due to their ability to produce and secrete a variety of enzymes and metabolites. Most processes are performed in submerged fermentation (SmF); however, solid-state fermentation (SSF) offers several advantages, including lower catabolite repression and substrate inhibition and higher productivity and stability of the enzymes produced. This study aimed to explain the improved metabolic behavior of A. brasiliensis ATCC9642 in SSF at high glucose concentrations through a proteomic approach. Online respirometric analysis provided reproducible samples for secretomic studies when the maximum CO2 production rate occurred, ensuring consistent physiological states. Extracellular extracts from SSF cultures were treated by SDS-PAGE, digested with trypsin, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Of 531 sequences identified, 207 proteins were analyzed. Twenty-five were identified as the most abundant unregulated proteins; 87 were found to be up-regulated and 95 were down-regulated with increasing glucose concentration. Of the regulated proteins, 120 were enzymes, most involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates (51), amino acids (23), and nucleotides (9). This study shows the high protein secretory activity of A. brasiliensis under SSF conditions. High glucose concentration favors catabolic activities, while some stress-related proteins and those involved in proteolysis are down-regulated.

  13. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The release of GDP from GTPases signals the initiation of a GTPase cycle, where the association of GTP triggers conformational changes promoting binding of downstream effector molecules. Studies have implicated the nucleotide-binding G5 loop to be involved in the GDP release mechanism. For example...... for GDP release, or, alternatively, the movement is a consequence of release. To gain additional insight into the sequence of events leading to GDP release, we have created a chimeric protein comprised of Escherichia coli NFeoB and the G5 loop from the human Giα1 protein. The protein chimera retains...... GTPase activity at a similar level to wild-type NFeoB, and structural analyses of the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound proteins show that the G5 loop adopts conformations analogous to that of the human nucleotide-bound Giα1 protein in both states. Interestingly, isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped...

  14. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Fang Ji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Deinoxanthin (DX is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS‑scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  15. Molecular-level insights into intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of nanocarbon oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruisheng; Zhao, Xiang; Gao, Xingfa

    2015-01-12

    Nanocarbon oxides have been proved to possess great peroxidase-like activity, catalyzing the oxidation of many peroxidase substrates, such as 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD), accompanied by a significant color change. This chromogenic reaction is widely used to detect glucose and occult blood. The chromogenic reaction was intensively investigated with density functional theory and molecular-level insights into the nature of peroxidase-like activity were gained. A radical mechanism was unraveled and the carboxyl groups of nanocarbon oxides were identified as the reactive sites. Aromatic domains connected with the carboxyl groups were critical to the peroxidase-like activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Crystal structures of an intrinsically active cholera toxin mutant yield insight into the toxin activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Claire J; Amaya, Edward I; Jobling, Michael G; Holmes, Randall K; Hol, Wim G J

    2004-04-06

    Cholera toxin (CT) is a heterohexameric bacterial protein toxin belonging to a larger family of A/B ADP-ribosylating toxins. Each of these toxins undergoes limited proteolysis and/or disulfide bond reduction to form the enzymatically active toxic fragment. Nicking and reduction render both CT and the closely related heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT) unstable in solution, thus far preventing a full structural understanding of the conformational changes resulting from toxin activation. We present the first structural glimpse of an active CT in structures from three crystal forms of a single-site A-subunit CT variant, Y30S, which requires no activational modifications for full activity. We also redetermined the structure of the wild-type, proenzyme CT from two crystal forms, both of which exhibit (i) better geometry and (ii) a different A2 "tail" conformation than the previously determined structure [Zhang et al. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. 251, 563-573]. Differences between wild-type CT and active CTY30S are observed in A-subunit loop regions that had been previously implicated in activation by analysis of the structure of an LT A-subunit R7K variant [van den Akker et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 10996-11004]. The 25-36 activation loop is disordered in CTY30S, while the 47-56 active site loop displays varying degrees of order in the three CTY30S structures, suggesting that disorder in the activation loop predisposes the active site loop to a greater degree of flexibility than that found in unactivated wild-type CT. On the basis of these six new views of the CT holotoxin, we propose a model for how the activational modifications experienced by wild-type CT are communicated to the active site.

  17. MCID/Low Disease Activity State Workshop: low disease activity state in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, George; Boers, Maarten; Shea, Beverley; Anderson, Jennifer; Felson, David; Johnson, Kent; Kirwan, John; Lassere, Marissa; Robinson, Vivian; Simon, Lee; Strand, Vibeke; van Riel, Piet; Tugwell, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The MCID (minimal clinically important difference) module of OMERACT 5 developed a research agenda that led to the conclusion that a state of low disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) would need to be defined. To develop such a definition the various concepts and terminologies, the process for developing an operational definition, and the availability and design of longitudinal datasets for validation needed to be considered. This article describes the process of the MCID/Low Disease Activity State Workshop at OMERACT 6 to develop such a definition.

  18. Structural insight into the active site of mushroom tyrosinase using phenylbenzoic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Takahiro; Yoshimori, Atsushi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Akira; Kamiya, Takanori; Abe, Hideaki; Abe, Takehiko; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi

    2017-07-01

    So far, many inhibitors of tyrosinase have been discovered for cosmetic and clinical agents. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition in the active site of tyrosinase have not been well understood. To explore this problem, we examined here the inhibitory effects of 4'-hydroxylation and methoxylation of phenylbenzoic acid (PBA) isomers, which have a unique scaffold to inhibit mushroom tyrosinase. The inhibitory effect of 3-PBA, which has the most potent inhibitory activity among the isomers, was slightly decreased by 4'-hydroxylation and further decreased by 4'-methoxylation against mushroom tyrosinase. Surprisingly, 4'-hydroxylation but not methoxylation of 2-PBA appeared inhibitory activity. On the other hand, both 4'-hydroxylation and methoxylation of 4-PBA increased the inhibitory activity against mushroom tyrosinase. In silico docking analyses using the crystallographic structure of mushroom tyrosinase indicated that the carboxylic acid or 4'-hydroxyl group of PBA derivatives could chelate with cupric ions in the active site of mushroom tyrosinase, and that the interactions of Asn260 and Phe264 in the active site with the adequate-angled biphenyl group are involved in the inhibitory activities of the modified PBAs, by parallel and T-shaped π-π interactions, respectively. Furthermore, Arg268 could fix the angle of the aromatic ring of Phe264, and Val248 is supposed to interact with the inhibitors as a hydrophobic manner. These results may enhance the structural insight into mushroom tyrosinase for the creation of novel tyrosinase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The relationship between cognitive insight and cognitive performance among individuals with at-risk mental state for developing psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmuro, Noriyuki; Katsura, Masahiro; Obara, Chika; Kikuchi, Tatsuo; Hamaie, Yumiko; Sakuma, Atsushi; Iizuka, Kunio; Ito, Fumiaki; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2017-04-22

    Impairments in cognitive insight-the capacity to appraise and modify one's own distorted beliefs-are believed to be associated with the formation of psychosis. Nevertheless, the association between cognitive insight and cognitive function among people with at-risk mental state (ARMS) for developing psychotic illness has not been made clear. In this study, we used the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) to assess cognitive insight and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) to assess cognitive functions. Fifty subjects with ARMS and 29 healthy volunteers were recruited as participants. The scores for the two groups on the BCIS, BACS, and WCST were compared and Spearman's rank correlations between the domains of the BCIS and cognitive performance were examined in each group. No significant differences were found in BCIS scores between these groups, whereas all of the cognitive function scores were poorer in the participants with ARMS. In the ARMS group, higher self-certainty on the BCIS was significantly correlated with lower performance in the mean number of categories achieved (ρ=-0.31, P=0.03) and perseverative errors of the Nelson type (ρ=0.29, P=0.04) on the WCST. This indicates that excessively high self-certainty might be linked with weaknesses in cognitive flexibility or set-shifting ability in people with ARMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The contribution of extracurricular activities to adolescent friendships: new insights through social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, David R; Simpkins, Sandra D; Vest, Andrea E; Price, Chara D

    2011-07-01

    Extracurricular activities are settings that are theorized to help adolescents maintain existing friendships and develop new friendships. The overarching goal of the current investigation was to examine whether coparticipating in school-based extracurricular activities supported adolescents' school-based friendships. We used social network methods and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine whether dyadic friendship ties were more likely to exist among activity coparticipants while controlling for alternative friendship processes, namely dyadic homophily (e.g., demographic and behavioral similarities) and network-level processes (e.g., triadic closure). Results provide strong evidence that activities were associated with current friendships and promoted the formation of new friendships. These associations varied based on school level (i.e., middle vs. high school) and activity type (i.e., sports, academic, arts). Results of this study provide new insight into the complex relations between activities and friendship that can inform theories of their developmental outcomes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  1. MCID/Low Disease Activity State Workshop: low disease activity state in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.A.; Boers, M.; Shea, B.; Anderson, J.; Felson, D.T.; Johnson, K.; Kirwan, J.; Lassere, M.N.; Robinson, V.; Simon, L.S.; Strand, V.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Tugwell, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The MCID (minimal clinically important difference) module of OMERACT 5 developed a research agenda that led to the conclusion that a state of low disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) would need to be defined. To develop such a definition the various concepts and terminologies, the process

  2. Physical activity counseling in primary care: Insights from public health and behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Leonard, Tammy; Drope, Jeffrey; Katz, David L; Patel, Alpa V; Maitin-Shepard, Melissa; Amir, On; Grinstein, Amir

    2017-05-06

    Physical inactivity has reached epidemic proportions in modern society. Abundant evidence points to a causal link between physical inactivity and increased risk for numerous noncommunicable diseases, such as some types of cancer and heart disease, as well as premature mortality. Yet, despite this overwhelming evidence, many individuals do not meet the recommended amount of physical activity required to achieve maximum health benefits. Because primary care physicians' advice is highly regarded, clinicians have the unique opportunity to play an important role in enabling patients to modify their behavior at the point of care with the goal of guiding patients to adopt and maintain an active lifestyle. In the current study, the authors evaluate pertinent literature from the fields of medicine/public health and economics/psychology to suggest a comprehensive approach to physical activity counseling at the primary care level. They first examine the public health approach to physical activity counseling, and then proceed to offer insights from behavioral economics, an emerging field that combines principles from psychology and economics. The application of key behavioral economics tools (eg, precommitment contracts, framing) to physical activity counseling in primary care is elaborated. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:233-244. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. An insight into the removal of fluoroquinolones in activated sludge process: Sorption and biodegradation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Yangang; Ben, Weiwei

    2017-06-01

    The detailed sorption steps and biodegradation characteristics of fluoroquinolones (FQs) including ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were investigated through batch experiments. The results indicate that FQs at a total concentration of 500μg/L caused little inhibition of sludge bioactivity. Sorption was the primary removal pathway of FQs in the activated sludge process, followed by biodegradation, while hydrolysis and volatilization were negligible. FQ sorption on activated sludge was a reversible process governed by surface reaction. Henry and Freundlich models could describe the FQ sorption isotherms well in the concentration range of 100-300μg/L. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that FQ sorption on activated sludge is spontaneous, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven. Hydrophobicity-independent mechanisms determined the FQ sorption affinity with activated sludge. The zwitterion of FQs had the strongest sorption affinity, followed by cation and anion, and aerobic condition facilitated FQ sorption. FQs were slowly biodegradable, with long half-lives (>100hr). FQ biodegradation was enhanced with increasing temperature and under aerobic condition, and thus was possibly achieved through co-metabolism during nitrification. This study provides an insight into the removal kinetics and mechanism of FQs in the activated sludge process, but also helps assess the environmental risks of FQs resulting from sludge disposal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. How has magmatism in the northwest United States affected the lithosphere? Insights from Sp Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, E.; Ford, H. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Lekic, V.; Fouch, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The origins of the age-progressive hot spot track of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) and the age-progressive magmatic wave of the Newberry Trend in the High Lava Plains (HLP) are much debated. Constraining lithospheric structure and its relationship to magmatism in this region can provide new insights. We employ Sp receiver functions to image the base of the lithosphere. Data was collected from stations within a ~1500km x ~900km area centered on the ESRP, comprising both permanent network stations (e.g. US, IW) and many temporary arrays, including the High Lava Plains seismic array and EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array. We first obtained Sp receiver functions for individual waveforms using an extended-time multi-taper deconvolution method. We then migrated into a 3D volume using common-conversion point stacking and a spline function representation of phase Fresnel zones assuming mantle velocities from Obrebski et al. (2011) and the crustal model of Lowry and Perez-Gussinye (2011). In some areas, we detect a mantle Sp arrival indicating a decrease in velocity with depth in the 55-100 km depth range, which is consistent with the transition from high velocity lithosphere to low velocity asthenosphere in the tomography. To the southeast of Newberry volcano beneath the HLP, a particularly strong and clear negative Sp phase increases in depth from ~55 km beneath the youngest magmatism to ~65 km beneath 9-11 Ma eruptive centers. The depth of this phase is roughly consistent with the pressures of last equilibration of asthenospherically derived magmatic samples [Till et al, 2012]. Continuing to the southeast beneath the Owyhee Plateau, where there are 14-16 Ma silicic calderas associated with the onset of the SRP magmatic trend, a significantly weaker negative Sp phase is found at depths of 80-90 km. Image quality is poorer beneath the eastern SRP, where magmatic ages are 12 Ma and younger, due to sparser path coverage east of the High Lava Plains array

  5. Insights on the structure and activity of Lusi mud edifice from land gravity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Guillaume; Husein, Alwi; Karyono, Karyono; Hadi, Soffian; Prasetyo, Hardi; Lupi, Matteo; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption in East Java, Indonesia, active since May 2006, is a sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system (SHHS) fed by magmatic fluids connected to the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. The aims of the present study are to investigate changes in the local gravity field to obtain new insight into: 1) the evolution of the collapse structure ten years after its inception, 2) provide new insights on the thickening of the mud edifice for constraints on 3D numerical models, and 3) the pulsating phases characterizing the Lusi activity, which result in temporal density variations of the mudflow inside the active conduit. To investigate the structure of the mud edifice, we conducted a gravity spatial mapping over an area of 56 km2 with 390 new gravity stations. To investigate the density changes happening over time, we conducted several continuous gravity monitoring. We present results from gravity measurement collected during field campaigns in June and August 2016, and augmented by passive seismic and environmental parameter monitoring. We calculated for a reference density of 2,670 kg m-3 a new Bouguer anomaly map, which shows significant changes in the local gravity field in comparison to the previously published 2006-gravity map. In the west and south part of the edifice, maximum gravity decreases (-1 mGal) characterize the collapse of part of the edifice. In the southeast and east of the central area of flooded mud breccia, the gravity field increases locally (+1 mGal) along the limit defined by a previous study on the surface deformation of the mud edifice. The 3D model supports the hypothesis of a locally pinched volume of either mud, sediment, or mix of both between the subsiding volume and the uplifting volume of mud. The continuous gravity monitoring experiments were located at 320 and 380m away from the central area of a mud breccia flooded region. Over time, residual gravity variations reach up to 0.020 mGal in amplitude and occur at wavelengths

  6. New Insights into Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay: Serum Dilution Factor as a Crucial Parameter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jońca

    Full Text Available Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE activity assay and inhibitor phenotyping can help to identify patients at risk of prolonged paralysis following the administration of neuromuscular blocking agents. The assay plays an important role in clinical chemistry as a good diagnostic marker for intoxication with pesticides and nerve agents. Furthermore, the assay is also commonly used for in vitro characterization of cholinesterases, their toxins and drugs. There is still lack of standardized procedure for measurement of BChE activity and many laboratories use different substrates at various concentrations. The purpose of this study was to validate the BChE activity assay to determine the best dilution of human serum and the most optimal concentration of substrates and inhibitors. Serum BChE activity was measured using modified Ellman's method applicable for a microplate reader. We present our experience and new insights into the protocol for high-throughput routine assays of human plasma cholinesterase activities adapted to a microplate reader. During our routine assays used for the determination of BChE activity, we have observed that serum dilution factor influences the results obtained. We show that a 400-fold dilution of serum and 5mM S-butyrylthiocholine iodide can be successfully used for the accurate measurement of BChE activity in human serum. We also discuss usage of various concentrations of dibucaine and fluoride in BChE phenotyping. This study indicates that some factors of such a multicomponent clinical material like serum can influence kinetic parameters of the BChE. The observed inhibitory effect is dependent on serum dilution factor used in the assay.

  7. Insights and models from medical anthropology for understanding the healing activity of the Historical Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Pilch

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches a basic introdution to medical anthropology as a key to understanding and interpreting  the healing activity of the historical Jesus described in the gospels. It presents select literature, leading experts, fundamental concepts, and insights and models of special value to biblical specialists. Only a cross-cultural discipline like medical anthropology allows the investigator to  interpret texts and events from other cultures with respect for their distinctive cultural contexts in order to draw more appropriate conclusions and applications in other cultures. Applications to biblical texts are not included in this essay but may be found in other articles published by the author and listed in the bibliography.

  8. Insights and models from medical anthropology for understanding the healing activity of the Historical Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Pilch

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches a basic introdution to medical anthropology as a key to understanding and interpreting  the healing activity of the historical Jesus described in the gospels. It presents select literature, leading experts, fundamental concepts, and insights and models of special value to biblical specialists. Only a cross-cultural discipline like medical anthropology allows the investigator to  interpret texts and events from other cultures with respect for their distinctive cultural contexts in order to draw more appropriate conclusions and applications in other cultures. Applications to biblical texts are not included in this essay but may be found in other articles published by the author and listed in the bibliography.

  9. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms which drive solar winds and activity.

  10. Charge-transfer excited states in aqueous DNA: Insights from many-body Green's function theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-06

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (∼1  eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  11. Validity Evidence for the State Mindfulness Scale for Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anne E.; Ullrich-French, Sarah; French, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Being attentive to and aware of one's experiences in the present moment with qualities of acceptance and openness reflects the state of mindfulness. Positive associations exist between state mindfulness and state autonomous motivation for everyday activities. Though this suggests that state mindfulness links with adaptive motivational experiences,…

  12. State-level gonorrhea rates and expedited partner therapy laws: insights from time series analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Edusei, K; Cramer, R; Chesson, H W; Gift, T L; Leichliter, J S

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we examined state-level monthly gonorrhea morbidity and assessed the potential impact of existing expedited partner therapy (EPT) laws in relation to the time that the laws were enacted. Longitudinal study. We obtained state-level monthly gonorrhea morbidity (number of cases/100,000 for males, females and total) from the national surveillance data. We used visual examination (of morbidity trends) and an autoregressive time series model in a panel format with intervention (interrupted time series) analysis to assess the impact of state EPT laws based on the months in which the laws were enacted. For over 84% of the states with EPT laws, the monthly morbidity trends did not show any noticeable decreases on or after the laws were enacted. Although we found statistically significant decreases in gonorrhea morbidity within four of the states with EPT laws (Alaska, Illinois, Minnesota, and Vermont), there were no significant decreases when the decreases in the four states were compared contemporaneously with the decreases in states that do not have the laws. We found no impact (decrease in gonorrhea morbidity) attributable exclusively to the EPT law(s). However, these results do not imply that the EPT laws themselves were not effective (or failed to reduce gonorrhea morbidity), because the effectiveness of the EPT law is dependent on necessary intermediate events/outcomes, including sexually transmitted infection service providers' awareness and practice, as well as acceptance by patients and their partners. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. States of consciousness experimental insights into meditation, waking, sleep and dreams

    CERN Document Server

    Cvetkovic, Dean

    2011-01-01

    In this accessible overview of current knowledge, an expert team of editors and authors describe experimental approaches to consciousness. These approaches are shedding light on some of the hitherto unknown aspects of the distinct states of human consciousness, including the waking state, different states of sleep and dreaming, meditation and more. The book presents the latest research studies by the contributing authors, whose specialities span neuroscience, neurology, biomedical engineering, clinical psychology and psychophysiology, psychosocial medicine and anthropology. Overall this anthology provides the reader with a clear picture of how different states of consciousness can be defined, experimentally measured and analysed. A future byproduct of this knowledge may be anticipated in the development of systematic corrective treatments for many disorders and pathological problems of consciousness.

  14. Active Affordance Learning in Continuous State and Action Spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C.; Hindriks, K.V.; Babuska, R.

    2014-01-01

    Learning object affordances and manipulation skills is essential for developing cognitive service robots. We propose an active affordance learning approach in continuous state and action spaces without manual discretization of states or exploratory motor primitives. During exploration in the action

  15. Theoretical Insights Into the Excited State Double Proton Transfer Mechanism of Deep Red Pigment Alkannin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Dong, Hao; Zheng, Yujun

    2018-01-24

    As the most important component of deep red pigments, alkannin is investigated theoretically in detail based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. Exploring the dual intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O1-H2···O3 and O4-H5···O6) of alkannin, we confirm the O1-H2···O3 may play a more important role in the first excited state than the O4-H5···O6 one. Infrared (IR) vibrational analyses and subsequent charge redistribution also support this viewpoint. Via constructing the S1-state potential energy surface (PES) and searching transition state (TS) structures, we illuminate the excited state double proton transfer (ESDPT) mechanism of alkannin is the stepwise process that can be first launched by the O1-H2···O3 hydrogen bond wire in gas state, acetonitrile (CH3CN) and cyclohexane (CYH) solvents. We present a novel mechanism that polar aprotic solvents can contribute to the first-step proton transfer (PT) process in the S1 state, and nonpolar solvents play important roles in lowering the potential energy barrier of the second-step PT reaction.

  16. Excited states behavior of nucleobases in solution: insights from computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We review the most significant results obtained in the study of isolated nucleobases in solution by quantum mechanical methods, trying to highlight also the most relevant open issues. We concisely discuss some methodological issues relevant to the study of molecular electronic excited molecular states in condensed phases, focussing on the methods most commonly applied to the study of nucleobases, i.e. continuum models as the Polarizable Continuum Model and explicit solvation models. We analyse how the solvent changes the relative energy of the lowest energy excited states in the Franck-Condon region, their minima and the Conical Intersections among the different states, interpreting the experimental optical spectra, both steady state and time-resolved. Several methods are available for accurately including solvent effects in the Franck-Condon region, and for most of the nucleobases the solvent shift on the different excited states can be considered assessed. The study of the excited state decay, both radiative and non-radiative, in solution still poses instead significant theoretical challenges.

  17. Social Media Activism and State Censorship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poell, T.; Trottier, D.; Fuchs, C.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter interrogates how activist social media communication in authoritarian contexts is shaped through the mutual articulation of social media user practices, business models, and technological architectures, as well as through the controlling efforts of states. It specifically focuses on

  18. Mechanistic insights into the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerga, Agoston; Chen, Danqi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fu, Jinping; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Wang, Yanfei; Duff, Stephen M G; Howard, Jennifer E; Rydel, Timothy J; Evdokimov, Artem G; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Evans, Adam; Bolognesi, Renata; Park, Yoonseong; Haas, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-15

    The cotton pests Lygus hesperus and Lygus lineolaris can be controlled by expressing Cry51Aa2.834_16 in cotton. Insecticidal activity of pore-forming proteins is generally associated with damage to the midgut epithelium due to pores, and their biological specificity results from a set of key determinants including proteolytic activation and receptor binding. We conducted mechanistic studies to gain insight into how the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein variant functions. Biophysical characterization revealed that the full-length Cry51Aa2.834_16 was a stable dimer in solution, and when exposed to Lygus saliva or to trypsin, the protein underwent proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminus of each of the subunits, resulting in dissociation of the dimer to two separate monomers. The monomer showed tight binding to a specific protein in Lygus brush border membranes, and also formed a membrane-associated oligomeric complex both in vitro and in vivo. Chemically cross-linking the β-hairpin to the Cry51Aa2.834_16 body rendered the protein inactive, but still competent to compete for binding sites with the native protein in vivo. Our study suggests that disassociation of the Cry51Aa2.834_16 dimer into monomeric units with unoccupied head-region and sterically unhindered β-hairpin is required for brush border membrane binding, oligomerization, and the subsequent steps leading to insect mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystal structure analysis of ornithine transcarbamylase from Thermus thermophilus --HB8 provides insights on the plasticity of the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Ramya; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2015-09-18

    The enzymatic biosynthesis of L-arginine involves complex, sequential action of many enzymes and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase) is one of the essential enzymes in the pathway. In mammals OTCase is part of the urea cycle. Arginine is used in a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial applications and therefore engineering arginine biosynthesis pathway for overproduction of arginine has gained importance. On the other hand, it was found that detrimental mutations in the human OTCase gene resulted clinical hyperammonemia, with subsequent neurological damage. Therefore a better understanding of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme from various sources could be useful for modifying its enzymatic action. Here we report the structure of ornithine transcarbamylase of Thermus thermophilus HB8 (aTtOTCase) at 2.0 Å resolution. On comparison with its homologs, aTtOTCase showed maximum variation at the substrate binding loops namely 80s and SMG/240s loops. The active site geometry of aTtOTCase is unique among its homologs where the side chain of certain residues (Leu57, Arg58 and Arg288) is oriented differently. To study the structural insights of substrate binding in aTtOTCase, docking of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and ornithine (Orn) was carried out sequentially. Both substrates were unable to bind in a proper orientation in the active site pocket and this could be due to the differently oriented side chains. This suggests that the active site geometry should also undergo fine tuning besides the large structural changes as the enzyme switches from completely open to a substrate bound closed state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Allosteric inhibition abrogates dysregulated LFA-1 activation: Structural insight into mechanisms of diminished immunologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Maryam; Olotu, Fisayo A; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2018-02-05

    Lymphocyte Function Associated antigen-1(LFA-1) has been implicated severely in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Its active and inactive conformations correlate with its diseased and non-diseased state respectively. This is determined by its degree of affinity for its intrinsic ligand (ICAM) at the active site and accompanying synergistic coordination at the α7 helix. This potentiates the role of inhibitors in disrupting this interaction allosterically. Herein, we present a first account of the structural dynamics which characterizes the inhibitory effect of a novel LFA-1 antagonist, Lifitegrast (SAR1118), upon binding to the I-domain allosteric site (IDAS) using molecular dynamics simulation. Findings from this study revealed that the inhibitor stabilized the closed conformation and reversed the open conformation to a low ICAM-affinity state (closed) as evidenced by the upward movement of the α7 helix and corresponding transitions at the active site. This in both cases favors the formation of the non-disease inactive form. Upon allosteric modulation, the inhibitor significantly restored protein stability, enhanced compactness and decreased residual fluctuation as crucial to its potency in the amelioration of immunological and inflammatory diseases which agrees with experimental studies. These findings could therefore serve as the basis for the exploration of the allosteric domain and its active site affinity modulation to aid the design of more specific and selective inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Request Strategies in Professional E-Mail Correspondence: Insights from the United States Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the rhetorical features of e-mail correspondence, this is the first study to examine the request strategies in e-mails written by native English-speaking professionals from a variety of industries in the United States. This study uses Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper's (1989) speech act framework to analyze the request…

  2. The Influence of Fathers on Children's Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors: Insights, Recommendations and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Philip J; Young, Myles D

    2017-09-01

    Although fathers have an important influence on their children's well-being, their unique influence on child lifestyle behaviors has been largely overlooked in the literature. To inform and encourage future research, this paper provides an overview of existing studies that have examined the influence of fathers on the physical activity and dietary behaviors of their children. While the available data indicate that fathers' behaviors and parenting practices likely play an important role in promoting healthy behaviors in children, the evidence base is limited by a reliance on observational designs and small, ungeneralizable samples. This paper also provides a summary of the methods, research findings, and experiential insights we have gained while conducting the "Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids" randomized controlled trials, which tested the efficacy and effectiveness of a socio-culturally targeted program that engages fathers to improve their own health and the health of their children. The paper concludes with a series of recommendations for recruiting and engaging fathers and a summary of directions for future research.

  3. Structural Insights into DD-Fold Assembly and Caspase-9 Activation by the Apaf-1 Apoptosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tsung-Wei; Yang, Chao-Yu; Kao, Wen-Pin; Kuo, Bai-Jiun; Lin, Shan-Meng; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Lo, Yu-Chih; Lin, Su-Chang

    2017-03-07

    Death domain (DD)-fold assemblies play a crucial role in regulating the signaling to cell survival or death. Here we report the crystal structure of the caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-CARD disk of the human apoptosome. The structure surprisingly reveals that three 1:1 Apaf-1:procaspase-9 CARD protomers form a novel helical DD-fold assembly on the heptameric wheel-like platform of the apoptosome. The small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle light scattering data also support that three protomers could form an oligomeric complex similar to the crystal structure. Interestingly, the quasi-equivalent environment of CARDs could generate different quaternary CARD assemblies. We also found that the type II interaction is conserved in all DD-fold complexes, whereas the type I interaction is found only in the helical DD-fold assemblies. This study provides crucial insights into the caspase activation mechanism, which is tightly controlled by a sophisticated and highly evolved CARD assembly on the apoptosome, and also enables better understanding of the intricate DD-fold assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 'Maximising shareholder value': a detailed insight into the corporate political activity of the Australian food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialon, Melissa; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven; Sacks, Gary

    2017-04-01

    To gain deeper insight into the corporate political activity (CPA) of the Australian food industry from a public health perspective. Fifteen interviews with a purposive sample of current and former policy makers, public health advocates and academics who have closely interacted with food industry representatives or observed food industry behaviours. All participants reported having directly experienced the CPA of the food industry during their careers, with the 'information and messaging' and 'constituency building' strategies most prominent. Participants expressed concern that food industry CPA strategies resulted in weakened policy responses to addressing diet-related disease. This study provides direct evidence of food industry practices that have the potential to shape public health-related policies and programs in Australia in ways that favour business interests at the expense of population health. Implications for public health: This evidence can inform policy makers and public health advocates and be used to adopt measures to ensure that public interests are put at the forefront as part of the policy development and implementation process. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Mechanochemical coupling in the myosin motor domain. I. Insights from equilibrium active-site simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Yu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the major structural transitions in molecular motors are often argued to couple to the binding of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, the recovery stroke in the conventional myosin has been shown to be dependent on the hydrolysis of ATP. To obtain a clearer mechanistic picture for such "mechanochemical coupling" in myosin, equilibrium active-site simulations with explicit solvent have been carried out to probe the behavior of the motor domain as functions of the nucleotide chemical state and conformation of the converter/relay helix. In conjunction with previous studies of ATP hydrolysis with different active-site conformations and normal mode analysis of structural flexibility, the results help establish an energetics-based framework for understanding the mechanochemical coupling. It is proposed that the activation of hydrolysis does not require the rotation of the lever arm per se, but the two processes are tightly coordinated because both strongly couple to the open/close transition of the active site. The underlying picture involves shifts in the dominant population of different structural motifs as a consequence of changes elsewhere in the motor domain. The contribution of this work and the accompanying paper [] is to propose the actual mechanism behind these "population shifts" and residues that play important roles in the process. It is suggested that structural flexibilities at both the small and large scales inherent to the motor domain make it possible to implement tight couplings between different structural motifs while maintaining small free-energy drops for processes that occur in the detached states, which is likely a feature shared among many molecular motors. The significantly different flexibility of the active site in different X-ray structures with variable level arm orientations supports the notation that external force sensed by the lever arm may transmit into the active site and influence the chemical steps (nucleotide

  6. Leadership of United States Academic Departments of Ophthalmology: Chairperson Characteristics, Accomplishments, and Personal Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Gad; Qureshi, Hanya M; Saraf, Steven S; Darnley-Fisch, Deborah A

    2018-02-01

    To report on the characteristics, accomplishments, and past experiences of current academic ophthalmology department chairs. Cross-sectional study. Setting: A confidential online survey. Total of 111 chairs of US academic ophthalmology departments. Chairs' general characteristics, training/former positions held, academic accomplishments, previous organization/committee involvement, motivation/insight, and overall work satisfaction. Fifty-five chair responses were received (96% male, mean age 57 years, mean term 7 years). The majority were American medical graduates (93%), full professors of ophthalmology (93%), and permanent chairs (96%). All completed their residency in the US and 96% completed a fellowship (25% vitreoretinal surgery, 22% cornea and external disease, and 20% glaucoma). On average, chairs authored 98 peer-reviewed articles, 2 books, and 11 book chapters. They were also significantly involved in peer-reviewed journal literature, serving as editors (20%), associate editors (18%), or editorial board members (60%). The majority of chairs indicated they decided to seek their position late in their career, having already become a full (33%) or associate professor (26%), primarily owing to a desire to build and promote an academic ophthalmology department (61%). Chairs regarded their experience as head of service as most important for their current performance as department heads. Their principal advice to aspiring ophthalmology chairs was to focus on developing skills as a clinician, researcher, and educator ("triple threat"). Overall, academic department chairs are accomplished leaders in ophthalmology and prolific authors with an established academic record. Chairs regarded their previous leadership roles within the department as invaluable to their effectiveness as chair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. State-Of in Uav Remote Sensing Survey - First Insights Into Applications of Uav Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, H.

    2017-08-01

    UAVs are increasingly adapted as remote sensing platforms. Together with specialized sensors, they become powerful sensing systems for environmental monitoring and surveying. Spectral data has great capabilities to the gather information about biophysical and biochemical properties. Still, capturing meaningful spectral data in a reproducible way is not trivial. Since a couple of years small and lightweight spectral sensors, which can be carried on small flexible platforms, have become available. With their adaption in the community, the responsibility to ensure the quality of the data is increasingly shifted from specialized companies and agencies to individual researchers or research teams. Due to the complexity of the data acquisition of spectral data, this poses a challenge for the community and standardized protocols, metadata and best practice procedures are needed to make data intercomparable. In November 2016, the ESSEM COST action Innovative optical Tools for proximal sensing of ecophysiological processes (OPTIMISE; http://optimise.dcs.aber.ac.uk/) held a workshop on best practices for UAV spectral sampling. The objective of this meeting was to trace the way from particle to pixel and identify influences on the data quality / reliability, to figure out how well we are currently doing with spectral sampling from UAVs and how we can improve. Additionally, a survey was designed to be distributed within the community to get an overview over the current practices and raise awareness for the topic. This talk will introduce the approach of the OPTIMISE community towards best practises in UAV spectral sampling and present first results of the survey (survey/"target="_blank">http://optimise.dcs.aber.ac.uk/uav-survey/). This contribution briefly introduces the survey and gives some insights into the first results given by the interviewees.

  8. Mechanistic insight on the catecholase activity of dinuclear copper complexes with distant metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Quijano, María Rosa; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor M; Gasque, Laura

    2012-04-28

    The catecholase activity of two dinuclear Cu(II) complexes with distant metal centers is discussed together with solid state and solution studies. The crystal structure for one of them, [Cu(2)(diep)(H(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(4)·2H(2)O, is described, showing the two copper ions are 7.457 Å apart and in a square pyramidal coordination. Both complexes display a weak antiferromagnetic coupling in the solid state that is manifest in the dimer EPR spectra obtained in frozen solution. The pH-potentiometric speciation performed in 1:1 MeOH-H(2)O allowed the assignment of hydrolyzed copper species as those catalytically active in the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (DTBC). The kinetic measurements led us to propose behavior consistent with Michaelis-Menten plus a linear dependence of the initial rate on [DTBC]. This can be associated with the presence of more than one catalytically active species, which is consistent with the evidence of several differently hydrolyzed species shown in the predominance diagrams. Product characterization studies led to establishing the formation of hydrogen peroxide during the catalytic cycle, while semiquinone and superoxide radicals were detected by EPR spectroscopy, supporting one-electron transference at each of the copper centers. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  9. 20 CFR 631.41 - Allowable State activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 631.41 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE III OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Programs § 631.41 Allowable State activities. (a...) Activities shall be coordinated with other programs serving dislocated workers, including training under...

  10. Vehicle choice in aging population: Some insights from a stated preference survey for California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavalec, C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper investigates the potential effects that an aging baby boomer generation will have on gasoline use through their vehicle choice decisions. The study uses stated preference data for both conventional and alternative fuel vehicles, and measures the impact of age of survey respondent on the perceived value of vehicle characteristics such as fuel economy, performance, and body style (e.g., car vs. truck). The results suggest the possibility that average fleet fuel economy may improve in the next few years, if survey preferences translate to actual purchase behavior. No clear implications can be drawn regarding the demand for alternative fuel vehicles.

  11. Geographical, socioeconomic, and ecological determinants of exotic plant naturalization in the United States: insights and updates from improved data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinfeng Guo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on alien species establishment in the United States and around the world have drastically improved our understanding of the patterns of species naturalization, biological invasions, and underlying mechanisms. Meanwhile, relevant new data have been added and the data quality has significantly increased along with the consistency of related concepts and terminology that are being developed. Here using new and/or improved data on the native and exotic plant richness and many socioeconomic and physical variables at the state level in the United States, we attempt to test whether previously discovered patterns still hold, particularly how native and exotic species are related and what are the dominant factors controlling the plant naturalization. We found that, while the number of native species is largely controlled by natural factors such as area and temperature, exotic species and exotic fraction are predominantly influenced by social factors such as human population. When domestically introduced species were included, several aspects in earlier findings were somewhat altered and additional insights regarding the mechanisms of naturalization could be achieved. With increased data availability, however, a greater challenge ahead appears to be how many and which variables to include in analyses.

  12. Spectroscopic insights on selfassembly and excited state interactions between rhodamine and phthalocyanine molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hao; Zhang, Xian-Fu

    2015-03-15

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence lifetimes of tetrasulfonated zinc phthalocyanine ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were measured in the absence and presence of four rhodamine dyes, Rhodamine B (RB), Ethyl rhodamine B (ERB), Rhodamine 6G (R6G), Rhodamine 110 (R110), and Pyronine B (PYB). The ground state complexes of phthalocyanine-(Rhodamine)2 were observed which exhibit new absorption bands. The binding constants are all very large (0.86×10(5)-0.22×10(8) M(-1)), suggesting rhodamine-phthalocyanine pairs are very good combinations for efficient selfassembly. Both the fluorescence intensity and the lifetime values of ZnPc(SO3Na)4 were decreased by the presence of rhodamines. The structural effect of rhodamines on selfassembly is significant. The ground state binding and dynamic quenching capability is PYB>R6G>ERB>RB>R110. The dynamic fluorescence quenching is due to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The PET rate constant is very large and in the order of 10(13) M(-1) s(-1), much greater than kf and kic (in the order of 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), which means that the PET efficiency is almost 100%. Therefore the non-covalent Pc-rhodamine is a very good pair of donor/acceptor for potential efficient solar energy conversion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyloidogenic behavior of different intermediate state of stem bromelain: A biophysical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ehtram, Aquib; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Nusrat, Saima; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-10-01

    Stem bromelain, a cysteine proteases from Ananas comosus is a widely accepted therapeutic drug with broad medicinal application. It exists as intermediate states at pH 2.0 and 10.0, where it encountered in gastrointestinal tract during adsorption (acidic pH) and in gut epithelium (alkaline pH), respectively. In this study, we monitored the thermal aggregation/amyloid formation of SB at different pH intermediate states. Thermal treatment of stem bromelain at pH 10.0 favors the fibrillation in which the extent of aggregation increases with increase in protein concentration. However, no fibril formation in stem bromelain at pH 2.0 was found at all the concentration used at pH 10.0. The fibril formation was confirmed by various techniques such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, dye binding assays and far UV circular dichroism. The Dynamic light scattering confirmed the formation of aggregates by measuring the hydrodynamic radii pattern. Moreover, microscopic techniques were performed to analyze the morphology of fibrils. The aggregation behavior may be due to variation in number of charged amino acid residues. The less negative charge developed at pH 10.0 may be responsible for aggregation. This work helps to overcome the aggregation related problems of stem bromelain during formulations in pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  15. Musical Training Induces Functional Plasticity in Perceptual and Motor Networks: Insights from Resting-State fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Luo; Zhi-wei Guo; Yong-xiu Lai; Wei Liao; Qiang Liu; Kendrick, Keith M; De-zhong Yao; Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory) cortices were evaluated using resting-state fu...

  16. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  17. Charge-state dependent compaction and dissociation of protein complexes: insights from ion mobility and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zoe; Politis, Argyris; Bush, Matthew F; Smith, Lorna J; Robinson, Carol V

    2012-02-22

    Collapse to compact states in the gas phase, with smaller collision cross sections than calculated for their native-like structure, has been reported previously for some protein complexes although not rationalized. Here we combine experimental and theoretical studies to investigate the gas-phase structures of four multimeric protein complexes during collisional activation. Importantly, using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we find that all four macromolecular complexes retain their native-like topologies at low energy. Upon increasing the collision energy, two of the four complexes adopt a more compact state. This collapse was most noticeable for pentameric serum amyloid P (SAP) which contains a large central cavity. The extent of collapse was found to be highly correlated with charge state, with the surprising observation that the lowest charge states were those which experience the greatest degree of compaction. We compared these experimental results with in vacuo molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of SAP, during which the temperature was increased. Simulations showed that low charge states of SAP exhibited compact states, corresponding to collapse of the ring, while intermediate and high charge states unfolded to more extended structures, maintaining their ring-like topology, as observed experimentally. To simulate the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of different charge states of SAP, we used MS to measure the charge state of the ejected monomer and assigned this charge to one subunit, distributing the residual charges evenly among the remaining four subunits. Under these conditions, MD simulations captured the unfolding and ejection of a single subunit for intermediate charge states of SAP. The highest charge states recapitulated the ejection of compact monomers and dimers, which we observed in CID experiments of high charge states of SAP, accessed by supercharging. This strong correlation between theory and experiment has implications for further

  18. Insight into Temperature Dependence of GTPase Activity in Human Guanylate Binding Protein-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Safikur; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1) belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1. PMID:22859948

  19. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  20. Stability and activity of mesophilic subtilisin E and its thermophilic homolog: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, G.; Merz, K.M. Jr.

    1999-07-28

    This report examines the origin of the high-temperature (250 K) behavior of a thermophilic mutant enzyme (labeled at 5-3H5; see Zhao and Arnold Prot. Eng. 1999, 12, 47--53) derived from subtilisin E by eight amino acid substitutions. Through the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the authors have provided molecular-level insights into how point mutations can affect protein structure and dynamics. From simulations the authors observed a reduced rmsd in several key regions, an increased overall flexibility, an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds, and an increase in the number of stabilizing interactions in the thermophilic system. It was shown that it is not a necessary requirement that thermophilic enzymes be less flexible than their mesophilic counterparts at low temperatures. However, thermophilic enzymes must retain their three-dimensional structures and flexibility at high temperatures in order to retain activity. Furthermore, the authors have been able to point out the effects of some of the single substitutions. Even if it is not possible yet to give general rules for rational protein design, the authors are able to make some predictions on how a protein should be stabilized in order to be thermophilic. In particular, the authors suggest that a promising strategy toward speeding up the design of thermally stable proteins would be to identify fluxional regions within a protein through the use of MD simulations (or suitable experiments). Presumably these regions allow for autocatalytic reactions to occur and are also involved in allowing water to gain access to the interior of the protein and initiate protein unfolding. These fluxional regions could also adversely affect the positioning of the catalytic machinery, thereby decreasing catalytic efficiency. Thus, once these locations have been identified, focused directed evolution studies could be designed that stabilize these fluxional regions.

  1. Atomic substitutions in synthetic apatite; Insights from solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, John S.

    Apatite, Ca5(PO4)3X (where X = F, Cl, or OH), is a unique mineral group capable of atomic substitutions for cations and anions of varied size and charge. Accommodation of differing substituents requires some kind of structural adaptation, e.g. new atomic positions, vacancies, or coupled substitutions. These structural adaptations often give rise to important physicochemical properties relevant to a range of scientific disciplines. Examples include volatile trapping during apatite crystallization, substitution for large radionuclides for long-term storage of nuclear fission waste, substitution for fluoride to improve acid resistivity in dental enamel composed dominantly of hydroxylapatite, and the development of novel biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility. Despite the importance and ubiquity of atomic substitutions in apatite materials, many of the mechanisms by which these reactions occur are poorly understood. Presence of substituents at dilute concentration and occupancy of disordered atomic positions hinder detection by bulk characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an isotope-specific structural characterization technique that does not require ordered atomic arrangements, and is therefore well suited to investigate atomic substitutions and structural adaptations in apatite. In the present work, solid-state NMR is utilized to investigate structural adaptations in three different types of apatite materials; a series of near-binary F, Cl apatite, carbonate-hydroxylapatite compositions prepared under various synthesis conditions, and a heat-treated hydroxylapatite enriched in 17O. The results indicate that hydroxyl groups in low-H, near binary F,Cl apatite facilitate solid-solution between F and Cl via column reversals, which result in average hexagonal symmetry despite very dilute OH concentration ( 2 mol percent). In addition, 19F NMR spectra indicate

  2. Heat of capillary condensation in nanopores: new insights from the equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sugata P; Piri, Mohammad

    2017-02-15

    Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) coupled with the Young-Laplace equation is a recently developed equation of state (EOS) that successfully presents not only the capillary condensation but also the pore critical phenomena. The development of this new EOS allows further investigation of the heats involved in condensation. Compared to the conventional approaches, the EOS calculations present the temperature-dependent behavior of the heat of capillary condensation as well as that of the contributing effects. The confinement effect was found to be the strongest at the pore critical point. Therefore, contrary to the bulk heat condensation that vanishes at the critical point, the heat of capillary condensation in small pores shows a minimum and then increases with temperature when approaching the pore critical temperature. Strong support for the existence of the pore critical point is also discussed as the volume expansivity of the condensed phase in confinement was found to increase dramatically near the pore critical temperature. At high reduced temperatures, the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was found to apply better for confined fluids than it does for bulk fluids.

  3. Spectroscopic insights on imidazole substituted phthalocyanine photosensitizers: fluorescence properties, triplet state and singlet oxygen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Lin, Yong; Guo, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jingzhong

    2014-12-10

    Imidazole substituted metal phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes were synthesized. UV-vis absorption, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, as well as laser flash photolysis were used to measure the photophysical and photosensitizing properties. All the imidazole-phthalocyanine conjugates show high ΦT (quantum yield of excited triplet formation), high ΦΔ (singlet oxygen formation yield, >0.50) and good fluorescence properties (quantum yield Φf>0.20 and lifetime τf>3.0 ns). Compared to the unsubstituted Pc, both α- and β-imidazole substitutions result in the remarkable decrease in Φf and τf, but the α-substitution is stronger. The imidazole substitution, on the other hand, causes the increase of ΦT, τT, and ΦΔ values. Magnesium phthalocyanine (MgPc) is more susceptible to the substitution than zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc). The mechanism responsible for the result is suggested based on the involvement of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. The high ΦΔ and appropriate fluorescence properties make the Pcs good candidate for PDT photosensitizers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Eldercare in the transnational setting: insights from Bangladeshi transnational families in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Iftekhar; Ingman, Stan

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the emotional impact of caregiving for elderly parents on migrant child in the transnational setting. To address this gap in the literature, this study examines the stressors, mediators, and outcomes of eldercare in the transnational context. Data were collected from 21 Bangladeshi immigrant men and women living in the United States who had living parents in Bangladesh over 60 years old. Despite the geographic distance, the migrants provide care to their parents such as emotional support, financial assistance, and arranging for care. While the health status of the care recipients contributed to primary objective stressors, none of the transnational caregivers' narratives reflected the presence of any subjective stressors such as role overload, role captivity, and relational deprivation. Distance and depending on others for hands-on caregiving resulted in feelings of loss of control over the caregiving process. Caregivers experienced a range of emotions from guilt, excessive worrying, and distress over the unpredictability and uncertainty of their circumstances. Kin networks, communicative technologies, and a cultural norm of filial piety contributed to mediating stress. The findings underscore the importance of supportive institutional policies such as visa and travel policies, employment leave, and counseling services for caregivers who provide care for their elderly parents transnationally.

  5. Local Government Capacity to Respond to Environmental Change: Insights from Towns in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Lincoln R; Lauber, T Bruce; Kay, David L; Cutts, Bethany B

    2017-07-01

    Local governments attempting to respond to environmental change face an array of challenges. To better understand policy responses and factors influencing local government capacity to respond to environmental change, we studied three environmental issues affecting rural or peri-urban towns in different regions of New York State: climate change in the Adirondacks (n = 63 towns), loss of open space due to residential/commercial development in the Hudson Valley (n = 50), and natural gas development in the Southern Tier (n = 62). Our analysis focused on towns' progression through three key stages of the environmental policy process (issue awareness and salience, common goals and agenda setting, policy development and implementation) and the factors that affect this progression and overall capacity for environmental governance. We found that-when compared to towns addressing open space development and natural gas development-towns confronted with climate change were at a much earlier stage in the policy process and were generally less likely to display the essential resources, social support, and political legitimacy needed for an effective policy response. Social capital cultivated through collaboration and networking was strongly associated with towns' policy response across all regions and could help municipalities overcome omnipresent resource constraints. By comparing and contrasting municipal responses to each issue, this study highlights the processes and factors influencing local government capacity to address a range of environmental changes across diverse management contexts.

  6. Franciscana strandings on the north coast of Santa Catarina State and insights into birth period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Lopes Paitach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Franciscana, Pontoporia blainvillei, is the most threatened small cetacean in the South Atlantic. Accidental captures in fishing nets is the main problem for this species throughout its distribution. Dead franciscanas found along the coast are an important source of information. This work aimed to analyze the records of dead franciscanas found on the northern coast of Santa Catarina, including Babitonga Bay. Between January 2001 and November 2012, 54 franciscana carcasses were recorded, with the highest number (8 individuals in 2011. Fifty-two percent (n=28 of the carcasses were recorded between August and October. Taking into account that this information was not obtained from a systematic effort, it was not possible to consider this as an estimation of mortality. The largest animal was a female, with a total length of 142 cm. Ten recovered animals (18.5% were smaller than 80 cm, and were considered fetuses or calves. These records indicate that the main birthing period for franciscanas in Santa Catarina is between October and January. The findings presented here contribute to our knowledge of franciscana ecology in the state of Santa Catarina.

  7. Detecting concept relations in clinical text: insights from a state-of-the-art model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Cherry, Colin; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; de Bruijn, Berry

    2013-04-01

    This paper addresses an information-extraction problem that aims to identify semantic relations among medical concepts (problems, tests, and treatments) in clinical text. The objectives of the paper are twofold. First, we extend an earlier one-page description (appearing as a part of [5]) of a top-ranked model in the 2010 I2B2 NLP Challenge to a necessary level of details, with the belief that feature design is the most crucial factor to the success of our system and hence deserves a more detailed discussion. We present a precise quantification of the contributions of a wide variety of knowledge sources. In addition, we show the end-to-end results obtained on the noisy output of a top-ranked concept detector, which could help construct a more complete view of the state of the art in the real-world scenario. As the second major objective, we reformulate our models into a composite-kernel framework and present the best result, according to our knowledge, on the same dataset. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radar data offer insights into the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet in the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Sørensen, Louise S.; Gudmandsen, Preben; Dall, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Ice-penetrating radar is a well-established tool for imaging the interior and the bed of an ice body. The data provide information on ice thickness, but also contain information on englacial stratigraphy, ice flow dynamics and conditions at the interface between ice and the bedrock. During the past two decades, the Greenland Ice Sheet has been extensively measured by radar instruments. However, a large radar dataset has so far been overlooked due to its inaccessibility to modern analysis techniques. This dataset was acquired in the 1970s in a large-scale project that ran over multiple years and covered more than 170,000 km of radar flight lines. While the ice thickness information from the data has subsequently been digitized, the data itself is presently only available as35-mm films, micro-fiche copies of the films and enlarged positives. Here we present the first results from an effort to digitize this unique and rare dataset. We demonstrate how the data may contain valuable information on the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet in the 1970s, a period where observations from the centre of the ice sheet are scarce.

  9. State opportunities for action: Update of states' combined heat and power activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Elizabeth [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Elliott, R. Neal [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2003-10-01

    This report updates the review of state policies with regard to CHP that the American Council for and Energy Efficient Economy completed in 2002. It describes the current activities of states with programs during the initial survey and also reviews new programs offered by the states.

  10. Genomics insights into different cellobiose hydrolysis activities in two Trichoderma hamatum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peng; Liu, Bo; Su, Yi; Hu, Yao; Hong, Yahui; Yi, Xinxin; Chen, Lei; Su, Shengying; Chu, Jeffrey S C; Chen, Nansheng; Xiong, Xingyao

    2017-04-19

    Efficient biomass bioconversion is a promising solution to alternative energy resources and environmental issues associated with lignocellulosic wastes. The Trichoderma species of cellulolytic fungi have strong cellulose-degrading capability, and their cellulase systems have been extensively studied. Currently, a major limitation of Trichoderma strains is their low production of β-glucosidases. We isolated two Trichoderma hamatum strains YYH13 and YYH16 with drastically different cellulose degrading efficiencies. YYH13 has higher cellobiose-hydrolyzing efficiency. To understand mechanisms underlying such differences, we sequenced the genomes of YYH13 and YYH16, which are essentially identical (38.93 and 38.92 Mb, respectively) and are similar to that of the T. hamatum strain GD12. Using GeneMark-ES, we annotated 11,316 and 11,755 protein-coding genes in YYH13 and YYH16, respectively. Comparative analysis identified 13 functionally important genes in YYH13 under positive selection. Through examining orthologous relationships, we identified 172,655, and 320 genome-specific genes in YYH13, YYH16, and GD12, respectively. We found 15 protease families that show differences between YYH13 and YYH16. Enzymatic tests showed that exoglucanase, endoglucanase, and β-glucosidase activities were higher in YYH13 than YYH16. Additionally, YYH13 contains 10 families of carbohydrate-active enzymes, including GH1, GH3, GH18, GH35, and GH55 families of chitinases, glucosidases, galactosidases, and glucanases, which are subject to stronger positive selection pressure. Furthermore, we found that the β-glucosidase gene (YYH1311079) and pGEX-KG/YYH1311079 bacterial expression vector may provide valuable insight for designing β-glucosidase with higher cellobiose-hydrolyzing efficiencies. This study suggests that the YYH13 strain of T. hamatum has the potential to serve as a model organism for producing cellulase because of its strong ability to efficiently degrade cellulosic biomass

  11. Stimulating Investment Development through Transformation of State Banks Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulpinska Lidiya K.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers significance of state corporations and state financial institutions in stimulation of investments into the fixed capital of the country and considers problems of increase of efficiency of activity of these institutions in the world and Ukraine. It considers the state sector of the developing countries through the prism of activity of state financial and non-financial corporations. It analyses theories of positive and negative features of carrying out state investing through state-owned banks. It analyses the role of state financial corporations in Ukraine, in particular, in crediting and expansion of the portfolio of acquired governmental bonds and offers ways of its increase in the context of necessity of directing funds into investment development.

  12. A Structural Snapshot of CYP2B4 in Complex with Paroxetine Provides Insights into Ligand Binding and Clusters of Conformational States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Pascual, Jaime; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    An X-ray crystal structure of CYP2B4 in complex with the drug paroxetine [(3S,4R)-3-[(2H-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yloxy)methyl]-4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine] was solved at 2.14 Å resolution. The structure revealed a conformation intermediate to that of the recently solved complex with amlodipine and that of the more compact complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole in terms of the placement of the F-G cassette. Moreover, comparison of the new structure with 15 previously solved structures of CYP2B4 revealed some new insights into the determinants of active-site size and shape. The 2B4-paroxetine structure is nearly superimposable on a previously solved closed structure in a ligand-free state. Despite the overall conformational similarity among multiple closed structures, the active-site cavity volume of the paroxetine complex is enlarged. Further analysis of the accessible space and binding pocket near the heme reveals a new subchamber that resulted from the movement of secondary structural elements and rearrangements of active-site side chains. Overall, the results from the comparison of all 16 structures of CYP2B4 demonstrate a cluster of protein conformations that were observed in the presence or absence of various ligands. PMID:23633618

  13. Active Learning of Nondeterministic Finite State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawoot Pacharoen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of learning nondeterministic finite state machines (NFSMs from systems where their internal structures are implicit and nondeterministic. Recently, an algorithm for inferring observable NFSMs (ONFSMs, which are the potentially learnable subclass of NFSMs, has been proposed based on the hypothesis that the complete testing assumption is satisfied. According to this assumption, with an input sequence (query, the complete set of all possible output sequences is given by the so-called Teacher, so the number of times for asking the same query is not taken into account in the algorithm. In this paper, we propose LNM*, a refined ONFSM learning algorithm that considers the amount for repeating the same query as one parameter. Unlike the previous work, our approach does not require all possible output sequences in one answer. Instead, it tries to observe the possible output sequences by asking the same query many times to the Teacher. We have proved that LNM* can infer the corresponding ONFSMs of the unknown systems when the number of tries for the same query is adequate to guarantee the complete testing assumption. Moreover, the proof shows that our algorithm will eventually terminate no matter whether the assumption is fulfilled or not. We also present the theoretical time complexity analysis of LNM*. In addition, experimental results demonstrate the practical efficiency of our approach.

  14. Structural insights into the architecture and allostery of full-length AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yi-Jiong; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yi

    2011-04-13

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric complex composed of α catalytic subunit, β scaffolding subunit, and γ regulatory subunit with critical roles in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. However, the molecular architecture of the intact complex and the allostery associated with the adenosine binding-induced regulation of kinase activity remain unclear. Here, we determine the three-dimensional reconstruction and subunit organization of the full-length rat AMPK (α1β1γ1) through single-particle electron-microscopy. By comparing the structures of AMPK in ATP- and AMP-bound states, we are able to visualize the sequential conformational changes underlying kinase activation that transmits from the adenosine binding sites in the γ subunit to the kinase domain of the α subunit. These results not only make substantial revision to the current model of AMPK assembly, but also highlight a central role of the linker sequence of the α subunit in mediating the allostery of AMPK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Uncovering Camouflage: Amygdala Activation Predicts Long-Term Memory of Induced Perceptual Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmer, Rachel; Dudai, Yadin; Rubin, Nava

    2011-01-01

    What brain mechanisms underlie learning of new knowledge from single events? We studied encoding in long-term memory of a unique type of one-shot experience, induced perceptual insight. While undergoing an fMRI brain scan, participants viewed degraded images of real-world pictures where the underlying objects were hard to recognize (‘camouflage’), followed by brief exposures to the original images (‘solution’), which led to induced insight (“Aha!”). A week later, participants’ memory was test...

  16. Metaproteomics of our microbiome - Developing insight in function and activity in man and model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolmeder, C.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    We are all colonized by a large microbiome, a complex set of microbes that have intimate associations with us. Culture-based approaches have provided insights in the complexity of the microbial communities living on surfaces inside and outside the body. However, the application of high-throughput

  17. Fundamental research on the evaluation of muscle activity state

    OpenAIRE

    遠藤, 厚志

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamental research results obtained by adding the sensory information to the activity state evaluation of muscle movement. The purpose of this study is to show the engineering evaluation results of the activity state of the muscle by sEMG(surface ElectroMyoGraphy) using the visual information that biofeedback is made. No evaluation method has the visual information, from being affected by the auxiliary cooperative muscles, not efficient. How to sEMG and biofeedback ...

  18. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  19. 34 CFR 300.814 - Other State-level activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other State-level activities. 300.814 Section 300.814 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF...

  20. 34 CFR 300.812 - Reservation for State activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reservation for State activities. 300.812 Section 300.812 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF...

  1. Monitoring Affect States during Effortful Problem Solving Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Sidney K.; Lehman, Blair; Person, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    We explored the affective states that students experienced during effortful problem solving activities. We conducted a study where 41 students solved difficult analytical reasoning problems from the Law School Admission Test. Students viewed videos of their faces and screen captures and judged their emotions from a set of 14 states (basic…

  2. Disrupted relationship between "resting state" connectivity and task-evoked activity during social perception in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Gallese, Vittorio; Salone, Anatolia; Martinotti, Giovanni; di Iorio, Giuseppe; Mantini, Dante; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni; Romani, Gian Luca; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Northoff, Georg

    2017-07-20

    Schizophrenia has been described as a self-disorder, whereas social deficits are key features of the illness. Changes in "resting state" activity of brain networks involved in self-related processing have been consistently reported in schizophrenia, but their meaning for social perception deficits remains poorly understood. Here, we applied a novel approach investigating the relationship between task-evoked neural activity during social perception and functional organization of self-related brain networks during a "resting state". "Resting state" functional MRI was combined with task-related functional MRI using a social perception experiment. Twenty-one healthy control participants (HC) and 21 out-patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (SCH) were included. There were no significant differences concerning age, IQ, education and gender between the groups. Results showed reduced "resting state" functional connectivity between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex in SCH, compared to HC. During social perception, neural activity in dorsal posterior cingulate cortex and behavioral data indicated impaired congruence coding of social stimuli in SCH. Task-evoked activity during social perception in dorsal posterior cingulate cortex co-varied with dorsal posterior cingulate cortex-ventromedial prefrontal cortex functional connectivity during a "resting state" in HC, but not in SCH. Task-evoked activity also correlated with negative symptoms in SCH. These preliminary findings, showing disrupted prediction of social perception measures by "resting state" functioning of self-related brain networks in schizophrenia, provide important insight in the hypothesized link between self and social deficits. They also shed light on the meaning of "resting state" changes for tasks such as social perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Solid-state NMR and computational insights into the crystal structure of silicocarnotite-based bioceramic materials synthesized mechanochemically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A S; Bulina, N V; Chaikina, M V; Prosanov, I Yu; Terskikh, V V; Lapina, O B

    In this work, we report the results of a detailed structural study of a promising bioceramic material silicocarnotite Ca5(PO4)2SiO4 (SC) synthesized from mechanochemically treated nanosized silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite by annealing at 1000°C. This novel synthetic approach represents an attractive and efficient route towards large-scale manufacturing of the silicocarnotite-based bioceramics. A combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), powder X-ray crystallography and density function theory (DFT) calculations has been implemented to characterize the phase composition of the prepared composite materials and to gain insight into the crystal structure of silicocarnotite. The phase composition analysis based on the multinuclear solid-state NMR has been found in agreement with X-ray powder diffraction indicating the minority phases of CaO (5-6wt%) and residual silicon-apatite (7-8wt%), while the rest of the material being a fairly crystalline silicocarnotite phase (86-88wt%). A combination of computational (CASTEP) and experimental methods was used to address the anionic site disorder in the silicocarnotite crystal structure. Distorted [OPO3] pyramids have appeared as an important structural motif in the SC crystal structure. The ratio between regular [PO4] and distorted [OPO3] tetrahedra is found between 2:1 and 3:1 based on XRD experiments and CASTEP calculations. The natural abundance (43)Ca magic angle spinning NMR spectra of silicocarnotite are reported for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipolytic activity from Rhizopus arrhizus using solid state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lipases were produced from a Rhizopus arrhizus strain, using rice bran as solid substrate, by solid state fermentation. The activity of lipases was found to be optimum at 30 °C and pH 6.5. The effect of different solvents on hydrolytic activity was carried out and isooctane was selected as the solvent of choice.

  5. Assessing state-level active living promotion using network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, Opal Vanessa; Taniguchi, Nicole; Iskandar, Livia; Maddock, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a growing problem in the United States, one that is being addressed through the development of active living communities. However, active living promotion requires collaboration among organizations that may not have previously shared goals. A network analysis was conducted to assess Hawaii's active living promotion network. Twenty-six organizations playing a significant role in promoting active living in Hawaii were identified and surveyed about their frequency of contact, level of collaboration, and funding flow with other agencies. A communication network was identified linking all agencies. This network had many long pathways, impeding information flow. The Department of Health (DOH) and the State Nutrition and Physical Activity Coalition (NPAC) were central nodes, but DOH connected state agencies while NPAC linked county and voluntary organizations. Within the network, information sharing was common, but collaboration and formal partnership were low. Linkages between county and state agencies, between counties, and between state agencies with different core agendas were particularly low. Results suggest that in the early stages of development, active living networks may be divided by geography and core missions, requiring work to bridge these divides. Network mapping appears helpful in identifying areas for network development.

  6. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect.

  7. Catalan external activities and the Spanish state/region relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Olaussen, Åshild

    1999-01-01

    The theme of this thesis is the political activity carried out by the Spanish region Catalonia and directed towards actors outside the border of the Spanish State. I name this regional external activities "paradiplomacy", and ask: Can the paradiplomatic activity of Catalonia indicate a process of change in the Spanish system of governance? Is it a process of change that will reflect the tendencies of a "Europe of the regions"? As implied by the research questions does the thesis treat the Cat...

  8. A Tale of Two Economies: 2016 Higher Education Legislative Activity in the West. Policy Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, there was an increasingly dramatic divergence between state economies in the West. Most states in the region benefited from an ongoing economic recovery, but states reliant on the energy sector for tax revenues were hit hard by the global decline in oil prices. This resulted in varying budget situations in legislatures across the…

  9. Resting state activity in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soddu, Andrea; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Demertzi, Athena; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Tshibanda, Luaba; Di, Haibo; Boly, Mélanie; Papa, Michele; Laureys, Steven; Noirhomme, Quentin

    Summary Recent advances in the study of spontaneous brain activity have demonstrated activity patterns that emerge with no task performance or sensory stimulation; these discoveries hold promise for the study of higher-order associative network functionality. Additionally, such advances are argued to be relevant in pathological states, such as disorders of consciousness (DOC), i.e., coma, vegetative and minimally conscious states. Recent studies on resting state activity in DOC, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques, show that functional connectivity is disrupted in the task-negative or the default mode network. However, the two main approaches employed in the analysis of resting state functional connectivity data (i.e., hypothesis-driven seed-voxel and data-driven independent component analysis) present multiple methodological difficulties, especially in non-collaborative DOC patients. Improvements in motion artifact removal and spatial normalization are needed before fMRI resting state data can be used as proper biomarkers in severe brain injury. However, we anticipate that such developments will boost clinical resting state fMRI studies, allowing for easy and fast acquisitions and ultimately improve the diagnosis and prognosis in the absence of DOC patients’ active collaboration in data acquisition. PMID:21693087

  10. Confrontation Between Judicial Activism and State of Exception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Pedro Moura D’Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The judiciary has excelled in the international and national scene, reaching role of great importance, thus creating opposition to the legislative and executive powers. The center of gravity of the sovereign power of the state moves toward the judiciary, that happens to have a more active role and controlling of the others powers, but also appears as a great defender of social and fundamental rights causes, seeking to make an effective constitution. Its great public notoriety has attracted great distrust of various sectors of society, especially by the two powers that have an increasing interference. Arises, therefore, a speech that the judiciary would be reversing into a big and uncontrollable power, increasing the suspicion that now it would be living in a real dictatorship of the judiciary through judicial activism. There is a growing concern with the expansion of activism and the role of the judiciary. The purpose of this work is to conceptualize and approach the judicial activism and the state of exception to search and reveal if there is any similarity, to then draw up a possible answer to the concern of forming a dictatorship of the judiciary. The state of exception is one of the rule of law paradoxes, while activism is a political manifestation of the judiciary. The similarity between the institutes appears as appalling in a dynamic expansion of political power of a state institution exercising judicial function, putting in check who would be the sovereign in a rule of law and democratic state.

  11. Highly Selective Activation of Heat Shock Protein 70 by Allosteric Regulation Provides an Insight into Efficient Neuroinflammation Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chao Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is widely involved in immune disorders, making it as an attractive drug target for inflammation diseases. Nonselective induction of Hsp70 upregulation for inflammation therapy could cause extensive interference in inflammation-unrelated protein functions, potentially resulting in side effects. Nevertheless, direct pharmacological activation of Hsp70 via targeting specific functional amino acid residue may provide an insight into precise Hsp70 function regulation and a more satisfactory treatment effect for inflammation, which has not been extensively focused. Here we show a cysteine residue (Cys306 for selective Hsp70 activation using natural small-molecule handelin. Covalent modification of Cys306 significantly elevates Hsp70 activity and shows more satisfactory anti-neuroinflammation effects. Mechanism study reveals Cys306 modification by handelin induces an allosteric regulation to facilitate adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis capacity of Hsp70, which leads to the effective blockage of subsequent inflammation signaling pathway. Collectively, our study offers some insights into direct pharmacological activation of Hsp70 by specially targeting functional cysteine residue, thus providing a powerful tool for accurately modulating neuroinflammation pathogenesis in human with fewer undesirable adverse effects.

  12. Hydroxylation of p-substituted phenols by tyrosinase: Further insight into the mechanism of tyrosinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Munoz, Jose Luis [GENZ - Grupo de Investigacion Enzimologia, Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular-A, Facultad de Biologia, Campus Internacional de Excelencia Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Berna, Jose [Grupo de Quimica Organica Sintetica, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Quimica Campus Internacional de Excelencia Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia (Spain); Garcia-Molina, Maria del Mar; Garcia-Molina, Francisco [GENZ - Grupo de Investigacion Enzimologia, Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular-A, Facultad de Biologia, Campus Internacional de Excelencia Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio [QCPAI - Grupo de Quimica de Carbohidratos, Polimeros y Aditivos Industriales, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Quimica Campus Internacional de Excelencia Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia (Spain); Varon, Ramon [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Avda. Espana s/n. Campus Universitario, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action the copper complexes and tyrosinase on phenols is equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope effect showed that nucleophilic attack to copper atom may be the slower step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The value of {rho} (Hammett constant) supports an electrophilic aromatic substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data obtained in steady state pH 7 conditions support the mechanism of Scheme 1SM. -- Abstract: A study of the monophenolase activity of tyrosinase by measuring the steady state rate with a group of p-substituted monophenols provides the following kinetic information: k{sub cat}{sup m} and the Michaelis constant, K{sub M}{sup m}. Analysis of these data taking into account chemical shifts of the carbon atom supporting the hydroxyl group ({delta}) and {sigma}{sub p}{sup +}, enables a mechanism to be proposed for the transformation of monophenols into o-diphenols, in which the first step is a nucleophilic attack on the copper atom on the form E{sub ox} (attack of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of C-1 on the copper atom) followed by an electrophilic attack (attack of the hydroperoxide group on the ortho position with respect to the hydroxyl group of the benzene ring, electrophilic aromatic substitution with a reaction constant {rho} of -1.75). These steps show the same dependency on the electronic effect of the substituent groups in C-4. Furthermore, a study of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols by tyrosinase points to an appreciable isotopic effect. In a proton inventory study with a series of p-substituted phenols, the representation of k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}}/k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}} is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates. These results indicate that

  13. State Legislation Related to Increasing Physical Activity: 2006-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Amy A.; Budd, Elizabeth; Camberos, Gabriela J.; Yan, Yan; Brownson, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Strategies to improve physical activity prevalence often include policy and environmental changes. State-level policies can be influential in supporting access and opportunities for physical activity in schools and communities. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of state legislation related to physical activity and identify the correlates of enactment of this legislation. Methods An online legislative database was used to collect bills from 50 states in the U.S. from 2006-2012 for ten topics related to physical activity. Bills were coded for content and compiled into a database with state-level variables (e.g., obesity prevalence). With enactment status as the outcome, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Of the 1542 bills related to physical activity introduced, 30% (N=460) were enacted. Bills on public transportation and trails were more likely to be enacted than those without these topics. Primary sponsorship by the Republican Party, bipartisan sponsorship, and mention of specific funding amounts were also correlates of enactment. Conclusion Policy surveillance of bills and correlates of enactment are important for understanding patterns in legislative support for physical activity. This information can be used to prioritize advocacy efforts and identify ways for research to better inform policy. PMID:26104603

  14. Brain state dependent activity in the cortex and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, David A; McGinley, Matthew J; Salkoff, David B

    2015-04-01

    Cortical and thalamocortical activity is highly state dependent, varying between patterns that are conducive to accurate sensory-motor processing, to states in which the brain is largely off-line and generating internal rhythms irrespective of the outside world. The generation of rhythmic activity occurs through the interaction of stereotyped patterns of connectivity together with intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties. One common theme in the generation of rhythms is the interaction of a positive feedback loop (e.g., recurrent excitation) with negative feedback control (e.g., inhibition, adaptation, or synaptic depression). The operation of these state-dependent activities has wide ranging effects from enhancing or blocking sensory-motor processing to the generation of pathological rhythms associated with psychiatric or neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The state of multiple sclerosis: current insight into the patient/health care provider relationship, treatment challenges, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar; Alexander, Maggie; Costello, Kathleen; Duddy, Martin; Jones, David E; Law, Nancy; O'Neill, Gilmore; Uccelli, Antonio; Weissert, Robert; Wray, Sibyl

    2017-01-01

    Managing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment presents challenges for both patients and health care professionals. Effective communication between patients with MS and their neurologist is important for improving clinical outcomes and quality of life. A closed-ended online market research survey was used to assess the current state of MS care from the perspective of both patients with MS (≥18 years of age) and neurologists who treat MS from Europe and the US and to gain insight into perceptions of treatment expectations/goals, treatment decisions, treatment challenges, communication, and satisfaction with care, based on current clinical practice. A total of 900 neurologists and 982 patients completed the survey, of whom 46% self-identified as having remitting-relapsing MS, 29% secondary progressive MS, and 11% primary progressive MS. Overall, patients felt satisfied with their disease-modifying therapy (DMT); satisfaction related to comfort in speaking with their neurologist and participation in their DMT decision-making process. Patients who self-identified as having relapsing-remitting MS were more likely to be very satisfied with their treatment. Top challenges identified by patients in managing their DMT were cost, side effects/tolerability of treatment, and uncertainty if treatment was working. Half of the patients reported skipping doses, but only 68% told their health care provider that they did so. Several important differences in perception were identified between patients and neurologists concerning treatment selection, satisfaction, expectations, goals, and comfort discussing symptoms, as well as treatment challenges and skipped doses. The study results emphasize that patient/neurologist communication and patient input into the treatment decision-making process likely influence patient satisfaction with treatment.

  16. Translation-rotation states of H2 in C60: New insights from a perturbation-theory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Peter M; Bačić, Zlatko

    2016-08-28

    We report an investigation of the translation-rotation (TR) level structure of H2 entrapped in C60, in the rigid-monomer approximation, by means of a low-order perturbation theory (PT). We focus in particular on the degree to which PT can accurately account for that level structure, by comparison with the variational quantum five-dimensional calculations. To apply PT to the system, the interaction potential of H2@C60 is decomposed into a sum over bipolar spherical tensors. A zeroth-order Hamiltonian, Hˆ0, is then constructed as the sum of the TR kinetic-energy operator and the one term in the tensor decomposition of the potential that depends solely on the radial displacement of the H2 center of mass (c.m.) from the cage center. The remaining terms in the potential are treated as perturbations. The eigenstates of Hˆ0, constructed to also account for the coupling of the angular momentum of the H2 c.m. about the cage center with the rotational angular momentum of the H2 about the c.m., are taken as the PT zeroth-order states. This zeroth-order level structure is shown to be an excellent approximation to the true one except for two types of TR-level splittings present in the latter. We then show that first-order PT accounts very well for these splittings, with respect to both their patterns and magnitudes. This allows one to connect specific features of the level structure with specific features of the potential-energy surface, and provides important new physical insight into the characteristics of the TR level structure.

  17. The state of multiple sclerosis: current insight into the patient/health care provider relationship, treatment challenges, and satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar; Alexander, Maggie; Costello, Kathleen; Duddy, Martin; Jones, David E; Law, Nancy; O’Neill, Gilmore; Uccelli, Antonio; Weissert, Robert; Wray, Sibyl

    2017-01-01

    Background Managing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment presents challenges for both patients and health care professionals. Effective communication between patients with MS and their neurologist is important for improving clinical outcomes and quality of life. Methods A closed-ended online market research survey was used to assess the current state of MS care from the perspective of both patients with MS (≥18 years of age) and neurologists who treat MS from Europe and the US and to gain insight into perceptions of treatment expectations/goals, treatment decisions, treatment challenges, communication, and satisfaction with care, based on current clinical practice. Results A total of 900 neurologists and 982 patients completed the survey, of whom 46% self-identified as having remitting-relapsing MS, 29% secondary progressive MS, and 11% primary progressive MS. Overall, patients felt satisfied with their disease-modifying therapy (DMT); satisfaction related to comfort in speaking with their neurologist and participation in their DMT decision-making process. Patients who self-identified as having relapsing-remitting MS were more likely to be very satisfied with their treatment. Top challenges identified by patients in managing their DMT were cost, side effects/tolerability of treatment, and uncertainty if treatment was working. Half of the patients reported skipping doses, but only 68% told their health care provider that they did so. Conclusion Several important differences in perception were identified between patients and neurologists concerning treatment selection, satisfaction, expectations, goals, and comfort discussing symptoms, as well as treatment challenges and skipped doses. The study results emphasize that patient/neurologist communication and patient input into the treatment decision-making process likely influence patient satisfaction with treatment. PMID:28053511

  18. Structural and dynamic insights into the role of conformational switching in the nuclease activity of theXanthomonas albilineansCas2 in CRISPR-mediated adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Donghyun; Hong, Suji; Jeong, Ugeene; Jeong, Migyeong; Suh, Nayoung; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Bae, Euiyoung

    2017-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute a microbial, adaptive immune system countering invading nucleic acids. Cas2 is a universal Cas protein found in all types of CRISPR-Cas systems, and its role is implicated in new spacer acquisition into CRISPR loci. In subtype I-C CRISPR-Cas systems, Cas2 proteins are metal-dependent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) nucleases, and a pH-dependent conformational transition has been proposed as a prerequisite for catalytic action. Here, we report the crystal structure of Xanthomonas albilineans Cas2 (XaCas2) and provide experimental evidence of a pH-dependent conformational change during functional activation. XaCas2 crystallized at an acidic pH represented a catalytically inactive conformational state in which two Asp8 residues were too far apart to coordinate a single catalytic metal ion. Consistently, XaCas2 exhibited dsDNA nuclease activity only under neutral and basic conditions. Despite the overall structural similarity of the two protomers, significant conformational heterogeneity was evident in the putative hinge regions, suggesting that XaCas2 engages in hinge-bending conformational switching. The presence of a Trp residue in the hinge region enabled the investigation of hinge dynamics by fluorescence spectroscopy. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity overlapped precisely with that of nuclease activity. Mutational analyses further suggested that conformational activation proceeded via a rigid-body hinge-bending motion as both D8E and hinge mutations significantly reduced nuclease activity. Together, our results reveal strong correlations between the conformational states, catalytic activity, and hinge dynamics of XaCas2, and provide structural and dynamic insights into the conformational activation of the nuclease function of Cas2.

  19. Resting-state functional connectivity between right anterior insula and right orbital frontal cortex correlate with insight level in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have explored the neurobiological basis of insight level in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, though the salience network (SN has been implicated in insight deficits in schizophrenia. This study was then designed to investigate whether resting-state (rs functional connectivity (FC of SN was associated with insight level in OCD patients. We analyzed rs-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from 21 OCD patients with good insight (OCD-GI, 19 OCD patients with poor insight (OCD-PI, and 24 healthy controls (HCs. Seed-based whole-brain FC and ROI (region of interest-wise connectivity analyses were performed with seeds/ROIs in the bilateral anterior insula (AI and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC. The right AI-right medial orbital frontal cortex (mOFC connectivity was found to be uniquely decreased in the OCD-PI group, and the value of this aberrant connectivity correlated with insight level in OCD patients. In addition, we found that the OCD-GI group had significantly increased right AI-left dACC connectivity within the SN, relative to HCs (overall trend for groups: OCD-GI > OCD-PI > HC. Our findings suggest that abnormal right AI-right mOFC FC may mediate insight deficits in OCD, perhaps due to impaired encoding and integration of self-evaluative information about OCD-related beliefs and behaviors. Our findings indicate a SN connectivity dissociation between OCD-GI and OCD-PI patients and support the notion of considering OCD-GI and OCD-PI as two distinct disorder subtypes.

  20. Enhanced proinflammatory state and autoimmune activation: a breakthrough to understanding chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay

    2014-01-01

    Insight is provided herein into the novel mechanisms of cardiometabolic risk. Previous reports, including the epidemiological work of the Turkish Adult Risk Factor study, indicated that proinflammatory state and oxidative stress are crucial for evaluating cardiometabolic risk. Autoimmune pathways in the course of oxidative stress are major determinants of cardiorenal and metabolic risk. The latter encompasses metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Along with platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, creatinine, thyroid stimulating hormone, acylation-stimulating protein, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and serum lipoprotein[Lp](a) are triggers of systemic low-grade inflammation and enhanced autoimmune reactions. Related studies are analyzed in the current review. Lp(a) plays a crucial role by taking part in the immune activation, thereby accelerating the course of diabetes, CKD, and other chronic disorders. Populations prone to impaired glucose tolerance, and particularly peri- and postmenopausal women, are at high risk of developing related vascular complications.

  1. Mitochondrial functional state impacts spontaneous neocortical activity and resting state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraju G Sanganahalli

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake, central to neural metabolism and function, is diminished in aging whereas enhanced after acute/sub-acute traumatic brain injury. To develop relevant translational models for these neuropathologies, we determined the impact of perturbed mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities on intrinsic brain activity using clinically relevant markers. From a multi-compartment estimate of probable baseline Ca(2+ ranges in the brain, we hypothesized that reduced or enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity would decrease or increase spontaneous neuronal activity respectively. As resting state fMRI-BOLD fluctuations and stimulus-evoked BOLD responses have similar physiological origins [1] and stimulus-evoked neuronal and hemodynamic responses are modulated by mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity [2], [3] respectively, we tested our hypothesis by measuring hemodynamic fluctuations and spontaneous neuronal activities during normal and altered mitochondrial functional states. Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity was perturbed by pharmacologically inhibiting or enhancing the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (mCU activity. Neuronal electrical activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF fluctuations were measured simultaneously and integrated with fMRI-BOLD fluctuations at 11.7T. mCU inhibition reduced spontaneous neuronal activity and the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC, whereas mCU enhancement increased spontaneous neuronal activity but reduced RSFC. We conclude that increased or decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities lead to diminished resting state modes of brain functional connectivity.

  2. Maintenance and decline of physical activity during adolescence: insights from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filion Annie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Better knowledge on why some individuals succeed in maintaining participation in physical activity throughout adolescence is needed to guide the development of effective interventions to increase and then maintain physical activity levels. Despite allowing an in-depth understanding, qualitative designs have infrequently been used to study physical activity maintenance. We explored factors contributing to the maintenance and the decline of physical activity during adolescence. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 515 grade 10-12 students. The Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents was used to determine physical activity level at the end of adolescence. An adapted version of this questionnaire was used to estimate physical activity in early adolescence. Among both genders, we identified participants who maintained a high level of physical activity since grade 7 and some whose activity level declined. For each category, groups of 10 students were randomly selected to take part in focus group discussions. Results Seven focus groups with 5 to 8 participants in each were held. Both maintainers and decliners associated physical activity with positive health outcomes. Maintenance of physical activity was associated with supportive social environments and heightened feelings of competence and attractiveness. A decline in physical activity was associated with negative social validation, poor social support and barriers related to access. Conclusions Although maintainers and decliners associate physical activity with similar themes, the experiences of both groups differ substantially with regards to those themes. Taking both perspectives in consideration could help improve interventions to increase and maintain physical activity levels of adolescents.

  3. Decay of an active GPCR: Conformational dynamics govern agonist rebinding and persistence of an active, yet empty, receptor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Christopher T; Fay, Jonathan F; Janz, Jay M; Farrens, David L

    2016-10-18

    Here, we describe two insights into the role of receptor conformational dynamics during agonist release (all-trans retinal, ATR) from the visual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin. First, we show that, after light activation, ATR can continually release and rebind to any receptor remaining in an active-like conformation. As with other GPCRs, we observe that this equilibrium can be shifted by either promoting the active-like population or increasing the agonist concentration. Second, we find that during decay of the signaling state an active-like, yet empty, receptor conformation can transiently persist after retinal release, before the receptor ultimately collapses into an inactive conformation. The latter conclusion is based on time-resolved, site-directed fluorescence labeling experiments that show a small, but reproducible, lag between the retinal leaving the protein and return of transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) to the inactive conformation, as determined from tryptophan-induced quenching studies. Accelerating Schiff base hydrolysis and subsequent ATR dissociation, either by addition of hydroxylamine or introduction of mutations, further increased the time lag between ATR release and TM6 movement. These observations show that rhodopsin can bind its agonist in equilibrium like a traditional GPCR, provide evidence that an active GPCR conformation can persist even after agonist release, and raise the possibility of targeting this key photoreceptor protein by traditional pharmaceutical-based treatments.

  4. Insights into the structural patterns of the antileishmanial activity of bi- and tricyclic N-heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Lizzi; Stephens, David E; D'Avila, Abigail; George, Kathryn G; Arman, Hadi; Zhang, Yu; Perry, George; Lleonart, Ricardo; Larionov, Oleg V; Fernández, Patricia L

    2016-08-07

    The influence of various structural patterns in a series of novel bi- and tricyclic N-heterocycles on the activity against Leishmania major and Leishmania panamensis has been studied and compounds that are active in the low micromolar region have been identified. Both quinolines and tetrahydrooxazinoindoles (TOI) proved to have significant antileishmanial activities, while substituted indoles were inactive. We have also showed that a chloroquine analogue induces Leishmania killing by modulating macrophage activation.

  5. Maintenance and decline of physical activity during adolescence: insights from a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Filion Annie; Cormier Marc; Casey Michelle; Bélanger Mathieu; Martin Geneviève; Aubut Stéphanie; Chouinard Philipe; Savoie Simon-Pierre; Beauchamp Jacinthe

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Better knowledge on why some individuals succeed in maintaining participation in physical activity throughout adolescence is needed to guide the development of effective interventions to increase and then maintain physical activity levels. Despite allowing an in-depth understanding, qualitative designs have infrequently been used to study physical activity maintenance. We explored factors contributing to the maintenance and the decline of physical activity during adolescence....

  6. Informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state reflected in prefrontal cortex activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichiro eWatanabe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress with wearable sensors has enabled researchers to capture face-to-face interactions quantitatively and given great insight into human dynamics. One attractive field for applying such sensors is the workplace, where the relationship between the face-to-face behaviors of employees and the productivity of the organization has been investigated. One interesting result of previous studies showed that informal face-to-face interaction among employees, captured by wearable sensors that the employees wore, significantly affects their performance. However, the mechanism behind this relationship has not yet been adequately explained, though experiences at the job scene might qualitatively support the finding. We hypothesized that informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state, which in turn affects the task performance. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the change of mood state before and after break time for two groups of participants, one that spent their breaks alone and one that spent them with other participants, by administering questionnaires and taking brain activity measurements. Recent neuroimaging studies have suggested a significant relationship between mood state and brain activity. Here, we show that face-to-face interaction during breaks significantly improved mood state, which was measured by Profiles of Mood States (POMS.We also observed that the verbal WM task performance of participants who did not have face-to-face interaction during breaks decreased significantly. In this paper, we discuss how the change of mood state was evidenced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC activity accompanied by working memory (WM tasks measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS.

  7. Working memory capacity and the functional connectome - insights from resting-state fMRI and voxelwise centrality mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markett, Sebastian; Reuter, Martin; Heeren, Behrend; Lachmann, Bernd; Weber, Bernd; Montag, Christian

    2017-02-28

    The functional connectome represents a comprehensive network map of functional connectivity throughout the human brain. To date, the relationship between the organization of functional connectivity and cognitive performance measures is still poorly understood. In the present study we use resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to explore the link between the functional connectome and working memory capacity in an individual differences design. Working memory capacity, which refers to the maximum amount of context information that an individual can retain in the absence of external stimulation, was assessed outside the MRI scanner and estimated based on behavioral data from a change detection task. Resting-state time series were analyzed by means of voxelwise degree and eigenvector centrality mapping, which are data-driven network analytic approaches for the characterization of functional connectivity. We found working memory capacity to be inversely correlated with both centrality in the right intraparietal sulcus. Exploratory analyses revealed that this relationship was putatively driven by an increase in negative connectivity strength of the structure. This resting-state connectivity finding fits previous task based activation studies that have shown that this area responds to manipulations of working memory load.

  8. Data inconsistencies from states with unconventional oil and gas activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Samantha; Kelso, Matthew; Auch, Ted; Edelstein, Karen; Ferrar, Kyle; Jalbert, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    The quality and availability of unconventional oil and gas (O&G) data in the United States have never been compared methodically state-to-state. By conducting such an assessment, this study seeks to better understand private and publicly sourced data variability and to identify data availability gaps. We developed an exploratory data-grading tool - Data Accessibility and Usability Index (DAUI) - to guide the review of O&G data quality. Between July and October 2013, we requested, collected, and assessed 5 categories of unconventional O&G data (wells drilled, violations, production, waste, and Class II disposal wells) from 10 states with active drilling activity. We based our assessment on eight data quality parameters (accessibility, usability, point location, completeness, metadata, agency responsiveness, accuracy, and cost). Using the DAUI, two authors graded the 10 states and then averaged their scores. The average score received across all states, data categories, and parameters was 67.1 out of 100, largely insufficient for proper data transparency. By state, Pennsylvania received the highest average ( = 93.5) and ranked first in all but one data category. The lowest scoring state was Texas ( = 44) largely due to its policy of charging for certain data. This article discusses the various reasons for scores received, as well as methodological limitations of the assessment metrics. We argue that the significant variability of unconventional O&G data-and its availability to the public-is a barrier to regulatory and industry transparency. The lack of transparency also impacts public education and broader participation in industry governance. This study supports the need to develop a set of data best management practices (BMPs) for state regulatory agencies and the O&G industry, and suggests potential BMPs for this purpose.

  9. Active Transportation Surveillance - United States, 1999-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Paul, Prabasaj; Wendel, Arthur M

    2015-08-28

    Physical activity is a health-enhancing behavior, and most U.S. adults do not meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Active transportation, such as by walking or bicycling, is one way that persons can be physically active. No comprehensive, multiyear assessments of active transportation surveillance in the United States have been conducted. 1999-2012. Five surveillance systems assess one or more components of active transportation. The American Community Survey and the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) both assess the mode of transportation to work in the past week. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who reported walking or bicycling to work can be calculated. NHTS and the American Time Use Survey include 1-day assessments of trips or activities. With that information, the proportion of respondents who report any walking or bicycling for transportation can be calculated. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey both assess recent (i.e., in the past week or past month) habitual physical activity behaviors, including those performed during active travel. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who report any recent habitual active transportation can be calculated. The prevalence of active transportation as the primary commute mode to work in the past week ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. The 1-day assessment indicated that the prevalence of any active transportation ranged from 10.5% to 18.5%. The prevalence of any habitual active transportation ranged from 23.9% to 31.4%. No consistent trends in active transportation across time periods and surveillance systems were identified. Among systems, active transportation was usually more common among men, younger respondents, and minority racial/ethnic groups. Among education groups, the highest prevalence of active transportation was usually among the least or most educated groups, and active transportation tended to be more

  10. Dynamic Insights on Surgical Activity in a New Modern Warfare: The French Role 2 in Bangui, Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Pasquier, Pierre; Racle, Maelle; Baudoin, Yoann; Malgras, Brice

    2017-03-01

    In December 2013, France deployed more than 2,000 soldiers in Central African Republic with two main missions, to restore security and to improve the humanitarian situation. The objectives of this article were to analyze the surgical activity of forward surgical teams in Central African Republic over 2 years and to discuss features of training for deployed surgeons. From December 5, 2013, to September 30, 2015, we retrospectively reviewed the electronic surgical database. Surgical activity was described as patient status, type of lesion, surgical procedures performed, and anatomic regions involved. During this study period, 431 surgical procedures were performed on 401 patients; 66% of the patients were civilians, 26% French soldiers, and 11% foreign soldiers. Surgical procedures were divided into 34% orthopedic activity and 66% general surgery activity. Orthopedic activity was mainly performed during the first months of the operation Sangaris, whereas general surgery occurred after summer 2014 with a return to peacetime. Our study demonstrated original and dynamic insights into the nature of surgical activity throughout the operation with mainly orthopedic surgery during the initial deployment for management of combat casualties and general surgery later, dedicated to elective surgery for local citizens. These data should enhance staffing, training, and deployment of future surgical teams in combat settings with continuous training programs to maintain specific competences, especially in cases of low surgical activity, such as virtual learning or e-learning that could be developed in the future. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Impact Of Human Activities On Ecosystem In Rivers State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was to assess the percent sample population size of people involved in selected human economic activities and the impact on ecosystem in Rivers State. The data for this study was obtained from a sample size of 1000 respondents who were purposively selected from the study area. Purposive sample was used ...

  12. Obesity, Health, and Physical Activity: Discourses from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieff, Susan G.; Veri, Maria J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the obesity, health, and physical activity discourses of the past 35 years in the context of the United States with particular reference to five social sectors: the biomedical domain; the popular media; nonprofit foundations, centers and agencies; various national and multinational corporations; and government at all levels.…

  13. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Davydova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namely, contracts, production sharing agreement, lease, joint venture. Promising areas of application of the PPP identified the transport sector, housing and utilities, energy and tourism sector. The features of cluster formations in the country and the prospects for tourism clusters.

  14. Physical activity, food intake, and body weight regulation: insights from doubly labeled water studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp, Klaas R

    2010-03-01

    Body weight and energy balance can be maintained by adapting energy intake to changes in energy expenditure and vice versa, whereas short-term changes in energy expenditure are mainly caused by physical activity. This review investigates whether physical activity is affected by over- and undereating, whether intake is affected by an increase or a decrease in physical activity, and whether being overweight affects physical activity. The available evidence is based largely on studies that quantified physical activity with doubly labeled water. Overeating does not affect physical activity, while undereating decreases habitual or voluntary physical activity. Thus, it is easier to gain weight than to lose weight. An exercise-induced increase in energy requirement is typically compensated by increased energy intake, while a change to a more sedentary routine does not induce an equivalent reduction of intake and generally results in weight gain. Overweight and obese subjects tend to have similar activity energy expenditures to lean people despite being more sedentary. There are two ways in which the general population trend towards increasing body weight can be reversed: reduce intake or increase physical activity. The results of the present literature review indicate that eating less is the most effective method for preventing weight gain, despite the potential for a negative effect on physical activity when a negative energy balance is reached.

  15. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with hemifacial spasm: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been used to detect the alterations of spontaneous neuronal activity in various neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, but rarely in hemifacial spasm (HFS, a nervous system disorder. We used resting-state fMRI with regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis to investigate changes in spontaneous brain activity of patients with HFS and to determine the relationship of these functional changes with clinical features. Thirty patients with HFS and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with controls, HFS patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in left middle frontal gyrus (MFG, left medial cingulate cortex (MCC, left lingual gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus (STG and right precuneus; and increased ReHo values in left precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, right brainstem, and right cerebellum. Furthermore, the mean ReHo value in brainstem showed a positive correlation with the spasm severity (r = 0.404, p = 0.027, and the mean ReHo value in MFG was inversely related with spasm severity in HFS group (r = -0.398, p = 0.028. This study reveals that HFS is associated with abnormal spontaneous brain activity in brain regions most involved in motor control and blinking movement. The disturbances of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ReHo measurements may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology of HFS.

  16. Nonequilibrium Equation of State in Suspensions of Active Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Ginot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active colloids constitute a novel class of materials composed of colloidal-scale particles locally converting chemical energy into motility, mimicking micro-organisms. Evolving far from equilibrium, these systems display structural organizations and dynamical properties distinct from thermalized colloidal assemblies. Harvesting the potential of this new class of systems requires the development of a conceptual framework to describe these intrinsically nonequilibrium systems. We use sedimentation experiments to probe the nonequilibrium equation of state of a bidimensional assembly of active Janus microspheres and conduct computer simulations of a model of self-propelled hard disks. Self-propulsion profoundly affects the equation of state, but these changes can be rationalized using equilibrium concepts. We show that active colloids behave, in the dilute limit, as an ideal gas with an activity-dependent effective temperature. At finite density, increasing the activity is similar to increasing adhesion between equilibrium particles. We quantify this effective adhesion and obtain a unique scaling law relating activity and effective adhesion in both experiments and simulations. Our results provide a new and efficient way to understand the emergence of novel phases of matter in active colloidal suspensions.

  17. Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Richard P; Berrigan, David; Dodd, Kevin W; Mâsse, Louise C; Tilert, Timothy; McDowell, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    To describe physical activity levels of children (6-11 yr), adolescents (12-19 yr), and adults (20+ yr), using objective data obtained with accelerometers from a representative sample of the U.S. population. These results were obtained from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES), a cross-sectional study of a complex, multistage probability sample of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population in the United States. Data are described from 6329 participants who provided at least 1 d of accelerometer data and from 4867 participants who provided four or more days of accelerometer data. Males are more physically active than females. Physical activity declines dramatically across age groups between childhood and adolescence and continues to decline with age. For example, 42% of children ages 6-11 yr obtain the recommended 60 min x d(-1) of physical activity, whereas only 8% of adolescents achieve this goal. Among adults, adherence to the recommendation to obtain 30 min x d(-1) of physical activity is less than 5%. Objective and subjective measures of physical activity give qualitatively similar results regarding gender and age patterns of activity. However, adherence to physical activity recommendations according to accelerometer-measured activity is substantially lower than according to self-report. Great care must be taken when interpreting self-reported physical activity in clinical practice, public health program design and evaluation, and epidemiological research.

  18. New Insights into Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cell Activation and Its Signaling Pathways in Glomerular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs have aroused an increasing attention recently. The proliferation of PECs is the main feature of crescentic glomerulonephritis; besides that, in the past decade, PEC activation has been identified in several types of noninflammatory glomerulonephropathies, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, diabetic glomerulopathy, and membranous nephropathy. The pathogenesis of PEC activation is poorly understood; however, a few studies delicately elucidate the potential mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in these processes. In this review we will focus on the latest observations and concepts about PEC activation in glomerular diseases and the newest identified signaling pathways in PEC activation.

  19. The Contribution of Extracurricular Activities to Adolescent Friendships: New Insights through Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, David R.; Simpkins, Sandra D.; Vest, Andrea E.; Price, Chara D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are settings that are theorized to help adolescents maintain existing friendships and develop new friendships. The overarching goal of the current investigation was to examine whether coparticipating in school-based extracurricular activities supported adolescents' school-based friendships. We used social network methods…

  20. New insights on the direct activation of isotropic petroleum pitch by alkaline hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilaplana-Ortego, E.; Lillo-Rodenas, M.A.; Alcaniz-Monge, J.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Linares-Solano, A. [Grupo de Materiales Carbonosos y Medio Ambiente, Dpto. Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    The paper provides interesting evidences that a low softening point isotropic petroleum pitch can be used as a good carbon precursor for the preparation of activated carbons. The activation is carried out by KOH and/or NaOH and the resulting activated carbons present well developed porosity. Such hydroxide activations can be done directly on the pristine petroleum pitch (P) or on the pitch that has been submitted to an air stabilisation followed by a N{sub 2} heat treatment (TAN). In general, KOH activation produces better results than NaOH, both in terms of porosity and yield, the results obtained for the activation of TAN being impressive because of the good porosity developments and high yields reached. The different treatments carried out over the petroleum pitch precursor clearly show that they significantly influence the extent of microporosity development. This is due to different changes occurring in the porous structure of the precursor as a function of the treatment carried out. The efficiency of the activation process increases as the mesophase content of the precursor decreases, as well as the mesophase formation during the activation process is avoided. (author)

  1. A Kinetic Insight into the Activation of n-Octane with Alkaline-Earth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    catalytic performance in these reactions depends on the acid- base properties of the catalyst, in addition to isolated cations capable of activating C-H bonds and sites that can activate the oxygen.4 Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has acid-base character, offers high stability, allows substitution into the apatite structure and.

  2. Insights into structure and activity of natural compound inhibitors of pneumolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng; Song, Meng; Niu, Xiaodi; Peng, Liping

    2017-02-06

    Pneumolysin is the one of the major virulence factor of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. In previous report, it is shown that β-sitosterol, a natural compound without antimicrobial activity, is a potent antagonist of pneumolysin. Here, two new pneumolysin natural compound inhibitors, with differential activity, were discovered via haemolysis assay. To explore the key factor of the conformation for the inhibition activity, the interactions between five natural compound inhibitors with differential activity and pneumolysin were reported using molecular modelling, the potential of mean force profiles. Interestingly, it is found that incorporation of the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) to replace the double bond (hydrocarbon sidechain) improved the anti-haemolytic activity. In view of the molecular modelling, binding of the five inhibitors to the conserved loop region (Val372, Leu460, and Tyr461) of the cholesterol binding sites led to stable complex systems, which was consistent with the result of β-sitosterol. Owing to the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25), campesterol and brassicasterol could form strong interactions with Val372 and show higher anti-haemolytic activity, which indicated that the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) in inhibitors was required for the anti-haemolytic activity. Overall, the current molecular modelling work provides a starting point for the development of rational design and higher activity pneumolysin inhibitors.

  3. Constitutive activity and ligand-dependent activation of the nuclear receptor CAR-insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windshügel, Björn; Poso, Antti

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) possesses, unlike most other nuclear receptors, a pronounced basal activity in vitro whose structural basis is still not fully understood. Using comparative molecular dynamics simulations of CAR X-ray crystal structures, we evaluated the molecular basis for constitutive activity and ligand-dependent receptor activation. Our results suggest that a combination of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds is required to maintain the activation helix in the active conformation also in absence of a ligand. Furthermore, we identified conformational rearrangements within the ligand-binding pocket upon agonist binding and an influence of CAR inducers pregnanedione and CITCO on the helical conformation of the activation helix. Based on the results a model for ligand-dependent CAR activation is suggested. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. New insights into the antioxidant activity and components in crude oat oil and soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Qiu, Shuang; Gan, Jing; Li, Zaigui; Nirasawa, Satoru; Yin, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Developing new antioxidants and using natural examples is of current interest. This study evaluated the antioxidant activities and the ability to inhibit soybean oil oxidation of oat oil obtained with different solvents. Oat oil extract obtained by ethanol extraction gave the highest antioxidant activity with a DPPH radical (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) scavenging activity of 88.2 % and a reducing power (A 700) of 0.83. Oat oil extracted by ethanol contained the highest polyphenol and α-tocopherol content. Significant correlation was observed between the total polyphenol contents, individual phenolic acid, α-tocopherol, and DPPH radical scavenging activity. Soybean oil with 2 % added oat oil showed low malondialdehyde content (8.35 mmol mL(-1)), suggesting that the added oat oil inhibited oxidation. Oat oil showed good antioxidant activity, especially when extracted with ethanol which could also retard the oxidation of soybean oil . DPPH radical scavenging activity was the best method to evaluate the antioxidant activity and components of oat oil.

  5. Certified Nurse Aide scope of practice: state-by-state differences in allowable delegated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Tara L; Resnick, Barbara; Chin-Hansen, Jennie; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne M; Miller, Nancy; Rubenstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the state-by-state differences in allowable delegated activities for Certified Nurse Aides (CNAs) working in long-term care settings, this exploratory descriptive study assessed what are the allowable tasks for CNAs based on findings from each state board of nursing. Specifically, findings from each state determined whether the care tasks allowed were consistent with those delineated by the 42 CFR § 483. This descriptive study included data drawn from all 50 states' regulatory offices or health care services agencies. Data were obtained from the regulations listed on each state's board of nursing, department of health, department of aging, department of health professions, department of commerce, and office of long-term care, among like agencies. The Code of Federal regulations (42 CFR § 483) listed 9 tasks that are allowable by each state. These tasks are identified as items 1 to 9: (1) personal care skills, (2) safety/emergency procedures, (3) basic nursing skills, (4) infection control, (5) communication and interpersonal skills, (6) care of cognitively impaired residents, (7) basic restorative care, (8) mental health and social service needs, and (9) residents' rights. Nine tasks delineated in the 42 CFR § 483 were identified as allowable in each state. On data analysis, it was found that 11 states noted that CNAs were able to perform workplace tasks that could be considered "expanded" care tasks, tasks beyond the basic care tasks listed in the 42 CFR § 483. Findings from this exploratory study aid in limiting the confusion around the application of workplace duties across states, providing a useful description of the care tasks CNAs are allowed to perform in an attempt to find uniformity state-by-state. Overall, states reported considering expanding the scope of practice or authorized duties for CNAs to strengthen patient care and safety. States may choose to expand CNA authorized duties so as to equip CNAs with specific

  6. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to passive and active one-legged cycling: insights into the contributions of central command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Connor J; Incognito, Anthony V; Notay, Karambir; Burns, Matthew J; Slysz, Joshua T; Seed, Jeremy D; Nardone, Massimo; Burr, Jamie F; Millar, Philip J

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of central command to the peripheral vasoconstrictor response during exercise has been investigated using primarily handgrip exercise. The purpose of the present study was to compare muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses during passive (involuntary) and active (voluntary) zero-load cycling to gain insights into the effects of central command on sympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise. Hemodynamic measurements and contralateral leg MSNA (microneurography) data were collected in 18 young healthy participants at rest and during 2 min of passive and active zero-load one-legged cycling. Arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence and burst area were calculated separately in the time domain. Blood pressure and stroke volume increased during exercise ( P cycling ( P > 0.05). In contrast, heart rate, cardiac output, and total vascular conductance were greater during the first and second minute of active cycling ( P cycling ( P 0.05). Reductions in total MSNA were attenuated during the first ( P cycling, in concert with increased MSNA burst amplitude ( P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The sensitivity of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence was lower during active than passive cycling ( P = 0.01), while control of MSNA burst strength was unchanged ( P > 0.05). These results suggest that central feedforward mechanisms are involved primarily in modulating the strength, but not the occurrence, of a sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle sympathetic nerve activity burst frequency decreased equally during passive and active cycling, but reductions in total muscle sympathetic nerve activity were attenuated during active cycling. These results suggest that central command primarily regulates the strength, not the occurrence, of a muscle sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise.

  7. Activation of dioxygen by copper metalloproteins and insights from model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, David A; Diaz, Daniel E; Liu, Jeffrey J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-04-01

    Nature uses dioxygen as a key oxidant in the transformation of biomolecules. Among the enzymes that are utilized for these reactions are copper-containing metalloenzymes, which are responsible for important biological functions such as the regulation of neurotransmitters, dioxygen transport, and cellular respiration. Enzymatic and model system studies work in tandem in order to gain an understanding of the fundamental reductive activation of dioxygen by copper complexes. This review covers the most recent advancements in the structures, spectroscopy, and reaction mechanisms for dioxygen-activating copper proteins and relevant synthetic models thereof. An emphasis has also been placed on cofactor biogenesis, a fundamentally important process whereby biomolecules are post-translationally modified by the pro-enzyme active site to generate cofactors which are essential for the catalytic enzymatic reaction. Significant questions remaining in copper-ion-mediated O2-activation in copper proteins are addressed.

  8. [NiFe] dithiolene diphosphine complex for hydrogen gas activation: a Theoretic Insight

    CERN Document Server

    GuYan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A diphosphino-nickel-iron dithiolene complex, [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, dppf = 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene), has been recently found to be reasonably active on proton reduction to dihydrogen (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 1109). Interestingly, this exceptional complex was found to be also reactive towards dihydrogen activation as indicated by the electrochemical investigation. However, a pure nickel dithiolene diphosphine theoretical mode, excluding the contributions from iron moiety, was applied to attribute the experimental catalytic observation. We have re-visited the theoretical approach in details for this [NiFe] catalyst and compared it with the non-active nickel dithiolene diphosphine complexes. We found that both nickel and iron moieties in this newly developed complex were imperative for the observed catalytic per-formance, particularly towards the activation of dihydrogen.

  9. Mechanistic and functional insights into fatty acid activation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Pooja; Goyal, Aneesh; Natarajan, Vivek T.; Rajakumara, Eerappa; Verma, Priyanka; Gupta, Radhika; Yousuf, Malikmohamed; Trivedi, Omita A.; Mohanty, Debasisa; Tyagi, Anil; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Rajesh S Gokhale

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAALs) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) provided a new perspective to fatty acid activation dogma. These proteins convert fatty acids to corresponding adenylates, which is an intermediate of acyl-CoA-synthesizing fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs). Presently, it is not evident how obligate pathogens like Mtb have evolved such new themes of functional versatility and whether the activation of fatty acids to acyl-adenylates could indeed be a genera...

  10. Structural Insights into the Dual Activities of the Nerve Agent Degrading Organophosphate Anhydrolase/Prolidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    containing chemical nerve agents. It also belongs to a family of prolidases, with significant activity against various Xaa -Pro dipeptides. Here we report the X...whose identity could not be definitively established but is suggestive of a bound glycolate, which is isosteric with a glycine ( Xaa ) product. All...significant prolidase activity, with specificity for various dipeptides ( Xaa -Pro) having proline as the second residue (6, 14). The enzyme is not capable of

  11. Insights on how the activity of an endoglucanase is affected by physical properties of insoluble celluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragatto, Juliano; Segato, Fernando; Cota, Junio; Mello, Danilo B; Oliveira, Marcelo M; Buckeridge, Marcos S; Squina, Fabio M; Driemeier, Carlos

    2012-05-31

    Cellulose physical properties like crystallinity, porosity, and particle size are known to influence cellulase activity, but knowledge is still insufficient for activity prediction from such measurable substrate characteristics. With the aim of illuminating enzyme-substrate relationships, this work evaluates a purified hyperthermophilic endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (from Pyrococcus furiosus) acting on 13 celluloses characterized for crystallinity and crystal width (by X-ray diffraction), wet porosity (by thermoporometry), and particle size (by light scattering). Activities are analyzed by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation, which is justified by low enzyme-substrate affinity. Michaelis-Menten coefficients K(m) and k(cat) are reinterpreted in the context of heterogeneous cellulose hydrolysis. For a set of as-received and milled microcrystalline celluloses, activity is successfully described as a function of accessible substrate concentration, with accessibility proportional to K(m)(-1). Accessibility contribution from external particle areas, pore areas, and crystalline packing are discriminated to have comparable magnitudes, implying that activity prediction demands all these substrate properties to be considered. Results additionally suggest that looser crystalline packing increases the lengths of released cello-oligomers as well as the maximum endoglucanase specific activity (k(cat)).

  12. Appraisal of active tectonics in Hindu Kush: Insights from DEM derived geomorphic indices and drainage analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Amer Mahmood

    2012-07-01

    The results obtained from these indices were combined to yield an index of relative active tectonics (IRAT using GIS. The average of the seven measured geomorphic indices was used to evaluate the distribution of relative tectonic activity in the study area. We defined four classes to define the degree of relative tectonic activity: class 1__very high (1.0 ≤ IRAT < 1.3; class 2__high (1.3 ≥ IRAT < 1.5; class 3—moderate (1.5 ≥ IRAT < 1.8; and class 4—low (1.8 ≥ IRAT. In view of the results, we conclude that this combined approach allows the identification of the highly deformed areas related to active tectonics. Landsat imagery and field observations also evidence the presence of active tectonics based on the deflected streams, deformed landforms, active mountain fronts and triangular facets. The indicative values of IRAT are consistent with the areas of known relative uplift rates, landforms and geology.

  13. Daily physical activity assessment with accelerometers: new insights and validation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasqui, G; Bonomi, A G; Westerterp, K R

    2013-06-01

    The field of application of accelerometry is diverse and ever expanding. Because by definition all physical activities lead to energy expenditure, the doubly labelled water (DLW) method as gold standard to assess total energy expenditure over longer periods of time is the method of choice to validate accelerometers in their ability to assess daily physical activities. The aim of this paper was to provide a systematic overview of all recent (2007-2011) accelerometer validation studies using DLW as the reference. The PubMed Central database was searched using the following keywords: doubly or double labelled or labeled water in combination with accelerometer, accelerometry, motion sensor, or activity monitor. Limits were set to include articles from 2007 to 2011, as earlier publications were covered in a previous review. In total, 38 articles were identified, of which 25 were selected to contain sufficient new data. Eighteen different accelerometers were validated. There was a large variability in accelerometer output and their validity to assess daily physical activity. Activity type recognition has great potential to improve the assessment of physical activity-related health outcomes. So far, there is little evidence that adding other physiological measures such as heart rate significantly improves the estimation of energy expenditure. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  14. Electronic word of mouth on twitter about physical activity in the United States: exploratory infodemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Campo, Shelly; Janz, Kathleen F; Eckler, Petya; Yang, Jingzhen; Snetselaar, Linda G; Signorini, Alessio

    2013-11-20

    Twitter is a widely used social medium. However, its application in promoting health behaviors is understudied. In order to provide insights into designing health marketing interventions to promote physical activity on Twitter, this exploratory infodemiology study applied both social cognitive theory and the path model of online word of mouth to examine the distribution of different electronic word of mouth (eWOM) characteristics among personal tweets about physical activity in the United States. This study used 113 keywords to retrieve 1 million public tweets about physical activity in the United States posted between January 1 and March 31, 2011. A total of 30,000 tweets were randomly selected and sorted based on numbers generated by a random number generator. Two coders scanned the first 16,100 tweets and yielded 4672 (29.02%) tweets that they both agreed to be about physical activity and were from personal accounts. Finally, 1500 tweets were randomly selected from the 4672 tweets (32.11%) for further coding. After intercoder reliability scores reached satisfactory levels in the pilot coding (100 tweets separate from the final 1500 tweets), 2 coders coded 750 tweets each. Descriptive analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Fisher exact tests were performed. Tweets about physical activity were dominated by neutral sentiments (1270/1500, 84.67%). Providing opinions or information regarding physical activity (1464/1500, 97.60%) and chatting about physical activity (1354/1500, 90.27%) were found to be popular on Twitter. Approximately 60% (905/1500, 60.33%) of the tweets demonstrated users' past or current participation in physical activity or intentions to participate in physical activity. However, social support about physical activity was provided in less than 10% of the tweets (135/1500, 9.00%). Users with fewer people following their tweets (followers) (P=.02) and with fewer accounts that they followed (followings) (P=.04) were more likely to talk positively about

  15. Activity Clamp Provides Insights into Paradoxical Effects of the Anti-Seizure Drug Carbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gareth; Leite, Marco; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Pavlov, Ivan; Schorge, Stephanie; Lignani, Gabriele

    2017-05-31

    A major challenge in experimental epilepsy research is to reconcile the effects of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on individual neurons with their network-level actions. Highlighting this difficulty, it is unclear why carbamazepine (CBZ), a frontline AED with a known molecular mechanism, has been reported to increase epileptiform activity in several clinical and experimental studies. We confirmed in an in vitro mouse model (in both sexes) that the frequency of interictal bursts increased after CBZ perfusion. To address the underlying mechanisms, we developed a method, activity clamp, to distinguish the response of individual neurons from network-level actions of CBZ. We first recorded barrages of synaptic conductances from neurons during epileptiform activity and then replayed them in pharmacologically isolated neurons under control conditions and in the presence of CBZ. CBZ consistently decreased the reliability of the second action potential in each burst of activity. Conventional current-clamp recordings using excitatory ramp or square-step current injections failed to reveal this effect. Network modeling showed that a CBZ-induced decrease of neuron recruitment during epileptic bursts can lead to an increase in burst frequency at the network level by reducing the refractoriness of excitatory transmission. By combining activity clamp with computer simulations, the present study provides a potential explanation for the paradoxical effects of CBZ on epileptiform activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The effects of anti-epileptic drugs on individual neurons are difficult to separate from their network-level actions. Although carbamazepine (CBZ) has a known anti-epileptic mechanism, paradoxically, it has also been reported to increase epileptiform activity in clinical and experimental studies. To investigate this paradox during realistic neuronal epileptiform activity, we developed a method, activity clamp, to distinguish the effects of CBZ on individual neurons from network

  16. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, th...

  17. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure-function relationship studies.

  18. Flavonoids as CDK1 Inhibitors: Insights in Their Binding Orientations and Structure-Activity Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, the interactions of flavonoids with protein kinases (PKs) have been described by using crystallographic experiments. Interestingly, different orientations have been found for one flavonoid inside different PKs and different chemical substitutions lead to different orientations of the flavonoid scaffold inside one PK. Accordingly, orientation predictions of novel analogues could help to the design of flavonoids with high PK inhibitory activities. With this in mind, we studied the binding modes of 37 flavonoids (flavones and chalcones) inside the cyclin-dependent PK CDK1 using docking experiments. We found that the compounds under study adopted two different orientations into the active site of CDK1 (orientations I and II in the manuscript). In addition, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using CoMFA and CoMSIA methodologies were constructed to explain the trend of the CDK1 inhibitory activities for the studied flavonoids. Template-based and docking-based alignments were used. Models developed starting from docking-based alignment were applied for describing the whole dataset and compounds with orientation I. Adequate R2 and Q2 values were obtained by each method; interestingly, only hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields describe the differential potency of the flavonoids as CDK1 inhibitors for both defined alignments and subsets. Our current application of docking and QSAR together reveals important elements to be drawn for the design of novel flavonoids with increased PK inhibitory activities.

  19. Structural insights into the initiating complex of the lectin pathway of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Le, Le T M; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2015-02-03

    The proteolytic cascade of the complement system is initiated when pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs) bind to ligands, resulting in the activation of associated proteases. In the lectin pathway of complement, the complex of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) initiates the pathway by activating a second protease, MASP-2. Here we present a structural study of a PRM/MASP complex and derive the overall architecture of the 450 kDa MBL/MASP-1 complex using small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. The serine protease (SP) domains from the zymogen MASP-1 dimer protrude from the cone-like MBL tetramer and are separated by at least 20 nm. This suggests that intracomplex activation within a single MASP-1 dimer is unlikely and instead supports intercomplex activation, whereby the MASP SP domains are accessible to nearby PRM-bound MASPs. This activation mechanism differs fundamentally from the intracomplex initiation models previously proposed for both the lectin and the classical pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural insight into proteolytic activation and regulation of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus A; Pedersen, Dennis V; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-11-01

    The complement system is a highly complex and carefully regulated proteolytic cascade activated through three different pathways depending on the activator recognized. The structural knowledge regarding the intricate proteolytic enzymes that activate and control complement has increased dramatically over the last decade. This development has been pivotal for understanding how mutations within complement proteins might contribute to pathogenesis and has spurred new strategies for development of complement therapeutics. Here we describe and discuss the complement system from a structural perspective and integrate the most recent findings obtained by crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy. In particular, we focus on the proteolytic enzymes governing activation and their products carrying the biological effector functions. Additionally, we present the structural basis for some of the best known complement inhibitors. The large number of accumulated molecular structures enables us to visualize the relative size, position, and overall orientation of many of the most interesting complement proteins and assembled complexes on activator surfaces and in membranes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the global wind oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Todd W.

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have searched for relationships between tornado activity and atmospheric teleconnections to provide insight on the relationship between tornadoes, their environments, and larger scale patterns in the climate system. Knowledge of these relationships is practical because it can improve seasonal and sub-seasonal predictions of tornado probability and, therefore, help mitigate tornado-related losses. This study explores the relationships between the annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the Global Wind Oscillation. Time series herein show that phases of the Global Wind Oscillation, and atmospheric angular momentum anomalies, vary over a period of roughly 20-25 years. Rank correlations indicate that tornado activity is weakly correlated with phases 2, 3, and 4 (positive) and 6, 7, and 8 (negative) of the Global Wind Oscillation in winter, spring, and fall. The correlation is not as clear in summer or at the annual scale. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 and fewer phase 6, 7, and 8 days tend to have more tornadoes. Lastly, logistic regression models indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 days have greater likelihoods of having more than normal tornado activity. Combined, these analyses suggest that seasons with more low atmospheric angular momentum days, or phase 2, 3, and 4 days, tend to have greater tornado activity than those with fewer days, and that this relationship is most evident in winter and spring.

  2. Resting-state beta and gamma activity in Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Park, Su Mi; Lee, Jaewon; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Jung, Hee Yeon; Choi, Sam-Wook; Kim, Dai Jin; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Jun-Young

    2013-09-01

    Internet addiction is the inability to control one's use of the Internet and is related to impulsivity. Although a few studies have examined neurophysiological activity as individuals with Internet addiction engage in cognitive processing, no information on spontaneous EEG activity in the eyes-closed resting-state is available. We investigated resting-state EEG activities in beta and gamma bands and examined their relationships with impulsivity among individuals with Internet addiction and healthy controls. Twenty-one drug-naïve patients with Internet addiction (age: 23.33 ± 3.50 years) and 20 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched healthy controls (age: 22.40 ± 2.33 years) were enrolled in this study. Severity of Internet addiction was identified by the total score on Young's Internet Addiction Test. Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 and a stop-signal task. Resting-state EEG during eyes closed was recorded, and the absolute/relative power of beta and gamma bands was analyzed. The Internet addiction group showed high impulsivity and impaired inhibitory control. The generalized estimating equation showed that the Internet-addiction group showed lower absolute power on the beta band than did the control group (estimate = -3.370, p Internet-addiction group showed higher absolute power on the gamma band than did the control group (estimate = 0.434, p Internet addiction as well as with the extent of impulsivity. The present study suggests that resting-state fast-wave brain activity is related to the impulsivity characterizing Internet addiction. These differences may be neurobiological markers for the pathophysiology of Internet addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New insights into co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste: Biogas versus biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqun; Yin, Yao; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    This study explored two holistic approaches for co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste. In Approach 1, mixed activated sludge and food waste were first hydrolyzed with fungal mash, and produced hydrolysate without separation was directly subject to anaerobic digestion. In Approach 2, solid generated after hydrolysis of food waste by fungal mash was directly converted to biofertilizer, while separated liquid with high soluble COD concentration was further co-digested with activated sludge for biomethane production. Although the potential energy produced from Approach 1 was about 1.8-time higher than that from Approach 2, the total economic revenue generated from Approach 2 was about 1.9-fold of that from Approach 1 due to high market value of biofertilizer. It is expected that this study may lead to a paradigm shift in biosolid management towards environmental and economic sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanistic and functional insights into fatty acid activation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Goyal, Aneesh; Natarajan, Vivek T; Rajakumara, Eerappa; Verma, Priyanka; Gupta, Radhika; Yousuf, Malikmohamed; Trivedi, Omita A.; Mohanty, Debasisa; Tyagi, Anil; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAALs) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) provided a new perspective to fatty acid activation dogma. These proteins convert fatty acids to corresponding adenylates, which is an intermediate of acyl-CoA-synthesizing fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs). Presently, it is not evident how obligate pathogens like Mtb have evolved such new themes of functional versatility and whether the activation of fatty acids to acyl-adenylates could indeed be a general mechanism. Here, based on elucidation of the first structure of a FAAL protein and by generating loss- as well as gain-of-function mutants that interconvert FAAL and FACL activities, we demonstrate that an insertion motif dictates formation of acyl-adenylate. Since FAALs in Mtb are crucial nodes in biosynthetic network of virulent lipids, inhibitors directed against these proteins provide a unique multi-pronged approach of simultaneously disrupting several pathways. PMID:19182784

  5. Insights into the structure and activity of prototype foamy virus RNase H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Berit

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNase H is an endonuclease that hydrolyzes the RNA strand in RNA/DNA hybrids. Retroviral reverse transcriptases harbor a C-terminal RNase H domain whose activity is essential for viral replication. The RNase H degrades the viral genomic RNA after the first DNA strand is synthesized. Here, we report the biophysical and enzymatic properties of the RNase H domain of prototype foamy virus (PFV as an independently purified protein. Sequence comparisons with other retroviral RNases H indicated that PFV RNase H harbors a basic protrusion, including a basic loop and the so-called C-helix, which was suggested to be important for activity and substrate binding and is absent in the RNase H domain of human immunodeficiency virus. So far, no structure of a retroviral RNase H containing a C-helix is available. Results RNase H activity assays demonstrate that the PFV RNase H domain is active, although its activity is about 200-fold reduced as compared to the full length protease-reverse transcriptase enzyme. Fluorescence equilibrium titrations with an RNA/DNA substrate revealed a KD for the RNase H domain in the low micromolar range which is about 4000-fold higher than that of the full-length protease-reverse transcriptase enzyme. Analysis of the RNase H cleavage pattern using a [32P]-labeled substrate indicates that the independent RNase H domain cleaves the substrate non-specifically. The purified RNase H domain exhibits a well defined three-dimensional structure in solution which is stabilized in the presence of Mg2+ ions. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the independent PFV RNase H domain is structured and active. The presence of the C-helix in PFV RNase H could be confirmed by assigning the protein backbone and calculating the chemical shift index using NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Insights into the glycyl radical enzyme active site of benzylsuccinate synthase: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Dean, Anthony M; Maupin, C Mark

    2013-08-21

    The fumarate addition reaction, catalyzed by the enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS), is considered to be one of the most intriguing and energetically challenging reactions in biology. BSS belongs to the glycyl radical enzyme family and catalyzes the fumarate addition reaction, which enables microorganisms to utilize hydrocarbons as an energy source under anaerobic conditions. Unfortunately, the extreme sensitivity of the glycyl radical to oxygen has hampered the structural and kinetic characterization of BSS, thereby limiting our knowledge on this enzyme. To enhance our molecular-level understanding of BSS, a computational approach involving homology modeling, docking studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to deduce the structure of BSS's catalytic subunit (BSSα) and illuminate the molecular basis for the fumarate addition reaction. We have identified two conserved and distinct binding pockets at the BSSα active site: a hydrophobic pocket for toluene binding and a polar pocket for fumaric acid binding. Subsequent dynamical and energetic evaluations have identified Glu509, Ser827, Leu390, and Phe384 as active site residues critical for substrate binding. The orientation of substrates at the active site observed in MD simulations is consistent with experimental observations of the syn addition of toluene to fumaric acid. It is also found that substrate binding tightens the active site and restricts the conformational flexibility of the thiyl radical, leading to hydrogen transfer distances conducive to the proposed reaction mechanism. The stability of substrates at the active site and the occurrence of feasible radical transfer distances between the thiyl radical, substrates, and the active site glycine indicate a substrate-assisted radical transfer pathway governing fumarate addition.

  7. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Próchnicki, Tomasz; Mangan, Matthew S.; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high-molecular-weight protein complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment in response to danger- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These complexes enable activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, leading to a cell death process called pyroptosis and to proteolytic cleavage and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Along with caspase-1, inflammasome components include an adaptor protein, ASC, and a sensor protein, which triggers the inflammasome assembly in response to a danger signal. The inflammasome sensor proteins are pattern recognition receptors belonging either to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) or to the AIM2-like receptor family. While the molecular agonists that induce inflammasome formation by AIM2 and by several other NLRs have been identified, it is not well understood how the NLR family member NLRP3 is activated. Given that NLRP3 activation is relevant to a range of human pathological conditions, significant attempts are being made to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular events that lead to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to a range of K + efflux-inducing danger signals. We also comment on the reported involvement of cytosolic Ca 2+ fluxes on NLRP3 activation. We outline the recent advances in research on the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of NLRP3 responses, and we point to several open questions regarding the current model of NLRP3 activation. PMID:27508077

  8. Structural insight into inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by a small-molecule antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhonghui; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Hong, Zebin

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serpin, is the physiological inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators and thus also an inhibitor of fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. It is a potential therapeutic target in many pathological conditions, including thrombosis...... of PAI-1 into a substrate for its target proteases and the subsequent slow conversion of PAI-1 into an irreversibly inactivated form. Our work provides structural clues to an understanding of PAI-1 inactivation by small-molecule antagonists and an important step toward the design of drugs targeting PAI-1....

  9. Insight into the role of urotensin II-related peptide tyrosine residue in UT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Etienne; Létourneau, Myriam; Hébert, Terence E; Chatenet, David

    2017-11-15

    While sharing common biological activity, the two endogenous ligands of the G protein-coupled receptor UT, e.g. urotensin II (UII) and urotensin II-related peptide (URP), also exhibit distinct effects that could be explained by distinct interactions with their cognate receptor (UT). Accordingly, introduction of a similar substitution at the intracyclic Tyr residue in UII and URP led to compounds with divergent pharmacologic profiles. Hypothesizing that the Tyr6 residue of URP is a key-element to understand the specific activation of UT by URP, we undertook a study of the structure-activity relationship in which this particular residue was replaced by non-natural and constrained amino acids. Each compound was evaluated for its ability to bind UT, to induce rat aortic ring contraction and to activate Gq and G12 signaling pathways. We identified [Pep6]URP, that binds UT with an affinity similar to that of URP, but behaves as a biased ligand. Used as an antagonist, this peptide is also able to selectively reduce the maximal aortic contraction of URP but not UII. Our results suggest that the orientation of the Tyr residue can stabilize at least two different conformations of UT, leading to biased signaling and a probe-dependent allosteric effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Insights into the catalytic properties of bamboo vacuolar invertase through mutational analysis of active site residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chiao; Yang, Chii-Shen; Yang, Chien-Chih; Wang, Ai-Yu; Sung, Hsien-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Plant acid invertases, which are either associated with the cell wall or present in vacuoles, belong to family 32 of glycoside hydrolases (GH32). Homology modeling of bamboo vacuolar invertase Bobetafruct3 using Arabidopsis cell-wall invertase AtcwINV1 as a template showed that its overall structure is similar to GH32 enzymes, and that the three highly conserved motifs, NDPNG, RDP and EC, are located in the active site. This study also used site-directed mutagenesis to examine the roles of the conserved amino acid residues in these three motifs, which include Asp135, Arg259, Asp260, Glu316 and Cys317, and a conserved Trp residue (Trp159) that resides between the NDPNG and RDP motifs. The mutants W159F, W159L, E316Q and C317A retained acid invertase activity, but no invertase activity was observed for the mutant E316A or mutants with changes at Asp135, Arg259, or Asp260. The apparent K(m) values of the four mutants with invertase activity were all higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. The mutants W159L and E316Q exhibited lower k(cat) values than the wild-type enzyme, but an increase in the k(cat) value was observed for the mutants W159F and C317A. The results of this study demonstrate that these residues have individual functions in catalyzing sucrose hydrolysis.

  11. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  12. Marketing activities to support ‘Moderately Novel’ product innovation: Insights from the chemical industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.A.J.; Vissers, G.A.N.; Dankbaar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Scholars often follow a contingency approach to study which marketing activities are suitable for a particular type of product innovation project, thereby making a distinction between incremental and radical innovation only. ‘Moderately novel’ projects, which have intermediate levels of newness,

  13. Immunoglobulin free light chains: new insights in mast cell activation and immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thio, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies are described that elaborate on the biological properties of immunoglobulin free light chains (Ig-fLC) related to the activation of mast cells and effects on other cells. Mast cell degranulation through Ig-fLC requires two events. At first, mast cell-bound Ig-fLCs

  14. Defense Against Pathogens: Structural Insights into the Mechanism of Chitin Induced Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; Shibuya, Naoto; Kaku, Hanae

    2017-11-24

    Pattern recognition receptors on the plant cell surface mediate the recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns, in a process which activates downstream immune signaling. These receptors are plasma membrane-localized kinases which need to be autophosphorylated to activate downstream responses. Perception of attacks from fungi occurs through recognition of chitin, a polymer of an N-acetylglucosamine which is a characteristic component of the cell walls of fungi. This process is regulated in Arabidopsis by chitin elicitor receptor kinase CERK1. A more complex process characterizes rice, in which regulation of chitin perception is operated by a complex composed of OsCERK1, a homolog of CERK1, and the chitin elicitor binding protein OsCEBiP. Recent literature has provided a mechanistic description of the complex regulation of activation of innate immunity in rice and an advance in the structural description of molecular players involved in this process. This review describes the current status of the understanding of molecular events involved in innate immunity activation in rice. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Insights on Redox Active Proteins Involved in ER-Associated Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lea Cecilie

    by the ubiquitin-proteasome system thereby preventing the otherwise potentially devastating effects of accumulated misfolded proteins. One member of the ERAD pathway is the VCP-interacting membrane protein (VIMP). VIMP is a selenoprotein with a proposed reductase activity. Moreover, VIMP is an ER membrane protein...

  16. Deeper Insight into the Diels-Alder Reaction through the Activation Strain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, I.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder (DA) cycloaddition reaction has the ability to significantly increase molecular complexity regioselectively and stereospecifically in a single synthetic step. In this review it is discussed how the activation strain model of chemical reactivity reveals the physical factors that

  17. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  18. Global Indicators Analysis and Consultancy Experience Insights into Correlation between Entrepreneurial Activities and Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Krivokapić

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many researches and practical experiences clearly indicate the existence of a strong relationship between entrepreneurial activities and the business environment in which these activities are initiated. Although this topic has been quite ignored until the late twentieth century, a lot of studies and consulting practice have contributed to the fact that there are now a number of theories concerning mentioned correlation. These theories aim to offer a model that would provide better utilization of the possibilities from the business environment which could be very important for the development from both macroeconomic and microeconomic aspects. An increasing number of articles on this topic says enough about its importance, and numerous researches by many reputable globally recognized institutions go in favor of this claim. There are many indicators that observe the economic situation in a country or a region from different aspects, so the analyses of these indicators make it possible to determine the specific relationships between entrepreneurial activities and the local and the global business environment. Given the complexity of these relations, the impact cannot be observed partially, without taking into consideration other important factors, but more detailed analyses, however, result in some useful conclusions, which in the proper context can have a positive impact on many economic factors. It is very important to emphasize the fact that the correlation between the business environment and entrepreneurial activities is bidirectional, since this influence is mutual, so that changes in one of these factors can and usually cause some modifications in the other. Frequent series of such iterations actually lead to changes in the business environment, while entrepreneurial activity changes its shape and affects the economy of a country or a region, which is of particular importance for its competitiveness in the era of globalization.

  19. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam B

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Barira Islam,1,* Charu Sharma,2,* Abdu Adem,3 Elhadi Aburawi,1 Shreesh Ojha3 1Department of Paediatrics, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+. We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure–function relationship studies. Keywords: polyphenols

  20. Mechanism-Based Inhibitors of the Human Sirtuin 5 Deacylase: Structure-Activity Relationship, Biostructural, and Kinetic Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Nima; Auth, Marina; Troelsen, Kathrin R; Pannek, Martin; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Fontenas, Martin; Hirschey, Matthew D; Steegborn, Clemens; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-11-20

    The sirtuin enzymes are important regulatory deacylases in a variety of biochemical contexts and may therefore be potential therapeutic targets through either activation or inhibition by small molecules. Here, we describe the discovery of the most potent inhibitor of sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) reported to date. We provide rationalization of the mode of binding by solving co-crystal structures of selected inhibitors in complex with both human and zebrafish SIRT5, which provide insight for future optimization of inhibitors with more "drug-like" properties. Importantly, enzyme kinetic evaluation revealed a slow, tight-binding mechanism of inhibition, which is unprecedented for SIRT5. This is important information when applying inhibitors to probe mechanisms in biology. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Is intuitive eating related to resting state vagal activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Tylka, Tracy L; Williams, DeWayne P; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2017-11-15

    Efferent and afferent fibers of the vagus nerve are involved in regulating hunger and satiety. Vagally-mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) reflects vagal activity. Previously no study addressed a potential association between resting state vagal activity and intuitive eating. Self-reports on intuitive eating and measures of resting state vmHRV were obtained in 39 students (16 female, mean age: 19.64±1.44years). Hierarchical multiple regression models showed that, after controlling for gender, age, and body mass index, resting vagal activity was inversely related to the Unconditional Permission to Eat subscale of the Intuitive Eating scale. Individuals with higher resting vagal activity tend to be less willing to eat desired foods and are more likely to label certain foods as forbidden. Future studies should include measures of self-regulation and eating disorder symptomatology to identify potential mediators or moderators when attempting to replicate these preliminary findings in larger samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells: New Insights into Antigen Recognition and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, a novel subpopulation of innate-like T cells that express an invariant T cell receptor (TCRα chain and a diverse TCRβ chain, can recognize a distinct set of small molecules, vitamin B metabolites, derived from some bacteria, fungi but not viruses, in the context of an evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex-related molecule 1 (MR1. This implies that MAIT cells may play unique and important roles in host immunity. Although viral antigens are not recognized by this limited TCR repertoire, MAIT cells are known to be activated in a TCR-independent mechanism during some viral infections, such as hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. In this article, we will review recent works in MAIT cell antigen recognition, activation and the role MAIT cells may play in the process of bacterial and viral infections and pathogenesis of non-infectious diseases.

  3. Nonlinear optical studies and structure-activity relationship of chalcone derivatives with in silico insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Adithya, K. S.; Shankar, Pruthvik; Jagadeesh Babu, N.; Srivastava, Sailesh; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Nine chalcones were prepared via Claisen-Schmidt condensation, and characterized by UV-vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectrometry. One of the representative member 4-NDM-TC has been studied via single crystal XRD and the TGA/DTA technique. SHG efficiency and NLO susceptibilities of the chalcones have been evaluated by the Kurtz and Perry method and Degenerate Four Wave Mixing techniques respectively. 3-Cl-4‧-HC was noted to possess SHG efficiency 1.37 times that of urea while 4-NDM-TC returned the highest third order NLO susceptibilities with respect to CS2. In silico studies help evaluate various physical parameters, in correlating the observed activities. In conclusion, the structure-activity relationship was derived based on the in silico and experimental results for the third order NLO susceptibilities.

  4. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzyme activities and gene expression of starch metabolism provide insights into grape berry development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Chaobo; Wu, Weimin; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chuan; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-01-01

    Grapes are categorized as a non-climacteric type of fruit which its ripening is not associated to important rises in respiration and ethylene synthesis. The starch metabolism shares a certain role in the carbohydrate metabolic pathways during grape berry development, and is regarded as an important transient pool in the pathway of sugar accumulation. However, the comprehensive role of starch and its contribution to the quality and flavor of grape berry have not been explored thoroughly. In this study, the expression levels of genes enzyme activities and carbohydrate concentrations related to starch metabolism, were analyzed to understand the molecular mechanism of starch accumulation during grape berry development. The results indicated that starch granules in grape berry were located at the chloroplast in the sub-epidermal tissues, acting as the temporary reserves of photosynthetic products to meet the needs for berry development, and relatively high starch contents could be detected at véraison stage. Moreover, both ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) and sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.3.1.14) involved in starch synthesis displayed elevated gene expression and enzymes activities in the sub-epidermal tissue, while α- and β-amylases involved in its degradation were highly transcribed and active in the central flesh, explaining the absence of starch in this last tissue. Change in the gene expression and activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, β-amylase and sucrose phosphate synthase revealed that they were regulated by the circadian rhythms in the fruitlets compared with those in the leaves. Both the morphological, enzymological and transcriptional data in this study provide advanced understandings on the function of starch during berry development and ripening that are so important for berry quality. This study will further facilitate our understanding of the sugar metabolism in grape berry as well as in other plant species.

  6. THE DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST “CHANGING LOOK” QUASAR: NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE PHYSICS AND PHENOMENOLOGY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Cales, Sabrina; Urry, C. Megan [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Moran, Edward C. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University, Laramaie, WY 82071 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gallo, Luigi [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2015-02-20

    SDSS J015957.64+003310.5 is an X-ray selected, z = 0.31 active galactic nucleus (AGN) from the Stripe 82X survey that transitioned from a Type 1 quasar to a Type 1.9 AGN between 2000 and 2010. This is the most distant AGN, and first quasar, yet observed to have undergone such a dramatic change. We re-observed the source with the double spectrograph on the Palomar 5 m telescope in 2014 July and found that the spectrum is unchanged since 2010. From fitting the optical spectra, we find that the AGN flux dropped by a factor of 6 between 2000 and 2010 while the broad Hα emission faded and broadened. Serendipitous X-ray observations caught the source in both the bright and dim state, showing a similar 2–10 keV flux diminution as the optical while lacking signatures of obscuration. The optical and X-ray changes coincide with g-band magnitude variations over multiple epochs of Stripe 82 observations. We demonstrate that variable absorption, as might be expected from the simplest AGN unification paradigm, does not explain the observed photometric or spectral properties. We interpret the changing state of J0159+0033 to be caused by dimming of the AGN continuum, reducing the supply of ionizing photons available to excite gas in the immediate vicinity around the black hole. J0159+0033 provides insight into the intermittency of black hole growth in quasars, as well as an unprecedented opportunity to study quasar physics (in the bright state) and the host galaxy (in the dim state), which has been impossible to do in a single sources until now.

  7. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqassim, Saif S; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L Mario; Bianchet, Mario A

    2016-03-03

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains-determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering-as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins.

  8. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Kondeti, Bhargav; Tu, Chingkuang; Maupin, C Mark; Silverman, David N; McKenna, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3 (-), respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH(-)/H2O) in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type) of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II) can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1--methylimidazole, 2--methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole) have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the 'in' and 'out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations) the activity of H64A CA II.

  9. Cloud droplet activation mechanisms of amino acid aerosol particles: insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric amino acids constitute a large fraction of water-soluble organic nitrogen compounds in aerosol particles, and have been confirmed as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN materials in laboratory experiments. We present a molecular dynamics (MD study of six amino acids with different structures and chemical properties that are relevant to the remote marine atmospheric aerosol–cloud system, with the aim of investigating the detailed mechanism of their induced changes in surface activity and surface tension, which are important properties for cloud drop activation. Distributions and orientations of the amino acid molecules are studied; these l-amino acids are serine (SER, glycine (GLY, alanine (ALA, valine (VAL, methionine (MET and phenylalanine (PHE and are categorised as hydrophilic and amphiphilic according to their affinities to water. The results suggest that the presence of surface-concentrated amphiphilic amino acid molecules give rise to enhanced Lennard–Jones repulsion, which in turn results in decreased surface tension of a planar interface and an increased surface tension of the spherical interface of droplets with diameters below 10 nm. The observed surface tension perturbation for the different amino acids under study not only serves as benchmark for future studies of more complex systems, but also shows that amphiphilic amino acids are surface active. The MD simulations used in this study reproduce experimental results of surface tension measurements for planar interfaces and the method is therefore applicable for spherical interfaces of nano-size for which experimental measurements are not possible to conduct.

  10. Structural insights into the enzymatic activity and potential substrate promiscuity of human 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterlass, Judith E; Wood, Robert J; Baslé, Arnaud; Tucker, Julie; Cano, Céline; Noble, Martin M E; Curtin, Nicola J

    2017-11-28

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism and energy production to sustain increased growth, enable metastasis and overcome resistance to cancer treatments. Although primary roles for many metabolic proteins have been identified, some are promiscuous in regards to the reaction they catalyze. To efficiently target these enzymes, a good understanding of their enzymatic function and structure, as well as knowledge regarding any substrate or catalytic promiscuity is required. Here we focus on the characterization of human 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH). PHGDH catalyzes the NAD + -dependent conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to phosphohydroxypyruvate, which is the first step in the de novo synthesis pathway of serine, a critical amino acid for protein and nucleic acid biosynthesis. We have investigated substrate analogues to assess whether PHGDH might possess other enzymatic roles that could explain its occasional over-expression in cancer, as well as to help with the design of specific inhibitors. We also report the crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of human PHGDH, a dimer, solved with bound cofactor in one monomer and both cofactor and L -tartrate in the second monomer. In vitro enzyme activity measurements show that the catalytic subunit of PHGDH is still active and that PHGDH activity could be significantly inhibited with adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose.

  11. Organization of left–right coordination of neuronal activity in the mammalian spinal cord: Insights from computational modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Natalia A; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Markin, Sergey N; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Kiehn, Ole; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-01-01

    Different locomotor gaits in mammals, such as walking or galloping, are produced by coordinated activity in neuronal circuits in the spinal cord. Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the cord is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs), whose axons cross the midline. In this study, we construct and analyse two computational models of spinal locomotor circuits consisting of left and right rhythm generators interacting bilaterally via several neuronal pathways mediated by different CINs. The CIN populations incorporated in the models include the genetically identified inhibitory (V0D) and excitatory (V0V) subtypes of V0 CINs and excitatory V3 CINs. The model also includes the ipsilaterally projecting excitatory V2a interneurons mediating excitatory drive to the V0V CINs. The proposed network architectures and CIN connectivity allow the models to closely reproduce and suggest mechanistic explanations for several experimental observations. These phenomena include: different speed-dependent contributions of V0D and V0V CINs and V2a interneurons to left–right alternation of neural activity, switching gaits between the left–right alternating walking-like activity and the left–right synchronous hopping-like pattern in mutants lacking specific neuron classes, and speed-dependent asymmetric changes of flexor and extensor phase durations. The models provide insights into the architecture of spinal network and the organization of parallel inhibitory and excitatory CIN pathways and suggest explanations for how these pathways maintain alternating and synchronous gaits at different locomotor speeds. The models propose testable predictions about the neural organization and operation of mammalian locomotor circuits. Key points Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the mammalian spinal cord is provided by several sets of commissural interneurons (CINs) whose axons cross the midline. Genetically identified inhibitory V

  12. Organization of left-right coordination of neuronal activity in the mammalian spinal cord: Insights from computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Natalia A; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Markin, Sergey N; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Kiehn, Ole; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-06-01

    Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the mammalian spinal cord is provided by several sets of commissural interneurons (CINs) whose axons cross the midline. Genetically identified inhibitory V0D and excitatory V0V CINs and ipsilaterally projecting excitatory V2a interneurons were shown to secure left-right alternation at different locomotor speeds. We have developed computational models of neuronal circuits in the spinal cord that include left and right rhythm-generating centres interacting bilaterally via three parallel pathways mediated by V0D , V2a-V0V and V3 neuron populations. The models reproduce the experimentally observed speed-dependent left-right coordination in normal mice and the changes in coordination seen in mutants lacking specific neuron classes. The models propose an explanation for several experimental results and provide insights into the organization of the spinal locomotor network and parallel CIN pathways involved in gait control at different locomotor speeds. Different locomotor gaits in mammals, such as walking or galloping, are produced by coordinated activity in neuronal circuits in the spinal cord. Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the cord is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs), whose axons cross the midline. In this study, we construct and analyse two computational models of spinal locomotor circuits consisting of left and right rhythm generators interacting bilaterally via several neuronal pathways mediated by different CINs. The CIN populations incorporated in the models include the genetically identified inhibitory (V0D ) and excitatory (V0V ) subtypes of V0 CINs and excitatory V3 CINs. The model also includes the ipsilaterally projecting excitatory V2a interneurons mediating excitatory drive to the V0V CINs. The proposed network architectures and CIN connectivity allow the models to closely reproduce and suggest mechanistic explanations for several experimental

  13. Pharmacological insight into the anti-inflammatory activity of sesquiterpene lactones from Neurolaena lobata (L.) R.Br. ex Cass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, R; Binder, M; Zupkó, I; Afonyushkin, T; Lajter, I; Vasas, A; de Martin, R; Unger, C; Dolznig, H; Diaz, R; Frisch, R; Passreiter, C M; Krupitza, G; Hohmann, J; Kopp, B; Bochkov, V N

    2014-10-15

    Neurolaena lobata is a Caribbean medicinal plant used for the treatment of several conditions including inflammation. Recent data regarding potent anti-inflammatory activity of the plant and isolated sesquiterpene lactones raised our interest in further pharmacological studies. The present work aimed at providing a mechanistic insight into the anti-inflammatory activity of N. lobata and eight isolated sesquiterpene lactones, as well as a structure-activity relationship and in vivo anti-inflammatory data. The effect of the extract and its compounds on the generation of pro-inflammatory proteins was assessed in vitro in endothelial and monocytic cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Their potential to modulate the expression of inflammatory genes was further studied at the mRNA level. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of the chemically characterized extract was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats. The compounds and extract inhibited LPS- and TNF-α-induced upregulation of the pro-inflammatory molecules E-selectin and interleukin-8 in HUVECtert and THP-1 cells. LPS-induced elevation of mRNA encoding for E-selectin and interleukin-8 was also suppressed. Furthermore, the extract inhibited the development of acute inflammation in rats. Sesquiterpene lactones from N. lobata interfered with the induction of inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and chemokines in cells stimulated with bacterial products and cytokines. Structure-activity analysis revealed the importance of the double bond at C-4-C-5 and C-2-C-3 and the acetyl group at C-9 for the anti-inflammatory activity. The effect was confirmed in vivo, which raises further interest in the therapeutic potential of the compounds for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Using campaigns to improve perceptions of the value of adult vaccination in the United States: Health communication considerations and insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Glen J; Shen, Angela K; Schwartz, Jason L

    2017-10-09

    Vaccines have much relevance and promise for improving adult health in the United States, but to date, overall use and uptake remain far below desired levels. Many adults have not received recommended vaccinations and many healthcare providers do not strongly and actively encourage their use with patients. This has led some public health and medical experts to conclude that adult vaccines are severely undervalued by the U.S. public and healthcare providers and to call for campaigns and communication-based efforts to foster increased appreciation, and in turn, higher adult immunization rates. A narrative integrative review that draws upon the vaccine valuation and health communication literatures is used to develop a framework to guide campaign and communication-based efforts to improve public, provider, and policymakers' assessment of the value of adult vaccination. The review does this by: (1) distinguishing social psychological value from economic value; (2) identifying the implications of social psychological value considerations for adult vaccination-related communication campaigns; and (3) using five core health communication considerations to illustrate how social psychological notions of value can be integrated into campaigns or communication that are intended to improve adult vaccination value perceptions and assessments, and in turn, motivate greater support for and uptake of recommended adult vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of resting state activity in MCI individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Esposito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Aging is the major risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI. The aim of this study was to identify novel modifications of brain functional connectivity in MCI patients. MCI individuals were compared to healthy elderly subjects.Methods. We enrolled 37 subjects (age range 60–80 y.o.. Of these, 13 subjects were affected by MCI and 24 were age-matched healthy elderly control (HC. Subjects were evaluated with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, and prose memory (Babcock story tests. In addition, with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we investigated resting state network (RSN activities. Resting state (Rs fMRI data were analyzed by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA. Subjects were followed-up with neuropsychological evaluations for three years.Results. Rs-fMRI of MCI subjects showed increased intrinsic connectivity in the Default Mode Network (DMN and in the Somatomotor Network (SMN. Analysis of the DMN showed statistically significant increased activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and left inferior parietal lobule (lIPL. During the three years follow-up, 4 MCI subjects converted to AD. The subset of MCI AD-converted patients showed increased connectivity in the right Inferior Parietal Lobule (rIPL. As for SMN activity, MCI and MCI-AD converted groups showed increased level of connectivity in correspondence of the right Supramarginal Gyrus (rSG.Conclusions. Our findings indicate alterations of DMN and SMN activity in MCI subjects, thereby providing potential imaging-based markers that can be helpful for the early diagnosis and monitoring of these patients.

  16. New Insights on the Mechanism of the K+-Independent Activity of Crenarchaeota Pyruvate Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J.; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  17. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3−, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the `in' and `out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations the activity of H64A CA II.

  18. Addressing complex healthcare problems in diverse settings: insights from activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Gail; Entwistle, Vikki A; Beech, Nic

    2012-02-01

    In the U.K., approaches to policy implementation, service improvement and quality assurance treat policy, management and clinical care as separate, hierarchical domains. They are often based on the central knowledge transfer (KT) theory idea that best practice solutions to complex problems can be identified and 'rolled out' across organisations. When the designated 'best practice' is not implemented, this is interpreted as local--particularly management--failure. Remedial actions include reiterating policy aims and tightening performance management of solution implementation, frequently to no avail. We propose activity theory (AT) as an alternative approach to identifying and understanding the challenges of addressing complex healthcare problems across diverse settings. AT challenges the KT conceptual separations between levels of policy, management and clinical care. It does not regard knowledge and practice as separable, and does not understand them in the commodified way that has typified some versions of KT theory. Instead, AT focuses on "objects of activity" which can be contested. It sees new practice as emerging from contradiction and understands knowledge and practice as fundamentally entwined, not separate. From an AT perspective, there can be no single best practice. The contributions of AT are that it enables us to understand the dynamics of knowledge-practice in activities rather than between levels. It shows how efforts to reduce variation from best practice may paradoxically remove a key source of practice improvement. After explaining the principles of AT we illustrate its explanatory potential through an ethnographic study of primary healthcare teams responding to a policy aim of reducing inappropriate hospital admissions of older people by the 'best practice' of rapid response teams. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Insights into seasonal active layer dynamics by monitoring relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Cole, C. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Screaton, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal freeze and thaw of the active layer above permafrost results in dramatic changes in seismic velocity. We used daily cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at Poker Flat Research Range in central Alaska to create a nearly continuous 2-year record of relative velocity changes. This analysis required that we modify the Moving Window Cross-spectral Analysis technique used in the Python package MSNoise to reduce the occurrence of cycle skipping. Results show relative velocity variations follow a seasonal pattern, where velocities decrease in late spring through the summer months and increase through the fall and winter months. This timing is consistent with active layer freeze and thaw in this region. These results were compared to a suite of ground- and satellite-based measurements to identify relationships. A decrease in relative velocities in late spring closely follows the timing of snow melt recorded in nearby ground temperatures and snow-depth logs. This transition also aligns with a decrease in the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) derived from multi-temporal Landsat 8 satellite imagery collected over the study site. A gradual increase in relative velocity through the fall months occurs when temperatures below ground surface remain near zero. We suggest this is due to latent heat feedbacks that keep temperatures constant while active layer velocities increase from continued ice formation. This highlights the value in velocity variations for capturing details on the freezing process. In addition, spatial variations in the magnitude of velocity changes are consistent with thaw probe surveys. Exploring relationships with remote sensing may allow indirect measurements of thaw over larger areas and further surface wave analysis may allow for thickness evolution measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for

  20. New insights on the mechanism of the K(+- independent activity of crenarchaeota pyruvate kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo De la Vega-Ruíz

    Full Text Available Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme, whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C, and the other (Tm of 105.2°C associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C. The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  1. New insights on the mechanism of the K(+-) independent activity of crenarchaeota pyruvate kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  2. Mutational activation of niche-specific genes provides insight into regulatory networks and bacterial function in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Stephen R; Jackson, Robert W; Moon, Christina D; Jacobs, Michael A; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Gehrig, Stefanie M; Rainey, Paul B

    2007-11-13

    The genome of the plant-colonizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 harbors a subset of genes that are expressed specifically on plant surfaces. The function of these genes is central to the ecological success of SBW25, but their study poses significant challenges because no phenotype is discernable in vitro. Here, we describe a genetic strategy with general utility that combines suppressor analysis with IVET (SPyVET) and provides a means of identifying regulators of niche-specific genes. Central to this strategy are strains carrying operon fusions between plant environment-induced loci (EIL) and promoterless 'dapB. These strains are prototrophic in the plant environment but auxotrophic on laboratory minimal medium. Regulatory elements were identified by transposon mutagenesis and selection for prototrophs on minimal medium. Approximately 10(6) mutants were screened for each of 27 strains carrying 'dapB fusions to plant EIL and the insertion point for the transposon determined in approximately 2,000 putative regulator mutants. Regulators were functionally characterized and used to provide insight into EIL phenotypes. For one strain carrying a fusion to the cellulose-encoding wss operon, five different regulators were identified including a diguanylate cyclase, the flagella activator, FleQ, and alginate activator, AmrZ (AlgZ). Further rounds of suppressor analysis, possible by virtue of the SPyVET strategy, revealed an additional two regulators including the activator AlgR, and allowed the regulatory connections to be determined.

  3. Discovery of anabaenopeptin 679 from freshwater algal bloom material: Insights into the structure-activity relationship of anabaenopeptin protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Henrik; Kurita, Kenji L; Pan, Li; Wahome, Paul G; He, Haiyin; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Carter, Guy T; Linington, Roger G

    2016-10-15

    Cyanobacteria possess a unique capacity for the production of structurally novel secondary metabolites compared to the biosynthetic abilities of other environmental prokaryotes such as bacteria of the genus Streptomyces. Two different strategies to explore cyanobacteria-derived natural products have been explored previously: (1) cultivation of single cyanobacterial strains, in bioreactors for example; (2) bulk collections from the environment of so called 'algal blooms' that are dominated by cyanobacteria. In this study a new environmentally friendly collection technique for obtaining large quantities of algal bloom biomass was utilized. Algal biomass derived from eight million liters of lake water was concentrated using a novel continuous countercurrent filtration system. Analysis of this freshwater algal bloom from Grand Lake-Saint Marys, Ohio led to the discovery of anabaenopeptin 679 (1), as well as the known anabaenopeptins B, F, H and 908. Anabaenopeptin 679 is unusual in that it possesses the classical anabaenopeptin-like cyclic pentapeptide core, but lacks the typical sidechain attached to the constitutive ureido group. Screening of all anabaenopeptin derivatives in an enzymatic assay for inhibitory activity toward carboxypeptidase A identified anabaenopeptin 679 as a strong inhibitor of carboxypeptidase A with an IC50 value of 4.6μg/mL. This result defines a new minimal core structure for carboxypeptidase activity among the anabaenopeptin class, and provides further insight into the structure-activity relationship of anabaenopeptin-like carboxypeptidase A inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data show...... with a model in which HMW-GS are extended but not highly rigid. Application of a pattern recognition technique, based on principal component analysis (PCA), to the ROA spectra reinforces these conclusions....

  5. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Deeper Insight into the Diels-Alder Reaction through the Activation Strain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-12-06

    In this Focus Review, we present the application of the so-called Activation Strain Model of chemical reactivity to the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. To this end, representative recent examples have been selected to illustrate the power of this new computational approach to gain a deeper quantitative understanding of this fundamental process in chemistry. We cover a wide range of issues, such as, the "endo-rule", reactivity trends emerging from systematic variation in the reactants' strain, and cycloaddition reactions involving relevant species in material science, that is, fullerenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nanotubes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Active reward processing during human sleep: insights from sleep-related eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampros ePerogamvros

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present two carefully documented cases of patients with sleep-related eating disorder (SRED, a parasomnia which is characterized by involuntary compulsive eating during the night and whose pathophysiology is not known. Using video-polysomnography and psychometric examination, we found that both patients present elevated novelty seeking and increased reward sensitivity on reward-related questionnaires. In light of new evidence on the mesolimbic dopaminergic implication in compulsive eating disorders, our findings suggest a role of an active reward system during sleep in the manifestation of SRED.

  8. An insight on the neuropharmacological activity of Telescopium telescopium--a mollusc from the Sunderban mangrove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, S K; Kumar, K T Manisenthil; Roy, Amrita; Karmakar, S; Lahiri, Shawon; Palit, G; Vedasiromoni, J R; Sen, T

    2008-12-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the tissue extract of a marine snail Telescopium telescopium, collected from the coastal regions of West Bengal India. On extensive pharmacological screening, it was found that the biological extract of T. telescopium (TTE) produced significant central nervous system (CNS)-depressant activity as observed from the reduced spontaneous motility, potentiation of pentobarbitone induced sleeping time, hypothermia and respiratory depression with transient apnoea. The extract significantly decreased both residual curiosity and also muscle coordination. The fraction, obtained following saturation with 60-80% ammonium sulphate (80S), was also found to demonstrate predominant CNS-depressant activity. It was observed that both TTE and the 80S fraction significantly altered the brain noradrenaline and homovanillic acid levels without affecting the brain gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) concentration. Based on the present observations, it can be suggested that the CNS-depressant effects produced by TTE and 80S could be attributable to modified catecholamine metabolism in the brain.

  9. Insights on the phytochemical profile (cyclopeptides) and biological activities of Calotropis procera latex organic fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucá, Thiago Lustosa; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Viana de Matos, Mayara Patrícia; Marinho-Filho, José Delano Barreto; Moreira, Renato Azevedo; de Oliveira Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant whose pharmacological properties are associated with its latex. Here, the Calotropis procera latex fractions were investigated in an attempt to trace its phytochemical profile and measure its anti-inflammatory and toxicity activity. The crude latex was partitioned, yielding five fractions (49.4% hexane, 5.2% dichloromethane, 2.0% ethyl acetate, 2.1% n-butanol, and 41.1% aqueous). Phytochemical screening and spectroscopy analysis revealed that dichloromethane is the most chemically diverse fraction. Triterpenes were detected in both the hexane and dichloromethane fractions, while flavonoids were detected in the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions. These fractions were cytotoxic to cancer cell lines (LD50 0.05 to 3.9  μ g/mL) and lethal to brine shrimp (LD50 10.9 to 65.7  μ g/mL). Reduced neutrophil migration in rats was observed in carrageenan-induced peritonitis for the dichloromethane (67%), ethyl acetate (56%), and aqueous (72%) fractions. A positive reaction with tolidine and ninhydrin suggested that cyclopeptides are in the ethyl acetate fraction. It is therefore concluded that Calotropis procera latex dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions exhibit both in vitro and in vivo activities as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Cyclopeptide detection is especially interesting because previous attempts to investigate these low-molecular cyclic amino acid sequences in C. procera have failed.

  10. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  11. An Insight into the Anticancer Activities of Ru(II-Based Metallocompounds Using Docking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike organic molecules, reports on docking of metal complexes are very few; mainly due to the inadequacy of force fields in docking packages to appropriately characterize the metal atoms that consequentially hinder the rational design of metal-based drug complexes. In this study we have made used Molegro and Autodock to predict the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II complexes against twelve anticancer targets. We observed that introducing the quantum calculated atomic charges of the optimized geometries significantly improved the docking predictions of these anticancer metallocompounds. Despite several limitations in the docking of metal-based complexes, we obtained results that are highly correlated with the available experimental results. Most of our newly proposed metallocompounds are found theoretically to be better anticancer metallocompounds than all the experimentally proposed RAPTA complexes. An interesting features of a strong interactions of new modeled of metallocompounds against the two base edges of DNA strands suggest similar mechanisms of anticancer activities similar to that of cisplatin. There is possibility of covalent bonding between the metal center of the metallocompounds and the residues of the receptors DNA-1, DNA-2, HDAC7, HIS and RNR. However, the general results suggest the possibility of metals positioning the coordinated ligands in the right position for optimal receptor interactions and synergistic effects, rather than forming covalent bonds.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of TiO{sub 2}:Ag nanocrystalline heterostructures: Experimental and theoretical insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    André, Rafaela S. [UFSCar – Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Department of Chemistry, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Zamperini, Camila A. [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Química, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Mima, Ewerton G. [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Escola de Odontologia de Araraquara, Departamento de Materias Odontológicos e Próteses Dentárias, 14801-903 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Longo, Valéria M., E-mail: valeria.longo@liec.ufscar.br [USP – Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Modelagem e Simulação Molecular, P.O. Box 477, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Sertão Pernambucano, IFSetão-PE, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); Sambrano, Júlio R. [UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Modelagem e Simulação Molecular, P.O. Box 477, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); and others

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • Greener hydrothermal process to obtain nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} anatase with Ag nanoparticles. • Antifungal effect against planktonic cells of C. albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. • DFT calculations of anatase TiO{sub 2} and metallic Ag. • Mechanism for the formation of reactive species at surface. - Abstract: We report the synthesis and characterization of silver-decorated titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}:Ag) nanoparticles, as well as a discussion of their antimicrobial activity. This material was synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment and characterized by complementary techniques. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration of TiO{sub 2}:Ag nanoparticles against planktonic and biofilm-forming strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Candida species (spp.) and the total biofilm mass were determined. The basis of the biological activity of TiO{sub 2}:Ag was investigated by electronic analysis of the material using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. In the proposed mechanism of action, the impregnated semiconductor donates electrons to the forbidden band gaps in the metal, generating point defects, with partially located electrons and holes at the surface, initiating a radical process involving the solvent and biological target. Our results suggest that this TiO{sub 2}:Ag nanomaterial has potential for use in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  13. Insights on the Phytochemical Profile (Cyclopeptides and Biological Activities of Calotropis procera Latex Organic Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Lustosa Jucá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant whose pharmacological properties are associated with its latex. Here, the Calotropis procera latex fractions were investigated in an attempt to trace its phytochemical profile and measure its anti-inflammatory and toxicity activity. The crude latex was partitioned, yielding five fractions (49.4% hexane, 5.2% dichloromethane, 2.0% ethyl acetate, 2.1% n-butanol, and 41.1% aqueous. Phytochemical screening and spectroscopy analysis revealed that dichloromethane is the most chemically diverse fraction. Triterpenes were detected in both the hexane and dichloromethane fractions, while flavonoids were detected in the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions. These fractions were cytotoxic to cancer cell lines (LD50 0.05 to 3.9 μg/mL and lethal to brine shrimp (LD50 10.9 to 65.7 μg/mL. Reduced neutrophil migration in rats was observed in carrageenan-induced peritonitis for the dichloromethane (67%, ethyl acetate (56%, and aqueous (72% fractions. A positive reaction with tolidine and ninhydrin suggested that cyclopeptides are in the ethyl acetate fraction. It is therefore concluded that Calotropis procera latex dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions exhibit both in vitro and in vivo activities as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Cyclopeptide detection is especially interesting because previous attempts to investigate these low-molecular cyclic amino acid sequences in C. procera have failed.

  14. Some Insights to the Reuse of Dredged Marine Soils by Admixing with Activated Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Ming Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular dredging is necessary for the development of coastal regions and the maintenance of shipping channels. The dredging process dislodges sediments from the seabed, and the removed materials, termed dredged marine soils, are generally considered a geowaste for dumping. However, disposal of the dredged soils offshores can lead to severe and irreversible impact on the marine ecosystem, while disposal on land often incurs exorbitant costs with no guarantee of zero-contamination. It is therefore desirable to reuse the material, and one option is solidification with another industrial waste, that is, steel slag. This paper describes the exploratory work of admixing dredged marine soil with activated steel slag for improvement of the mechanical properties. An optimum activation concentration of NaOH was introduced to the soil-slag mixture for uniform blending. Specimens were prepared at different mix ratios then left to cure for up to 4 weeks. The unconfined compressive strength test was conducted to monitor the changes in strength at predetermined intervals. It was found that the strength does not necessarily increase with higher steel slag content, indicating an optimum slag content required for the maximum solidification effect to take place. Also, regardless of the slag content, longer curing time produces greater strength gain. In conclusion, steel slag addition to dredged sediments can effectively strengthen the originally weak soil structure by both the “cementation” and “filler” effects, though the combined effects were not distinguished in the present study.

  15. Insights on the Phytochemical Profile (Cyclopeptides) and Biological Activities of Calotropis procera Latex Organic Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucá, Thiago Lustosa; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Viana de Matos, Mayara Patrícia; Marinho-Filho, José Delano Barreto; Moreira, Renato Azevedo; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant whose pharmacological properties are associated with its latex. Here, the Calotropis procera latex fractions were investigated in an attempt to trace its phytochemical profile and measure its anti-inflammatory and toxicity activity. The crude latex was partitioned, yielding five fractions (49.4% hexane, 5.2% dichloromethane, 2.0% ethyl acetate, 2.1% n-butanol, and 41.1% aqueous). Phytochemical screening and spectroscopy analysis revealed that dichloromethane is the most chemically diverse fraction. Triterpenes were detected in both the hexane and dichloromethane fractions, while flavonoids were detected in the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions. These fractions were cytotoxic to cancer cell lines (LD50 0.05 to 3.9 μg/mL) and lethal to brine shrimp (LD50 10.9 to 65.7 μg/mL). Reduced neutrophil migration in rats was observed in carrageenan-induced peritonitis for the dichloromethane (67%), ethyl acetate (56%), and aqueous (72%) fractions. A positive reaction with tolidine and ninhydrin suggested that cyclopeptides are in the ethyl acetate fraction. It is therefore concluded that Calotropis procera latex dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions exhibit both in vitro and in vivo activities as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Cyclopeptide detection is especially interesting because previous attempts to investigate these low-molecular cyclic amino acid sequences in C. procera have failed. PMID:24348174

  16. Learning shapes spontaneous activity itinerating over memorized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-03-08

    Learning is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems so that an appropriate output pattern is generated for a given input. Often, such a memory is considered to be included in one of the attractors in neural dynamical systems, depending on the initial neural state specified by an input. Neither neural activities observed in the absence of inputs nor changes caused in the neural activity when an input is provided were studied extensively in the past. However, recent experimental studies have reported existence of structured spontaneous neural activity and its changes when an input is provided. With this background, we propose that memory recall occurs when the spontaneous neural activity changes to an appropriate output activity upon the application of an input, and this phenomenon is known as bifurcation in the dynamical systems theory. We introduce a reinforcement-learning-based layered neural network model with two synaptic time scales; in this network, I/O relations are successively memorized when the difference between the time scales is appropriate. After the learning process is complete, the neural dynamics are shaped so that it changes appropriately with each input. As the number of memorized patterns is increased, the generated spontaneous neural activity after learning shows itineration over the previously learned output patterns. This theoretical finding also shows remarkable agreement with recent experimental reports, where spontaneous neural activity in the visual cortex without stimuli itinerate over evoked patterns by previously applied signals. Our results suggest that itinerant spontaneous activity can be a natural outcome of successive learning of several patterns, and it facilitates bifurcation of the network when an input is provided.

  17. Learning shapes spontaneous activity itinerating over memorized states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Kurikawa

    Full Text Available Learning is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems so that an appropriate output pattern is generated for a given input. Often, such a memory is considered to be included in one of the attractors in neural dynamical systems, depending on the initial neural state specified by an input. Neither neural activities observed in the absence of inputs nor changes caused in the neural activity when an input is provided were studied extensively in the past. However, recent experimental studies have reported existence of structured spontaneous neural activity and its changes when an input is provided. With this background, we propose that memory recall occurs when the spontaneous neural activity changes to an appropriate output activity upon the application of an input, and this phenomenon is known as bifurcation in the dynamical systems theory. We introduce a reinforcement-learning-based layered neural network model with two synaptic time scales; in this network, I/O relations are successively memorized when the difference between the time scales is appropriate. After the learning process is complete, the neural dynamics are shaped so that it changes appropriately with each input. As the number of memorized patterns is increased, the generated spontaneous neural activity after learning shows itineration over the previously learned output patterns. This theoretical finding also shows remarkable agreement with recent experimental reports, where spontaneous neural activity in the visual cortex without stimuli itinerate over evoked patterns by previously applied signals. Our results suggest that itinerant spontaneous activity can be a natural outcome of successive learning of several patterns, and it facilitates bifurcation of the network when an input is provided.

  18. Altered resting-state activity in seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Elseoud, Ahmed; Nissilä, Juuso; Liettu, Anu; Remes, Jukka; Jokelainen, Jari; Takala, Timo; Aunio, Antti; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Koponen, Hannu; Zang, Yu-Feng; Tervonen, Osmo; Timonen, Markku; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    At present, our knowledge about seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is based mainly up on clinical symptoms, epidemiology, behavioral characteristics and light therapy. Recently developed measures of resting-state functional brain activity might provide neurobiological markers of brain disorders. Studying functional brain activity in SAD could enhance our understanding of its nature and possible treatment strategies. Functional network connectivity (measured using ICA-dual regression), and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) were measured in 45 antidepressant-free patients (39.78 ± 10.64, 30 ♀, 15 ♂) diagnosed with SAD and compared with age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls (HCs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. After correcting for Type 1 error at high model orders (inter-RSN correction), SAD patients showed significantly increased functional connectivity in 11 of the 47 identified RSNs. Increased functional connectivity involved RSNs such as visual, sensorimotor, and attentional networks. Moreover, our results revealed that SAD patients compared with HCs showed significant higher ALFF in the visual and right sensorimotor cortex. Abnormally altered functional activity detected in SAD supports previously reported attentional and psychomotor symptoms in patients suffering from SAD. Further studies, particularly under task conditions, are needed in order to specifically investigate cognitive deficits in SAD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Silicate species of water glass and insights for alkali-activated green cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helén Jansson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite that sodium silicate solutions of high pH are commonly used in industrial applications, most investigations are focused on low to medium values of pH. Therefore we have investigated such solutions in a broad modulus range and up to high pH values (∼14 by use of infrared (IR spectroscopy and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si-NMR. The results show that the modulus dependent pH value leads to more or less charged species, which affects the configurations of the silicate units. This in turn, influences the alkali-activation process of low CO2 footprint cements, i.e. materials based on industrial waste or by-products.

  20. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Shannon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras and occasions (20–120 survey days. Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p. For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common

  1. Insights on Glucocorticoid Receptor Activity Modulation through the Binding of Rigid Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presman, Diego M.; Alvarez, Lautaro D.; Levi, Valeria; Eduardo, Silvina; Digman, Michelle A.; Martí, Marcelo A.; Veleiro, Adriana S.; Burton, Gerardo; Pecci, Adali

    2010-01-01

    Background The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression in a ligand-dependent fashion. This modular protein is one of the major pharmacological targets due to its involvement in both cause and treatment of many human diseases. Intense efforts have been made to get information about the molecular basis of GR activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, the behavior of four GR-ligand complexes with different glucocorticoid and antiglucocorticoid properties were evaluated. The ability of GR-ligand complexes to oligomerize in vivo was analyzed by performing the novel Number and Brightness assay. Results showed that most of GR molecules form homodimers inside the nucleus upon ligand binding. Additionally, in vitro GR-DNA binding analyses suggest that ligand structure modulates GR-DNA interaction dynamics rather than the receptor's ability to bind DNA. On the other hand, by coimmunoprecipitation studies we evaluated the in vivo interaction between the transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2) coactivator and different GR-ligand complexes. No correlation was found between GR intranuclear distribution, cofactor recruitment and the homodimerization process. Finally, Molecular determinants that support the observed experimental GR LBD-ligand/TIF2 interaction were found by Molecular Dynamics simulation. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here sustain the idea that in vivo GR homodimerization inside the nucleus can be achieved in a DNA-independent fashion, without ruling out a dependent pathway as well. Moreover, since at least one GR-ligand complex is able to induce homodimer formation while preventing TIF2 coactivator interaction, results suggest that these two events might be independent from each other. Finally, 21-hydroxy-6,19-epoxyprogesterone arises as a selective glucocorticoid with potential pharmacological interest. Taking into account that GR homodimerization and cofactor recruitment are considered essential

  2. Climate impacts on human settlement and agricultural activities in northern Norway: new insights from biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'anjou, R. M.; Bradley, R. S.; Balascio, N. L.; Finkelstein, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Disentangling the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities on the environment is a major challenge in paleoenvironmental research. Here, we used fecal sterols and other biogeochemical compounds in lake sediments from northern Norway to identify both natural and anthropogenic signals of environmental change during the late Holocene. The area was first occupied by humans and their grazing animals at ~2,250±75 cal yr BP. The arrival of humans is indicated by an abrupt increase in coprostanol (and its epimer epicoprostanol) in the sediments, and an associated increase in 5β-stigmastanol (and 5β-epistigmastanol), which resulted from human and animal feces washing into the lake. Human settlement was accompanied by an abrupt increase in landscape fires (indicated by the rise in pyrolytic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and a decline in woodland (registered by a change in n-alkane chain lengths from leaf waxes), accelerating a process that began earlier in the Holocene. Human activity and associated landscape changes in the region over the last two millennia were mainly driven by summer temperatures, as indicated by independent tree-ring reconstructions, though there were periods when socio-economic factors played an equally important role. This is the first time that fecal sterols in lake sediments have been used to provide a record of human occupancy through time. This approach may be useful in many archeological studies, both to confirm the presence of humans and grazing animals, and to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural factors that have influenced the environment in the past.

  3. Insights on glucocorticoid receptor activity modulation through the binding of rigid steroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression in a ligand-dependent fashion. This modular protein is one of the major pharmacological targets due to its involvement in both cause and treatment of many human diseases. Intense efforts have been made to get information about the molecular basis of GR activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the behavior of four GR-ligand complexes with different glucocorticoid and antiglucocorticoid properties were evaluated. The ability of GR-ligand complexes to oligomerize in vivo was analyzed by performing the novel Number and Brightness assay. Results showed that most of GR molecules form homodimers inside the nucleus upon ligand binding. Additionally, in vitro GR-DNA binding analyses suggest that ligand structure modulates GR-DNA interaction dynamics rather than the receptor's ability to bind DNA. On the other hand, by coimmunoprecipitation studies we evaluated the in vivo interaction between the transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2 coactivator and different GR-ligand complexes. No correlation was found between GR intranuclear distribution, cofactor recruitment and the homodimerization process. Finally, Molecular determinants that support the observed experimental GR LBD-ligand/TIF2 interaction were found by Molecular Dynamics simulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented here sustain the idea that in vivo GR homodimerization inside the nucleus can be achieved in a DNA-independent fashion, without ruling out a dependent pathway as well. Moreover, since at least one GR-ligand complex is able to induce homodimer formation while preventing TIF2 coactivator interaction, results suggest that these two events might be independent from each other. Finally, 21-hydroxy-6,19-epoxyprogesterone arises as a selective glucocorticoid with potential pharmacological interest. Taking into account that GR homodimerization and cofactor recruitment are

  4. Molecular insights into cold active polygalacturonase enzyme for its potential application in food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L N; Pulicherla, K K

    2015-09-01

    Pectin is a complex structural heteropolysaccharide that require numerous pectinolytic enzymes for its complete degradation. Polygalacturonase from mesophilic or thermophilic origin are being widely used in fruit and vegetable processing in the recent decades to degrade pectic substances. Recently cold active pectinases are finding added advantages over meso and thermophilic counterparts, to use in industrial scale particularly in food processing industry. They facilitate in conservation of several properties of foods so that the end product retains its naturality and also generates economic benefits. In the present study, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, a well reported marine psychrophile is taken as a model organism for cold active polygalacturonase and is evaluated in comparision to the routinely used mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes by insicio approach. Polygalacturonase sequences from industrially important microbial sources were subjected to MEME and Pfam wherein motifs and domains involved in the conservation were analyzed. Dendrogram revealed sequence level similarity and motifs showed uniform distribution of conserved regions that are involved in important functions. It was also observed through clustalW analysis that the amount of arginine content of psychrophiles is less when compared with thermophiles. Finally, all the modeled enzyme structures were subjected to docking studies using Autodock 4.2 with the substrate polygalacturonic acid and binding energies were found to be -5.73, -6.22 and -7.27 KCals/mole for meso, thermo and psychrophiles respectively which indicates the efficiency of psychrophilic enzymes when compared with its counterparts giving scope for further experimentation to find their better usage in various food industry applications.

  5. Insights into the activity and specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Felicity L; Neres, João; Ramraj, Anitha; Raju, Rajesh K; Hillier, Ian H; Vincent, Mark A; Bryce, Richard A

    2013-05-28

    Trypanosoma cruzitrans-sialidase (TcTS), which catalyzes the transfer or hydrolysis of terminal sialic acid residues, is crucial to the development and proliferation of the T. cruzi parasite and thus has emerged as a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We here probe the origin of the observed preference for the transfer reaction over hydrolysis where the substrate for TcTS is the natural sialyl donor (represented in this work by sialyllactose). Thus, acceptor lactose preferentially attacks the sialyl-enyzme intermediate rather than water. We compare this with the weaker preference for such transfer shown by a synthetic donor substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl α-d-acetylneuraminide. For this reason, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations of TcTS following its sialylation by the substrate to examine the behavior of the asialyl leaving group by the protein. These simulations indicate that, where lactose is released, this leaving group samples well-defined interactions in the acceptor site, some of which are mediated by localized water molecules; also, the extent of the opening of the acceptor site to solvent is reduced as compared with those of unliganded forms of TcTS. However, where there is release of 4-methylumbelliferone, this leaving group explores a range of transient poses; surrounding active site water is also more disordered. The acceptor site explores more open conformations, similar to the case in which the 4-methylumbelliferone is absent. Thus, the predicted solvent accessibility of sialylated TcTS is increased when 4-methylumbelliferyl α-d-acetylneuraminide is the substrate compared to sialyllactose; this in turn is likely to contribute to a greater propensity for hydrolysis of the covalent intermediate. These computational simulations, which suggest that protein flexibility has a role in the transferase/sialidase activity of TcTS, have the potential to aid in the design of anti-Chagas inhibitors effective against this

  6. DIFFERENCE IN STATE OF NUTRITION BETWEEN ACTIVE AND NON ACTIVE WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Ivana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern sedentary women′s live, phisical inactivity, put off matrninity for later are the majority bad factors for women halty and working capacity . The main target of this work is to show difference in anthropometrical characteristics and state of nutrition women athlets and women non-athlets average ages of 30 to 35 years.They are working active but don′t have maternity activities. The results of this longitudinal investigation show that women who takes any activity are better than non active women. We find diference in circular dimension, sfin fold, % body fat and BMI.

  7. Structural insight into the recognition of complement C3 activation products by integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is the major effector of innate immunity. It is the body’s first defense against pathogens recognizing and tagging them for subsequent elimination. Complement is a germline-encoded system of more than 50 circulating and membrane-bound proteins that recognize molecular patterns...... associated with microbes and apoptotic or necrotic cells. Complement not only protects against pathogens but also maintains body homeostasis. Activation of complement leads to cleavage of the complement proteins C4, C3 and C5, and their fragments have effector functions through binding to pathogen surfaces...... and their clearance by dendritic cells is mediated by αMβ2. The central molecule in my project, αMβ2 integrin, recognizes many diverse ligands including iC3b, but the molecular basis for such recognition was lacking. During my PhD I have obtained a major breakthrough in the dissection of iC3b interaction with αMβ2. I...

  8. In vitro analysis of RQC activities provides insights into the mechanism and function of CAT tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Beatriz A; Howard, Conor J; KC, Subheksha; Frost, Adam; Weinberg, David E

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomes can stall during translation due to defects in the mRNA template or translation machinery, leading to the production of incomplete proteins. The Ribosome-associated Quality control Complex (RQC) engages stalled ribosomes and targets nascent polypeptides for proteasomal degradation. However, how each RQC component contributes to this process remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that key RQC activities—Ltn1p-dependent ubiquitination and Rqc2p-mediated Carboxy-terminal Alanine and Threonine (CAT) tail elongation—can be recapitulated in vitro with a yeast cell-free system. Using this approach, we determined that CAT tailing is mechanistically distinct from canonical translation, that Ltn1p-mediated ubiquitination depends on the poorly characterized RQC component Rqc1p, and that the process of CAT tailing enables robust ubiquitination of the nascent polypeptide. These findings establish a novel system to study the RQC and provide a framework for understanding how RQC factors coordinate their activities to facilitate clearance of incompletely synthesized proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27949.001 PMID:28718767

  9. New insights into the anti-obesity activity of xanthones from Garcinia mangostana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-Yu; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lin, Li-Gen

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. This condition, and its related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, have become major public health challenges. Fruits are important dietary components, and bioactive constituents from fruits are considered to be a promising source for developing effective and safe anti-obesity drugs. Garcinia mangostana Linn. (Clusiaceae) is a tropical evergreen tree, and its fruit, mangosteen, is called 'Queen of Fruit'. The pericarp of G. mangostana has been used for centuries in Southeast Asia as a medicinal agent for treatment of various diseases. Products derived from mangosteen are widely consumed to ameliorate metabolic dysfunction and resultant metabolic syndrome. However, the chemical principles and mechanisms underlying these effects are unclear. This review summarizes the recent chemical and pharmacological studies related to G. mangostana, including weight reduction, anti-adipogenesis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation activity. The aim of this review is to shed light on the role of G. mangostana and its constituents in preventing and treating obesity, which should encourage more interest in the development of relevant therapeutic methods.

  10. Further insights into the anti-aggregating activity of NMDA in human platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franconi, Flavia; Miceli, Mauro; Alberti, Luisa; Seghieri, Giuseppe; De Montis, M Graziella; Tagliamonte, Alessandro

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on thromboxane B2 synthesis and on [Ca2+]i was studied in human platelets.NMDA (10−7 M) completely inhibited the synthesis of thromboxane B2 from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA), while it did not interfere with the aggregating effect of the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U-46619.NMDA (0.1 μM–10 μM) dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium in washed platelets pre-loaded with fura 2 AM, and this effect was not additive with that of AA.NMDA shifted the dose-response curve of AA to the right. At the highest AA concentrations platelet aggregation was not inhibited.The antiaggregating effect of NMDA was not antagonized by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor.Finally, NMDA (0.01 nM–100 nM) associated with either aspirin or indomethacin significantly potentiated the antiaggregating activity of both cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors.It was concluded that NMDA is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation and thromboxane B2 synthesis in human platelet rich plasma (PRP). PMID:9630340

  11. Metabolomics insights into activated redox signaling and lipid metabolism dysfunction in chronic kidney disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD rats and CKD patients. Compared with control rats, AAN rats showed anemia, increased serum urea and creatinine, progressive renal interstitial fibrosis, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic proteins at weeks 8 and 12. However, no significant difference was found at week 4. Metabolomics identified 12-ketodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodesoxycholic acid, LPC(15:0 and docosahexaenoic acid as biomarkers for early detection of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. With prolonging aristolochic acid I exposure, LPE(20:2, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and LPC(17:0 were identified as biomarkers for progression from early to advanced AAN and lysoPE(22:5, indoxyl sulfate, uric acid and creatinine as biomarkers of advanced AAN. These biomarkers were reversed by treatment of irbesartan and ergone in AAN rats at week 24 and adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, these biomarkers were also reversed by irbesartan treatment in CKD patients.

  12. New insights into dietary supplements used in sport: active substances, pharmacological and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncic, Marijana Zovko; Tomczyk, Michal

    2013-08-01

    As a society we are increasingly concerned about our physical appearance. For example, as much as 24% of people in developed countries admittedly exercise to improve their performance. Professional sportsmen and amateurs alike are in a constant search for new means that will enable them better sport results in shorter time. Among those means, a prominent place belongs to dietary supplements. However, the producers often advertise products whose use in sports is neither scientifically founded nor safe. This brings on an irrational use of herbal supplements which sometimes leads to unwanted side effects, but is more often of little use. Thus, the aim of this review will be to systematically evaluate some of the herbal supplements that are used as adaptogenic and ergogenic aids in sport. The review will include available data on Rhodiola rosea, Withania somnifera, Schisandra chinensis, Tribulus terrestris, Vitis vinifera, Citrus aurantium, and others. Their effects, active ingredients as well as possible adverse effects will be discussed with special focus on clinical studies.

  13. Biogeochemical Activity of Siderophilic Cyanobacteria and Insights from their Genomes Implications for the Development of New Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Bryant, D. A.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Tringe, S. G.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Galindo, C., Jr.; Malley, K.; Sosa, O.; Garrison, D. H.; McKay, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Verifying the links between genomie features in living organisms and their mineralization/demineralization activity will help to reveal traces of life on Earth and beyond. Among contemporary environments, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may represent one of the most appropriate natural models for insights into ancient life since organisms may have originated on Earth and possibly Mars in association with hydrothennal activity and high [Fe(2+)]. Siderophilic or "iron-loving" cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting IDHS may have genomic features and properties similar to those of ancient organisms because abundant Fe(2+) in IDHS has a strong potential to increase the magnitude of oxidative stress. That is why specific and/or additional proteins involved in Fe mineralization by siderophilic CB are expected. Inorganic polyphosphates (PPi) are known to increase the viability of prokaryotes Linder heavy metal concentrations and UV stress conditions. PPi have also been proposed as biosignatures. Ancient CB could have also been stressed by occasional migrations from the Fe(2+) rich Ocean to the basaltic land which was almost devoid of dissolved Fe(2+). Thus, the study of the adaptation reactions of siderophilic CB to fluctuation of dissolved Fe level may shed light on the paleophysiology of ancient oxygenic prokaryotes. Moreover, bioweathered Fe, Al, P, Cu, Ti and rare earth elements can be thought of as candidate organomarkers that document the effects of or ganic molecules in weathered rocks. However, the molecular mechanisms of the maintenance of Fe homeostasis in siderophilic CB, the role of PPi for this process and bioweathering activities are poorly understood. Here we present preliminary results describing a new mechanism of Fe mineralization in siderophilic CB, the effect of Fe on the generation of PPi bodies in siderophilic CB, their bioweathering activity and preliminary analysis of the diversity of proteins involved in the prevention of oxidative stress in phototrophs

  14. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Siyu [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Kai [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: pzhang@nmemc.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (t{sub d,E}) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (t{sub ·OH,E}) in sunlit surface waters. The t{sub d,E} values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas t{sub ·OH,E} ranges from 3.24 h to 33.6 h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. - Highlights: • It is first reported on hydroxyl-radical oxidation of 6 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. • Methods were developed to assess photolysis and oxidation fate in surface waters. • The neutral form reacted faster with hydroxyl radical than protonated forms. • The main oxidation intermediates and transformation pathways were clarified. • The antibacterial activity changes depend on dominant photolysis pathways.

  15. Mechanical behaviour of the Krafla geothermal reservoir: Insight into an active magmatic hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggertsson, Guðjón H.; Lavallée, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie E.

    2017-04-01

    Krafla volcano, located in North-East Iceland, holds an active magmatic hydrothermal system. Since 1978, this system has been exploited for geothermal energy. Today it is exploited by Landsvirkjun National Power of Iceland and the system is generating 60 MWg from 18 wells, tapping into fluids at 200-300°C. In order to meet further demands of environmentally sustainable energy, Landsvirkjun aims to drill deeper and source fluids in the super-heated, super high-enthalpy system which resides deeper (at 400-600°C). In relation to this, the first well of the Icelandic Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) was drilled in Krafla in 2009. Drilling stopped at a depth of 2.1 km, when the drill string penetrated a rhyolitic magma body, which could not be bypassed despite attempts to side-track the well. This pioneering effort demonstrated that the area close to magma had great energy potential. Here we seek a constraint on the mechanical properties of reservoir rocks overlying the magmatic systems to gain knowledge on these systems to improve energy extraction. During two field surveys in 2015 and 2016, and through information gathered from drilling of geothermal wells, five main rock types were identified and sampled [and their porosities (i.e., storage capacities) where determined with a helium-pycnometer]: basalts (5-60% porosity), hyaloclastites (geothermal reservoir. Uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength tests have been carried out, as well as indirect tensile strength tests using the Brazilian disc method, to measure the rock strengths. The results show that the rock strength is inversely proportional to the porosity and strongly affected by the abundance of microcracks; some of the rocks are unusually weak considering their porosities, especially at low effective pressure as constrained at Krafla. The results also show that the porous lithologies may undergo significant compaction at relatively low loads (i.e., depth). Integration of the observed mechanical behaviour and

  16. Investigation of Pseudo-Active State in Z-Source Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaltz, Erik; Oprea, Octavian; Larsen, Lasse

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a new operating state of the Z-source inverter denoted the pseudo-active state. The pseudoactive state is a state that may boost the output voltage of the Zsource inverter to a level higher than expected. The influence of the pseudo-active state is investigated and an equation...

  17. GPi oscillatory activity differentiates tics from the resting state, voluntary movements, and the unmedicated parkinsonian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohi Jimenez-Shahed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS. Thalamic (Cm-Pf and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson’s disease (PD in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs within the STN in PD patients is pathologic. Methods: We recorded intraoperative local field potentials (LFPs from the postero-ventrolateral GPi in three adult patients with TS at rest, during voluntary movements, and during tic activity and compared them to the intraoperative GPi-LFP activity recorded from four unmedicated PD patients at rest. Results: In all PD patients, we noted excessive beta band activity (13-30Hz at rest which consistently modulated the amplitude of the co-existent HFOs observed between 200-400Hz, indicating the presence of beta-HFO CFC. In all 3 TS patients at rest, we observed theta band activity (4-7Hz and HFOs. Two patients had beta band activity, though at lower power than theta oscillations. Tic activity was associated with increased high frequency (200-400Hz and gamma band (35-200Hz activity. There was no beta-HFO CFC in TS patients at rest. However, CFC between the phase of 5-10Hz band activity and the amplitude of HFOs was found in two TS patients. During tics, this shifted to CFC between the phase of beta band activity and the amplitude of HFOs in all subjects. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study that shows that beta-HFO CFC exists in the GPi of TS patients during tics and at rest in PD patients, and suggests that this pattern might be specific to pathologic/involuntary movements. Furthermore, our findings suggest that during tics, resting

  18. What should be the roles of conscious States and brain States in theories of mental activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E

    2011-01-01

    Answers to the title's question have been influenced by a history in which an early science of consciousness was rejected by behaviourists on the argument that this entails commitment to ontological dualism and "free will" in the sense of indeterminism. This is, however, a confusion of theoretical assertions with metaphysical assertions. Nevertheless, a legacy within computational and information-processing views of mind rejects or de-emphasises a role for consciousness. This paper sketches a mentalistic metatheory in which conscious states are the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and thus have a central role in the explanation of mental activity and action-while specifying determinism and materialism as useful working assumptions. A mentalistic theory of causal learning, experimentally examined with phenomenal reports, is followed by examination of these questions: Are there common roles for phenomenal reports and brain imaging? Is there defensible evidence for unconscious brain states carrying symbolic representations? Are there interesting dissociations within consciousness?

  19. Designing anti-influenza aptamers: novel quantitative structure activity relationship approach gives insights into aptamer-virus interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Musafia

    Full Text Available This study describes the development of aptamers as a therapy against influenza virus infection. Aptamers are oligonucleotides (like ssDNA or RNA that are capable of binding to a variety of molecular targets with high affinity and specificity. We have studied the ssDNA aptamer BV02, which was designed to inhibit influenza infection by targeting the hemagglutinin viral protein, a protein that facilitates the first stage of the virus' infection. While testing other aptamers and during lead optimization, we realized that the dominant characteristics that determine the aptamer's binding to the influenza virus may not necessarily be sequence-specific, as with other known aptamers, but rather depend on general 2D structural motifs. We adopted QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship tool and developed computational algorithm that correlate six calculated structural and physicochemical properties to the aptamers' binding affinity to the virus. The QSAR study provided us with a predictive tool of the binding potential of an aptamer to the influenza virus. The correlation between the calculated and actual binding was R2 = 0.702 for the training set, and R2 = 0.66 for the independent test set. Moreover, in the test set the model's sensitivity was 89%, and the specificity was 87%, in selecting aptamers with enhanced viral binding. The most important properties that positively correlated with the aptamer's binding were the aptamer length, 2D-loops and repeating sequences of C nucleotides. Based on the structure-activity study, we have managed to produce aptamers having viral affinity that was more than 20 times higher than that of the original BV02 aptamer. Further testing of influenza infection in cell culture and animal models yielded aptamers with 10 to 15 times greater anti-viral activity than the BV02 aptamer. Our insights concerning the mechanism of action and the structural and physicochemical properties that govern the interaction

  20. Designing anti-influenza aptamers: novel quantitative structure activity relationship approach gives insights into aptamer-virus interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musafia, Boaz; Oren-Banaroya, Rony; Noiman, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of aptamers as a therapy against influenza virus infection. Aptamers are oligonucleotides (like ssDNA or RNA) that are capable of binding to a variety of molecular targets with high affinity and specificity. We have studied the ssDNA aptamer BV02, which was designed to inhibit influenza infection by targeting the hemagglutinin viral protein, a protein that facilitates the first stage of the virus' infection. While testing other aptamers and during lead optimization, we realized that the dominant characteristics that determine the aptamer's binding to the influenza virus may not necessarily be sequence-specific, as with other known aptamers, but rather depend on general 2D structural motifs. We adopted QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) tool and developed computational algorithm that correlate six calculated structural and physicochemical properties to the aptamers' binding affinity to the virus. The QSAR study provided us with a predictive tool of the binding potential of an aptamer to the influenza virus. The correlation between the calculated and actual binding was R2 = 0.702 for the training set, and R2 = 0.66 for the independent test set. Moreover, in the test set the model's sensitivity was 89%, and the specificity was 87%, in selecting aptamers with enhanced viral binding. The most important properties that positively correlated with the aptamer's binding were the aptamer length, 2D-loops and repeating sequences of C nucleotides. Based on the structure-activity study, we have managed to produce aptamers having viral affinity that was more than 20 times higher than that of the original BV02 aptamer. Further testing of influenza infection in cell culture and animal models yielded aptamers with 10 to 15 times greater anti-viral activity than the BV02 aptamer. Our insights concerning the mechanism of action and the structural and physicochemical properties that govern the interaction with the influenza

  1. Using activity triggered e-diaries to reveal the associations between physical activity and affective states in older adult's daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanning, Martina; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-09-17

    Evidence suggests that older adults show positive affects after participating in exercise bouts. However, it is less clear, if and how physical activities in daily living enhance affective states, too. This is dissatisfying, as most of older adults' physical activities are part of their daily living. To answer these questions we used activity-triggered e-diaries to investigate the within-subject effects of physical activity on three dimensions of affective states (valence, energetic arousal, calmness) during everyday life. Older adults (N = 74) between 50 and 70 years took part in the study during three consecutive days. Physical activity in daily living was objectively assessed using accelerometers. Affects were measured 10 min after a study participant surpassed a predefined threshold for activity or inactivity. The participants were prompted by an acoustic signal to assess their momentary affective states on an e-diary. Data were analyzed with hierarchical multilevel analyses. Whenever older individuals were more physically active, they felt more energized (energetic arousal) and agitated (calmness). However, they did not feel better (valence). Interestingly, body mass index (BMI) and valence were associated in a significant cross-level interaction. BMI acts as a moderating variable in the way that lower BMI scores were associated with higher levels of valence scores after being physically active. The innovative ambulatory assessment used here affords an interesting insight to the affective effects of daily activity of older adults. These effects are no simple and no linear ones, i.e. physical activity is not associated with positive affects per se as shown several times in experimental studies with single activity bouts. Rather there is a differentiating association seen as an enhanced feeling of energy and agitation, which is not accompanied by a better feeling. Socio-emotional selectivity theory may support the finding that older individuals are

  2. Shallow Lunar Seismic Activity and the Current Stress State of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Weber, Renee C.; Collins, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    A vast, global network of more than 3200 lobate thrust fault scarps has been revealed in high resolution Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images. The fault scarps are very young, less than 50 Ma, based on their small scale and crisp appearance, crosscutting relations with small-diameter impact craters, and rates of infilling of associated small, shallow graben and may be actively forming today. The population of young thrust fault scarps provides a window into the recent stress state of the Moon and offers insight into the origin of global lunar stresses. The distribution of orientations of the fault scarps is non-random, inconsistent with isotropic stresses from late-stage global contraction as the sole source of stress. Modeling shows that tidal stresses contribute significantly to the current stress state of the lunar crust. Tidal stresses (orbital recession and diurnal tides) superimposed on stresses from global contraction result in non-isotropic compressional stress and may produce thrust faults consistent with lobate scarp orientations. At any particular point on the lunar surface, peak compressive stress will be reached at a certain time in the diurnal cycle. Coseismic slip events on currently active thrust faults are expected to be triggered when peak stresses are reached. Analysis of the timing of the 28 the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo seismic network shows that 19 indeed occur when the Moon is closer to apogee, while only 9 shallow events occur when the Moon is closer to perigee. Here we report efforts to refine the model for the current stress state of the Moon by investigating the contribution of polar wander. Progress on relocating the epicentral locations of the shallow moonquakes using an algorithm designed for sparse networks is also reported.

  3. Structural Insights of the Cysteine Protease Heynein from Induction and Characterization of Non-native Intermediate States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are vital to cell physiology and many plants secrete these proteases for defense purposes. Many recent studies have reported unusually high stabilities for several plant cysteine proteases which possibly enable these proteases to function under adverse environmental conditions. Here, we have examined the conformational features of a new plant cysteine protease heynein using spectroscopic tools to understand the basis for its robust functional stability. The studies revealed structural integrity over a wide range of pH (2.5-12.0, temperature (65 oC and urea (8M. However, at pH 2.0, the protein gets acid-unfolded (UA -state with exposed hydrophobic patches, which upon addition of more protons (pH 0.5 or anions (0.5 M KCl and 0.2 M Na2 SO4 yields conformationally distinct refolded intermediates respectively termed: A-, I 1 - and I 2 -states. Strikingly, a high methanol level drives the UA -state into a predominantly -sheet rich conformation (O-state. We observed three-state unfolding kinetics of the I 2 -state by urea, possibly suggesting presence of two domains in the heynein molecule.

  4. Insights on the role of accurate state estimation in coupled model parameter estimation by a conceptual climate model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Lin, Xiaopei; Li, Mingkui

    2017-03-01

    The uncertainties in values of coupled model parameters are an important source of model bias that causes model climate drift. The values can be calibrated by a parameter estimation procedure that projects observational information onto model parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio of error covariance between the model state and the parameter being estimated directly determines whether the parameter estimation succeeds or not. With a conceptual climate model that couples the stochastic atmosphere and slow-varying ocean, this study examines the sensitivity of state-parameter covariance on the accuracy of estimated model states in different model components of a coupled system. Due to the interaction of multiple timescales, the fast-varying atmosphere with a chaotic nature is the major source of the inaccuracy of estimated state-parameter covariance. Thus, enhancing the estimation accuracy of atmospheric states is very important for the success of coupled model parameter estimation, especially for the parameters in the air-sea interaction processes. The impact of chaotic-to-periodic ratio in state variability on parameter estimation is also discussed. This simple model study provides a guideline when real observations are used to optimize model parameters in a coupled general circulation model for improving climate analysis and predictions.

  5. Resting-state EEG theta activity and risk learning: sensitivity to reward or punishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massar, Stijn A A; Kenemans, J Leon; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-03-01

    Increased theta (4-7 Hz)-beta (13-30 Hz) power ratio in resting state electroencephalography (EEG) has been associated with risky disadvantageous decision making and with impaired reinforcement learning. However, the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making remain unclear. The first aim of the present study was to replicate the earlier found relationship and examine the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making using the Iowa Gambling Task. The second aim of the study was to examine whether the relation were associated with differences in reward or punishment sensitivity. We replicated the earlier found relationship by showing a positive association between theta/beta ratio and risky decision making. This correlation was mainly driven by theta oscillations. Furthermore, theta power correlated with reward motivated learning, but not with punishment learning. The present results replicate and extend earlier findings by providing novel insights into the relation between thetabeta ratios and risky decision making. Specifically, findings show that resting-state theta activity is correlated with reinforcement learning, and that this association may be explained by differences in reward sensitivity. © 2013.

  6. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  7. Histopathological and molecular insights into the ovicidal activities of two entomopathogenic fungi against two-spotted spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Wei-Bing; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2014-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi can infect and kill spider mite eggs but their ovicidal activities are poorly understood. Here we gain histopathogenical and molecular insights into the ovicidal activities of Beauveria bassiana and Isaria fumosorosea against the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae. Scanning electronic microscopy indicated successful adhesion and germination of fungal conidia on egg shell at 24h post-spray (HPS). Germ tubes of both fungi could penetrate into egg shell with penetration pegs at 48 HPS. Interestingly, the germ tubes of B. bassiana may elongate on egg surface to locate appropriate sites for penetration, acting as 'searching' hyphae. Aside from the normal penetration, the germ tubes of I. fumosorosea can be completely or partially embedded into egg shell for a distance of extension, forming shell humps. Light microscopy of ultrathin sections of infected eggs showed shrunken (affected) or disrupted embryos at 48-96 HPS despite little effect on egg cleavage at 24 HPS. However, distinguishable hyphal cells were hardly found inside the embryos lacking oxygen although fungal outgrowths were abundant on unhatched (killed) eggs. In PCR with specific probes, the 18S rDNA signals of B. bassiana (412 bp) and I. fumosorosea (454 bp) in the DNA extracts from surface-cleaned mite eggs increased at 0-96 HPS, confirming fungal colonization in the infected eggs. We consider that the colonization on shell surface and underside could rely upon extending hyphae for uptake of egg nutrition, resulting in embryo disruption. Our observations add knowledge to microbial control of spider mites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological state of life in the buried biosphere: insights from amino acid racemization modeling and superresolution microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    gener- ation times of ultra-slow microbial life from millennial toward decadal time scales. The obtained data will therefore influence our view of microbial activities on global element cycling over geologic time scales. Controlling factors of the microbial community size and its activity seemed...

  9. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2014-11-17

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  10. Communicating Climate Change in the Agricultural Sector: Insights from Surveys and Interviews with Agricultural Advisors in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopy, L. S.; Carlton, S.; Dunn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding U.S. agricultural stakeholder views about the existence of climate change and what influences these views is central to developing communication in support of adaptation and mitigation. It has been postulated in the literature that extreme weather events can shape people's climate change beliefs and adaptation attitudes. In this presentation, we use data from pre- and post-extreme event surveys and interviews to examine the effects of the 2012 Midwestern US drought on agricultural advisors' climate change beliefs, adaptation attitudes, and risk perceptions. We found that neither climate change beliefs nor attitudes toward adaptation changed significantly as a result of the drought. Risk perceptions did change, however, with advisors becoming more concerned about risks from drought and pests and less concerned about risks related to flooding and ponding. Qualitative interviews revealed that while advisors readily accept the occurrence of extreme weather as a risk, the irregularity and unpredictability of extreme events for specific localities limits day-to-day consideration in respect to prescribed management advice. Instead, advisors' attention is directed towards planning for short-term changes encompassing weather, pests, and the market, as well as planning for long-term trends related to water availability. These findings provide important insights for communicating climate change in this critical sector while illustrating the importance of social science research in planning and executing communication campaigns.

  11. 34 CFR 403.70 - How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities? 403.70 Section 403.70 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION...

  12. Local people's knowledge with regard to land use activities in southwest Madagascar - Conceptual insights for sustainable land management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz-Vietta, Nadine V M; Tahirindraza, H Stone; Stoll-Kleemann, Susanne

    2017-09-01

    Environmental conditions in the Mahafaly Plateau region in southwest Madagascar are harsh, with a long dry season and a short rainy season. The local people's land use capabilities and skills are adapted to these conditions. Nevertheless, they are currently confronted by drastic climatic changes, including longer dry seasons, which have resulted in food and water scarcities. It is therefore essential to ensure sustainable land management in the region. At present, the main land use activities are agriculture, livestock farming, natural resource collection including timber and non-timber forest products, and the practice of local customs. Land use activities have always resulted in land conversion, yet over time this ecological transformation also leads to the accumulation of knowledge. The aim of the present article is therefore twofold. First, it aims to examine local people's knowledge with regard to land use activities and the transmission of this knowledge from one generation to the next; second, it considers the extent to which local people's knowledge may contribute to the development of sustainable land management. Our research is based on more than 80 qualitative interviews with local inhabitants of the Mahafaly Plateau region. Our analysis of local people's knowledge identifies four categories: ecological knowledge, knowledge related to natural resource usage, knowledge of names, and the interconnection between knowledge and belief. Furthermore, these knowledge categories provide conceptual insights for sustainable land management. Along with the long-term persistence of natural resources and their functions and the satisfaction of basic needs through resource usage, both the recognition of mental images as a regulating mechanism and the maintenance of the relation between the natural and the supernatural world have a role to play in sustainable land management in the study area. Local knowledge transmission processes serve to foster ongoing learning and

  13. Instruments of State Regulation of Innovative Activity in the Russian Federation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rustem A Shichiyakh; Svetlana V Tolkacheva; Sergei V Shkiotov; Elena U Karakaeva; Maryam I Borlakova; Andrey A Zyablov

    2016-01-01

      Innovative policy of the state - it is the socio-economic policy. It reflects the investment activity in the state, which reflects the direction, goals, forms of state authority in the field of science and technology...

  14. Roles of State and Trait Anxiety in Physical Activity Participation for Adults with Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fen Ma

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: State anxiety demonstrated greater power than trait anxiety in its relationship with physical activity. These findings suggest that clinical mental health professionals should consider state anxiety when encouraging Taiwanese adults with anxiety disorders to engage in physical activity.

  15. New insights into mutable collagenous tissue: correlations between the microstructure and mechanical state of a sea-urchin ligament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The mutable collagenous tissue (MCT of echinoderms has the ability to undergo rapid and reversible changes in passive mechanical properties that are initiated and modulated by the nervous system. Since the mechanism of MCT mutability is poorly understood, the aim of this work was to provide a detailed morphological analysis of a typical mutable collagenous structure in its different mechanical states. The model studied was the compass depressor ligament (CDL of a sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus, which was characterized in different functional states mimicking MCT mutability. Transmission electron microscopy, histochemistry, cryo-scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, and field emission gun-environmental scanning electron microscopy were used to visualize CDLs at the micro- and nano-scales. This investigation has revealed previously unreported differences in both extracellular and cellular constituents, expanding the current knowledge of the relationship between the organization of the CDL and its mechanical state. Scanning electron microscopies in particular provided a three-dimensional overview of CDL architecture at the micro- and nano-scales, and clarified the micro-organization of the ECM components that are involved in mutability. Further evidence that the juxtaligamental cells are the effectors of these changes in mechanical properties was provided by a correlation between their cytology and the tensile state of the CDLs.

  16. Metabolomic profiling in Selaginella lepidophylla at various hydration states provides new insights into the mechanistic basis of desiccation tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selaginella lepidophylla is one of only a few species of spike mosses (Selaginellaceae) that have evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) or the ability to ‘resurrect’ from an air-dried state. In order to understand the metabolic basis of DT, S. lepidophylla was subjected to a five-stage, rehydration/de...

  17. Photoisomers of Azobenzene Star with a Flat Core: Theoretical Insights into Multiple States from DFT and MD Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Markus; Saphiannikova, Marina; Santer, Svetlana; Guskova, Olga

    2017-09-21

    This study focuses on comparing physical properties of photoisomers of an azobenzene star with benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide core. Three azobenzene arms of the molecule undergo a reversible trans-cis isomerization upon UV-vis light illumination giving rise to multiple states from the planar all-trans one, via two mixed states to the kinked all-cis isomer. Employing density functional theory, we characterize the structural and photophysical properties of each state indicating a role the planar core plays in the coupling between azobenzene chromophores. To characterize the light-triggered switching of solvophilicity/solvophobicity of the star, the difference in solvation free energy is calculated for the transfer of an azobenzene star from its gas phase to implicit or explicit solvents. For the latter case, classical all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions of azobenzene star are performed employing the polymer consistent force field to shed light on the thermodynamics of explicit hydration as a function of the isomerization state and on the structuring of water around the star. From the analysis of two contributions to the free energy of hydration, the nonpolar van der Waals and the electrostatic terms, it is concluded that isomerization specificity largely determines the polarity of the molecule and the solute-solvent electrostatic interactions. This convertible hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity together with readjustable occupied volume and the surface area accessible to water, affects the self-assembly/disassembly of the azobenzene star with a flat core triggered by light.

  18. Geographical, socioeconomic, and ecological determinants of exotic plant naturalization in the United States: insights and updates from improved data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Marcel Rejmanek; Jun Wen

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on alien species establishment in the United States and around the world have drastically improved our understanding of the patterns of species naturalization, biological invasions, and underlying mechanisms. Meanwhile, relevant new data have been added and the data quality has significantly increased along with the consistency of related concepts and...

  19. Functional imaging reveals movement preparatory activity in the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan A Bekinschtein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vegetative State (VS is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Given that movement preparation in response to a motor command is a sign of purposeful behavior, our results are consistent with residual conscious awareness in these patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness.

  20. Near-IR MCD of the nonheme ferrous active site in naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase: correlation to crystallography and structural insight into the mechanism of Rieske dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Chakrabarty, Sarmistha; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2008-02-06

    Near-IR MCD and variable temperature, variable field (VTVH) MCD have been applied to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (NDO) to describe the coordination geometry and electronic structure of the mononuclear nonheme ferrous catalytic site in the resting and substrate-bound forms with the Rieske 2Fe2S cluster oxidized and reduced. The structural results are correlated with the crystallographic studies of NDO and other related Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases to develop molecular level insights into the structure/function correlation for this class of enzymes. The MCD data for resting NDO with the Rieske center oxidized indicate the presence of a six-coordinate high-spin ferrous site with a weak axial ligand which becomes more tightly coordinated when the Rieske center is reduced. Binding of naphthalene to resting NDO (Rieske oxidized and reduced) converts the six-coordinate sites into five-coordinate (5c) sites with elimination of a water ligand. In the Rieske oxidized form the 5c sites are square pyramidal but transform to a 1:2 mixture of trigonal bipyramial/square pyramidal sites when the Rieske center is reduced. Thus the geometric and electronic structure of the catalytic site in the presence of substrate can be significantly affected by the redox state of the Rieske center. The catalytic ferrous site is primed for the O2 reaction when substrate is bound in the active site in the presence of the reduced Rieske site. These structural changes ensure that two electrons and the substrate are present before the binding and activation of O2, which avoids the uncontrolled formation and release of reactive oxygen species.

  1. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Water Data Coordination, U.S. Geological Survey, and published in the "Catalog of Information on Water Data, Index to Water Quality Section, Edition 1970." This is one of four indexes, each of which is a separate section of the Catalog. Three of the indexes, "Index to Water-Quality Section," "Index to Surface-Water Section," and "Index to Ground-.Water Stations," contain information on data acquired on a recurrent basis at specific locations for a period of 3 years or more. The fourth section, "Index to Areal Investigations and Miscellaneous Activities," is concerned with specific projects or shorter-term data activities that involve field or laboratory measurements or observations not included in any other section of the Catalog. The Catalog is a record of activities throughout the country (and in some places along the international border between the United States and Canada) conducted by Federal and non-Federal agencies engaged in the acquisition of water data and who furnish such information for presentation in the Catalog. The Catalog itself is an outgrowth of an assignment to the Department of the Interior and in turn to the Geological Survey, by the Office of Management and Budget, through the medium of OMB Circular A-67. This Circular states in part that one of the assigned responsibilities will be maintenance of a "central catalog of information on...water data and on Federal activities being planned or conducted to acquire such data." As an extension of this activity, non-Federal agencies are solicited to participate in the program. In this report, information is presented by means of tables and illustrations preceded by brief explanations. It includes the agencies collecting the data, the number of stations located on surface and ground waters where temperature measurements are made, the distribution of stations by States and by the 21 regions of the Water Resources Council (WRC) (a Federal agency created in accordance with the Water Resources Planning Act of

  2. A rate-state model for aftershocks triggered by dislocation on a rectangular fault: a review and new insights

    OpenAIRE

    F. Catalli; Console, R.

    2006-01-01

    We compute the static displacement, stress, strain and the Coulomb failure stress produced in an elastic medium by a finite size rectangular fault after its dislocation with uniform stress drop but a non uniform dislocation on the source. The time-dependent rate of triggered earthquakes is estimated by a rate-state model applied to a uniformly distributed population of faults whose equilibrium is perturbated by a stress change caused only by the first dislocation. The rate of triggered events...

  3. A rate-state model for aftershocks triggered by dislocation on a rectangular fault: a review and new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Console, R.; F. Catalli

    2007-01-01

    We compute the static displacement, stress, strain and the Coulomb failure stress produced in an elastic medium by a finite size rectangular fault after its dislocation with uniform stress drop but a non uniform dislocation on the source. The time-dependent rate of triggered earthquakes is estimated by a rate-state model applied to a uniformly distributed population of faults whose equilibrium is perturbated by a stress change caused only by the first dislocation. The rate of t...

  4. Insight on the energy in the United States; Apercus sur l'energie aux Etats-Unis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamet, Ph

    2006-11-15

    This document recapitulates the main characteristics and the key data of the energy in the United States (fossil energies, renewable energies, electric power production). The main american strategies are then described as the actions at the international scale during the last five years. The main data of the research programs in the energy domain are presented and the possible consequences of the government change at the Congress are analyzed. (A.L.B.)

  5. Capturing state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-receptors: a microscopic look into the structural and functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payghan, Pavan V; Bera, Indrani; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-08-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid type A receptors (GABAA-Rs) are the key players in the mammalian brain that meditate fast inhibitory neurotransmission events. The structural integrity of these ligand-gated ion channel controls chloride ion permeability, which in turn monitors important pharmacological functions. Despite ample studies on GABAA-Rs, there was a need for a study on full-length receptor structures, devoted to track structure-function correlations based on their dynamic behavior consideration. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations accompanied by other biophysical methods to shed light on sequential and unaddressed questions like How GABAA-R structure facilitates the entry of GABA molecules at its two orthosteric binding sites? After entry, what structural features and changes monitor site-wise GABA binding differences? In the same context, what are the roles and responsibilities of loops such as C and F? On physiologically relevant time scales, how open to close state transition occurs? How salt bridges such as E155-R207 and E153-R207 maintain state-dependent C-loop structures? In an attempt, our simulation study unravels the complete course of GABA binding-unbinding pathway. This provides us with the relevant understanding of state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-Rs.

  6. New Insight Into Metformin Action: Regulation of ChREBP and FOXO1 Activities in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Kover, Karen L; Heruth, Daniel P; Watkins, Dara J; Moore, Wayne V; Jackson, Kathyrin; Zang, Mengwei; Clements, Mark A; Yan, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Metformin has been considered a potential adjunctive therapy in treating poorly controlled type 1 diabetes with obesity and insulin resistance, owing to its potent effects on improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanism of metformin's vascular protective effects remains obscure. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), a key regulator of cellular redox state induced by high-glucose concentration, decreases thioredoxin reductase activity and mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Here we report that high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction is associated with induction of TXNIP expression in primary human aortic endothelial cells exposed to high-glucose conditions, whereas the metformin treatment suppresses high-glucose-induced TXNIP expression at mRNA and protein levels. We further show that metformin decreases the high-glucose-stimulated nuclear entry rate of two transcription factors, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), as well as their recruitment on the TXNIP promoter. An AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor partially compromised these metformin effects. Our data suggest that endothelial dysfunction resulting from high-glucose concentrations is associated with TXNIP expression. Metformin down-regulates high-glucose-induced TXNIP transcription by inactivating ChREBP and FOXO1 in endothelial cells, partially through AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

  7. What Should Be the Roles of Conscious States and Brain States in Theories of Mental Activity?**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E.

    2011-01-01

    Answers to the title’s question have been influenced by a history in which an early science of consciousness was rejected by behaviourists on the argument that this entails commitment to ontological dualism and “free will” in the sense of indeterminism. This is, however, a confusion of theoretical assertions with metaphysical assertions. Nevertheless, a legacy within computational and information-processing views of mind rejects or de-emphasises a role for consciousness. This paper sketches a mentalistic metatheory in which conscious states are the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and thus have a central role in the explanation of mental activity and action-while specifying determinism and materialism as useful working assumptions. A mentalistic theory of causal learning, experimentally examined with phenomenal reports, is followed by examination of these questions: Are there common roles for phenomenal reports and brain imaging? Is there defensible evidence for unconscious brain states carrying symbolic representations? Are there interesting dissociations within consciousness? PMID:21694964

  8. Dynamic Raman Line Shapes on an Evolving Excited-State Landscape: Insights from Tunable Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Weimin; Zhu, Liangdong; Fang, Chong

    2017-07-27

    Tracking molecular motions in real time remains a formidable challenge in science and engineering fields because the experimental methodology requires simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Building on early successes and future potential of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) as a structural dynamics technique, we present a comprehensive study of stimulated Raman line shapes of a photosensitive molecule in solution with tunable Raman pump and probe pulses. Following femtosecond 400 nm electronic excitation, the model photoacid pyranine exhibits dynamic and mode-dependent Raman line shapes when the Raman pump is tuned from the red side toward and across the excited-state absorption (ESA) band (e.g., from S1) with varying resonance conditions. On the anti-Stokes FSRS side, low-frequency modes below ∼1000 cm-1 exhibit a line shape change from gain to dispersive to loss, whereas the dispersive intermediate is much less notable for high-frequency modes. The characteristic mode frequency blue shift involving vibrationally hot states in S1 with time constants of ∼9.6 and 58.6 ps reveals the sensitivity of anti-Stokes FSRS to vibrational cooling and solvation. This work lays the foundation for expanding tunable FSRS technology on both the Stokes and anti-Stokes sides to investigate a variety of photoinduced processes in solution with sufficient resolution to expose functional motions and increased sensitivity to monitor vibrational cooling.

  9. Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Austin, Krista G; McGraw, Susan M; Leahy, Guy D; Lieberman, Harris R

    2017-07-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicated that 89% of Americans regularly consumed caffeinated products, but these data did not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine consumption prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with caffeine intake in active duty United States (US) Air Force personnel. Service members (N = 1787) stationed in the US and overseas completed a detailed questionnaire describing their intake of caffeine-containing products in addition to their demographic, lifestyle, and military characteristics. Overall, 84% reported consuming caffeinated products ≥1 time/week with caffeine consumers ingesting a mean ± standard error of 212 ± 9 mg/day (224 ± 11 mg/day for men, 180 ± 12 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated products (% users) were sodas (56%), coffee (45%), teas (36%), and energy drinks (27%). Multivariate logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine consumption (≥1 time/week) included older age, ethnicity other than black, tobacco use, less aerobic training, and less sleep; energy drink use was associated with male gender, younger age, tobacco use, and less sleep. Compared to NHANES data, the prevalence of caffeine consumption in Air Force personnel was similar but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Aeroelastic code development activities in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Designing wind turbines to be fatigue resistant and to have long lifetimes at minimal cost is a major goal of the federal wind program and the wind industry in the United States. To achieve this goal, we must be able to predict critical loads for a wide variety of different wind turbines operating under extreme conditions. The codes used for wind turbine dynamic analysis must be able to analyze a wide range of different wind turbine configurations as well as rapidly predict the loads due to turbulent wind inflow with a minimal set of degrees of freedom. Code development activities in the US have taken a two-pronged approach in order to satisfy both of these criteria: (1) development of a multi-purpose code which can be used to analyze a wide variety of wind turbine configurations without having to develop new equations of motion with each configuration change, and (2) development of specialized codes with minimal sets of specific degrees of freedom for analysis of two- and three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines and calculation of machine loads due to turbulent inflow. In the first method we have adapted a commercial multi-body dynamics simulation package for wind turbine analysis. In the second approach we are developing specialized codes with limited degrees of freedom, usually specified in the modal domain. This paper will summarize progress to date in the development, validation, and application of these codes. (au) 13 refs.

  11. [Rest and activity states in the Commerson's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus commersonii)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, O V; Liamin, O I; Manger, P R; Siegel, J M; Mukhametov, L M

    2009-01-01

    The unihemispheric slow-wave sleep, the ability to sleep during swimming with one open eye and the absence of paradoxical sleep in the form of it is observed in all terrestrial mammals are unique features of sleep in cetaceans. Visual observations supplement electrophysiological studies and allow obtaining novel data about sleep of cetaceans. In the present study we examined behavior of 3 adult Commerson's dolphins Cephalorhynchus commersonii which were housed in the oceanarium Sea-World (San Diego, USA). The behavior of the dolphins can be subdivided into 5 swimming types: 1) active swimming marked by variable speed and irregular trajectory of movement (on average for 3 dolphins 35.1 +/- 2.7% of the 24-h period) was scored as active wakefulness; 2) circular swimming was divided into slow and fast swimming and occupied, on average, 44.4 +/- 3.8 and 9.7 +/- 0.8% of the 24-h period, respectively; while in circular swimming, dolphins swam from 1 to 6 circles on one respiration pause; 3) quiet chaotic swimming (3.9 +/- 1.2%) that occurred at the bottom and was not accompanied by signs of activity; 4) floating, and 5) slow swimming at the surface (4.1 +/- 0.5 and 2.8 +/- 0.4%), respectively; the latter two swimming types were accompanied by frequent respiration (hyperventilation). We suggest that sleep in Commerson's dolphins occurred predominantly during the circular and quiet swimming. From time to time the dolphins slowed down their speeds and even stopped for several seconds. Such episodes appeared to be the deepest sleep episodes. In all dolphins muscle jerks as well erections in the male were observed. Jerks and erections occurred during the circular and quiet chaotic swimming. Similar to other studied small cetaceans, Commerson's dolphins are in a state of almost uninterrupted swimming during 24 h per day and they sleep during swimming. Some muscle jerks that we observed in the dolphins in this study might have been episodes of paradoxical sleep.

  12. Improving Supply Chain Performance Through Organizational Design: Insights from key suppliers to the United States Air Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Ketchen, Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creating organizational designs that maximize performance is a key goal for many executives. We sought to uncover ways that a giant organization – the United States Department of Defense (DoD – could improve its performance via organazational design changes. Based on input from 80 executives who collectively represent over 60 defense contractors, we found that the DoD could become more efficient and effective by (1 relying on relational contracting within its supply chains, (2 designing better reward systems, (3 focusing on results rather than processes when managing its suppliers, (4 moving its supply chains toward a best value approach, and (5 investing strategically in its workforce. In drawing implications from our findings for organizations in general, we highlight companies that have reaped rewards from making these five moves in the past.

  13. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  15. Altered local spontaneous activity in frontal lobe epilepsy: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Li, Hechun; He, Zhongqiong; Jiang, Sisi; Klugah-Brown, Benjamin; Chen, Lin; Wang, Pu; Tan, Song; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the local spatiotemporal consistency of spontaneous brain activity in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Eyes closed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected from 19 FLE patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. A novel measure, named FOur-dimensional (spatiotemporal) Consistency of local neural Activities (FOCA) was used to assess the spatiotemporal consistency of local spontaneous activity (emphasizing both local temporal homogeneity and regional stability of brain activity states). Then, two-sample t test was performed to detect the FOCA differences between two groups. Partial correlations between the FOCA values and durations of epilepsy were further analyzed. Compared with controls, FLE patients demonstrated increased FOCA in distant brain regions including the frontal and parietal cortices, as well as the basal ganglia. The decreased FOCA was located in the temporal cortex, posterior default model regions, and cerebellum. In addition, the FOCA measure was linked to the duration of epilepsy in basal ganglia. Our study suggested that alterations of local spontaneous activity in frontoparietal cortex and basal ganglia was associated with the pathophysiology of FLE; and the abnormality in frontal and default model regions might account for the potential cognitive impairment in FLE. We also presumed that the FOCA measure had potential to provide important insights into understanding epilepsy such as FLE.

  16. The economic efficiency and equity of government policies on brucellosis: comparative insights from Albania and the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, D; Bruce, M

    2017-04-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic bacterial disease that causes recurring febrile illness in humans, as well as reproductive failure and reduced milk production in livestock. The cost of brucellosis is equal to the sum of lost productivity of humans and animals, as well as private and public expenditures on brucellosis surveillance, prevention, control and treatment. In Albania, Brucella abortus and B. melitensis affect humans, cattle and small ruminants. In the United States, B. abortus affects cattle and wild ungulates in the Greater Yellowstone Area. These two case studies illustrate the importance of place-specific context in developing sustainable and effective brucellosis mitigation policies. Government regulations and mitigation strategies should be designed with consideration of all costs and benefits, both to public agencies and private stakeholders. Policy-makers should, for example, weigh the benefits of a regulation that increases epidemiological certainty against the costs of compliance for producers and households. The distribution of costs and benefits amongst public agencies and private individuals can have important implications for a policy's economic efficiency and equity quite apart from their total magnitude.

  17. Membrane Mediated Antimicrobial and Antitumor Activity of Cathelicidin 6: Structural Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Multi-Microsecond Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-01-01

    The cathelicidin derived bovine antimicrobial peptide BMAP27 exhibits an effective microbicidal activity and moderate cytotoxicity towards erythrocytes. Irrespective of its therapeutic and multidimensional potentiality, the structural studies are still elusive. Moreover, the mechanism of BMAP27 mediated pore formation in heterogeneous lipid membrane systems is poorly explored. Here, we studied the effect of BMAP27 in model cell-membrane systems such as zwitterionic, anionic, thymocytes-like (TLM) and leukemia-like membranes (LLM) by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation longer than 100 μs. All-atom MD studies revealed a stable helical conformation in the presence of anionic lipids, however, significant loss of helicity was identified in TLM and zwitterionic systems. A peptide tilt (~45˚) and central kink (at residue F10) was found in anionic and LLM models, respectively, with an average membrane penetration of < 0.5 nm. Coarse-grained (CG) MD analysis on a multi-μs scale shed light on the membrane-dependent peptide and lipid organization. Stable micelle and end-to-end like oligomers were formed in zwitterionic and TLM models, respectively. In contrast, unstable oligomer formation and monomeric BMAP27 penetration were observed in anionic and LLM systems with selective anionic lipid aggregation (in LLM). Peptide penetration up to ~1.5 nm was observed in CG-MD systems with the BMAP27 C-terminal oriented towards the bilayer core. Structural inspection suggested membrane penetration by micelle/end-to-end like peptide oligomers (carpet-model like) in the zwitterionic/TLM systems, and transmembrane-mode (toroidal-pore like) in the anionic/LLM systems, respectively. Structural insights and energetic interpretation in BMAP27 mutant highlighted the role of F10 and hydrophobic residues in mediating a membrane-specific peptide interaction. Free energy profiling showed a favorable (-4.58 kcal mol-1 for LLM) and unfavorable (+0.17 kcal mol-1 for TLM) peptide insertion

  18. DIAGNOSTICS OF META-INSTABLE STATE OF SEISMICALLY ACTIVE FAULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bornyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of a laboratory simulation of the seismic fault reactivation by “stick-slip” process, it was shown that the system of two blocks just before an impulse offset goes through the meta-instable dynamic state, with early and late stages of meta-instability [Ma et al., 2012]. In the first stage the offset begins in slow stationary mode with slow stresses relaxation on contact between blocks. In the second stage of the “accelerated synergies” strain rate increases and, subsequently, the deformation process through a process of self-organization came to dynamic impulse offset. The experimental results were used for interpretation of the results of spectral analysis of the deformation monitoring data. The data were held within the southern part ofLakeBaikal, where Kultuk earthquake (27.08.2008, Ms=6.1. took place. Its epicenter was located in the South end zone of the main Sayan fault. Monitoring of deformations of rocks was carried out from April to November2008 in tunnel, located at30 km from the epicenter of the earthquake. The time series data was divided into month periods and then the periods were processed by the method of spectral analysis. The results showed that before the earthquake has ordered view spectrogram, whereas in other time intervals, both before and after the earthquake such orderliness in spectrograms is missing. An ordered view spectrograms for deformation monitoring data can be interpreted as a consequence of the self-organiza­tion of deformation process in the transition of seismically active fault into meta-unstable before the Kultuk earthquake.

  19. State of stress in exhumed basins and implications for fluid flow: insights from the Illizi Basin, Algeria

    KAUST Repository

    English, Joseph M.

    2017-05-31

    The petroleum prospectivity of an exhumed basin is largely dependent on the ability of pre-existing traps to retain oil and gas volumes during and after the exhumation event. Although faults may act as lateral seals in petroleum traps, they may start to become hydraulically conductive again and enable fluid flow and hydrocarbon leakage during fault reactivation. We constrain the present day in situ stresses of the exhumed Illizi Basin in Algeria and demonstrate that the primary north–south and NW–SE (vertical strike-slip) fault systems in the study area are close to critical stress (i.e. an incipient state of shear failure). By contrast, the overpressured and unexhumed Berkine Basin and Hassi Messaoud areas to the north do not appear to be characterized by critical stress conditions. We present conceptual models of stress evolution and demonstrate that a sedimentary basin with benign in situ stresses at maximum burial may change to being characterized by critical stress conditions on existing fault systems during exhumation. These models are supportive of the idea that the breaching of a closed, overpressured system during exhumation of the Illizi Basin may have been a driving mechanism for the regional updip flow of high-salinity formation water within the Ordovician reservoirs during Eocene–Miocene time. This work also has implications for petroleum exploration in exhumed basins. Fault-bounded traps with faults oriented at a high angle to the maximum principal horizontal stress direction in strike-slip or normal faulting stress regimes are more likely to have retained hydrocarbons in exhumed basins than fault-bounded traps with faults that are more optimally oriented for shear failure and therefore have a greater propensity to become critically stressed during exhumation.

  20. A rate-state model for aftershocks triggered by dislocation on a rectangular fault: a review and new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Catalli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We compute the static displacement, stress, strain and the Coulomb failure stress produced in an elastic medium by a finite size rectangular fault after its dislocation with uniform stress drop but a non uniform dislocation on the source. The time-dependent rate of triggered earthquakes is estimated by a rate-state model applied to a uniformly distributed population of faults whose equilibrium is perturbated by a stress change caused only by the first dislocation. The rate of triggered events in our simulations is exponentially proportional to the shear stress change, but the time at which the maximum rate begins to decrease is variable from fractions of hour for positive stress changes of the order of some MPa, up to more than a year for smaller stress changes. As a consequence, the final number of triggered events is proportional to the shear stress change. The model predicts that the total number of events triggered on a plane containing the fault is proportional to the 2/3 power of the seismic moment. Indeed, the total number of aftershocks produced on the fault plane scales in magnitude, M, as 10M. Including the negative contribution of the stress drop inside the source, we observe that the number of events inhibited on the fault is, at long term, nearly identical to the number of those induced outside, representing a sort of conservative natural rule. Considering its behavior in time, our model does not completely match the popular Omori law; in fact it has been shown that the seismicity induced closely to the fault edges is intense but of short duration, while that expected at large distances (up to some tens times the fault dimensions exhibits a much slower decay.

  1. The State Regulation of Innovation Activity at the Present Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qoqiauri Lamara G.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the necessity of state regulation in the field of development of innovations and technologies at the present stage. The main directions of the state innovation policies in developed countries of the world are studied and analyzed. Special attention is paid to the objectives of the national strategy for development of science and innovations and to searching the ways for fulfilling this strategy. Apart from these specific problems, the work considers the issue of the state regulation and support of further introduction of innovations and increase of the so called “entrepreneurial” role of the state.

  2. 40 CFR 745.325 - Lead-based paint activities: State and Tribal program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead-based paint activities: State and... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES State and Indian Tribal Programs § 745.325 Lead-based paint activities: State and...

  3. Solution structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis NmtR in the apo state: insights into Ni(II)-mediated allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul Won; Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Chang, Feng-Ming James; Reyes-Caballero, Hermes; Ye, Yuzhen; Merz, Kenneth M; Giedroc, David P

    2012-03-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an obligate human respiratory pathogen that encodes approximately 10 arsenic repressor (ArsR) family regulatory proteins that allow the organism to respond to a wide range of changes in its immediate microenvironment. How individual ArsR repressors have evolved to respond to selective stimuli is of intrinsic interest. The Ni(II)/Co(II)-specific repressor NmtR and related actinomycete nickel sensors harbor a conserved N-terminal α-NH(2)-Gly2-His3-Gly4 sequence. Here, we present the solution structure of homodimeric apo-NmtR and show that the core of the molecule adopts a typical winged-helix ArsR repressor (α1-α2-α3-αR-β1-β2-α5) "open conformation" that is similar to that of the related zinc sensor Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, but harboring long, flexible N-terminal (residues 2-16) and C-terminal (residues 109-120) extensions. Binding of Ni(II) to the regulatory sites induces strong paramagnetic broadening of the α5 helical region and the extreme N-terminal tail to residue 10. Ratiometric pulse chase amidination mass spectrometry reveals that the rate of amidination of the α-amino group of Gly2 is strongly attenuated in the Ni(II) complex relative to the apo state and noncognate Zn(II) complex. Ni(II) binding also induces dynamic disorder on the microsecond to millisecond time scale of key DNA interacting regions that likely contributes to the negative regulation of DNA binding by Ni(II). Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations reveal that NmtR readily accommodates a distal Ni(II) hexacoordination model involving the α-amine and His3 of the N-terminal region and α5 residues Asp91', His93', His104, and His107, which collectively define a new metal sensing site configuration in ArsR family regulators.

  4. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C. J.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J. J.; van Dijk, B. W.; Postma, T. J.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activity

  5. Reap around the State: "Best of Reap" Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Learning Resources Unit.

    This booklet presents selected activities from elementary, middle, junior high, and senior high schools In Indiana, intended to encourage students to read. It offers ideas for 11 community activities (including guest readers, nursing home reading, and a young author celebration), 14 continuous activities (such as the great book graffiti wall and…

  6. Scalable Synthesis of Efficient Water Oxidation Catalysts: Insights into the Activity of Flame-Made Manganese Oxide Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanyu; Hall, Jeremy; Nasiri, Noushin; Gengenbach, Thomas; Spiccia, Leone; Cheah, Mun Hon; Tricoli, Antonio

    2015-12-21

    Chemical energy storage by water splitting is a promising solution for the utilization of renewable energy in numerous currently impracticable needs, such as transportation and high temperature processing. Here, the synthesis of efficient ultra-fine Mn3O4 water oxidation catalysts with tunable specific surface area is demonstrated by a scalable one-step flame-synthesis process. The water oxidation performance of these flame-made structures is compared with pure Mn2O3 and Mn5O8, obtained by post-calcination of as-prepared Mn3O4 (115 m(2)  g(-1)), and commercial iso-structural polymorphs, probing the effect of the manganese oxidation state and synthetic route. The structural properties of the manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated by XRD, FTIR, high-resolution TEM, and XPS. It is found that these flame-made nanostructures have substantially higher activity, reaching up to 350 % higher surface-specific turnover frequency (0.07 μmolO2  m(-2)  s(-1)) than commercial nanocrystals (0.02 μmolO2  m(-2)  s(-1)), and production of up to 0.33 mmolO2  molMn (-1)  s(-1). Electrochemical characterization confirmed the high water oxidation activity of these catalysts with an initial current density of 10 mA cm(-2) achieved with overpotentials between 0.35 and 0.50 V in 1 m NaOH electrolyte. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Genetic structure provides insights into the geographic origins and temporal change in the invasive charru mussel (Sururu) in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calazans C, Sávio H; Walters, Linda J; Fernandes, Flavio C; Ferreira, Carlos E L; Hoffman, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    In 2004, Mytella charruana (d'Orbigny, 1842) (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae) became established along the coast of the southeastern United States (SE-US). Using mitochondrial DNA sequencing (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I), we compared genetic variation throughout its native range in South America to its invasive range in the SE-US. Samples from the SE-US were collected in 2006 and 2010 enabling a temporal comparison to evaluate possible genetic changes of the invasive population. We addressed two questions. First, what are the potential source populations (or geographic regions) for the SE-US invasion? Second, how has genetic diversity changed between the two sampling periods within the SE-US? We identified a total of 72 haplotypes, 64 of which were isolated to geographic sites and only 8 were shared among sites. The highly structured native range provides insight into the origin of invasive populations where our results suggest that the introduced SE-US population originated from multiple source populations with the Panama region as the primary source. Additionally, our results indicate that genetic composition of the non-native populations was unchanged between the two sampling periods. Mytella charruana exhibit a significant pattern of genetic structure among natural populations, owing to biogeographic barriers that limit natural dispersal, and an ability to persist in novel habitats, owing to a suite of life-history characters that favor survival under variable conditions. Overall, this study explains why M. charruana may become an increasing threat to locations founded by anthropogenic transportation.

  8. Laser cleaning in conservation of stone, metal, and painted artifacts: state of the art and new insights on the use of the Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, S.; Agresti, J.; Cacciari, I.; Ciofini, D.; Mascalchi, M.; Osticioli, I.; Mencaglia, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    In the present work the application of laser cleaning in the conservation of cultural assets is reviewed and some further developments on the interpretation of the associated laser-material interaction regimes are reported. Both the state of the art and new insights mainly focus on systematic approaches addressed to the solution of representative cleaning problems, including stone and metal artifacts along with wall and easel paintings. The innovative part is entirely dedicated to the extension of the application perspective of the Nd:YAG lasers by exploiting the significant versatility provided by their different pulse durations. Besides extensively discussing the specific conservation and physical problems involved in stone and metal cleaning, a significant effort was also made to explore the application potential for wall and easel paintings. The study of the latter was confined to preliminary irradiation tests carried out on prepared samples. We characterized the ablation phenomenology, optical properties, and photomechanical generation associated with the irradiation of optically absorbing varnishes using pulse durations of 10 and 120 ns. Further results concern the nature of the well-known problem of the yellowish appearance in stone cleaning, removal of biological growths and graffiti from stones, cleaning of bronze and iron artifacts and related aspects of laser conversion of unstable minerals, removal of calcareous stratification from wall paintings, and other features.

  9. Selective C-C and C-H bond activation/cleavage of pinene derivatives: synthesis of enantiopure cyclohexenone scaffolds and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Weber, Manuel; Sarpong, Richmond

    2015-05-20

    The continued development of transition-metal-mediated C-C bond activation/cleavage methods would provide even more opportunities to implement novel synthetic strategies. We have explored the Rh(I)-catalyzed C-C activation of cyclobutanols resident in hydroxylated derivatives of pinene, which proceed in a complementary manner to the C-C bond cleavage that we have observed with many traditional electrophilic reagents. Mechanistic and computational studies have provided insight into the role of C-H bond activation in the stereochemical outcome of the Rh-catalyzed C-C bond activation process. Using this new approach, functionalized cyclohexenones that form the cores of natural products, including the spiroindicumides and phomactin A, have been accessed.

  10. An update of Utah State University's GAS activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megill, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of the Utah State University's participation in the space program are listed. Proposed experiments include: a study of the velocity of a bubble in water under the influence of a temperature gradient; reflight of an experiment on surface tension driven convective flow; surface waves in zero-G; crystallization in zero-G (vapor phase and liquid phase); bio gas generation; and penicillum growth; study of undamped oscillations in a vacuum and zero-G. The effect that spinoffs have had on the Utah State University were discussed.

  11. Program activities, DOE state and local assistance programs, 1980 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiogioji, Melvin H.

    1981-01-01

    Progress achieved by DOE State and Local Assistance Programs during FY 1980 and since they were established is summarized. These programs enable improved energy efficiency of industry, transportation, commercial establishments, public buildings, and residences. Eight programs (State Energy Conservation, Energy Extension Service, Weatherization Assistance, Institutional Buildings Grants, Energy-Related Inventions, Appropriate Technology Small Grants, Emergency Energy Conservation, Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions) are described. They provide the impetus for thousands of individual and organizational actions that have significantly affected national energy use patterns. (MCW)

  12. Student Activism in the High Schools of New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, Bernard F.; Langworthy, Philip B.

    The purpose of nine regional meetings between New York State Education Department personnel, educators and students from selected secondary school districts was to obtain information about unrest and the changing expectations of high school students. The following conclusions were made: (1) rising expectations of students are part of the "times,"…

  13. Solid-state fermentation : modelling fungal growth and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    In solid-state fermentation (SSF) research, it is not possible to separate biomass quantitatively from the substrate. The evolution of biomass dry weight in time can therefore not be measured. Of the aiternatives to dry weight available, glucosamine content is most

  14. 59 Solid State Synthesis, Characterisation and Biological Activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-11-21

    Nov 21, 2014 ... synthesized complexes are non-electrolytes. Keywords: Hydrogen bond network, Mechanochemistry, Coordination ploymers. INTRODUCTION. Solid-state reactivity of molecular crystals has an old history but it was initially restricted to photochemical reactions and acid–base reactions. (Kaupp, 1996).

  15. Large-scale brain networks in board game experts: insights from a domain-related task and task-free resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Liang, Dongmei; Qiu, Lihua; Gao, Qing; Liu, Chengyi; Gong, Qiyong; Chen, Huafu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance relies on the coordination of large-scale networks of brain regions that are not only temporally correlated during different tasks, but also networks that show highly correlated spontaneous activity during a task-free state. Both task-related and task-free network activity has been associated with individual differences in cognitive performance. Therefore, we aimed to examine the influence of cognitive expertise on four networks associated with cognitive task performance: the default mode network (DMN) and three other cognitive networks (central-executive network, dorsal attention network, and salience network). During fMRI scanning, fifteen grandmaster and master level Chinese chess players (GM/M) and fifteen novice players carried out a Chinese chess task and a task-free resting state. Modulations of network activity during task were assessed, as well as resting-state functional connectivity of those networks. Relative to novices, GM/Ms showed a broader task-induced deactivation of DMN in the chess problem-solving task, and intrinsic functional connectivity of DMN was increased with a connectivity pattern associated with the caudate nucleus in GM/Ms. The three other cognitive networks did not exhibit any difference in task-evoked activation or intrinsic functional connectivity between the two groups. These findings demonstrate the effect of long-term learning and practice in cognitive expertise on large-scale brain networks, suggesting the important role of DMN deactivation in expert performance and enhanced functional integration of spontaneous activity within widely distributed DMN-caudate circuitry, which might better support high-level cognitive control of behavior.

  16. Large-scale brain networks in board game experts: insights from a domain-related task and task-free resting state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujun Duan

    Full Text Available Cognitive performance relies on the coordination of large-scale networks of brain regions that are not only temporally correlated during different tasks, but also networks that show highly correlated spontaneous activity during a task-free state. Both task-related and task-free network activity has been associated with individual differences in cognitive performance. Therefore, we aimed to examine the influence of cognitive expertise on four networks associated with cognitive task performance: the default mode network (DMN and three other cognitive networks (central-executive network, dorsal attention network, and salience network. During fMRI scanning, fifteen grandmaster and master level Chinese chess players (GM/M and fifteen novice players carried out a Chinese chess task and a task-free resting state. Modulations of network activity during task were assessed, as well as resting-state functional connectivity of those networks. Relative to novices, GM/Ms showed a broader task-induced deactivation of DMN in the chess problem-solving task, and intrinsic functional connectivity of DMN was increased with a connectivity pattern associated with the caudate nucleus in GM/Ms. The three other cognitive networks did not exhibit any difference in task-evoked activation or intrinsic functional connectivity between the two groups. These findings demonstrate the effect of long-term learning and practice in cognitive expertise on large-scale brain networks, suggesting the important role of DMN deactivation in expert performance and enhanced functional integration of spontaneous activity within widely distributed DMN-caudate circuitry, which might better support high-level cognitive control of behavior.

  17. Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa Insight is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal of the Africa Institute of South Africa. It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and is indexed in the International Bibliography of Social Science (IBSS). It is a multi-disciplinary journal primarily focusing on African ...

  18. An active state of the BL Lacertae object Markarian 421 detected by INTEGRAL in April 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, E.; Türler, M.; Fiocchi, M.; Boissay, R.; Bazzano, A.; Foschini, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Bianchin, V.; Castignani, G.; Ferrigno, C.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Beckmann, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Hudec, R.; Malaguti, G.; Maraschi, L.; Pursimo, T.; Romano, P.; Soldi, S.; Stamerra, A.; Treves, A.; Ubertini, P.; Vercellone, S.; Walter, R.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: Multiwavelength variability of blazars offers indirect, but very effective, insight into their powerful engines and on the mechanisms through which energy is propagated from the centre down the jet. The BL Lac object Mkn 421 is a TeV emitter, a bright blazar at all wavelengths, and therefore an excellent target for variability studies. Methods: We activated INTEGRAL observations of Mkn 421 in an active state on 16-21 April 2013, and complemented them with Fermi-LAT data. Results: We obtained well sampled optical, soft, and hard X-ray light curves that show the presence of two flares and time-resolved spectra in the 3.5-60 keV (JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI) and 0.1-100 GeV (Fermi-LAT) ranges. The average flux in the 20-100 keV range is 9.1 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 (~4.5 mCrab) and the nuclear average apparent magnitude, corrected for Galactic extinction, is V ≃ 12.2. In the time-resolved X-ray spectra, which are described by broken power laws and, marginally better, by log-parabolic laws, we see a hardening that correlates with flux increase, as expected in refreshed energy injections in a population of electrons that later cool via synchrotron radiation. The hardness ratios between the JEM-X fluxes in two different bands and between the JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI fluxes confirm this trend. During the observation, the variability level increases monotonically from the optical to the hard X-rays, while the large LAT errors do not allow a significant assessment of the MeV-GeV variability. The cross-correlation analysis during the onset of the most prominent flare suggests a monotonically increasing delay of the lower frequency emission with respect to that at higher frequency, with a maximum time-lag of about 70 min, that is however not well constrained. The spectral energy distributions from the optical to the TeV domain were compared to homogeneous models of blazar emission based on synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering. They represent a satisfactory

  19. Insights into induced earthquakes and aftershock activity with in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations in an active underground mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, F.; Olivier, G.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.; Lynch, R.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of the crust shortly after large earthquakes has been the subject of numerous studies, but many co- and post-seismic processes remain poorly understood. Damage and healing of the bulk rock mass, post-seismic deformation and the mechanisms of earthquake triggering are still not well understood. These processes are important to properly model and understand the behaviour of faults and earthquake cycles.In this presentation, we will show how in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations have given new insights into these co- and post-seismic processes. An experiment was performed where a blast was detonated in a tunnel in an underground mine, while seismic velocity variations were accurately (0.005 %) measured with ambient seismic noise correlations. Additionally, aftershock activity was examined and the influence of the removal of a piece of solid rock was estimated with elastic static stress modelling. The majority of the aftershocks were delayed with respect to the passing of the dynamic waves from the blast, while the locations of the aftershocks appeared clustered and not homogeneously spread around the blast location. A significant velocity drop is visible during the time of the blast, which is interpreted as co-seismic damage and plastic deformation. These non-elastic effects are healed by the confining stresses over a period of 5 days until the seismic velocity converges to a new baseline level. The instantaneous weakening and gradual healing observed from the velocity variations are qualitatively similar to results reported in laboratory studies. The change in the baseline level of the seismic velocity before and after the blast indicate a change in the static stress that is comparable to the results of elastic static stress modelling. The differences between the elastic model predictions and the seismic velocity variations could be due to zones of fractured rock, indicated by the spatial clustering of the aftershocks, that are not

  20. Some Directions in State Activities of Ye. F. Kankrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga G. Larina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article studies biographical facts on Yegor Frantsevich Kankrin and contains an analysis of his activities in the office of Minister of Finance. Based on the archive, biographical and legislative sources, the article considers the system of measures taken by Kankrin in the financial, industrial, mining, wood industry and educational spheres. The authors studied his work at the Jewish (second Committee as well as the drawbacks in his professional activities and the reasons behind them.

  1. Global Inventory and Characterization of Pyroclastic Deposits on Mercury: New Insights into Pyroclastic Activity from MESSENGER Orbital Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Head, James W.; Kerber, Laura; Blewett, David T.; Denevi, Brett W.; Domingue, Deborah L.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Gwinner, Klaus; Helbert, Joern; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present new observations of pyroclastic deposits on the surface of Mercury from data acquired during the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. The global analysis of pyroclastic deposits brings the total number of such identified features from 40 to 51. Some 90% of pyroclastic deposits are found within impact craters. The locations of most pyroclastic deposits appear to be unrelated to regional smooth plains deposits, except some deposits cluster around the margins of smooth plains, similar to the relation between many lunar pyroclastic deposits and lunar maria. A survey of the degradation state of the impact craters that host pyroclastic deposits suggests that pyroclastic activity occurred on Mercury over a prolonged interval. Measurements of surface reflectance by MESSENGER indicate that the pyroclastic deposits are spectrally distinct from their surrounding terrain, with higher reflectance values, redder (i.e., steeper) spectral slopes, and a downturn at wavelengths shorter than approximately 400nm (i.e., in the near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum). Three possible causes for these distinctive characteristics include differences in transition metal content, physical properties (e.g., grain size), or degree of space weathering from average surface material on Mercury. The strength of the near-ultraviolet downturn varies among spectra of pyroclastic deposits and is correlated with reflectance at visible wavelengths. We suggest that this interdeposit variability in reflectance spectra is the result of either variable amounts of mixing of the pyroclastic deposits with underlying material or inherent differences in chemical and physical properties among pyroclastic deposits.

  2. Novel Insights Into The Mode of Inhibition of Class A SHV-1 Beta-Lactamases Revealed by Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Ke; J Sampson; C Ori; F Prati; S Drawz; C Bethel; R Bonomo; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are potent class A and C {beta}-lactamase inactivators and are of particular interest due to their reversible nature mimicking the transition state. Here, we present structural and kinetic data describing the inhibition of the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase, a clinically important enzyme found in Klebsiella pneumoniae, by BATSI compounds possessing the R1 side chains of ceftazidime and cefoperazone and designed variants of the latter, compounds 1 and 2. The ceftazidime and cefoperazone BATSI compounds inhibit the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase with micromolar affinity that is considerably weaker than their inhibition of other {beta}-lactamases. The solved crystal structures of these two BATSIs in complex with SHV-1 reveal a possible reason for SHV-1's relative resistance to inhibition, as the BATSIs adopt a deacylation transition state conformation compared to the usual acylation transition state conformation when complexed to other {beta}-lactamases. Active-site comparison suggests that these conformational differences might be attributed to a subtle shift of residue A237 in SHV-1. The ceftazidime BATSI structure revealed that the carboxyl-dimethyl moiety is positioned in SHV-1's carboxyl binding pocket. In contrast, the cefoperazone BATSI has its R1 group pointing away from the active site such that its phenol moiety moves residue Y105 from the active site via end-on stacking interactions. To work toward improving the affinity of the cefoperazone BATSI, we synthesized two variants in which either one or two extra carbons were added to the phenol linker. Both variants yielded improved affinity against SHV-1, possibly as a consequence of releasing the strain of its interaction with the unusual Y105 conformation.

  3. 76 FR 60131 - Proposed Information Collection (State Application for Interment Allowance) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (State Application for Interment Allowance) Activity: Comment... comments on the information needed to determine a State's eligibility for interment allowances. DATES.... Title: State Application for Interment Allowance Under 38 U.S.C., Chapter 23, VA Form 21-530a. OMB...

  4. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; Dijk, van B.; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain

  5. 31 CFR 538.531 - Official activities of the United States Government and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official activities of the United States Government and international organizations. 538.531 Section 538.531 Money and Finance: Treasury....531 Official activities of the United States Government and international organizations. (a) Subject...

  6. Models of Innovation Activity Firms and the Competitive State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekrasova Ekaterina, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper clarified the concept of innovation activity of firms from the perspective of the model open innovation with traditional and alternative approaches to the methods of the protection of innovation activity results outlined. With the use of institutional tools, theoretical concepts and practical study the patterns of innovative activity of firms (external, internal & cooperative strategies are analyzed and the selection criteria for models of innovation are proposed on the basis of a comparison of transaction costs and benefits specific to the closed forms and conditions for cooperation. The forms of cooperation, their pros & cons are mentioned given the results of some empirical evidence. Practical recommendations for the Russian companies to organize their innovation activities are given, as well as on the improvement of competition policy with regard to the inclusion of innovation factor in the analysis of mergers in Russia (also based on the mechanism of the use of this factor by means of merger simulation models. The paper also suggests the criteria for the evaluation of collaborative R&D projects of firms as antitrust tools aimed to use the “rule of reason” when the decisions are made.

  7. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Letícia Martins Peçanha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormones (THs, triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4, are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 μg/g, i.p. during 21 days mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10, gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10 and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10 muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 μg/g, i.p. did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways.

  8. State public health laboratory system quality improvement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bertina; Vagnone, Paula Snippes

    2013-01-01

    The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) and the APHL Laboratory Systems and Standards Committee manage the Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP). One component of L-SIP is an assessment that allows the members and stakeholders of a laboratory system to have an open and honest discussion about the laboratory system's strengths and weaknesses. From these facilitated discussions, gaps and opportunities for improvement are identified. In some cases, ideas for how to best address these gaps emerge, and workgroups are formed. Depending on resources, both monetary and personnel, laboratory staff will then prioritize the next component of L-SIP: which quality improvement activities to undertake. This article describes a sample of quality improvement activities initiated by several public health laboratories after they conducted L-SIP assessments. These projects can result in more robust linkages between system entities, which can translate into improvements in the way the system addresses the needs of stakeholders.

  9. United States-Russia: Environmental management activities, Summer 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (JCCEM) was formed between the US and Russia. This report describes the areas of research being studied under JCCEM, namely: Efficient separations; Contaminant transport and site characterization; Mixed wastes; High level waste tank remediation; Transuranic stabilization; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Emergency response. Other sections describe: Administrative framework for cooperation; Scientist exchange; Future actions; Non-JCCEM DOE-Russian activities; and JCCEM publications.

  10. Structures of the inactive and active states of RIP2 kinase inform on the mechanism of activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pellegrini

    Full Text Available Innate immune receptors NOD1 and NOD2 are activated by bacterial peptidoglycans leading to recruitment of adaptor kinase RIP2, which, upon phosphorylation and ubiquitination, becomes a scaffold for downstream effectors. The kinase domain (RIP2K is a pharmaceutical target for inflammatory diseases caused by aberrant NOD2-RIP2 signalling. Although structures of active RIP2K in complex with inhibitors have been reported, the mechanism of RIP2K activation remains to be elucidated. Here we analyse RIP2K activation by combining crystal structures of the active and inactive states with mass spectrometric characterization of their phosphorylation profiles. The active state has Helix αC inwardly displaced and the phosphorylated Activation Segment (AS disordered, whilst in the inactive state Helix αC is outwardly displaced and packed against the helical, non-phosphorylated AS. Biophysical measurements show that the active state is a stable dimer whilst the inactive kinase is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium, consistent with the observed structural differences at the dimer interface. We conclude that RIP2 kinase auto-phosphorylation is intimately coupled to dimerization, similar to the case of BRAF. Our results will help drug design efforts targeting RIP2 as a potential treatment for NOD2-RIP2 related inflammatory diseases.

  11. What graph theory actually tells us about resting state interictal MEG epileptic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiomar Niso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory provides a useful framework to study functional brain networks from neuroimaging data. In epilepsy research, recent findings suggest that it offers unique insight into the fingerprints of this pathology on brain dynamics. Most studies hitherto have focused on seizure activity during focal epilepsy, but less is known about functional epileptic brain networks during interictal activity in frontal focal and generalized epilepsy. Besides, it is not clear yet which measures are most suitable to characterize these networks. To address these issues, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG data using two orthogonal planar gradiometers from 45 subjects from three groups (15 healthy controls (7 males, 24 ± 6 years, 15 frontal focal (8 male, 32 ± 16 years and 15 generalized epileptic (6 male, 27 ± 7 years patients during interictal resting state with closed eyes. Then, we estimated the total and relative spectral power of the largest principal component of the gradiometers, and the degree of phase synchronization between each sensor site in the frequency range [0.5–40 Hz]. We further calculated a comprehensive battery of 15 graph-theoretic measures and used the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to elucidate the minimum set of them that fully describe these functional brain networks. The results show that differences in spectral power between the control and the other two groups have a distinctive pattern: generalized epilepsy presents higher total power for all frequencies except the alpha band over a widespread set of sensors; frontal focal epilepsy shows higher relative power in the beta band bilaterally in the fronto-central sensors. Moreover, all network indices can be clustered into three groups, whose exemplars are the global network efficiency, the eccentricity and the synchronizability. Again, the patterns of differences were clear: the brain network of the generalized epilepsy patients presented greater

  12. What graph theory actually tells us about resting state interictal MEG epileptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niso, Guiomar; Carrasco, Sira; Gudín, María; Maestú, Fernando; Del-Pozo, Francisco; Pereda, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory provides a useful framework to study functional brain networks from neuroimaging data. In epilepsy research, recent findings suggest that it offers unique insight into the fingerprints of this pathology on brain dynamics. Most studies hitherto have focused on seizure activity during focal epilepsy, but less is known about functional epileptic brain networks during interictal activity in frontal focal and generalized epilepsy. Besides, it is not clear yet which measures are most suitable to characterize these networks. To address these issues, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data using two orthogonal planar gradiometers from 45 subjects from three groups (15 healthy controls (7 males, 24 ± 6 years), 15 frontal focal (8 male, 32 ± 16 years) and 15 generalized epileptic (6 male, 27 ± 7 years) patients) during interictal resting state with closed eyes. Then, we estimated the total and relative spectral power of the largest principal component of the gradiometers, and the degree of phase synchronization between each sensor site in the frequency range [0.5-40 Hz]. We further calculated a comprehensive battery of 15 graph-theoretic measures and used the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to elucidate the minimum set of them that fully describe these functional brain networks. The results show that differences in spectral power between the control and the other two groups have a distinctive pattern: generalized epilepsy presents higher total power for all frequencies except the alpha band over a widespread set of sensors; frontal focal epilepsy shows higher relative power in the beta band bilaterally in the fronto-central sensors. Moreover, all network indices can be clustered into three groups, whose exemplars are the global network efficiency, the eccentricity and the synchronizability. Again, the patterns of differences were clear: the brain network of the generalized epilepsy patients presented greater efficiency and lower

  13. Structural Elucidation of the DFG-Asp in and DFG-Asp out States of TAM Kinases and Insight into the Selectivity of Their Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Messoussi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural elucidation of the active (DFG-Asp in and inactive (DFG-Asp out states of the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases is required for future development of TAM inhibitors as drugs. Herein we report a computational study on each of the three TAM members Tyro-3, Axl and Mer. DFG-Asp in and DFG-Asp out homology models of each one were built based on the X-ray structure of c-Met kinase, an enzyme with a closely related sequence. Structural validation and in silico screening enabled identification of critical amino acids for ligand binding within the active site of each DFG-Asp in and DFG-Asp out model. The position and nature of amino acids that differ among Tyro-3, Axl and Mer, and the potential role of these residues in the design of selective TAM ligands, are discussed.

  14. State-related differences in the level of psychomotor activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Brage, Søren; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    -measured psychomotor activity in bipolar disorder. During a 12 weeks study, repeated measurements of heart rate and movement monitoring over several days were collected during different affective states from 19 outpatients with bipolar disorder. Outcomes included activity energy expenditure (AEE) and trunk...... acceleration (ACC). Symptoms were clinically assessed using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Compared to patients in a euthymic state, patients in a manic state had significantly higher AEE. Compared to patients in a depressive state, patients in a manic state had...... significantly higher ACC and AEE. There was a significant diurnal variation in ACC and AEE between affective states. Finally, there was a significant correlation between the severity of manic symptoms and ACC and AEE, respectively. This first study measuring psychomotor activity during different affective...

  15. Safety insights from forensics evaluations at Daiichi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rempe

    2017-01-01

    Information obtained from Daiichi is required to inform Decontamination and Decommissioning activities, improving the ability of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO to characterize potential hazards and to ensure the safety of workers involved with cleanup activities. This paper reports initial results from the US Forensics Effort to utilize examination information obtained by TEPCO to enhance the safety of existing and future nuclear power plant designs. In this paper, three examples are presented in which examination information, such as visual images, dose surveys, sample evaluations, and muon tomography examinations, along with data from plant instrumentation, are used to obtain significant safety insights in the areas of component performance, fission product release and transport, debris end-state location, and combustible gas generation and transport. In addition to reducing uncertainties related to severe accident modeling progression, these insights confirm actions, such as the importance of water addition and containment venting, that are emphasized in updated guidance for severe accident prevention, mitigation, and emergency planning.

  16. Intergenerational continuity and discontinuity in Mexican-origin youths' participation in organized activities: insights from mixed-methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Sandra D; Vest, Andrea E; Price, Chara D

    2011-12-01

    Motivation theories suggest that parents are an integral support for adolescents' participation in organized activities. Despite the importance of parents, the field knows very little about how parents' own experiences in activities influence the participation of their adolescent children. The goals of this study were to examine (a) the patterns of intergenerational continuity and discontinuity in parents' activity participation during adolescence and their adolescents' activity participation, and (b) the processes underlying each of these patterns within Mexican-origin families. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through three in-depth interviews conducted with 31 seventh-grade adolescents and their parents at three time points over a year. The quantitative data suggested there was modest intergenerational continuity in activity participation. There were three distinct patterns: nine families were continuous participants, seven families were continuous nonparticipants, and 15 families were discontinuous, where the parent did not participate but the youth did participate in activities. The continuous participant families included families in which parents valued how organized activities contributed to their own lives and actively encouraged their adolescents' participation. The continuous nonparticipant families reported less knowledge and experience with activities along with numerous barriers to participation. There were three central reasons for the change in the discontinuous families. For a third of these families, parents felt strongly about providing a different childhood for their adolescents than what they experienced. The intergenerational discontinuity in participation was also likely to be sparked by someone else in the family or an external influence (i.e., friends, schools).

  17. Activities on Facebook reveal the depressive state of users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungkyu; Lee, Sang Won; Kwak, Jinah; Cha, Meeyoung; Jeong, Bumseok

    2013-10-01

    As online social media have become prominent, much effort has been spent on identifying users with depressive symptoms in order to aim at early diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention by using various online social media. In this paper, we focused on Facebook to discern any correlations between the platform's features and users' depressive symptoms. This work may be helpful in trying to reach and detect large numbers of depressed individuals more easily. Our goal was to develop a Web application and identify depressive symptom-related features from users of Facebook, a popular social networking platform. 55 Facebook users (male=40, female=15, mean age 24.43, SD 3.90) were recruited through advertisement fliers distributed to students in a large university in Korea. Using EmotionDiary, the Facebook application we developed, we evaluated depressive symptoms using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. We also provided tips and facts about depression to participants and measured their responses using EmotionDiary. To identify the Facebook features related to depression, correlation analyses were performed between CES-D and participants' responses to tips and facts or Facebook social features. Last, we interviewed depressed participants (CES-D≥25) to assess their depressive symptoms by a psychiatrist. Facebook activities had predictive power in distinguishing depressed and nondepressed individuals. Participants' response to tips and facts, which can be explained by the number of app tips viewed and app points, had a positive correlation (P=.04 for both cases), whereas the number of friends and location tags had a negative correlation with the CES-D scale (P=.08 and P=.045 respectively). Furthermore, in finding group differences in Facebook social activities, app tips viewed and app points resulted in significant differences (P=.01 and P=.03 respectively) between probably depressed and nondepressed individuals. Our results using Emotion

  18. Activities on Facebook Reveal the Depressive State of Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jinah

    2013-01-01

    Background As online social media have become prominent, much effort has been spent on identifying users with depressive symptoms in order to aim at early diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention by using various online social media. In this paper, we focused on Facebook to discern any correlations between the platform’s features and users’ depressive symptoms. This work may be helpful in trying to reach and detect large numbers of depressed individuals more easily. Objective Our goal was to develop a Web application and identify depressive symptom–related features from users of Facebook, a popular social networking platform. Methods 55 Facebook users (male=40, female=15, mean age 24.43, SD 3.90) were recruited through advertisement fliers distributed to students in a large university in Korea. Using EmotionDiary, the Facebook application we developed, we evaluated depressive symptoms using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. We also provided tips and facts about depression to participants and measured their responses using EmotionDiary. To identify the Facebook features related to depression, correlation analyses were performed between CES-D and participants’ responses to tips and facts or Facebook social features. Last, we interviewed depressed participants (CES-D≥25) to assess their depressive symptoms by a psychiatrist. Results Facebook activities had predictive power in distinguishing depressed and nondepressed individuals. Participants’ response to tips and facts, which can be explained by the number of app tips viewed and app points, had a positive correlation (P=.04 for both cases), whereas the number of friends and location tags had a negative correlation with the CES-D scale (P=.08 and P=.045 respectively). Furthermore, in finding group differences in Facebook social activities, app tips viewed and app points resulted in significant differences (P=.01 and P=.03 respectively) between probably depressed and

  19. Surgeons in the United States. Activities, output and income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, W W; Bloom, B S; McPherson, C K; Nickerson, R J; Colton, T; Peterson, O L

    1976-10-18

    In a national surgical manpower questionnaire survey, 76% of those MD and DO surgeons who were contactable returned questionnaires that included a log diary reporting details of their daily activities. Comparisons were made of allocation of professional time, number of operations performed, and net income of respondents by physician classification (including certification), specialty, practice arrangement, age, and census division. The mean professional workweek was estimated at 46 hours for all respondents. More than two thirds of the total professional time was spent in direct patient care; about half the surgeon's time was spent in the hospital, with nearly 20% in the operating room. The median annual work load of respondents was 170 operations. Their median annual net income was $45,700.

  20. Adolescent Girls' Reactions to Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment Tools and Insight into Lifestyle Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metos, Julie; Gren, Lisa; Brusseau, Timothy; Moric, Endi; O'Toole, Karen; Mokhtari, Tahereh; Buys, Saundra; Frost, Caren

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to understand adolescent girls' experiences using practical diet and physical activity measurement tools and to explore the food and physical activity settings that influence their lifestyle habits. Design: Mixed methods study using quantitative and qualitative methods. Setting: Large city in the western…

  1. Qualitative insights into how men with low-risk prostate cancer choosing active surveillance negotiate stress and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Emily M; Li, Hsin H; Lyons, Kathleen D; Morley, Christopher P; Formica, Margaret K; Perrapato, Scott D; Irwin, Brian H; Seigne, John D; Hyams, Elias S; Mosher, Terry; Hegel, Mark T; Stewart, Telisa M

    2017-05-08

    Active surveillance is a management strategy for men diagnosed with early-stage, low-risk prostate cancer in which their cancer is monitored and treatment is delayed. This study investigated the primary coping mechanisms for men following the active surveillance treatment plan, with a specific focus on how these men interact with their social network as they negotiate the stress and uncertainty of their diagnosis and treatment approach. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews at two academic institutions located in the northeastern US. Participants include 15 men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer following active surveillance. The decision to follow active surveillance reflects the desire to avoid potentially life-altering side effects associated with active treatment options. Men on active surveillance cope with their prostate cancer diagnosis by both maintaining a sense of control over their daily lives, as well as relying on the support provided them by their social networks and the medical community. Social networks support men on active surveillance by encouraging lifestyle changes and serving as a resource to discuss and ease cancer-related stress. Support systems for men with low-risk prostate cancer do not always interface directly with the medical community. Spousal and social support play important roles in helping men understand and accept their prostate cancer diagnosis and chosen care plan. It may be beneficial to highlight the role of social support in interventions targeting the psychosocial health of men on active surveillance.

  2. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Patients with Pulsatile Tinnitus: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations studying the brain functional activity of the tinnitus patients have indicated that neurological changes are important findings of this kind of disease. However, the pulsatile tinnitus (PT patients were excluded in previous studies because of the totally different mechanisms of the two subtype tinnitus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether altered baseline brain activity presents in patients with PT using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI technique. The present study used unilateral PT patients (n=42 and age-, sex-, and education-matched normal control subjects (n=42 to investigate the changes in structural and amplitude of low-frequency (ALFF of the brain. Also, we analyzed the relationships between these changes with clinical data of the PT patients. Compared with normal controls, PT patients did not show any structural changes. PT patients showed significant increased ALFF in the bilateral precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and decreased ALFF in multiple occipital areas. Moreover, the increased THI score and PT duration was correlated with increased ALFF in precuneus and bilateral IFG. The abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ALFF measurements in the absence of structural changes may provide insights into the neural reorganization in PT patients.

  3. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Phosphate Ion in Water: Insights into Solvation Shell Structure, Dynamics, and Kosmotropic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bikramjit; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-11-22

    The structure and dynamics of solvation shells of the phosphate ion in deuterated water are studied by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation. The total number of molecules in the first and second solvation shells is found to be close to the effective hydration number reported experimentally. The OD bonds that are hydrogen bonded to the phosphate ion are found to be red shifted as compared to bulk water, which is consistent with experimental results. However, the two OD bonds of the same water molecule in the first hydration shell are found to be vibrationally distinct, which can be attributed to different strengths of the ion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds near the ion. Also, the hydrogen bonds formed by the second solvation shell OD bonds are somewhat stronger than the bulk. This finding shows a long ranged effect of the phosphate ion on water and also gives insights into the water structure making property of this anion. The dynamics of water in the first solvation shell is found to be significantly slower than that of the bulk. We have investigated the origin of the orientational slowing down of the first solvation shell water molecules and made connections to similar results observed experimentally.

  4. Expression and characterization of the calcium-activated photoprotein from the ctenophore Bathocyroe fosteri: insights into light-sensitive photoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Meghan L; McDermott, Amy G; Shaner, Nathan C; Haddock, Steven H D

    2013-02-08

    Calcium-binding photoproteins have been discovered in a variety of luminous marine organisms [1]. Recent interest in photoproteins from the phylum Ctenophora has stemmed from cloning and expression of several photoproteins from this group [2-5]. Additional characterization has revealed unique biochemical properties found only in ctenophore photoproteins, such as inactivation by light. Here we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the photoprotein responsible for luminescence in the deep-sea ctenophore Bathocyroe fosteri. This animal was of particular interest due to the unique broad color spectrum observed in live specimens [6]. Full-length sequences were identified by BLAST searches of known photoprotein sequences against Bathocyroe transcripts obtained from 454 sequencing. Recombinantly expressed Bathocyroe photoprotein (BfosPP) displayed an optimal coelenterazine-loading pH of 8.5, and produced calcium-triggered luminescence with peak wavelengths closely matching the 493 nm peak observed in the spectrum of live B. fosteri specimens. Luminescence from recombinant BfosPP was inactivated most efficiently by UV and blue light. Primary structure alignment of BfosPP with other characterized photoproteins showed very strong sequence similarity to other ctenophore photoproteins and conservation of EF-hand motifs. Both alignment and structural prediction data provide more insight into the formation of the coelenterazine-binding domain and the probable mechanism of photoinactivation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Insights into the dual activity of SIVmac239 Vif against human and African green monkey APOBEC3G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Gaur

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Vif is essential for viral evasion of the host antiviral protein APOBEC3G (APO3G. The Vif protein from a distantly related African green monkey (Agm simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVagm is unable to suppress the antiviral activity of human APO3G but is active against Agm APO3G. SIVmac Vif on the other hand, possesses antiviral activity against both human and Agm APO3G. In this study, we were interested in mapping domains in SIVmac Vif that are responsible for its dual activity against human and Agm APO3G. We constructed a series of Vif chimeras by swapping domains in SIVmac Vif with equivalent regions from SIVagm Vif and determined their activity against human and Agm APO3G. We found that replacing any region in SIVmac Vif by corresponding fragments from SIVagm Vif only moderately reduced the activity of the chimeras against Agm APO3G but in all cases resulted in a severe loss of activity against human APO3G. These results suggest that the domains in SIVmac Vif required for targeting human and Agm APO3G are distinct and cannot be defined as linear amino acid motifs but rather appear to depend on the overall structure of full-length SIVmac Vif.

  7. Correlation between Cortical State and Locus Coeruleus Activity: Implications for Sensory Coding in Rat Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab eFazlali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical state modulates the background activity of cortical neurons, and their evoked response to sensory stimulation. Multiple mechanisms are involved in switching between cortical states including various neuromodulatory systems. Locus Coeruleus (LC is one of the major neuromodulatory nuclei in the brainstem with widespread projections throughout the brain and modulates the activity of cells and networks. Here, we quantified the link between the LC spontaneous activity, cortical state and sensory processing in the rat vibrissal somatosensory barrel cortex (BC. We simultaneously recorded unit activity from LC and BC along with prefrontal EEG while presenting brief whisker deflections under urethane anesthesia. The ratio of low to high frequency components of EEG (referred to as the L/H ratio was employed to identify cortical state. We found that the spontaneous activity of LC units exhibited a negative correlation with the L/H ratio. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that changes in LC firing preceded changes in the cortical state: the correlation of the LC firing profile with the L/H ratio was maximal at an average lag of -1.2 s. We further quantified BC neuronal responses to whisker stimulation during the synchronized and desynchronized states. In the desynchronized state, BC neurons showed lower stimulus detection threshold, higher response fidelity, and shorter response latency. The most prominent change was observed in the late phase of BC evoked activity (100-400 ms post stimulus onset: almost every BC unit exhibited a greater late response during the desynchronized state. Categorization of the BC evoked responses based on LC activity (into high and low LC discharge rates resulted in highly similar response profiles compared to categorization based on the cortical state (low and high L/H ratios. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the LC neuromodulatory system in desynchronization of cortical state and the consequent

  8. Viable But Not Culturable (VBNC) state of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in wine: New insights on molecular basis of VBNC behaviour using a transcriptomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Di Toro, Maria Rosaria; Grieco, Francesco; Michelotti, Vania; Salma, Mohammad; Lamontanara, Antonella; Russo, Pasquale; Orrù, Luigi; Alexandre, Hervé; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    The spoilage potential of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in wine is strongly connected with the aptitude of this yeast to enter in a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC) state when exposed to the harsh wine conditions. In this work, we characterized the VBNC behaviour of seven strains of B. bruxellensis representing a regional intraspecific biodiversity, reporting conclusive evidence for the assessment of VBNC as a strain-dependent character. The VBNC behaviour was monitored by fluorescein diacetate staining/flow cytometry for eleven days after addition of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1 and 1.2 mg/L of molecular SO2 (entrance in the VBNC state) and after SO2 removal (exit from the VBNC state). Furthermore, one representative strain was selected and RNA-seq analysis performed after exposure to 1.2 mg/L SO2 and during the recovery phase. 30 and 1634 genes were identified as differentially expressed following VBNC entrance and 'resuscitation', respectively. The results reported strongly suggested that the entrance in the SO2-induced VBNC state in B. bruxellensis is associated with both, sulfite toxicity and oxidative stress response, confirming the crucial role of genes/proteins involved in redox cell homeostasis. Among the genes induced during recovery, the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and encoding heat shock proteins, as well as enriched categories including amino acid transport and transporter activity was observed. The evidences of a general repression of genes involved in DNA replication suggest the occurrence of a true resuscitation of cell rather than a simple regrowth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New insights on cytotoxic activity of group 3 and lanthanide compounds: complexes with [N,N,N]-scorpionate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnino, Carmela; Bortoluzzi, Marco; Napoli, Mariagrazia; Popolo, Ada; Pinto, Aldo; Longo, Pasquale; Paolucci, Gino

    2013-09-01

    In this work was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of a series of monomeric group 3 and lanthanide (N,N,N)-heteroscorpionate-triflate complexes (M (OTf) 2 (cybpamd) (THF)) (Ln = Sc (2), Y (3), La (4), Nd (5), Sm (6), Dy (7), Yb (8); OTf = SO3CF3; cybpamd = N, N'-dicyclohexyl-2,2-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-acetamidinate) having octahedral geometry around the metal atoms on the human epithelial lung adenocarcinoma (A549), human melanoma (A375), human cervical epithelial adenocarcinoma, human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and murine macrophages (J774.A1) cell lines. All the tested compounds were incubated with cells for 72 h and their growth inhibition assessed by using MTT assay. On the cell line HEK-293 complexes 5 and 7 show a reasonable activities, while the murine macrophage cell line (J774.A1), only the scandium 2 complex is not very active. All complexes tested are poorly active on human health adenocarcinoma lung epithelial (A549) and human melanoma (A375). The group 3 and lanthanide (N,N,N)-heteroscorpionate triflate-complexes (M(OTf)2(cybpamd)(THF)) on murine macrophage (J774.A1) cell line, except that of scandium, show a reasonable activity. On human epithelial cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa) complexes 3, 5 and 6 are significantly more active than cis-platinum, as well as complex 5 is more active on human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell line. All the tested complexes are poorly active on human epithelial lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and human melanoma (A375). The different behaviour of the complexes examined (2-8) let us hypothesize that the cytotoxic activity is related to the molecule as a whole and not only to the ligand or the metal ion separately. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui-Guang [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Huang, Philip L. [American Biosciences, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chen, Hao-Chia [Endocrinology and Reproduction Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Zhang, John [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Huang, Paul L. [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kong, Xiang-Peng, E-mail: xiangpeng.kong@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Lee-Huang, Sylvia, E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  11. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  12. Comparative proteome analysis of Milnesium tardigradum in early embryonic state versus adults in active and anhydrobiotic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Schokraie

    Full Text Available Tardigrades have fascinated researchers for more than 300 years because of their extraordinary capability to undergo cryptobiosis and survive extreme environmental conditions. However, the survival mechanisms of tardigrades are still poorly understood mainly due to the absence of detailed knowledge about the proteome and genome of these organisms. Our study was intended to provide a basis for the functional characterization of expressed proteins in different states of tardigrades. High-throughput, high-accuracy proteomics in combination with a newly developed tardigrade specific protein database resulted in the identification of more than 3000 proteins in three different states: early embryonic state and adult animals in active and anhydrobiotic state. This comprehensive proteome resource includes protein families such as chaperones, antioxidants, ribosomal proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, transporters, protein channels, nutrient reservoirs, and developmental proteins. A comparative analysis of protein families in the different states was performed by calculating the exponentially modified protein abundance index which classifies proteins in major and minor components. This is the first step to analyzing the proteins involved in early embryonic development, and furthermore proteins which might play an important role in the transition into the anhydrobiotic state.

  13. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  14. An insight into the effects of B-site transition metals on the activity, activation effect and stability of perovskite oxygen electrodes for solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jiaxin; Yang, Shengbing; Zhong, Shaohua; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Chou; Chen, Xinbing; Liu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Here, effects of B-site transition metals (TMs) in the (La0.6Sr0.4)XO3-δ (X = Mn, Fe, Co) perovskite structure on the activity and stability of the oxygen electrodes during high temperature electrolysis are discussed to provide a deep understanding of the phenomena observed for different oxygen electrodes under anodic polarizations. Performance and stability of the electrodes vary significantly at 800 °C as the TMs changed from Mn to Fe and Co, which is attributed to the different ionic conductivities and surface chemistry of the materials that have a strong dependence on the valence state and electronic structure of TMs. Under an anodic current passage of 200 mA cm-2 at 800 °C, electrode polarization resistance (RE) and overpotential (η) of the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ (LSM) electrode decrease significantly by 1.75 Ω cm2 and 101 mV during the 1200 min test, compared with the constant values of RE and η for the (La0.6Sr0.4)FeO3-δ (LSF) and (La0.6Sr0.4)CoO3-δ (LSC) electrodes, an indication of the influence of B-site TMs on the electrode performance and stability. Most serious degradation is observed at the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ electrode due to the electrode detachment arising from the accelerated SrO surface segregation and related disintegration of LSM particles near the electrode/electrolyte interface.

  15. Time, Temperature, and Cationic Dependence of Alkali Activation of Slag: Insights from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Spectral Deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhane, Akash; Madavarapu, Sateesh Babu; Marzke, Robert; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2017-08-01

    The use of waste/by-product materials, such as slag or fly ash, activated using alkaline agents to create binding materials for construction applications (in lieu of portland cement) is on the rise. The influence of activation parameters (SiO 2 to Na 2 O ratio or M s of the activator, Na 2 O to slag ratio or n, cation type K + or Na + ) on the process and extent of alkali activation of slag under ambient and elevated temperature curing, evaluated through spectroscopic techniques, is reported in this paper. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy along with a Fourier self-deconvolution method is used. The major spectral band of interest lies in the wavenumber range of ∼950 cm -1 , corresponding to the antisymmetric stretching vibration of Si-O-T (T = Si or Al) bonds. The variation in the spectra with time from 6 h to 28 days is attributed to the incorporation of Al in the gel structure and the enhancement in degree of polymerization of the gel. 29 Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to quantify the Al incorporation with time, which is found to be higher when Na silicate is used as the activator. The Si-O-T bond wavenumbers are also generally lower for the Na silicate activated systems.

  16. Computational insights into active site shaping for substrate specificity and reaction regioselectivity in the EXTL2 retaining glycosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Fernanda; Lluch, José M; Masgrau, Laura

    2017-11-07

    Glycosyltransferases are enzymes that catalyze a monosaccharide transfer reaction from a donor to an acceptor substrate with the synthesis of a new glycosidic bond. They are highly substrate specific and regioselective, even though the acceptor substrate often presents multiple reactive groups. Currently, many efforts are dedicated to the development of biocatalysts for glycan synthesis and, therefore, a better understanding of how natural enzymes achieve this goal can be of valuable help. To gain a deeper insight into the catalytic strategies used by retaining glycosyltransferases, the wild type EXTL2 (CAZy family GT64) and four mutant forms (at positions 293 and 246) were studied using QM(DFT)/MM calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Existing hypotheses on the roles of Arg293, an enigmatic residue in the CAZy family GT64 that seemed to contradict a mechanism through an oxocarbenium intermediate, and of Asp246 have been tested. We also provide a molecular interpretation for the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Moreover, we have investigated why an Asp, and not a Glu like in the family GT6, is found on the β-face of the transferred GlcNAc. It is predicted that an Asp246Glu mutant of EXTL2 would be unable to catalyze the α-1,4 transfer. The results herein presented clarify the roles that Arg293, Asp246 and Leu213 have at different stages of the catalytic process (for binding but also for efficient chemical reaction). Altogether, we provide a molecular view that connects the identity and conformation of these residues to the substrate specificity and regioselectivity of the enzyme, illustrating a delicate interplay between all these aspects.

  17. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Phoebe K. [University of Cambridge, University Chemical Laboratory, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, U.K.; Gonville and Caius College, Trinity; Griffin, John M. [University of Cambridge, University Chemical Laboratory, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, U.K.; Darwiche, Ali [Institut; Réseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l’Energie (RS2E), FR CNRS 3459, 80039 Amiens Cedex, France; Borkiewicz, Olaf J. [X-ray; Wiaderek, Kamila M. [X-ray; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray; Morris, Andrew J. [Theory of; Chupas, Peter J. [X-ray; Monconduit, Laure [Institut; Réseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l’Energie (RS2E), FR CNRS 3459, 80039 Amiens Cedex, France; Grey, Clare P. [University of Cambridge, University Chemical Laboratory, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, U.K.

    2016-02-15

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ Na-23 magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from Na-23 ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electro-chemically; a-Na3-xSb (x approximate to 0.4-0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na1.7Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb-Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na3-xSb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphofis network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na1.7Sb, then a-Na3-xSb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na3-xSb without the formation of a-Na3-xSb. a-Na3-xSb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature Na-23 NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes.

  18. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev (NEU); (UNM); (CNRS-UMR); (General Motors); (Pajarito); (MSU)

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via different methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role

  19. 12 CFR 211.6 - Permissible activities of Edge and agreement corporations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... management with respect to securities, other financial instruments, real-property interests, and other... GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International... the United States. (a) Activities incidental to international or foreign business. An Edge or...

  20. Evaluation of Force Degradation Pattern of Elastomeric Ligatures and Elastomeric Separators in Active Tieback State

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammadi, Amir; Mahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial force and force decay of commercially available elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators in active tieback state in a simulated oral environment...

  1. Search activity of the passe of the Historical Faculty of Transbaikal State Humanitarian and Pedagogical University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drobotushenko Evgeniy Viktorovich

    2013-01-01

    .... The focus is on the attitudes towards activities and goals of the search party “Khingan – Khalkhin-Gol” which was established in early 2012 at the Department of History of Transbaikal State Humanitarian and Pedagogical University.

  2. Insights into the molecular requirements for the anti-obesity activity of a series of CB1 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Karen C; De Lima, Emmanuela F; De Mello, Paula H; Da Silva, Albérico B F; Honório, Káthia M

    2010-10-01

    Two-dimensional and 3D quantitative structure-activity relationships studies were performed on a series of diarylpyridines that acts as cannabinoid receptor ligands by means of hologram quantitative structure-activity relationships and comparative molecular field analysis methods. The quantitative structure-activity relationships models were built using a data set of 52 CB1 ligands that can be used as anti-obesity agents. Significant correlation coefficients (hologram quantitative structure-activity relationships: r² = 0.91, q² = 0.78; comparative molecular field analysis: r² = 0.98, q² = 0.77) were obtained, indicating the potential of these 2D and 3D models for untested compounds. The models were then used to predict the potency of an external test set, and the predicted (calculated) values are in good agreement with the experimental results. The final quantitative structure-activity relationships models, along with the information obtained from 2D contribution maps and 3D contour maps, obtained in this study are useful tools for the design of novel CB1 ligands with improved anti-obesity potency. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Active and passive smoking - New insights on the molecular composition of different cigarette smoke aerosols by LDI-FTICRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Scheffler, Jean-Luc; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The aerosol generated when a cigarette is smoked is a significant indoor contaminant. Both smokers and non-smokers can be exposed to this class of pollutants. Nevertheless, they are not exposed to the same kind of smoke. The active smoker breathes in the mainstream smoke (MSS) during a puff, whereas the passive smoker inhales not only the smoke generated by the lit cigarette between two puffs (SSS) but also the smoke exhaled by active smokers (EXS). The aerosol fraction of EXS has until now been poorly documented; its composition is expected to be different from MSS. This study aims to investigate the complex composition of aerosol from EXS to better understand the difference in exposure between active and passive smokers. To address this, the in-situ laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (LDI-FTICRMS) was used to characterise the aerosol composition of EXS from two different smokers. Results clearly indicated many similarities between EXS samples but also significant differences with MSS and SSS aerosol. The comparison of MSS and EXS aerosol allowed the chemicals retained by the active smoker's lungs to be identified, whereas the convolution of the EXS and SSS aerosol compositions were considered relevant to the exposition of a passive smoker. As a consequence, active smokers are thought to be mainly exposed to polar and poorly unsaturated oxygenated and nitrogenated organics, compared with poorly oxygenated but highly unsaturated compounds in passive smokers.

  4. Relationships between motivations, activities and settings: the recreation opportunity spectrum within the Delaware State Park system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Vogelsong; Alan R. Graefe; John J., Jr. Confer; Dave S. Solan; Jennifer K. Kramp

    1998-01-01

    The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) was first developed by the US Forest Service to classic lands available for recreation by activities, settings, and visitor expectations. This paper examines the relationship between these three criteria within the Delaware State Park System. Respondents were asked to rank the importance of 22 reasons for visiting a state park...

  5. 77 FR 13618 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). This is a proposed extension of an...

  6. 77 FR 11142 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, State/Local...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... natural hazards that impact them, to identify actions and activities to reduce any losses from hazards... resources. Collection of Information Title: State/Local/Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plans. Type of Information... demonstration of the goals, priorities to reduce risks from natural hazards. Affected Public: State, local, or...

  7. High Lassa Fever activity in Northern part of Edo State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose was to establish simple statistics of the effects of lassa fever in northern part of Edo State, Nigeria. Lassa fever activity in the northern part of Edo state, Nigeria, was confirmed in 2004 by laboratory analysis of samples sent to Bernhard–Nocht Institute (BNI) for Tropical Medicine Hamburg, Germany.

  8. 78 FR 54637 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State Educational Agency, Local...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State Educational Agency, Local Educational... OMB has been requested by October 1, 2013. A regular clearance process is also hereby being initiated... considered public records. Title of Collection: State Educational Agency, Local Educational Agency, and...

  9. 77 FR 69650 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers... concerning the Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty Free. This request for comment is...: Title: Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty Free. OMB Number: 1651-0035. Form Number...

  10. Resting-State Neurophysiological Activity Patterns in Young People with ASD, ADHD, and ASD + ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Elizabeth; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Azadi, Bahar; Asherson, Philip; Bolton, Patrick F.; McLoughlin, Grainne

    2018-01-01

    Altered power of resting-state neurophysiological activity has been associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which commonly co-occur. We compared resting-state neurophysiological power in children with ASD, ADHD, co-occurring ASD + ADHD, and typically developing controls. Children with ASD…

  11. 77 FR 74471 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; State of Preschool Survey 2013-2015 AGENCY.... This helps the Department assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the... in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: State of Preschool...

  12. AEE-active cyclic tetraphenylsilole derivatives with ∼100% solid-state fluorescence quantum efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuanjing; Samedov, Kerim; Dolinar, Brian S; Albright, Haley; Song, Zhegang; Zhang, Chaocan; Tang, Ben Zhong; West, Robert

    2015-08-07

    Two new strongly AEE active (I/I0 ≈ 94) tetraphenylsilole-containing cyclosiloxanes with cyan emissions (λem = 500 nm) and ∼100% solid state fluorescence quantum yields are reported. The intra- and intermolecular C-Hπ interactions in the crystal play a major role in the observed high solid state fluorescence quantum yields.

  13. Mitochondrial network in glioma's invadopodia displays an activated state both in situ and in vitro: potential functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Hoa, Neil T; Ge, Lisheng; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas are typically characterized by their infiltrative nature, and the prognosis can be linked to the invasive nature of the tumoral cells. Glioblastoma multiforme are very invasive cancers and this contributes to their lethality. The invadopodia are considered essential for their motility. Human glioma cell invadopodia were examined with transmission electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. By electron microscopy, in situ gliomas (fibrillary astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, pilocytic astrocytoma) show mitochondria with a dense matrix condensed configuration, indicating an active state. The mitochondria were frequently in close contact with an extended smooth endoplasmic reticulum displaying an endoplasmic reticulum subfraction associated with mitochondria. Mitochondria were seen within the filopodia that were penetrating into the extracellular matrix. The activated mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum were also detected within the invadopdia, which was associated microblood vessels. Fluorescent microscopy confirmed that D54 and U251 glioma cells growing in vitro also contained filopodia with mitochondria. The U251 glioma cells' filopodia that penetrated through 1.2-μm pores of transwell chambers also contained mitocondria, suggesting that the mitochondria are actively involved in the invasion process. Migration and invasion of tumor cells requires an increase in cellular motility and involves formation of lamellipodia, protrusions of the plasma membrane, and individual filopodia [ 1 ]. Gliomas are typically characterized by their infiltrative nature, resulting in a poorly demarcated interface between tumor and normal brain tissue. Their poor prognosis can be linked to the invasive nature of these cells. The motility of these tumor cells is correlated with the presence of invadopodia [ 2 ], and, consequently, more insight is necessary into their structural and molecular aspects. Evidence of robust invadopodia activity in

  14. Participation in physical activity in persons with spinal cord injury: a comprehensive perspective and insights into gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Alexandra; Fekete, Christine; Cieza, Alarcos; Geyh, Szilvia; Meyer, Thorsten

    2013-07-01

    To prevent secondary conditions and to improve and maintain health, regular physical activity is recommended as an important component of a health-promoting lifestyle for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, participation in physical activity is low in persons with SCI, especially in women. The objective of this study is to identify (1) categories of functioning, the environment and personal factors that influence participation in physical activity in persons with SCI and (2) gender differences within identified factors. An explorative qualitative study design using both focus groups and individual interviews based on a semi-structured interview guide was used. Statements were linked to categories or chapters of the four components of functioning (body structures, body functions, activities and participation) and of the environment included in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and a recently developed list of personal factors. An in-depth analysis of the statements was performed to identify relevant associations and gender differences. Twenty-six persons (13 female, 13 male) participated in the study. Sixty-seven categories and four chapters from all components of functioning and environmental factors included in the ICF and 33 subdivisions of personal factors were found to be associated with physical activity in persons with SCI. Gender differences could be assigned to areas of gender roles, social support, athletic identity, interests, and general behavioral patterns. This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of participation in physical activity in persons with SCI and presents a first step toward the identification of gender differences. The results should be validated by further quantitative research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. INSIGHTS INTO FUNCTIONAL PHARMACOLOGY OF α1 GABAA RECEPTORS: HOW MUCH DOES PARTIAL ACTIVATION AT THE BENZODIAZEPINE SITE MATTER?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksimović, Srđan; Varagic, Zdravko; Kovačević, Jovana; Van Linn, Michael; Milić, Marija; Rallapalli, Sundari; Timić, Tamara; Sieghart, Werner; Cook, James M.; Savić, Miroslav M.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of ligands inactive or low-active at α1 GABAA receptors has become the key concept for development of novel, more tolerable benzodiazepine (BZ)-like drugs. WYS8, a remarkably (105 times) α1-subtype selective partial positive modulator, may serve as a pharmacological tool for refining the role of α1 GABAA receptors in mediation of BZs’ effects. Here, the effects of WYS8 on GABA-induced currents and on diazepam-induced potentiation of recombinant BZ-sensitive GABAA receptors were studied in more detail. In addition, the behavioral profile of WYS8 (0.2, 1 and 10 mg/kg i.p.), on its own and in combination with diazepam, was tested in the spontaneous locomotor activity, elevated plus maze, grip strength, rotarod and pentylenetetrazole tests. WYS8, applied at an in vivo attainable concentration of 100 nM, reduced the stimulation of GABA currents by 1 μM diazepam by 57% at α1β3γ2, but not at α2β3γ2, α3β3γ2, or α5β3γ2 GABAA receptors. The administration of WYS8 alone induced negligible behavioral consequences. When combined with diazepam, WYS8 caused a reduced sedation, muscle relaxation and anticonvulsant activity, as compared to this BZ alone, whereas ataxia was preserved, and the anxiolytic effect of 2 mg/kg diazepam was unmasked. Hence, a partial instead of full activation at α1 GABAA receptors did not necessarily result in the attenuation of the effects assumed to be mediated by activation of these receptors, or in the full preservation of the effects mediated by activation of other GABAA receptors. Thus, the role of α1 GABAA receptors appears more complex than that proposed by genetic studies. PMID:23685860

  16. Functional Activity and Connectivity Differences of Five Resting-State Networks in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease or Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Yan, Hao; Han, Zaizhu; Bi, Yanchao; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Jia; Wu, Meiru; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Yumei

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the activity within and the connectivity between resting state networks (RSNs) in healthy subjects and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state MRI were performed on patients diagnosed with AD (n=18) or MCI (n=16) and on healthy subjects (n=18) with matching demographic characteristics (age, sex, and education level). Independent component analysis and Granger causality analysis (GCA) were used during image postprocessing. We calculated 'In + Out degree' for each RSN. Then, we investigated the relationships between "In + Out degree" of each brain network and the cognitive behavioural data. RSNs were obtained using the optimal matching method. The core areas of the five RSNs were similar between the AD, MCI, and healthy control groups, but the activity within these five RSNs was significantly lower in the AD and MCI groups than in the healthy control group (P<0.01, false discovery rate corrected). The GCA results showed that the connectivity between the five RSNs, particularly the connectivity from the default mode network (DMN) to the other RSNs, was slightly lower in MCI patients and was significantly lower in AD patients than in healthy subjects. In contrast, increased connectivity was evident between the memory network and the executive control network in the AD and MCI patients. The "In + Out degree" of the DMN negatively correlated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment score in AD patients (R=-0.43, P<0.05). In conclusion, the activity within RSNs and the connectivity between RSNs differed between AD patients, MCI patients, and normal individuals; these results provide an imaging reference for the diagnosis of AD and the measurement of disease progression and reveal insight into the pathogenesis of AD.

  17. Using Community Insight to Understand Physical Activity Adoption in Overweight and Obese African American and Hispanic Women: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Scherezade K.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.; Evans, Alexandra E.; Thompson, Deborah I.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2015-01-01

    Ecologic models suggest that multiple levels of influencing factors are important for determining physical activity participation and include individual, social, and environmental factors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to use an ecologic framework to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying behavioral mechanisms that influence…

  18. Empirical Studies on Actively Managed Mutual Funds: New Insights into the Costs and Benefits of Portfolio Disclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Dyakov (Teodor)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dyakov’s dissertation bundles three empirical studies on actively managed mutual funds. His studies provide new knowledge of the costs and benefits of portfolio disclosure and shed more light into the question whether mutual fund investors have an information

  19. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  20. Comparison of brain mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity with cyanide LD(50) yields insight into the efficacy of prophylactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziaz, Mandy L; Frazier, Kathryn; Guidry, Paul B; Ruiz, Robyn A; Petrikovics, Ilona; Haines, Donovan C

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, therefore inhibiting the cell oxygen utilization and resulting in the condition of histotoxic anoxia. The enzyme rhodanese detoxifies cyanide by utilizing sulfur donors to convert cyanide to thiocyanate, and new and improved sulfur donors are actively sought as researchers seek to improve cyanide prophylactics. We have determined brain cytochrome c oxidase activity as a marker for cyanide exposure for mice pre-treated with various cyanide poisoning prophylactics, including sulfur donors thiosulfate (TS) and thiotaurine (TT3). Brain mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation, the outer mitochondrial membrane was disrupted by a maltoside detergent, and the decrease in absorbance at 550 nm as horse heart ferrocytochrome c (generated by the dithiothreitol reduction of ferricytochrome c) was oxidized was monitored. Overall, the TS control prophylactic treatment provided significant protection of the cytochrome c oxidase activity. The TT3-treated mice showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity even in the absence of cyanide. In both treatment series, addition of exogenous Rh did not significantly enhance the prevention of cytochrome c oxidase inhibition, but the addition of sodium nitrite did. These findings can lead to a better understanding of the protection mechanism by various cyanide antidotal systems. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Insights into the mechanisms of Promysalin, a secondary metabolite with genus-specific antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promysalin, a secondary metabolite produced by Pseudomonas putida RW10S1, has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Pseudomonas sp., including both human and plant pathogens. Promysalin induces swarming and biofilm formation in the producing species, and inhibits growth of susceptible sp...

  2. Mechanism-based Inhibitors of the Human Sirtuin 5 Deacylase: Structure-Activity Relationship, Biostructural, and Kinetic Insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajabi, Nima; Auth, Marina; Troelsen, Kathrin Rentzius

    2017-01-01

    The sirtuin enzymes are important regulatory deacylases in a variety of biochemical contexts and may therefore be potential therapeutic targets through either activation or inhibition by small molecules. Here, we describe the discovery of the most potent inhibitor of sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) reported to...

  3. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Renin activity and aldosterone assay among Nigerians with hypertension and normotension: An insight into normative values and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, Adeseye Abiodun; Salawu, Afolabi; Adeniyi, Boluwatife

    2017-12-13

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone tend to differ between Blacks and Caucasians and studies are very scarce among Africans. We therefore aimed to determine the normative value of plasma renin activity and serum aldosterone among school teachers in Nigeria with normal blood pressure compared with their hypertensive counterparts and relevant clinical/demographic associations. Plasma renin activity and serum aldosterone were measured using the kits provided by Diagnostic Biochem, Canada among randomly selected school teachers recruited as part of a study to assess their total cardiovascular risks. Mean serum values were compared between normotensive and hypertensive participants and were correlated with clinical and demographic parameters. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17.0, Chicago, Ill, USA. P <0.05 was taken as statistically significant. The mean PRA level of all study participants was 0.80 ± 0.85 ng/mL.h (mean ± SD) while the mean serum level of aldosterone was 93.9 ± 60.9 pg/ml. The mean aldosterone: renin ratio was 446.5 ± 958.2. The frequency of occurrence of hypertension was 29%. Only plasma renin activity was significantly correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, age and the rate pressure product (a measure of cardiovascular risk). The finding of a higher mean PRA among hypertensive subjects is definitely related to the antihypertensive medications being taken including beta blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors among others. The prevalence of high aldosterone/renin ratio which could reflect the proportion of primary aldosteronism was 10.8%. Nigerians have a low renin activity compared to their Caucasian counterpart. PRA may be an important determinant of blood pressure among Nigerians. Appropriate drugs that target phenotypic status of PRA and aldosterone may be useful in the management of hypertension and the choice of pharmacotherapy among Nigerians. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any

  5. A STATE AS AN ACTIVATOR OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern mechanisms and instruments of state regulation of science, technology and innovation are systematized from the point of view of market failures overcoming in these areas of the economy.

  6. Expert insights

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jonathan; Thomson Reuters; DInar Standard

    2014-01-01

    The 2014-15 State of the Global Islamic Economy Report presents the continuing building of Islamic economy's momentum. Much has happened since the launch of the inaugural State of the Global Islamic Economy Report last year. The Halal Food sector saw investments, such as the Brazilian food group BRF investing $90 million in setting up a production plant in UAE; new Halal testing technologies emerged from France, Malaysia, and UAE; Dubai began marketing its new Halal hubs; MIHAS Malaysia saw r...

  7. New Insight into the Pathogenesis of Erythema Nodosum Leprosum: The Role of Activated Memory T-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edessa Negera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Memory T-cells, particularly, effector memory T cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. Although erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL is an inflammatory complication of leprosy, the role of memory T cell subsets has never been studied in this patient group. The aim of this study was at investigate the kinetics of memory T cell subsets in patients with ENL before and after prednisolone treatment. A case–control study design was used to recruit 35 untreated patients with ENL and 25 non-reactional lepromatous leprosy (LL patient controls at ALERT Hospital, Ethiopia. Venous blood samples were obtained before, during, and after treatment from each patient. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated and used for immunophenotyping of T cell activation and memory T-cell subsets by flow cytometry. The kinetics of these immune cells in patients with ENL before and after treatment were compared with LL patient controls as well as within ENL cases at different time points. The median percentage of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells expressing activated T-cells were significantly higher in the PBMCs from patients with ENL than from LL patient controls before treatment. The median percentage of central and activated memory T-cells was significantly increased in patients with ENL compared to LL patient controls before treatment. Interestingly, patients with ENL had a lower percentage of naïve T cells (27.7% compared to LL patient controls (59.5% (P < 0.0001 before treatment. However, after prednisolone treatment, patients with ENL had a higher median percentage of naïve T-cells (43.0% than LL controls (33.0% (P < 0.001. The median percentage of activated T-cells (effector memory and effector T-cells was significantly increased in patients with ENL (59.2% before treatment compared to after treatment with prednisolone (33.9% (P < 0.005. This is the first work

  8. New Insight into the Pathogenesis of Erythema Nodosum Leprosum: The Role of Activated Memory T-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negera, Edessa; Bobosha, Kidist; Walker, Stephen L; Endale, Birtukan; Howe, Rawleigh; Aseffa, Abraham; Dockrell, Hazel M; Lockwood, Diana N

    2017-01-01

    Memory T-cells, particularly, effector memory T cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. Although erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is an inflammatory complication of leprosy, the role of memory T cell subsets has never been studied in this patient group. The aim of this study was at investigate the kinetics of memory T cell subsets in patients with ENL before and after prednisolone treatment. A case-control study design was used to recruit 35 untreated patients with ENL and 25 non-reactional lepromatous leprosy (LL) patient controls at ALERT Hospital, Ethiopia. Venous blood samples were obtained before, during, and after treatment from each patient. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and used for immunophenotyping of T cell activation and memory T-cell subsets by flow cytometry. The kinetics of these immune cells in patients with ENL before and after treatment were compared with LL patient controls as well as within ENL cases at different time points. The median percentage of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) T-cells expressing activated T-cells were significantly higher in the PBMCs from patients with ENL than from LL patient controls before treatment. The median percentage of central and activated memory T-cells was significantly increased in patients with ENL compared to LL patient controls before treatment. Interestingly, patients with ENL had a lower percentage of naïve T cells (27.7%) compared to LL patient controls (59.5%) (P < 0.0001) before treatment. However, after prednisolone treatment, patients with ENL had a higher median percentage of naïve T-cells (43.0%) than LL controls (33.0%) (P < 0.001). The median percentage of activated T-cells (effector memory and effector T-cells) was significantly increased in patients with ENL (59.2%) before treatment compared to after treatment with prednisolone (33.9%) (P < 0.005). This is the first work

  9. Molecular Basis of Enhanced Activity in Factor VIIa-Trypsin Variants Conveys Insights into Tissue Factor-mediated Allosteric Regulation of Factor VIIa Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Anders B.; Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Svensson, L. Anders

    2016-01-01

    -ray crystallography, we show that the introduced 170 loop from trypsin directly interacts with the FVIIa active site, stabilizing segment 215-217 and activation loop 3, leading to enhanced activity. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel fluorescence quenching studies support that segment 215-217 conformation...... is pivotal to the enhanced activity of the FVIIa variants. We speculate that the allosteric regulation of FVIIa activity by TF binding follows a similar path in conjunction with protease domain N terminus insertion, suggesting a more complete molecular basis of TF-mediated allosteric enhancement of FVIIa...

  10. Mechanism of Antibacterial Activity via Morphology Change of α-AgVO3: Theoretical and Experimental Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Regiane Cristina; de Foggi, Camila Cristina; Teixeira, Mayara Mondego; da Silva, Maya Dayana Penha; Assis, Marcelo; Francisco, Eric Mark; Pimentel, Bruna Natalia Alves da Silva; Pereira, Paula Fabiana Dos Santos; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Andres, Juan; Gracia, Lourdes; Longo, Elson

    2017-04-05

    The electronic configuration, morphology, optical features, and antibacterial activity of metastable α-AgVO 3 crystals have been discussed by a conciliation and association of the results acquired by experimental procedures and first-principles calculations. The α-AgVO 3 powders were synthesized using a coprecipitation method at 10, 20, and 30 °C. By using a Wulff construction for all relevant low-index surfaces [(100), (010), (001), (110), (011), (101), and (111)], the fine-tuning of the desired morphologies can be achieved by controlling the values of the surface energies, thereby lending a microscopic understanding to the experimental results. The as-synthesized α-AgVO 3 crystals display a high antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The results obtained from the experimental and theoretical techniques allow us to propose a mechanism for understanding the relationship between the morphological changes and antimicrobial performance of α-AgVO 3 .

  11. Biotransformation of finasteride by Ocimum sanctum L., and tyrosinase inhibitory activity of transformed metabolites: experimental and computational insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Nisar, Muhammad; Iriti, Marcello; Shah, Mohammad Raza; Mahmud, Maqsood; Ali, Ihsan; Khan, Inamullah

    2014-12-01

    Transformation of Finasteride (I) by cell suspension cultures of Ocimum sanctum L. was investigated. Fermentation of compound (I) with O. sanctum afforded three oxidized derivatives, 16β-hydroxyfinasteride (II), 11α-hydroxyfinasteride (III) and 15β-hydroxyfinasteride (IV). Among these metabolites, compound (II) was a new metabolite. Compound (I) and its derivatives were studied for their tyrosinase inhibition assay. All test compounds exhibited significant activity compared to standard drug kojic acid, with compound IV being the most potent member with an IC50 of 1.87μM. Molecular docking revealed significant molecular interactions behind the potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity of the tested compounds. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Insights into the activation mechanism of calcium ions on the sericite surface: A combined experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuehua; He, Jianyong; Zhang, Chenhu; Zhang, Chenyang; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dongbo; Chen, Pan; Han, Haisheng; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Wang, Li

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors and the activation mechanism of calcium ions (Ca2+) on sericite surface have been investigated by Zeta potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Micro-flotation tests and First principle calculations. Zeta potential tests results show that the sericite surface potential increases due to the adsorption of calcium ions on the surface. Micro-flotation tests demonstrate that sericite recovery remarkably rise by 10% due to the calcium ions activation on sericite surface. However, the characteristic adsorption bands of calcium oleate do not appear in the FT-IR spectrum, suggesting that oleate ions just physically adsorb on the sericite surface. The first principle calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) further reveals the microscopic adsorption mechanism of calcium ions on the sericite surface before and after hydration.

  13. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera cons...

  14. Iron-Targeting Antitumor Activity of Gallium Compounds and Novel Insights Into Triapine®-Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antholine, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Recent Advances: Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine® has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Critical Issues: Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. Future Directions: The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000–000. PMID:22900955

  15. Iron-targeting antitumor activity of gallium compounds and novel insights into triapine(®)-metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Christopher R; Antholine, William E

    2013-03-10

    Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine(®) has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it.

  16. Chemical activity and distribution of emerging pollutants: Insights from a multi-compartment analysis of a freshwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza, Pedro A; Massei, Riccardo; Wild, Romy; Krauss, Martin; Brack, Werner

    2017-12-01

    Emerging pollutants are ubiquitous in the aquatic system and may pose risks to aquatic ecosystems. The quantification and prediction of environmental partitioning of these chemicals in aquatic systems between water, sediment and biota is an important step in the comprehensive assessment of their sources and final fates in the environment. In this multi-compartment field study, we applied equilibrium partitioning theory and chemical activity estimates to investigate the predictability of concentrations in Gammarus pulex as a model invertebrate from water and sediment in a typical small central European river. Furthermore, K OW -based and LSER approaches were assessed for the calculation of sediment organic carbon-, lipid-, and protein-water partitioning coefficients and activity ratios between the different compartments. Gammarid-water activity ratios close to unity have been observed for many chemicals, while sediment-water and sediment-biota chemical activity ratios exceeded unity by up to six orders of magnitudes. Causes may be: disequilibrium due to slow desorption kinetics and/or an underestimation of partition coefficients due to the presence of strongly adsorbing phases in the sediments. Water concentrations, particularly when using LSER for prediction of partition coefficients were good predictors of internal concentrations in gammarids for most emerging pollutants. Some hydrophilic chemicals such as the neonicotinoid imidacloprid tend to accumulate more in G. pulex than expected from equilibrium partitioning. This conclusion holds both for K OW as well as for LSER-based predictions and suggests previously unidentified mechanisms of bio-accumulation which may include binding to specific protein structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity of the North Su Volcano: New Insights from Repeated Bathymetric Surveys and ROV Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, J.; Bach, W.; Tivey, M.; Yoerger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bathymetric data from cruises in 2002, 2006, and 2011 were combined and compared to determine the evolution of volcanic activity, seafloor structures, erosional features and to identify and document the distribution of hydrothermal vents on North Su volcano, SuSu Knolls, eastern Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea). Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 (WHOI Jason-2) and 2011 (MARUM Quest-4000) combined with repeated bathymetric surveys from 2002 and 2011 are used to identify morphologic features on the slopes of North Su and to track temporal changes. ROV MARUM Quest-4000 bathymetry was used to develop a 10 m grid of the top of North Su to precisely depict recent changes. In 2006, the south slope of North Su was steeply sloped and featured numerous white smoker vents discharging acid sulfate waters. These vents were covered by several tens of meters of sand- to gravel-sized volcanic material in 2011. The growth of this new cone changed the bathymetry of the south flank of North Su up to ~50 m and emplaced ~0.014 km3 of clastic volcanic material. This material is primarily comprised of fractured altered dacite and massive fresh dacite as well as crystals of opx, cpx, olivine and plagioclase. There is no evidence for pyroclastic fragmentation, so we hypothesize that the fragmentation is likely related to hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal activity varies over a short (~50 m) lateral distance from 'flashing' black smokers to acidic white smoker vents. Within 2 weeks of observation time in 2011, the white smoker vents varied markedly in activity suggesting a highly episodic hydrothermal system. Based on ROV video recordings, we identified steeply sloping (up to 30°) slopes exposing pillars and walls of hydrothermal cemented volcaniclastic material representing former fluid upflow zones. These features show that hydrothermal activity has increased slope stability as hydrothermal cementation has prevented slope collapse. Additionally, in some places

  18. Hydrothermal fluids circulation and travertine deposition in an active tectonic setting: Insights from the Kamara geothermal area (western Anatolia, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Andrea; Alçiçek, M. Cihat; Yalçıner, Cahit Çağlar; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Liotta, Domenico; Meccheri, Marco; Rimondi, Valentina; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Gandin, Anna; Boschi, Chiara; Büyüksaraç, Aydin; Alçiçek, Hülya; Bülbül, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Coexistence of thermal springs, travertine deposits and tectonic activity is a recurring feature for most geothermal areas. Although such a certainty, their relationships are debated mainly addressing on the role of the tectonic activity in triggering and controlling fluids flow and travertine deposition. In this paper, we present the results of an integrated study carried out in a geothermal area located in western Anatolia (Turkey), nearby the well-known Pamukkale area (Denizli Basin). Our study focused on the relationships among hydrothermal fluids circulation, travertine deposition and tectonic activity, with particular emphasis on the role of faults in controlling fluids upwelling, thermal springs location and deposition of travertine masses. New field mapping and structural/kinematics analyses allowed us to recognize two main faults systems (NW- and NE-trending), framed in the Neogene-Quaternary extensional tectonic evolution of western Anatolia. A geo-radar (GPR) prospection was also provided in a key-area, permitting us to reconstruct a buried fault zone and its relationships with the development of a fissure-ridge travertine deposit (Kamara fissure-ridge). The integration among structural and geophysical studies, fluids inclusion, geochemical, isotopic data and 230 Th/238 U radiometric age determination on travertine deposits, depict the characteristics of the geothermal fluids and their pathway, up to the surface. Hydrological and seismological data have been also taken in account to investigate the relation between local seismicity and fluid upwelling. As a main conclusion we found strict relationships among tectonic activity, earthquakes occurrence, and variation of the physical/chemical features of the hydrothermal fluids, presently exploited at depth, or flowing out in thermal springs. In the same way, we underline the tectonic role in controlling the travertine deposition, making travertine (mainly banded travertine) a useful proxy to reconstruct the

  19. Gas piston activity of the Nyiragongo lava lake: First insights from a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Kervyn, Matthieu; Kervyn, François

    2017-10-01

    Nyiragongo volcano (D.R. Congo), in the western branch of the East African Rift System, is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. Its eruptive activity is mainly characterized by the presence of a persistent lava lake in its main crater. As observed at other persistent lava lakes, the Nyiragongo lava lake level exhibits metric vertical variations in the form of minutes-to hour-long cycles, which we infer to be gas piston activity. To study this activity, we developed and tested a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera (STLC) system, which takes stereo-pairs of photographs of the Nyiragongo crater at regular intervals. Each pair of gas- and steam-free images during daytime allows the production of a 3D point cloud. The comparison of the point clouds provides a measurement of topographic changes related to variations in lava lake level. The processing of a first dataset acquired between 18 and 20 September 2011, at an acquisition rate of 1 pair of images every 2 min, revealed cycles of vertical lava lake level variations reaching up to 3.8 m. Lava lake level variations >0.5 m are detected significantly. They are interpreted to result from gas accumulation and release in the lava lake itself. The limitations of the STLC approach are related to the number of cameras used and the atmospheric masking by steam and volcanic gas in the Nyiragongo crater. The proposed photogrammetric approach could be applied elsewhere or in other disciplines, where frequent topographic changes occur.

  20. A Precursory Phase to a Sudden Enhanced Activity at Yasur volcano (Vanuatu) : Insights from Simultaneous Infrasonic and Seismic Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergniolle, S.; Zielinski, C.; Battaglia, J.; Metaxian, J. P.; Bani, P.; LE Pichon, A.; Lardy, M.; Millier, P.; Frogneux, M.; Gallois, F.; Herry, P.; Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent activity at Yasur (Vanuatu), characterised by a close series of Strombolian explosions, is analysed using simultaneous infrasonic and seismic recordings (6-25 Nov 2008) close to the vents. The RMS amplitudes per hour, the number of explosions and the peak-to-peak amplitudes of each signal show that the initial quiet phase (11 days) is followed by a precursory phase (7 days) prior to an enhanced activity (17 hours). Three periods exist during the strong activity: (1) a rapid increase leading to the paroxysm (3 hours), (2) a first (5 hours) and (3) a second decrease (9 hours), each having an excellent correlation between seismic and infrasonic RMS amplitudes per hour (correlation coefficient > 0.96) when using the band associated to explosions (1-5 Hz and 1.8-4 Hz for seismic and infrsonic recordings, respectively). The ratio between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes, assumed to be a proxy for the magma level, increases strongly during the week before the paroxysm. This is explained by the arrival of an additional gas flux at the top of the reservoir. The foam accumulated there, whose partial coalescence and spreading towards the conduit are responsible for the permanent Strombolian activity, thickens. This enhances both the viscous massive foam coalescence and the foam spreading. This leads to an increase in the gas flux in the conduit, ultimately responsible for the formation of a shallow foam at the surface. This foam acts as a viscous cap overlying the magma column, thereby increasing the radiated infrasonic pressure and the strength of the explosions. The first decrease in the relationship between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes is associated with the stopping of the additionnal gas flux in the magma reservoir and the rapid decrease of the top of the magma column due to the previous intense degassing. The second decrease corresponds to the time neccessary to restore the convective motions in the conduit at their normal velocities.

  1. Vulnerability of the Nigerian coast: An insight into sea level rise owing to climate change and anthropogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danladi, Iliya Bauchi; Kore, Basiru Mohammed; Gül, Murat

    2017-10-01

    Coastal areas are important regions in the world as they host huge population, diverse ecosystems and natural resources. However, owing to their settings, elevations and proximities to the sea, climate change (global warming) and human activities are threatening issues. Herein, we report the coastline changes and possible future threats related to sea level rise owing to global warming and human activities in the coastal region of Nigeria. Google earth images, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and geological maps were used. Using google earth images, coastal changes for the past 43 years, 3 years prior to and after the construction of breakwaters along Goshen Beach Estate (Lekki) were examined. Additionally, coastline changes along Lekki Phase I from 2013 to 2016 were evaluated. The DEM map was used to delineate 0-2 m, 2-5 m and 5-10 m asl which correspond to undifferentiated sands and gravels to clays on the geological map. The results of the google earth images revealed remarkable erosion along both Lekki and Lekki Phase I, with the destruction of a lagoon in Lekki Phase I. Based on the result of the DEM map and geology, elevations of 0-2 m, 2-5 m and 5-10 m asl were interpreted as highly risky, moderately risky and risky respectively. Considering factors threatening coastal regions, the erosion and destruction of the lagoon along the Nigerian coast may be ascribed to sea level rise as a result of global warming and intense human activities respectively.

  2. Influences on adherence to diet and physical activity recommendations in women and children: insights from six European studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskip, Hazel; Baird, Janis; Barker, Mary; Briley, Annette L; D'Angelo, Stefania; Grote, Veit; Koletzko, Berthold; Lawrence, Wendy; Manios, Yannis; Moschonis, George; Chrousos, George P; Poston, Lucilla; Godfrey, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Across Europe, poor health behaviours are associated with increased risks of non-communicable diseases. There is particular concern about young women, children and families, not least as health behaviours operating before and during pregnancy and in early postnatal life may have profound long-term consequences for children's health. Using findings drawn from 7 European countries, we aimed to identify barriers to the implementation and uptake of dietary and physical activity recommendations, and to consider how best to achieve changes in mothers' behaviours and thereby improve the adoption of health recommendations. Six studies across the 7 countries were used for this narrative synthesis of findings. A woman's education has a strong influence on her own and her children's health behaviours. Women's diets vary across ethnic groups and according to number of children, but psychological factors, such as self-efficacy and sense of control, which may be amenable to modification, are powerful, too, particularly in women with lower educational attainment. Maternal influences on children's behaviours are strong. Differences exist in infant feeding across countries, and there are apparent urban/rural differences in children's diets and physical activity. Interventions are needed before, as well as during, pregnancy to improve the diets of families with young children. Interventions to address psychological barriers to eating well and being more active are indicated. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Semantic activation and verbal working memory maintenance in schizophrenic thought disorder: insights from electrophysiology and lexical ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dean F

    2008-04-01

    We have examined language processing using ambiguous words (homographs like panel or toast) and rapid or slow presentation rates while recording event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Homographs allow for tracking the train of thought at points of lexical ambiguity and detecting modulation of associative threads by previous context. Rapid presentation rates stress automatic semantic activation, and slow rates stress controlled verbal working memory contextual modulation. In conjunction with reaction times and performance, ERPs allow for objective measurement of activity related to language processing from word presentation through overt behavioral response. Smaller N400 to related and unrelated items at short stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), the presence of a semantic bias, and large N400 to related and unrelated items at long SOAs are present in schizophrenia. We describe a model of initial semantic memory hyper-priming and subsequent decay of information in verbal working memory stores, the activation-maintenance model of schizophrenic thought disorder hypothesized to underlie the thought disorder in schizophrenia.

  4. Semantic Activation and Verbal Working Memory Maintenance in Schizophrenic Thought Disorder: Insights from Electrophysiology and Lexical Amibiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We have examined language processing using ambiguous words (homographs like panel or toast) and rapid or slow presentation rates while recording event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Homographs allow for tracking the train of thought at points of lexical ambiguity and detecting modulation of associative threads by previous context. Rapid presentation rates stress automatic semantic activation, and slow rates stress controlled verbal working memory contextual modulation. In conjunction with reaction times and performance, ERPs allow for objective measurement of activity related to language processing from word presentation through overt behavioral response. Smaller N400 to related and unrelated items at short stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), the presence of a semantic bias, and large N400 to related and unrelated items at long SOAs are present in schizophrenia. We describe a model of initial semantic memory hyper-priming and subsequent decay of information in verbal working memory stores, the activation-maintenance model of schizophrenic thought disorder hypothesized to underlie the thought disorder in schizophrenia. PMID:18450179

  5. New Insights in Thrombin Inhibition Structure-Activity Relationships by Characterization of Octadecasaccharides from Low Molecular Weight Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Pierre A J; Guichard, Olivier Y; Herman, Fréderic; Sizun, Philippe; Viskov, Christian

    2017-03-08

    Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWH) are complex anticoagulant drugs that mainly inhibit the blood coagulation cascade through indirect interaction with antithrombin. While inhibition of the factor Xa is well described, little is known about the polysaccharide structure inhibiting thrombin. In fact, a minimal chain length of 18 saccharides units, including an antithrombin (AT) binding pentasaccharide, is mandatory to form the active ternary complex for LMWH obtained by alkaline β-elimination (e.g., enoxaparin). However, the relationship between structure of octadecasaccharides and their thrombin inhibition has not been yet assessed on natural compounds due to technical hurdles to isolate sufficiently pure material. We report the preparation of five octadecasaccharides by using orthogonal separation methods including size exclusion, AT affinity, ion pairing and strong anion exchange chromatography. Each of these octadecasaccharides possesses two AT binding pentasaccharide sequences located at various positions. After structural elucidation using enzymatic sequencing and NMR, in vitro aFXa and aFIIa were determined. The biological activities reveal the critical role of each pentasaccharide sequence position within the octadecasaccharides and structural requirements to inhibit thrombin. Significant differences in potency, such as the twenty-fold magnitude difference observed between two regioisomers, further highlights the importance of depolymerisation process conditions on LMWH biological activity.

  6. Decreased Electrophysiological Activity Represents the Conscious State of Emptiness in Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo eHinterberger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many neuroscientific theories explain consciousness with higher order information processing corresponding to an activation of specific brain areas and processes. In contrast, most forms of meditation ask for a down-regulation of certain mental processing activities while remaining fully conscious. To identify the physiological properties of conscious states with decreased mental and cognitive processing, the electrical brain activity (64 channels of EEG of 50 participants of various meditation proficiencies was measured during distinct and idiosyncratic meditative tasks. The tasks comprised a wakeful ‘thoughtless emptiness (TE’, a ‘focused attention’, and an ‘open monitoring’ task asking for mindful presence in the moment and in the environment without attachment to distracting thoughts. Our analysis mainly focused on 30 highly experienced meditators with at least 5 years and 1000 hours of meditation experience.Spectral EEG power comparisons of the TE state with the resting state or other forms of meditation showed decreased activities in specific frequency bands. In contrast to a focused attention task the TE task showed significant central and parietal gamma decreases (pOur findings indicate that a conscious state of thoughtless emptiness reached by experienced meditators is characterized by reduced high-frequency brain processing with simultaneous reduction of the low frequencies. This suggests that such a state of meditative conscious awareness might be different from higher cognitive and mentally focused states but also from states of sleep and drowsiness.

  7. Volcanic and Tectonic Activity in the Red Sea Region (2004-2013): Insights from Satellite Radar Interferometry and Optical Imagery

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Studying recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region is important for improving our knowledge of the Red Sea plate boundary and for regional geohazard assessments. However, limited information has been available about the past activity due to insufficient in-situ data and remoteness of some of the activity. In this dissertation, I have used satellite remote sensing to derive new information about several recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region. I first report on three volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea, the 2007-8 Jebel at Tair eruption and the 2011-12 & 2013 Zubair eruptions, which resulted in formation of two new islands. Series of high- resolution optical images were used to map the extent of lava flows and to observe and analyze the growth and destructive processes of the new islands. I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the evolution of lava flows, to estimate their volumes, as well as to generate ground displacements maps, which were used to model the dikes that fed the eruptions. I then report on my work of the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion and the 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence in western Saudi Arabia. I used InSAR observations and stress calculations to study the intruding dike at Harrat Lunayyir, while I combined InSAR data and Bayesian estimation to study the Tabuk earthquake activity. The key findings of the thesis are: 1) The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea indicate that the area is magmatically more active than previously acknowledged and that a rifting episode has been taken place in the southern Red Sea; 2) Stress interactions between an ascending dike intrusion and normal faulting on graben-bounding faults above the dike can inhibit vertical propagation of magma towards the surface; 3) InSAR observations can improve locations of shallow earthquakes and fault model uncertainties are useful to associate earthquake activity with mapped faults; 4). The

  8. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Ján

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  9. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    OpenAIRE

    Mandula Ján

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  10. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandula Ján

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  11. Initial Validity Evidence for the State Mindfulness Scale for Physical Activity with Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; Cox, Anne; Cole, Amy; Rhoades Cooper, Brittany; Gotch, Chad

    2017-01-01

    Experiencing mindfulness during movement-based interventions (e.g., yoga) may help support adaptive physical activity motivation processes in youth. However, there is currently no measure for assessing state mindfulness with youth within the context of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate a…

  12. Decreased activation of subcortical brain areas in the motor fatigue state: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Hou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of motor fatigue is the exercise-induced reduction of neural activity to voluntarily drive the muscle or muscle group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides access to investigate the neural activation on the whole brain level and studies observed changes of activation intensity after exercise-induced motor fatigue in the sensorimotor cortex. However, in human, little evidence exists to demonstrate the role of subcortical brain regions in motor fatigue, which is contradict to abundant researches in rodent indicating that during simple movement, the activity of the basal ganglia is modulated by the state of motor fatigue. Thus, in present study, we explored the effect of motor fatigue on subcortical areas in human. A series of fMRI data were collected from 11 healthy subjects while they were executing simple motor tasks in two conditions: before and under the motor fatigue state. The results showed that in both conditions, movements evoked activation volumes in the sensorimotor areas, SMA, cerebellum, thalamus and basal ganglia. Of primary importance are the results that the intensity and size of activation volumes in the subcortical areas (i.e. thalamus and basal ganglia areas are significantly decreased during the motor fatigue state, implying that motor fatigue disturbs the motor control processing in a way that both sensorimotor areas and subcortical brain areas are less active. Further study is needed to clarify how subcortical areas contribute to the overall decreased activity of CNS during motor fatigue state.

  13. Guide Dog Teams in the United States: Annual Number Trained and Active, 1993-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Ed; Eames, Toni; Diament, Sara

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated the number of guide dog teams that have been trained and are active in the United States from 1993-1999. Results found 1,556 guide dog teams were trained in 1999, an increase of 7%, and that there were 9,000 active teams, an increase of 10% since 1993. (Contains eight references.) (CR)

  14. Deformation from an Active Crater: Insights into Volcano Dynamics from White Island, New Zeland, using High Resolution SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamling, I. J.; Kilgour, G.

    2016-12-01

    Located 48 km offshore, White Island Island is New Zealand's most active volcano with eruptive activity documented for the past 150,000 years. Despite 70% of the volcano being beneath the sea, the main crater is host to a vigorous hydrothermal system and acid crater lake. The island was the scene of one of New Zealand's major volcanic disasters in 1914 when the collapse of the south west corner of the crater wall caused a debris avalanche killing 11 miners. Between 1967 and 2009, 9 long-term deformation events were detected from levelling data within the crater floor. Accompanying these events were a range of activity from small eruptions to more passive degassing. The most recent eruption, on April 27th 2016, removed 15 m of lake floor sediments and much of the crater lake. Here we use high resolution TerraSAR/TanDEM-X SAR data acquired since 2015 to track changes in the lake level in the build up to the eruption and to generate a deformation timeseries. Preceding the eruption, we observe uplift of the crater floor, consistent with the pressurization of the hydrothermal system, and at the same time evidence for continued creep of the south west crater wall which collapsed in 1914. In the months running up to the eruption both the uplift and movement of the crater wall decrease and, at the same time, we see a decrease in the lake level. The eruption deposited a layer of ash across the crater floor which we assess using a combination of field measurements, coherence loss and changes in the radar amplitude. Following the eruption, as the lake began to refill, we see renewed motion of the crater wall accompanied by localised subsidence around the crater lake. We suggest that changes to the hydrothermal system and crater lake are sufficient to alter the pore pressure within the volcanic edifice promoting failure of the crater wall.

  15. Exploiting the high-resolution crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus MenH to gain insight into enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Florian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MenH (2-succinyl-6-hydroxy-2,4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of menaquinone, catalyzing an unusual 2,5-elimination of pyruvate from 2-succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate. Results The crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus MenH has been determined at 2 Å resolution. In the absence of a complex to inform on aspects of specificity a model of the enzyme-substrate complex has been used in conjunction with previously published kinetic analyses, site-directed mutagenesis studies and comparisons with orthologues to investigate the structure and reactivity of MenH. Conclusions The overall basic active site displays pronounced hydrophobic character on one side and these properties complement those of the substrate. A complex network of hydrogen bonds involving well-ordered water molecules serves to position key residues participating in the recognition of substrate and subsequent catalysis. We propose a proton shuttle mechanism, reliant on a catalytic triad consisting of Ser89, Asp216 and His243. The reaction is initiated by proton abstraction from the substrate by an activated Ser89. The propensity to form a conjugated system provides the driving force for pyruvate elimination. During the elimination, a methylene group is converted to a methyl and we judge it likely that His243 provides a proton, previously acquired from Ser89 for that reduction. A conformational change of the protonated His243 may be encouraged by the presence of an anionic intermediate in the active site.

  16. Interaction between Calpain-1 and HSP90: New Insights into the Regulation of Localization and Activity of the Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averna, Monica; De Tullio, Roberta; Pedrazzi, Marco; Bavestrello, Margherita; Pellegrini, Matteo; Salamino, Franca; Pontremoli, Sandro; Melloni, Edon

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) interacts with calpain-1, but not with calpain-2, and forms a discrete complex in which the protease maintains its catalytic activity, although with a lower affinity for Ca2+. Equilibrium gel distribution experiments show that this complex is composed by an equal number of molecules of each protein partner. Moreover, in resting cells, cytosolic calpain-1 is completely associated with HSP90. Since calpain-1, in association with HSP90, retains its proteolytic activity, and the chaperone is displaced by calpastatin also in the absence of Ca2+, the catalytic cleft of the protease is not involved in this association. Thus, calpain-1 can form two distinct complexes depending on the availability of calpastatin in the cytosol. The occurrence of a complex between HSP90 and calpain-1, in which the protease is still activable, can prevent the complete inhibition of the protease even in the presence of high calpastatin levels. We also demonstrate that in basal cell conditions HSP90 and calpain-1, but not calpain-2, are inserted in the multi-protein N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) complex. The amount of calpain-1 at the NMDAR cluster is not modified in conditions of increased [Ca2+]i, and this resident protease is involved in the processing of NMDAR components. Finally, the amount of calpain-1 associated with NMDAR cluster is independent from Ca2+-mediated translocation. Our findings show that HSP90 plays an important role in maintaining a given and proper amount of calpain-1 at the functional sites. PMID:25575026

  17. Altered baseline brain activity in children with bipolar disorder during mania state: a resting-state study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu D

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dali Lu,1 Qing Jiao,2 Yuan Zhong,3,4 Weijia Gao,1 Qian Xiao,1 Xiaoqun Liu,1 Xiaoling Lin,5 Wentao Cheng,6 Lanzhu Luo,6 Chuanjian Xu,3 Guangming Lu,2 Linyan Su1 1Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Taishan Medical University, Taian, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 4School of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 5School of Nursing of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pediatric and Geriatric Psychiatry, Fuzhou Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Fuzhou, People's Republic of China Background: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have shown abnormal functional connectivity in regions involved in emotion processing and regulation in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD. Recent studies indicate, however, that task-dependent neural changes only represent a small fraction of the brain's total activity. How the brain allocates the majority of its resources at resting state is still unknown. We used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method of fMRI to explore the spontaneous neuronal activity in resting state in PBD patients. Methods: Eighteen PBD patients during the mania phase and 18 sex-, age- and education-matched healthy subjects were enrolled in this study and all patients underwent fMRI scanning. The ALFF method was used to compare the resting-state spontaneous neuronal activity between groups. Correlation analysis was performed between the ALFF values and Young Mania Rating Scale scores. Results: Compared with healthy controls, PBD patients presented increased ALFF in bilateral caudate and left pallidum as well as decreased ALFF in left precuneus

  18. INSIGHTS INTO FUNCTIONAL PHARMACOLOGY OF α1 GABAA RECEPTORS: HOW MUCH DOES PARTIAL ACTIVATION AT THE BENZODIAZEPINE SITE MATTER?

    OpenAIRE

    Joksimović, Srđan; Varagic, Zdravko; Kovačević, Jovana; Van Linn, Michael; Milić, Marija; Rallapalli, Sundari; Timić, Tamara; Sieghart, Werner; Cook, James M.; Savić, Miroslav M.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of ligands inactive or low-active at α1 GABAA receptors has become the key concept for development of novel, more tolerable benzodiazepine (BZ)-like drugs. WYS8, a remarkably (105 times) α1-subtype selective partial positive modulator, may serve as a pharmacological tool for refining the role of α1 GABAA receptors in mediation of BZs’ effects. Here, the effects of WYS8 on GABA-induced currents and on diazepam-induced potentiation of recombinant BZ-sensitive GABAA receptors were stud...

  19. Moving physical activity beyond the school classroom: A social-ecological insight for teachers of the facilitators and barriers to students’ non-curricular physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hyndman, Brendon; Telford, Amanda; Finch, Caroline; Benson, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Non-curricular avenues such as active play during school breaks have been established as a major source for children’s physical and cognitive development, yet there is little information for teachers on the influences affecting primary and secondary school students’ non-curricular physical activity. During this study focus groups and drawing were used to explore the broader influences on primary (n=47) and secondary (n=29) school students’ physical activity behaviour beyond ...

  20. Neural correlates of insight in dreaming and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Steiger, Axel; Holsboer, Florian; Czisch, Michael; Hobson, J Allan

    2015-04-01

    The idea that dreaming can serve as a model for psychosis has a long and honourable tradition, however it is notoriously speculative. Here we demonstrate that recent research on the phenomenon of lucid dreaming sheds new light on the debate. Lucid dreaming is a rare state of sleep in which the dreamer gains insight into his state of mind during dreaming. Recent electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data for the first time allow very specific hypotheses about the dream-psychosis relationship: if dreaming is a reasonable model for psychosis, then insight into the dreaming state and insight into the psychotic state should share similar neural correlates. This indeed seems to be the case: cortical areas activated during lucid dreaming show striking overlap with brain regions that are impaired in psychotic patients who lack insight into their pathological state. This parallel allows for new therapeutic approaches and ways to test antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards rice bran protein utilization: In silico insight on the role of oryzacystatins in biologically-active peptide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-01-15

    Rice bran proteins (RBP) have been demonstrated to harbour biologically active peptides, which can be released by proteases and applied in human health promotion. In this study, the roles of rice bran cysteine protease inhibitors, oryzacystatins, were considered for efficient production of bioactive peptides from RBP. In silico evidence demonstrates that aspartate protease (pepsin at pH>2) and metalloproteinase (thermolysin) have strong prospects for use in simultaneously cleaving the QXVXGX motif of oryzacystatins, which can lead to their inactivation, and in releasing bioactive sequences from the protease inhibitors. The cleaved bioactive peptides are known to possess activities that can be applied in the management of hypertension, oxidative stress, type 2 diabetes mellitus and other aberrant cellular processes. Moreover, several potentially bioactive di- and tripeptides were identified in oryzacystatin peptide pools. This study provides an important consideration and a direction that can lead to efficient release of bioactive peptides from rice bran proteins for functional food applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optical properties of novel environmentally benign biologically active ferrocenyl substituted chromophores: A detailed insight via experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salman A.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al-Ghamdi, Najat Saeed M.; Zayed, Mohie E. M.; Sharma, Kamlesh; Parveen, Humaira

    2017-07-01

    Series of ferrocenyl substituted chromophores were synthesized via a reaction of acetyl ferrocene and a variety of aldehyde under microwave irradiation. The structure of synthesized compounds were established by spectroscopic (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESI-MS) and elemental analysis. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements provided that all compounds have good absorbent and fluorescent properties. Fluorescence polarity studies demonstrated that these compounds were sensitive to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents. In addition, spectroscopic and physicochemical parameters, including singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, Stokes shift, oscillator strength and dipole moment, were investigated in order to explore the analytical potential of the synthesized compounds. The anti-bacterial activity of these compounds were first studied in vitro by the disk diffusion assay against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was then determined with the reference of standard drug chloramphenicol. The results displayed that compound 3 was better inhibitors for both types of the bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) than chloramphenicol. Based on the density functional theory; total energy, the atomic orbital contribution to frontier orbitals: LUMO and HOMO, of all synthesized compounds were calculated to support the antibacterial activities.

  3. Direct atomic-level insight into the active sites of a high-performance PGM-free ORR catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoon T.; Cullen, David A.; Higgins, Drew; Sneed, Brian T.; Holby, Edward F.; More, Karren L.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2017-08-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) metal-nitrogen-carbon catalysts have emerged as a promising alternative to their costly platinum (Pt)-based counterparts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) but still face some major challenges, including (i) the identification of the most relevant catalytic site for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and (ii) demonstration of competitive PEFC performance under automotive-application conditions in the hydrogen (H2)-air fuel cell. Herein, we demonstrate H2-air performance gains achieved with an iron-nitrogen-carbon catalyst synthesized with two nitrogen precursors that developed hierarchical porosity. Current densities recorded in the kinetic region of cathode operation, at fuel cell voltages greater than ~0.75 V, were the same as those obtained with a Pt cathode at a loading of 0.1 milligram of Pt per centimeter squared. The proposed catalytic active site, carbon-embedded nitrogen-coordinated iron (FeN4), was directly visualized with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the contributions of these active sites associated with specific lattice-level carbon structures were explored computationally.

  4. Crystal-chemistry insight into the photocatalytic activity of BiOCl x Br1- x nanoplate solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan-Yan; Han, Xu; Tan, Qu; Wu, Ke-Jia; Qi, Shu-Yan

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a facile alcoholysis method was developed to synthesize BiOCl x Br1- x nanoplates at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In this route, strong acid or alkaline environment was absolutely avoided to realize the high exposure of {001} crystal facets. The regular changes in XRD peaks and cell parameters as a function of the Br content strongly declared that the obtained BiOCl x Br1- x products belonged to a group of solid solutions. The 2D nanosheets with in-plane wrinkles were clearly observed in TEM images. Interestingly, as the Br content increased, band gaps of BiOCl x Br1- x solid solutions gradually decreased. The photocatalytic degradation of RhB under simulated sunlight irradiation indicated that BiOCl0.5Br0.5 had the best photocatalytic activity. From the viewpoint of crystal chemistry, the photocatalytic activity of BiOCl x Br1- x solid solutions was closely related with the exposure amount of {001} facets, interlayer spacing of (001) plane and energy-level position of valence band.

  5. Metagenomic insight into the bioaugmentation mechanism of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in an activated sludge system treating coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailei, Wang; Ping, Li; Ying, Wang; Lei, Liu; Jianming, Yao

    2017-01-05

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium was seeded to a sequencing batch reactor treating phenol wastewater. Compared to the contrast reactor (R1), the bioaugmented reactor (R2) exhibits better performance in sludge settling ability, as well as biomass and phenol removal, even though the added fungus is not persistently surviving in the reactor. Bioaugmentation improved bacterial population, growing up to 10,000 times higher than that of eukaryotes. Metagenomic sequencing results show the bioaugmentation finally increases bacterial and eukaryotic richness, but reduces their community diversity. In contrast to R1, bacterial distribution in R2 is more concentrated in Proteobacteria. The relative abundances of filamentous fungi, yeast and microalgae in R2 are all higher than those in R1 at different treatment phases, and two reactors are finally dominated by different protozoan and metazoan. In conclusion, P. chrysosporium improves reactor performances by influencing microbial community structure, and this phenomenon might be attributed to the ecological competition in sludge and toxicity reduction of phenol wastewater. The novelty of this study emphasizes why a species which is not persistently active in bioreactor still plays a crucial role in enhancing reactor performance. Results obtained here impact the conventional criteria for selection of bioaugmentation microbes used in activated sludge systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Co,N-codoped graphene as efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction: Insight into the active centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumin; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yong; Ding, Dong; Bu, Yunfei; Chu, Fuqiang; Kong, Yong; Liu, Meilin

    2017-09-01

    Co and N co-doped carbon (CNC) material is one of the most promising precious-metal-free catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), however, widespread application of CNC will require continuous innovation and optimization of fabrication to maximize electrocatalytic performance, which is always a challenge. Herein, two types of three-dimensional (3D) graphene materials synthesized by one-step of simultaneous doping (Co,N/3DG-1) and two-step of sequential doping (Co,N/3DG-2) respectively, are evaluated and correlated their electrocatalytic activity for HER with experimental parameters. The results indicate that Co,N/3DG-2 exhibits significantly better electrocatalytic activity than Co,N/3DG-1. The structure analysis reveals that Co,N/3DG-2 has more moderate Co-N coordinated number than Co,N/3DG-1. Density functional theory calculations unravels that the equilibrium C and N around Co atom is more favorable to the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. The results shed new light on the rational design of dual hetero-atom co-doped carbon materials, which may be applicable to other energy conversion and storage systems.

  7. Insight into the hydrogen evolution reaction of nickel dichalcogenide nanosheets: activities related to non-metal ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuancai; Gao, Shang-Peng; Dong, Pei; Baines, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Ye, Mingxin; Shen, Jianfeng

    2017-05-04

    Transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, X = S, Se, Te), have been proven to be promising substitutes for noble metals in hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs). However, forthright comparisons of metal sulfides, metal selenides, and metal tellurides are rarely conducted, let alone the mechanism of the important role of their non-metal ligands. In this paper, we report the pilot study of a controllable method for the preparation of a series of NiX2 (X = S, Se, Te) nanosheets via a facile anion-exchange reaction. Consequently, the HER activities and stabilities of NiS2, NiSe2, and NiTe2 nanosheets were tested in both acid and alkaline solutions. The required overpotentials to reach 10 mA cm-2 in 0.5 M H2SO4 for NiS2, NiSe2, and NiTe2 were 213, 156, and 276 mV, respectively. The best performance of NiSe2 was also confirmed in 1 M KOH. Besides NiS2 and NiTe2 nanosheets, the HER properties of NiSe2 nanosheets are superior to most of the available nickel catalysts. Interestingly, the results from electrochemical measurements were found to be fully consistent with the data based on density function theory calculation. Among various factors that might influence the HER activities of nickel dichalcogenides, the free energies of hydrogen adsorption and conductivities have played important roles.

  8. Activation of clay sample from Zaria L.G.A. of kaduna State and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clay samples from Zaria L.G.A. of Kaduna state was acid activated using hydrochloric acid in the concentration range of 5%, 10%, to 30% (v/v), at 90oC ± 2oC for 3 hours, and heat activated at 145oC for 30 minutes. The raw, acid and heat activated clay were tested on groundnut, palm and cottonseed oils. The per cent ...

  9. Momentary Affective States Are Associated with Momentary Volume, Prospective Trends, and Fluctuation of Daily Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kanning, Martina K.; Dominik eSchoebi

    2016-01-01

    Several interventions aiming to enhance physical activity in everyday life showed mixed effects. Affective constructs are thought to potentially support health behavior change. However, little is known about within-subject associations between momentary affect and subsequent physical activity in everyday life. This study analyzed the extent to which three dimensions of affective states (valence, calmness, and energetic arousal) were associated with different components of daily activity traje...

  10. Active thrusting as a possible seismogenic source in Sicily (Southern Italy): Some insights from integrated structural kinematic and seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Giusy; Ferrarini, Federica; de Nardis, Rita; Visini, Francesco; Barbano, Maria Serafina

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a new seismogenic interpretation of mainland and central-southern Sicily, based on an integrated structural-kinematic-seismological approach. Through analysis of available structural and geophysical data, the tectonic setting, the major kinematic units and the crust geometry of the Sicilian southward-verging fold-and-thrust belt system are schematized in sections and in map form. The depth-contour lines of the outermost basal thrust plane, which dates back to Plio-Pleistocene times with some evidence of Holocene activity, are reconstructed. This plane, here named Sicilian Basal Thrust (SBT), emerges along the southward convex Sciacca-Gela-Catania front and reaches the base of the crust at a depth of about 30 km beneath northern Sicily. Additionally, an important regional upper crust splay, with the same arched shape, has been identified some kilometres northward. In order to detect any possible indication of seismogenic activity linked to ongoing deformation of the SBT and its splay, we analyzed the distribution and kinematics of the instrumental seismicity in the period between 1981 and 2006. Particular attention was given to the background seismicity (Ml up to 4.6) located beneath the sedimentary cover at Mt. Etna, as it allows individuating a northward deepening seismogenic volume undergoing an average N-S compression, which corresponds well with the SBT geometry in section view. A merged dataset of all the known major historical and instrumental events (moment magnitude ≥ 4.5) that occurred above the SBT 0-to-30 km depth-contour lines from 217 B.C. to 2006 was compiled and analyzed. Based on information from instrumental data and/or on speculations on the shape and extent of the historical earthquake macroseismic fields, two major ranges of hypocentral depths have been schematically identified within the merged dataset: an upper crust range (in average Belice 1968 and the Catania 1818 events, can be attributed to an ongoing activity of the

  11. The INSIGHT SEIS VBB Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillier, S.; De Raucourt, S.; Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, B.; Mimoun, D.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Pike, W. T.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Bierwirth, M.; Laudet, P.; Perez, R.; Kerjean, L.; Hurst, K. J.; Mocquet, A.; Garcia, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The SEIS experiment is the primary payload of the Interior Structure investigation using Seismology and Heat Transport (INSIGHT) Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery program, and selected for a competitive phase A study, together with two other projects. The objective of the INSIGHT SEIS experiment is the determination of the deep internal structure of Mars. In particular, geophysical parameters of first importance, such as the state (liquid/solid) and size of the core, structure of the mantle, shape of discontinuities, thickness of the crust will be determined by the experiment. It will measure seismic activity in a very broad band of signal, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz), to address the widest range of scientific questions, from the state of the core to the meteoritic impact and quake rates. The instrument integrates a Very Broad Band (VBB) 3 axis seismometer, completed by another trihedron of MEMS short period seismometers, environmental sensors for pressure, wind and temperature, The sensors will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The sensor assembly, which contains all seismic sensors, the leveling system, as well as house-keeping and temperature measurements, will be deployed on the soil in order to allow the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The wind and thermal shield, the sensors' specific containers (vacuum sphere for VBBs) and a passive thermal compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the VBB against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a deection threshold below 10-9 ms-2 Hz-1/2 in the VBB bandwidth. A dedicated electronics will manage the overall experiment and ultra-low noise, space qualified 24 bits A/D converters will perform the acquisition

  12. Activity and relationships of muscular and cardiovascular systems in different states during muscular activity in athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryimakov A.A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Revealed that the performance of high-power exercise on a bicycle ergometer to failure athletes skilled cyclists (15 men increases the activity and relationship of muscular and cardiovascular systems. At rest and fatigue manifests linear relationship between the two systems, during commissioning with stable condition - is exponential. The development of fatigue compensated without changing leadership of the quadriceps, biceps and calf muscles of the lower extremities in the efforts to change the relationship and partial role in various areas of cyclic motion, increasing their electrical activity. With the development of decompensated fatigue decreases the electrical activity and disturbed coordination of major muscles in the relationship right and left limbs.

  13. Self-efficacy for physical activity and insight into its benefits are modifiable factors associated with physical activity in people with COPD: a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H. ten Hakken; H.N. Boezen; J.E. Hartman; N.H. de Greef

    2013-01-01

    QUESTIONS: What are the perceived reasons for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to be physically active or sedentary? Are those reasons related to the actual measured level of physical activity? DESIGN: A mixed-methods study combining qualitative and quantitative

  14. Self-efficacy for physical activity and insight into its benefits are modifiable factors associated with physical activity in people with COPD : A mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, H. Marike; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.

    Questions: What are the perceived reasons for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to be physically active or sedentary? Are those reasons related to the actual measured level of physical activity? Design: A mixed-methods study combining qualitative and quantitative approaches.

  15. A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Project Management: A Model for Active Participation and Involvement: Insights from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam A. Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates and evaluates the effectiveness of a blended learning approach to create a meaningful learning environment. We use the term blended learning approach in this paper to refer to the use of multiple or hybrid instructional methods that emphasize the role of learners as contributors to the learning process rather than recipients of learning. Contribution to learning is attained by using in class gaming as pathways that ensure active involvement of learners. Using a blended learning approach is important in order to be able to address different learning styles of the target group. The approach was also important in order to be able to demonstrate different types of challenges, issues and competences needed in project management. Student evaluations of the course confirmed that the use of multiple learning methods and, in particular, in class gaming was beneficial and contributed to a meaningful learning experience.

  16. Insights from the docking analysis of biologically active compounds from plant Litsea Genus as potential COX-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Sarmah, Rajeev; Bora, Tarun Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Litsea spp of Laural family are traditionally used as herbal medicine for treating inflammation including gastroenterologia, oedema and rheumatic arthritis. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate and understand the molecular principles for such actions. Here, we have illustrated the binding of thirteen Litsea derived biologically active compounds against the inflammation associated target COX (cyclo-oxygenase) -2 enzymes. We compared the binding information of these compounds with a selected number of already known COX-2 inhibitors. The comparison reflected that some of these compounds such as linderol, catechin, 6'-hydroxy-2',3',4' - trimethoxy-chalcone and litseaone have better or equivalent binding features compared to already known inhibitory compounds namely celecoxib, acetylsalicylic acid, rofecoxib. Therefore, all these small compounds reported from plant Litsea spp were found to possess potential medicinal values with anti-inflammatory properties.

  17. New insight on the interaction of self-activated and Mn-related emission centers in ZnS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacherikov, Yu Yu; Vorona, I.; Zhuk, A.; Gilchuk, A. V.; Korsunska, N.; Markevich, I.

    2017-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectra of undoped and thermally doped with Mn ZnS single crystals are studied. In the PL spectra, the bands caused by Mn-related and self-activated (SA) emission centers were observed. A number of narrow peaks whose intensity enhanced with increasing Mn content were found in the PLE spectra of SA emission. The same peaks were present in the PLE spectra of the Mn-related emission band. Some of these peaks were previously observed in the absorption spectra and attributed to Mn2+ ions. The appearance of Mn-related peaks in the PLE spectra of SA emission is explained by excitation transfer from the Mn2+ ions to SA emission centers. The conditions required for this transfer and possible mechanisms of the process are discussed.

  18. State and Local Health Department Activities Related to Abortion: A Web Site Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Nancy F; Johns, Nicole E; Rosenzweig, Caroline; Hunter, Lauren A; Roberts, Sarah C M

    2017-08-29

    Recent legislation in states across the United States has required governmental health agencies to take on new and different roles in relation to abortion. While there has been media attention to health department roles in regulating abortion providers, there has been no systematic investigation of the range of activities in which state and local health departments are engaged. To systematically investigate health department activities related to abortion. We searched state health department Web sites of the 50 states and District of Columbia using key words such as "abortion" and "pregnancy termination". Two trained coders categorized 6093 documents using the 10 Essential Public Health Services (EPHS) framework. We then applied these methods to 671 local health department documents. State and local health department Web sites. N/A. On average, states engaged in 5.1 of 10 Essential Services related to abortion. Most (76%-98%) state health departments engaged in activities to Monitor Health Status (EPHS1), Enforce Laws (EPHS6), and Evaluate Effectiveness, Accessibility, and Quality (EPHS9). Many (47%-69%) engaged in activities to Inform and Educate (EPHS3), Develop Policies (EPHS5), and Link to Services (EPHS7). A minority (4%-29%) engaged in activities to Diagnose and Investigate Health Problems (EPHS2), Mobilize Community Partnerships (EPHS4), and Assure Competent Workforce (EPHS8). No state engaged in Innovative Research (EPHS10). Few local health departments engaged in abortion-related activities. While most state health departments engage in abortion-related activities, they appear to reflect what the law requires rather than the range of core public health activities. Additional research is needed to assess whether these services meet quality standards for public health services and determine how best to support governmental health agencies in their growing tasks. These findings raise important questions about the role of public health agencies and

  19. Active transportation measurement and benchmarking development : New Orleans state of active transportation report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a surge in bicycle and pedestrian use in communities that have invested in active transportation infrastruc-ture and programming. While these increases show potentially promising trends, many of the cities that ha...

  20. Structure-activity relationships for the fluorescence of ochratoxin A: Insight for detection of ochratoxin A metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenette, Christine; Paugh, Robert J. [Departments of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Tozlovanu, Mariana; Juzio, Maud [ENSAT, UMR CNRS 5503, 1 Avenue Agrobiopole 31326 Auzeville-Tolosane (France); Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie [ENSAT, UMR CNRS 5503, 1 Avenue Agrobiopole 31326 Auzeville-Tolosane (France)], E-mail: leszkowicz@ensat.fr; Manderville, Richard A. [Departments of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: rmanderv@uoguelph.ca

    2008-06-09

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium that is widely found as a contaminant of food products. The toxin is a renal carcinogen in male rats, the cause of mycotoxicoses in pigs and has been associated with chronic human kidney diseases. Bioactivation has been implicated in OTA-mediated toxicity, although inconsistent results have been reported, due, in part, to the difficulty in detecting OTA metabolites in vivo. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with fluorescence detection (FLD) is the most widely used analytical detection method for OTA. Under acidic conditions the toxin generates blue fluorescence (465 nm) that is due to an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process that generates an emissive keto tautomer. Disruption of this ESIPT process quenches fluorescence intensity and causes a blue shift in emission maxima. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of the C5-chlorine atom, the lactone moiety and the amide bond on OTA fluorescence and derive optical parameters for OTA metabolites that have been detected in vitro. Our results highlight the limitations of LC/FLD for OTA metabolites that do not undergo ESIPT. For emissive derivatives, our absorption and emission data improves the sensitivity of LC/FLD (3-4-fold increase in the limit of detection (LOD)) for OTA analogues bearing a C5-OH group, such as the hydroquinone (OTHQ) metabolite and the glutathione conjugate of OTA (OTA-GSH). This increased sensitivity may facilitate the detection of OTA metabolites bearing a C5-OH group in biological fluids and enhance our understanding of OTA-mediated toxicity.

  1. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, I; Stam, C J; Douw, L; Bartolomei, F; Heimans, J J; van Dijk, B W; Postma, T J; Klein, M; Reijneveld, J C

    2008-05-01

    In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activity compared to healthy controls and that particularly global slowing correlates with neurocognitive dysfunction. Resting state MEG recordings were obtained from 17 LGG patients and 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls. Relative spectral power was calculated in the delta, theta, upper and lower alpha, beta, and gamma frequency band. A battery of standardized neurocognitive tests measuring 6 neurocognitive domains was administered. LGG patients showed a slowing of the resting state brain activity when compared to healthy controls. Decrease in relative power was mainly found in the gamma frequency band in the bilateral frontocentral MEG regions, whereas an increase in relative power was found in the theta frequency band in the left parietal region. An increase of the relative power in the theta and lower alpha band correlated with impaired executive functioning, information processing, and working memory. LGG patients are characterized by global slowing of their resting state brain activity and this slowing phenomenon correlates with the observed neurocognitive deficits.

  2. Isolation and screening of rare-Actinobacteria, a new insight for finding natural products with anti-vascular calcification activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Fatemeh; Hamedi, Javad; Motevaseli, Elaheh; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh

    2017-10-09

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a significant pathological process in some life-threatening diseases. Several pathological mechanisms, including transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells to osteoblast-like cells and apoptosis are involved in VC. Compounds with an inhibitory effect on these processes are potentially efficient medications. In consideration of the multiple biological activities of Actinobacteria, this research was aimed at finding anti-VC metabolite-producing Actinobacteria. After the isolation and identification of Actinobacteria, the effect of their fermentation broth extracts on the apoptosis rate was measured using various methods- e.g. ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining, DNA laddering and diphenylamine assays. The effect of the most effective fermentation broth extract of Actinobacteria (FBEA) on the mRNA expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osteopontin (OPN) was examined. Finally, the most effective FBEA was fractionated and the chemical composition of anti-VC fractions was analyzed using GC-MS. Various VC inhibition rates were observed in the tested FBEA (20 μg ml(-1) ; 17.9% to 60.15%). The inhibition of DNA fragmentation was 7%-48%. The FBE with the greatest anti-calcification activity belonged to Kribbella sp. UTMC 267 and, according to 16S rRNA analysis, Kribbella sancticallisti with a similarity of 98.53% is its nearest neighbor. The FBE of Kribbella sp. UTMC 267 reduced Runx2 mRNA expression by 2.95 folds and OPN mRNA expression by 28.57 folds, both of which are considered significant (P<0.05). Finally, GC-MS analysis showed the existence of potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammation agents in FBE of Kribbella sp. UTMC 267. Actinobacterial metabolites can provide a new strategy for treating VC diseases by reducing the expression of osteogenic genes, the apoptosis rate, and oxidative stress. This study highlights the therapeutic potential of Kribbella sp. metabolites and Actinobacteria as a new

  3. Resonant activation in polymer translocation: new insights into the escape dynamics of molecules driven by an oscillating field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, N; Fiasconaro, A; Adorno, D Persano; Spagnolo, B

    2010-08-04

    The translocation of molecules across cellular membranes or through synthetic nanopores is strongly affected by thermal fluctuations. In this work we study how the dynamics of a polymer in a noisy environment changes when the translocation process is driven by an oscillating electric field. An improved version of the Rouse model for a flexible polymer has been adopted to mimic the molecular dynamics, by taking into account the harmonic interactions between adjacent monomers and the excluded-volume effect by introducing a Lennard-Jones potential between all beads. A bending recoil torque has also been included in our model. The polymer dynamics is simulated in a two-dimensional domain by numerically solving the Langevin equations of motion. Thermal fluctuations are taken into account by introducing a Gaussian uncorrelated noise. The mean first translocation time of the polymer centre of inertia shows a minimum as a function of the frequency of the oscillating forcing field. This finding represents the first evidence of the resonant activation behaviour in the dynamics of polymer translocation.

  4. Influence of bromoethyl group on biological activity of 5-fluorouracil prodrug: Insights from X-ray crystallography and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Chuan; Liu, Kuan-Guan; Qin, Da-An; Cheng, Chen-Chen; Chen, Bing-Xiong; Hu, Mao-Lin

    2012-11-01

    To develop alkyl halides for a promising prodrug system, a 5-fluorouracil prodrug containing a bromoethyl group (5-FUBr) was synthesized and its hydrophobicity, cytotoxicity and DNA-bonding ability were investigated in detail. Compare with 5-fluorouracil, 5-FUBr exhibits a great advantage of hydrophobicity and shows significant reduction in toxic side effect. To explore the mechanism of action of 5-FUBr at the molecular level, X-ray crystallography and molecular docking were exploited to make a more detailed analysis of the bromoethyl contribution to the construction of meaningful structure-activity relationship. Details of X-ray crystal structure of 5-FUBr suggest that 5-fluorouracil may be more apt to be released from 5-FUBr. The appearance of the bromoethyl group in 5-FUBr makes a remarkable impact on inhibition of thymidylate synthase (TS), and the impact of subtle structural variation between 5-fluorouracil and 5-FUBr should be taken into account in the process of developing this family of 5-fluorouracil prodrugs.

  5. Detoxification of Deoxynivalenol via Glycosylation Represents Novel Insights on Antagonistic Activities of Trichoderma when Confronted with Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Tan, Yanglan; Liu, Na; Yan, Zheng; Liao, Yucai; Chen, Jie; de Saeger, Sarah; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Wu, Aibo

    2016-11-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin mainly produced by the Fusarium graminearum complex, which are important phytopathogens that can infect crops and lead to a serious disease called Fusarium head blight (FHB). As the most common B type trichothecene mycotoxin, DON has toxic effects on animals and humans, which poses a risk to food security. Thus, efforts have been devoted to control DON contamination in different ways. Management of DON production by Trichoderma strains as a biological control-based strategy has drawn great attention recently. In our study, eight selected Trichoderma strains were evaluated for their antagonistic activities on F. graminearum by dual culture on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium. As potential antagonists, Trichoderma strains showed prominent inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and mycotoxin production of F. graminearum. In addition, the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (D3G), which was once regarded as a detoxification product of DON in plant defense, was detected when Trichoderma were confronted with F. graminearum. The occurrence of D3G in F. graminearum and Trichoderma interaction was reported for the first time, and these findings provide evidence that Trichoderma strains possess a self-protection mechanism as plants to detoxify DON into D3G when competing with F. graminearum.

  6. A comprehensive insight into tetracycline resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in activated sludge using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-06-05

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L) was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge.

  7. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  8. Evolution of drug resistance: insight on TEM β-lactamases structure and activity and β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, A C; Fernandes, R; Moreira, I S

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of the first penicillin bacterial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics has spread and evolved promoting new resistances to pathogens. The most common mechanism of resistance is the production of β-lactamases that have spread thorough nature and evolve to complex phenotypes like CMT type enzymes. New antibiotics have been introduced in clinical practice, and therefore it becomes necessary a concise summary about their molecular targets, specific use and other properties. β-lactamases are still a major medical concern and they have been extensively studied and described in the scientific literature. Several authors agree that Glu166 should be the general base and Ser70 should perform the nucleophilic attack to the carbon of the carbonyl group of the β-lactam ring. Nevertheless there still is controversy on their catalytic mechanism. TEMs evolve at incredible pace presenting more complex phenotypes due to their tolerance to mutations. These mutations lead to an increasing need of novel, stronger and more specific and stable antibiotics. The present review summarizes key structural, molecular and functional aspects of ESBL, IRT and CMT TEM β-lactamases properties and up to date diagrams of the TEM variants with defined phenotype. The activity and structural characteristics of several available TEMs in the NCBI-PDB are presented, as well as the relation of the various mutated residues and their specific properties and some previously proposed catalytic mechanisms.

  9. A Forced Damped Oscillation Framework for Undulatory Swimming Provides New Insights into How Propulsion Arises in Active and Passive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions (“active” swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid (“passive” swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  10. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Arylation of Heterocycles via C-H Bond Activation: Expanded Scope Through Mechanistic Insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Berman, Ashley; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-07-18

    A practical, functional group tolerant method for the Rh-catalyzed direct arylation of a variety of pharmaceutically important azoles with aryl bromides is described. Many of the successful azole and aryl bromide coupling partners are not compatible with methods for the direct arylation of heterocycles using Pd(0) or Cu(I) catalysts. The readily prepared, low molecular weight ligand, Z-1-tert-butyl-2,3,6,7-tetrahydrophosphepine, which coordinates to Rh in a bidentate P-olefin fashion to provide a highly active yet thermally stable arylation catalyst, is essential to the success of this method. By using the tetrafluoroborate salt of the corresponding phosphonium, the reactions can be assembled outside of a glove box without purification of reagents or solvent. The reactions are also conducted in THF or dioxane, which greatly simplifies product isolation relative to most other methods for direct arylation of azoles employing high-boiling amide solvents. The reactions are performed with heating in a microwave reactor to obtain excellent product yields in two hours.

  11. Detoxification of Deoxynivalenol via Glycosylation Represents Novel Insights on Antagonistic Activities of Trichoderma when Confronted with Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin mainly produced by the Fusarium graminearum complex, which are important phytopathogens that can infect crops and lead to a serious disease called Fusarium head blight (FHB. As the most common B type trichothecene mycotoxin, DON has toxic effects on animals and humans, which poses a risk to food security. Thus, efforts have been devoted to control DON contamination in different ways. Management of DON production by Trichoderma strains as a biological control-based strategy has drawn great attention recently. In our study, eight selected Trichoderma strains were evaluated for their antagonistic activities on F. graminearum by dual culture on potato dextrose agar (PDA medium. As potential antagonists, Trichoderma strains showed prominent inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and mycotoxin production of F. graminearum. In addition, the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (D3G, which was once regarded as a detoxification product of DON in plant defense, was detected when Trichoderma were confronted with F. graminearum. The occurrence of D3G in F. graminearum and Trichoderma interaction was reported for the first time, and these findings provide evidence that Trichoderma strains possess a self-protection mechanism as plants to detoxify DON into D3G when competing with F. graminearum.

  12. Idle state classification using spiking activity and local field potentials in a brain computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jordan J; Tien, Rex N; Inoue, Yoh; Schwartz, Andrew B

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies of intracortical brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have often focused on or compared the use of spiking activity and local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding kinematic movement parameters. Conversely, using these signals to detect the initial intention to use a neuroprosthetic device or not has remained a relatively understudied problem. In this study, we examined the relative performance of spiking activity and LFP signals in detecting discrete state changes in attention regarding a user's desire to actively control a BCI device. Preliminary offline results suggest that the beta and high gamma frequency bands of LFP activity demonstrated a capacity for discriminating idle/active BCI control states equal to or greater than firing rate activity on the same channel. Population classifier models using either signal modality demonstrated an indistinguishably high degree of accuracy in decoding rest periods from active BCI reach periods as well as other portions of active BCI task trials. These results suggest that either signal modality may be used to reliably detect discrete state changes on a fine time scale for the purpose of gating neural prosthetic movements.

  13. Gravity data of the Norcia and Castelluccio basins (central Italy): insight for active faulting of the area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, P.; Rustichelli, A.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Piccardi, L.; Ruiz-Constán, A.; Tondi, E.; López-Garrido, A. C.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.

    2009-04-01

    , indicating an increase of crustal thickness towards the Apennine edge, in agreement with the regional Bouguer map available from whole Italy. Negative residual anomalies up to -4 mGal are located in Norcia and Castelluccio depressions. Norcia has a roughly triangular depocenter located to the northwestern part, where probably are situated the most intense tectonic activity. It is surrounded by sharps west and northeastern scarps, corresponding to faults, the second clearly formed on recent sediments. Surprisingly, the southern half of the Norcia Basin, in spite of its flat character, seems to have a very thin practically absent sedimentary infill. It may represent an old flat surface of erosion, perhaps downthrown during fault activity. Catelluccio basin has a slightly asymmetrical sinsedimentary infill, controlled by faults located to the northwestern and northeastern borders.

  14. A Study of Postwar Japan (1945-1950): What Insights and Lessons Can be Gained From the United States Led Rebirth of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-16

    Shinto . This sacred position in the State Shinto reinforced the Emperor’s control over the people. The Japanese have an ancient religion called... Shinto . This religion was much more of a mythological worship of Japan and its gods and heroes. State Shinto was modeled after the older Shinto , but was...revised and used as a State religion in modern times. State Shinto was more of a cult than a religion. There were three primary beliefs that formed

  15. A gel-free approach in vascular smooth muscle cell proteome: perspectives for a better insight into activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedeschi Lorena

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS analysis is a powerful approach to identify proteins, owing to its capacity to fractionate molecules according to different chemical features. The first protein expression map of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC was published in 2001 and since then other papers have been produced. The most detailed two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE map was presented by Mayr et al who identified 235 proteins, corresponding to the 154 most abundant unique proteins in mouse aortic VSMC. A chromatographic approach aimed at fractionating the VSMC proteome has never been used before. Results This paper describes a strategy for the study of the VSMC proteome. Our approach was based on pre-fractionation with ion exchange chromatography coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis assisted by a liquid chromatography (LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF. Ion exchange chromatography resulted in a good strategy designed to simplify the complexity of the cellular extract and to identify a large number of proteins. Selectivity based on the ion-exchange chemical features was adequate if evaluated on the basis of protein pI. The LC-MALDI approach proved to be highly reproducible and sensitive since we were able to identify up to 815 proteins with a concentration dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude. Conclusions In our opinion, the large number of identified proteins and the promising quantitative reproducibility made this approach a powerful method to analyze complex protein mixtures in a high throughput way and to obtain statistical data for the discovery of key factors involved in VSMC activation and to analyze a label-free differential protein expression.

  16. New insights into the evolutionary origins of the recombination-activating gene proteins and V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Lina Marcela; Schatz, David G

    2017-06-01

    The adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates relies on V(D)J recombination as one of the main processes to generate the diverse array of receptors necessary for the recognition of a wide range of pathogens. The DNA cleavage reaction necessary for the assembly of the antigen receptor genes from an array of potential gene segments is mediated by the recombination-activating gene proteins RAG1 and RAG2. The RAG proteins have been proposed to originate from a transposable element (TE) as they share mechanistic and structural similarities with several families of transposases and are themselves capable of mediating transposition. A number of RAG-like proteins and TEs with sequence similarity to RAG1 and RAG2 have been identified, but only recently has their function begun to be characterized, revealing mechanistic links to the vertebrate RAGs. Of particular significance is the discovery of ProtoRAG, a transposon superfamily found in the genome of the basal chordate amphioxus. ProtoRAG has many of the sequence and mechanistic features predicted for the ancestral RAG transposon and is likely to be an evolutionary relative of RAG1 and RAG2. In addition, early observations suggesting that RAG1 is able to mediate V(D)J recombination in the absence of RAG2 have been confirmed, implying independent evolutionary origins for the two RAG genes. Here, recent progress in identifying and characterizing RAG-like proteins and the TEs that encode them is summarized and a refined model for the evolution of V(D)J recombination and the RAG proteins is presented. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Biochemical evidence for energy-independent flippase activity in bovine epididymal sperm membranes: an insight into membrane biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, Archita; Francis, Vincent Gerard; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2013-09-01

    During the maturation process spermatozoa undergo a series of changes in their lateral and horizontal lipid profiles. However, lipid metabolism in spermatozoa is not clearly understood for two reasons: i) the mature spermatozoa are devoid of endoplasmic reticulum, which is the major site of phospholipid (PL) synthesis in somatic cells, and ii) studies have been superficial due to the difficulty in culturing spermatozoa. We hypothesize that spermatozoa contain biogenic membrane flippases since immense changes in lipids occur during spermatogenic differentiation. To test this, we isolated spermatozoa from bovine epididymides and reconstituted the detergent extract of sperm membranes into proteoliposomes. In vitro assays showed that proteoliposomes reconstituted with sperm membrane proteins exhibit ATP-independent flip-flop movement of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol. Half-life time of PC flipping was found to be ∼3.2±1 min for whole sperm membrane, which otherwise would have taken ∼11-12 h in the absence of protein. Further biochemical studies confirm the flip-flop movement to be protein-mediated, based on its sensitivity to protease and protein-modifying reagents. To further determine the cellular localization of flippases, we isolated mitochondria of spermatozoa and checked for ATP-independent flippase activity. Interestingly, mitochondrial membranes showed flip-flop movement but were specific for PC with half-life time of ∼5±2 min. Our results also suggest that spermatozoa have different populations of flippases and that their localization within the cellular compartments depends on the type of PL synthesis.

  18. Solid State Inflation Balloon Active Deorbiter: Scalable Low-Cost Deorbit System for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Solid State Inflation Balloon Active Deorbiter project is to develop and demonstrate a scalable, simple, reliable, and low-cost active deorbiting system capable of controlling the downrange point of impact for the full-range of small satellites from 1 kg to 180 kg. The key enabling technology being developed is the Solid State Gas Generator (SSGG) chip, generating pure nitrogen gas from sodium azide (NaN3) micro-crystals. Coupled with a metalized nonelastic drag balloon, the complete Solid State Inflation Balloon (SSIB) system is capable of repeated inflation/deflation cycles. The SSGG minimizes size, weight, electrical power, and cost when compared to the current state of the art.

  19. Cortical activation during clock reading as a quadratic function of dementia state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Ralf; Milian, Monika; Erb, Michael; Eschweiler, Gerhard W; Grodd, Wolfgang; Leyhe, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuroimaging studies have demonstrated decreased brain activation, while increased activation was detected in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). It can be hypothesized that increased cerebral activity seen in patients with MCI reflects neural compensation at the beginning of neurodegenerative processes. Later, as patients develop AD, neural integrity is increasingly impaired. This is accompanied by decreased neural activation. In this study we examined cognitive performance and functional magnetic resonance imaging activation on a Clock Reading task (CRT) and a Spatial Control task (SCT) in healthy controls, patients with MCI, and patients with early AD. Correlations between neural-functional activation and cognitive state, measured by the Mini Mental Status Examination, were determined using rank, linear and quadratic correlation models. It could be shown that CRT, in comparison to SCT, specifically activates brain regions in the ventral visual stream and precuneus known to be involved in conceptual processing and spatial imagery. The correlation between brain activity and cognitive state followed a quadratic rather than a linear pattern in several brain regions, including the lingual gyrus, cuneus, and precuneus. The strongest brain activity was found in patients with MCI and less severely impaired early AD subjects. These findings support the hypothesis that patients in early stages of dementia compensate for neuronal loss by the recruitment of additional neural resources reflected by increased neural activation, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent signal.

  20. Students’ Extracurricular Activities in Higher Education and Its Effect on Personal Development and Academic Achievement (Case Study In Islamic State University of Suska Riau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirah Diniaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the students’ extracurricular activities at Islamic State University of Suska Riau concerning the types and forms of their activities, background of the activity, benefits of extracurricular activities, and its effect on students’ self-development and academic achievement. 300 students who enroll at sixth semester in eight Faculties (Tarbiyah and Teacher’s Training, Sharia and Law, Ushuludin, Dakwah and Communication Sciences, Science and Technology, Psychology, Economics and Social Sciences, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry were the sample of this study. The data were then processed statistically using percentages and regression of correlation. It was found that the type of extracurricular followed by the students were leadership (70%, those of whom had the motivation to add insight, knowledge and more critical thinking were (44.67%. Some students followed extra-curricular activity because of their solicitation or to follow the main stream (37%, some students did not get financial benefits from the activity (34.67%. Some other respondents felt that they could follow the extracurricular talents, interests and personal abilities (58.67%, and think about their future after graduating from the college (66%. Things need to be followed up by students and university staffs were the more active students who attend the extracurricular activities were the lower achievement ones. Copyright © 2014 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  1. Hidden State Conditional Random Field for Abnormal Activity Recognition in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As the number of elderly people has increased worldwide, there has been a surge of research into assistive technologies to provide them with better care by recognizing their normal and abnormal activities. However, existing abnormal activity recognition (AAR algorithms rarely consider sub-activity relations when recognizing abnormal activities. This paper presents an application of the Hidden State Conditional Random Field (HCRF method to detect and assess abnormal activities that often occur in elderly persons’ homes. Based on HCRF, this paper designs two AAR algorithms, and validates them by comparing them with a feature vector distance based algorithm in two experiments. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms favorably outperform the competitor, especially when abnormal activities have same sensor type and sensor number as normal activities.

  2. Population Decoding of Motor Cortical Activity using a Generalized Linear Model with Hidden States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhern, Vernon; Wu, Wei; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Paninski, Liam

    2010-01-01

    Generalized linear models (GLMs) have been developed for modeling and decoding population neuronal spiking activity in the motor cortex. These models provide reasonable characterizations between neural activity and motor behavior. However, they lack a description of movement-related terms which are not observed directly in these experiments, such as muscular activation, the subject's level of attention, and other internal or external states. Here we propose to include a multi-dimensional hidden state to address these states in a GLM framework where the spike count at each time is described as a function of the hand state (position, velocity, and acceleration), truncated spike history, and the hidden state. The model can be identified by an Expectation-Maximization algorithm. We tested this new method in two datasets where spikes were simultaneously recorded using a multi-electrode array in the primary motor cortex of two monkeys. It was found that this method significantly improves the model-fitting over the classical GLM, for hidden dimensions varying from 1 to 4. This method also provides more accurate decoding of hand state (lowering the Mean Square Error by up to 29% in some cases), while retaining real-time computational efficiency. These improvements on representation and decoding over the classical GLM model suggest that this new approach could contribute as a useful tool to motor cortical decoding and prosthetic applications. PMID:20359500

  3. Predicting risk-taking behavior from prefrontal resting-state activity and personality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Studer

    Full Text Available Risk-taking is subject to considerable individual differences. In the current study, we tested whether resting-state activity in the prefrontal cortex and trait sensitivity to reward and punishment can help predict risk-taking behavior. Prefrontal activity at rest was assessed in seventy healthy volunteers using electroencephalography, and compared to their choice behavior on an economic risk-taking task. The Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale was used to measure participants' trait sensitivity to reward and punishment. Our results confirmed both prefrontal resting-state activity and personality traits as sources of individual differences in risk-taking behavior. Right-left asymmetry in prefrontal activity and scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale, reflecting trait sensitivity to punishment, were correlated with the level of risk-taking on the task. We further discovered that scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale modulated the relationship between asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state activity and risk-taking. The results of this study demonstrate that heterogeneity in risk-taking behavior can be traced back to differences in the basic physiology of decision-makers' brains, and suggest that baseline prefrontal activity and personality traits might interplay in guiding risk-taking behavior.

  4. 34 CFR 403.71 - In what additional ways may funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In what additional ways may funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities? 403.71 Section 403.71 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED...

  5. Frontopolar activity and connectivity support dynamic conscious augmentation of creative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam E; Cohen, Michael S; Raab, Hillary A; Yedibalian, Christopher G; Gray, Jeremy R

    2015-03-01

    No ability is more valued in the modern innovation-fueled economy than thinking creatively on demand, and the "thinking cap" capacity to augment state creativity (i.e., to try and succeed at thinking more creatively) is of broad importance for education and a rich mental life. Although brain-based creativity research has focused on static individual differences in trait creativity, less is known about changes in creative state within an individual. How does the brain augment state creativity when creative thinking is required? Can augmented creative state be consciously engaged and disengaged dynamically across time? Using a novel "thin slice" creativity paradigm in 55 fMRI participants performing verb-generation, we successfully cued large, conscious, short-duration increases in state creativity, indexed quantitatively by a measure of semantic distance derived via latent semantic analysis. A region of left frontopolar cortex, previously associated with creative integration of semantic information, exhibited increased activity and functional connectivity to anterior cingulate gyrus and right frontopolar cortex during cued augmentation of state creativity. Individual differences in the extent of increased activity in this region predicted individual differences in the extent to which participants were able to successfully augment state creative performance after accounting for trait creativity and intelligence. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the sleep-like states in frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A V; Karmanova, I G; Kozlachkova, E Y; Voronova, I P; Popova, N K

    1994-10-01

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, was determined in the brain stem in active awake frogs, and frogs in three sleep-like states: with plastic muscle tone (SLS-1), with rigid muscle tone (SLS-2), and with relaxed muscle tone (SLS-3). Significant decrease in the enzyme activity has been found in frogs in SLS-1 and SLS-2 compared to awake animals. The development in frogs a cataleptic-like immobility after treating the animals with rhythmic lighting was accompanied with a decrease in the brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity. These results provide strong evidence for the involvement of the brain serotonin in frogs in the control of evolutionary ancient sleep-like states, probably by the regulation of muscle tone.

  7. Activation pathway of Src kinase reveals intermediate states as targets for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-03-01

    Unregulated activation of Src kinases leads to aberrant signalling, uncontrolled growth and differentiation of cancerous cells. Reaching a complete mechanistic understanding of large-scale conformational transformations underlying the activation of kinases could greatly help in the development of therapeutic drugs for the treatment of these pathologies. In principle, the nature of conformational transition could be modelled in silico via atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, although this is very challenging because of the long activation timescales. Here we employ a computational paradigm that couples transition pathway techniques and Markov state model-based massively distributed simulations for mapping the conformational landscape of c-src tyrosine kinase. The computations provide the thermodynamics and kinetics of kinase activation for the first time, and help identify key structural intermediates. Furthermore, the presence of a novel allosteric site in an intermediate state of c-src that could be potentially used for drug design is predicted.

  8. Animal-borne imaging reveals novel insights into the foraging behaviors and Diel activity of a large-bodied apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Nifong

    Full Text Available Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals' experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal

  9. Urea-Dependent Adenylate Kinase Activation following Redistribution of Structural States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogne, Per; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-10-04

    Proteins are often functionally dependent on conformational changes that allow them to sample structural states that are sparsely populated in the absence of a substrate or binding partner. The distribution of such structural microstates is governed by their relative stability, and the kinetics of their interconversion is governed by the magnitude of associated activation barriers. Here, we have explored the interplay among structure, stability, and function of a selected enzyme, adenylate kinase (Adk), by monitoring changes in its enzymatic activity in response to additions of urea. For this purpose we used a 31P NMR assay that was found useful for heterogeneous sample compositions such as presence of urea. It was found that Adk is activated at low urea concentrations whereas higher urea concentrations unfolds and thereby deactivates the enzyme. From a quantitative analysis of chemical shifts, it was found that urea redistributes preexisting structural microstates, stabilizing a substrate-bound open state at the expense of a substrate-bound closed state. Adk is rate-limited by slow opening of substrate binding domains and the urea-dependent redistribution of structural states is consistent with a model where the increased activity results from an increased rate-constant for domain opening. In addition, we also detected a strong correlation between the catalytic free energy and free energy of substrate (ATP) binding, which is also consistent with the catalytic model for Adk. From a general perspective, it appears that urea can be used to modulate conformational equilibria of folded proteins toward more expanded states for cases where a sizeable difference in solvent-accessible surface area exists between the states involved. This effect complements the action of osmolytes, such as trimethylamine N-oxide, that favor more compact protein states. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Results from the United states' 2014 report card on physical activity for children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentro, Kara N; Beals, Kim; Crouter, Scott E; Eisenmann, Joey C; McKenzie, Thomas L; Pate, Russell R; Saelens, Brian E; Sisson, Susan B; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Sothern, Melinda S; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2014-05-01

    The National Physical Activity Plan Alliance partnered with physical activity experts to develop a report card that provides a comprehensive assessment of physical activity among United States children and youth. The 2014 U.S. Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth includes 10 indicators: overall physical activity levels, sedentary behaviors, active transportation, organized sport participation, active play, health-related fitness, family and peers, school, community and the built environment, and government strategies and investments. Data from nationally representative surveys were used to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the physical activity indicators. The Committee used the best available data source to grade the indicators using a standard rubric. Approximately one-quarter of children and youth 6 to 15 years of age were at least moderately active for 60 min/day on at least 5 days per week. The prevalence was lower among youth compared with younger children, resulting in a grade of D- for overall physical activity levels. Five of the remaining 9 indicators received grades ranging from B- to F, whereas there was insufficient data to grade 4 indicators, highlighting the need for more research in some areas. Physical activity levels among U.S. children and youth are low and sedentary behavior is high, suggesting that current infrastructure, policies, programs, and investments in support of children's physical activity are not sufficient.

  11. Globalization and Cooperative Activity among National Labor Unions and National Environmental Organizations in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    STEELE, David Foster

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the cooperative activity between national labor unions and national environmental organizations in the United States on issues associated with globalization. Past researchers have advocated the need for organizations that makeup the labor and environmental movements to work together, but do they? It is hypothesized that globalization issues may be a key factor for cooperative activity between national labor unions and national environmental organizations. The conducted res...

  12. Identification of resting and active state EEG features of Alzheimer's disease using discrete wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, Parham; Devilbiss, David M; Verma, Ajay; Bernstein, Allan; Hess, Terry; Simon, Adam J; Ashrafiuon, Hashem

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with deficits in a number of cognitive processes and executive functions. Moreover, abnormalities in the electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum develop with the progression of AD. These features have been traditionally characterized with montage recordings and conventional spectral analysis during resting eyes-closed and resting eyes-open (EO) conditions. In this study, we introduce a single lead dry electrode EEG device which was employed on AD and control subjects during resting and activated battery of cognitive and sensory tasks such as Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and auditory stimulations. EEG signals were recorded over the left prefrontal cortex (Fp1) from each subject. EEG signals were decomposed into sub-bands approximately corresponding to the major brain frequency bands using several different discrete wavelet transforms and developed statistical features for each band. Decision tree algorithms along with univariate and multivariate statistical analysis were used to identify the most predictive features across resting and active states, separately and collectively. During resting state recordings, we found that the AD patients exhibited elevated D4 (~4-8 Hz) mean power in EO state as their most distinctive feature. During the active states, however, the majority of AD patients exhibited larger minimum D3 (~8-12 Hz) values during auditory stimulation (18 Hz) combined with increased kurtosis of D5 (~2-4 Hz) during PASAT with 2 s interval. When analyzed using EEG recording data across all tasks, the most predictive AD patient features were a combination of the first two feature sets. However, the dominant discriminating feature for the majority of AD patients were still the same features as the active state analysis. The results from this small sample size pilot study indicate that although EEG recordings during resting conditions are able to differentiate AD from control subjects, EEG activity

  13. Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Hannah L.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Zieff, Susan G.; Eyler, Amy A.; Lyn, Rodney; Goins, Karin Valentine; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Changing the built environment to promote active lifestyles requires collaboration among diverse sectors. Multisectoral collaborative groups in the United States promote active lifestyles through environmental and policy changes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of these collaborative groups and the extent to which they have achieved change. Methods We identified, recruited, and interviewed the coordinators of active living collaborative groups in the United States. We used descriptive statistics to characterize groups by composition, stakeholder engagement, and the extent of environmental and policy change in 8 strategic areas. Results Fifty-nine groups from 22 states participated in the study. Most groups had a diverse set of partners and used a range of activities to advance their agendas. Most groups achieved some form of environmental or policy change. On average, groups reported working on 5 strategy areas; parks and recreation (86%) and Safe Routes to School (85%) were named most frequently. More than half of groups reported their environmental initiatives as either in progress or completed. Groups reported the most success in changing policy for public plazas, street improvements, streetscaping, and parks, open space, and recreation. Complete Streets policy and zoning ordinances were the most frequently cited policy types. Engaging in media activities and the policy-making process in addition to engaging stakeholders appear to influence success in achieving change. Conclusion Although many groups successfully worked on parks and recreation improvements, opportunities remain in other areas, including transit and infill and redevelopment. Additional time and resources may be critical to realizing these types of changes. PMID:23391295

  14. Understanding the Role of Water in Modifying Particle Mixing States for CCN Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, D. N.; Gao, S.; Pierce, J. R.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    CCN data sets from ambient and chamber studies, which consist of complex heterogeneous mixtures of organic and inorganic aerosol mixtures, may not show a single activation curve but instead can exhibit multiple activations not associated with doubly charged particles. It has been suggested that these activation curves may be representative of multiple externally mixed compounds, whereas single activation curves are representative of single component or multicomponent internally mixed aerosols. To characterize and modify mixing states, a new laminar flow tube apparatus was developed to control the extent of mixing of organic and inorganic fractions under different environmental conditions such as relative humidity. Data sets yielding multiple activation curves have been recreated by mixing multiple inorganic and organic compounds. Preliminary results suggest that aerosol water is a significant factor; under dry conditions, the aerosols remained externally mixed while humid conditions facilitated internal mixing. For example, ammonium sulfate (inorganic) and succinic acid (organic) when dry, maintained an external mixture and multiple activation curves were observed to be constant. Under humid conditions, external mixing was initially observed; however, the aerosol water promoted internal mixing and the activation curves were observed to converge into a single curve. The data agrees well with Köhler Theory and single parameter (kappa) theory thermodynamic predictions of droplet activation. Data sets are also compared with a diffusion based coagulation particle model to predict mixing behavior. The method of analysis and the effect of mixing states of multiple components on the supersaturated hygroscopic properties of aerosols are presented.

  15. Hydrogen Production by Ethanol Steam Reforming (ESR over CeO2 Supported Transition Metal (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Catalysts: Insight into the Structure-Activity Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Konsolakis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate steam reforming of ethanol with regard to H2 production over transition metal catalysts supported on CeO2. Various parameters concerning the effect of temperature (400–800 °C, steam-to-carbon (S/C feed ratio (0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, metal entity (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and metal loading (15–30 wt.% on the catalytic performance, were thoroughly studied. The optimal performance was obtained for the 20 wt.% Co/CeO2 catalyst, achieving a H2 yield of up to 66% at 400 °C. In addition, the Co/CeO2 catalyst demonstrated excellent stability performance in the whole examined temperature range of 400–800 °C. In contrast, a notable stability degradation, especially at low temperatures, was observed for Ni-, Cu-, and Fe-based catalysts, ascribed mainly to carbon deposition. An extensive characterization study, involving N2 adsorption-desorption (BET, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDS, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, and Temperature Programmed Reduction (H2-TPR was undertaken to gain insight into the structure-activity correlation. The excellent reforming performance of Co/CeO2 catalysts could be attributed to their intrinsic reactivity towards ethanol reforming in combination to their high surface oxygen concentration, which hinders the deposition of carbonaceous species.

  16. Dexamethasone enhances programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) expression during T cell activation: an insight into the optimum application of glucocorticoids in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Kailin; Gu, Bingxin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Xianghua

    2015-06-26

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a key cell-surface receptor of CD28 superfamily that triggers inhibitory pathways to attenuate T-cell responses and promote T-cell tolerance. As a crucial role in tumor immunity, PD-1 has been a focus of studies in anti-cancer therapy. It has been approved that tumors could exploit PD-1-dependent immune suppression for immune evasion. Considering the wide use of glucocorticoids (GCs) in anti-cancer therapy and their immunosuppressive effects, we explored whether GCs could influence the expression of PD-1. In our study, we used dexamethasone (DEX) as a model glucocorticoid and demonstrated that DEX could enhance PD-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The effects were completely inhibited by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone (RU486), indicating that the effect of DEX on PD-1 is mediated through GR. We further found the sensitivity to DEX-induced upregulation of PD-1 expression had a significant difference between different T cell subsets, with memory T cells more susceptible to this effect. We also showed that DEX could suppress T cell functions via inhibition of cytokines production such as IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and induction of apoptosis of T cells. Our findings suggest a novel way by which DEX suppress the function of activated T lymphocytes by enhancing expression of PD-1 and provide an insight into the optimum clinical application of GCs.

  17. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  18. Socio-Political Use of Physical Activity in the United States, The Soviet Union and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mark W.

    Evidence from this comparative investigation of the Soviet Union, China, and the United States shows that different countries attach their own political meaning and ideology to physical activity in order to stabilize and strengthen themselves, and thus, better promote their respective ideology in the international marketplace of political power.…

  19. TUNL XIX. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980. [North Carolina State Univ. activities at TUNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    Research performed by North Carolina State University personnel at TUNL is highlighted in this report, which is actually the complete TUNL progress report for 1980. Studies in the areas of neutron cross sections, neutron polarization, radiative capture, atomic physics and development activities are included. One may expect completed projects to be reported in physics journals or conference proceedings. (RWR)

  20. 78 FR 46597 - Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program Annual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... research into areas of water management, development, and conservation that have a regional or national....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research... Water Resources (NIWR) USGS Competitive Grant Program. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA...

  1. 75 FR 27575 - Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program Annual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... encourages regional cooperation among institutes in research into areas of water management, development, and... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program... Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (42 U.S.C. 10301 et seq.), authorizes a water resources...

  2. 76 FR 75893 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... paperwork and respondent burden, CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on an...

  3. The state of education and outreach activities in Africa in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports the state of education and outreach activities in Africa with particular reference to the chemical weapons convention (CWC) of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) that was established in 1997 and based in The Hague, The Netherlands. The study employed various ...

  4. 78 FR 9720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Holders or Containers which enter the... techniques or other forms of information. Title: Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty...

  5. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...

  6. Participation, responsibility and choice: summoning the active citizen in Western European welfare states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newman, J.; Tonkens, E.

    2011-01-01

    Responsibility, participation and choice are key policy framings of active citizenship, summoning the citizen to take on new roles in welfare state reform. This volume traces the emergence of new discourses and the ways in which they take up and rework struggles of social movements for greater

  7. Search activity of the passe of the Historical Faculty of Transbaikal State Humanitarian and Pedagogical University

    OpenAIRE

    Drobotushenko Evgeniy Viktorovich

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the specificity of historical and patriotic work in the Zabaykalsky region. The focus is on the attitudes towards activities and goals of the search party “Khingan – Khalkhin-Gol” which was established in early 2012 at the Department of History of Transbaikal State Humanitarian and Pedagogical University.

  8. Wildlife based business activities in Ogbe–Ijaw market of Delta state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wildlife based business activities in Ogbe Ijaw market of Delta State, Nigeria was studied with the aim of analyzing the nature of the business, parts of wildlife species sold, source of buyers for the products, means of procuring the products, channels for marketing the products, and risks involved in procuring wildlife products ...

  9. Is the effect of a countermovement on jump height due to active state development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; Casius, L.J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the difference in jump height between countermovement jumps (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ) could be explained by a difference in active state during propulsion. Methods: Simulations were performed with a model of the human musculoskeletal system comprising four body

  10. High solid-state fluorescence in ring-shaped AEE-active tetraphenylsilole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuanjing; Samedov, Kerim; Albright, Haley; Dolinar, Brian S; Guzei, Ilia A; Hu, Rongrong; Zhang, Chaocan; Tang, Ben Zhong; West, Robert

    2014-10-28

    Three ring-shaped AEE-active silole-containing compounds were synthesized by mild condensation reactions. Cyclotrisiloxane compound 1 displays high solid-state quantum yield (Φfl = 0.86) with the fluorescence maximum at 512 nm. This high fluorescence efficiency results mainly from decreased vibrational pathways to fluorescence decay due to the intramolecular C-H···π interactions.

  11. Momentary assessment of affect, physical feeling states, and physical activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve F; Huh, Jimi; Leventhal, Adam M; Riggs, Nathaniel; Hedeker, Donald; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2014-03-01

    Most research on the interplay of affective and physical feelings states with physical activity in children has been conducted under laboratory conditions and fails to capture intraindividual covariation. The current study used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to bidirectionally examine how affective and physical feeling states are related to objectively measured physical activity taking place in naturalistic settings during the course of children's everyday lives. Children (N = 119, ages 9-13 years, 52% male, 32% Hispanic) completed 8 days of EMA monitoring, which measured positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), feeling tired, and feeling energetic up to 7 times per day. EMA responses were time-matched to accelerometer assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in the 30 min before and after each EMA survey. Higher ratings of feeling energetic and lower ratings of feeling tired were associated with more MVPA in the 30 min after the EMA prompt. More MVPA in the 30 min before the EMA prompt was associated with higher ratings of PA and feeling energetic and lower ratings of NA. Between-subjects analyses indicated that mean hourly leisure-time MVPA was associated with less intraindividual variability in PA and NA. Physical feeling states predict subsequent physical activity levels, which in turn, predict subsequent affective states in children. Active children demonstrated higher positive and negative emotional stability. Although the strength of these associations were of modest magnitude and their clinical relevance is unclear, understanding the antecedents to and consequences of physical activity may have theoretical and practical implications for the maintenance and promotion of physical activity and psychological well-being in children. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Visualization of the Differential Transition State Stabilization within the Active Site Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Increasing interest in the enzymatic reaction mechanisms and in the nature of catalytic effects in enzymes causes the need of appropriate visualization methods. A new interactive method to investigate catalytic effects using differential transition state stabilization approach (DTSS [1, 2] is presented. The catalytic properties of the active site of cytidine deaminase (E.C. 3.5.4.5 is visualized in the form of differential electrostatic properties. The visualization was implemented using scripting interface of VMD [3]. Cumulative Atomic Multipole Moments (CAMM [4,5,6] were utilized for efficient yet accurate evaluation of the electrostatic properties. The implementation is efficient enough for interactive presentation of catalytic effects in the active site of the enzyme due to transition state or substrate movement. This system of visualization of DTTS approach can be potentially used to validate hypotheses regarding the catalytic mechanism or to study binding properties of transition state analogues.

  13. Ribozyme Catalysis with a Twist: Active State of the Twister Ribozyme in Solution Predicted from Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Colin S; York, Darrin M

    2016-03-09

    We present results from molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of the twister ribozyme at different stages along the reaction path to gain insight into its mechanism. The results, together with recent biochemical experiments, provide support for a mechanism involving general-acid catalysis by a conserved adenine residue in the active site. Although adenine has been previously implicated as a general acid acting through the N1 position in other ribozymes such as the hairpin and VS ribozymes, in the twister ribozyme there may be a twist. Biochemical experiments suggest that general acid catalysis may occur through the N3 position, which has never before been implicated in this role; however, currently, there is a lack of a detailed structural model for the active state of the twister ribozyme in solution that is consistent with these and other experiments. Simulations in a crystalline environment reported here are consistent with X-ray crystallographic data, and suggest that crystal packing contacts trap the RNA in an inactive conformation with U-1 in an extruded state that is incompatible with an in-line attack to the scissile phosphate. Simulations in solution, on the other hand, reveal this region to be dynamic and able to adopt a conformation where U-1 is stacked with G33. In this state, the nucleophile is in line with the scissile phosphate, and the N1 position of G33 and N3 position of A1 are poised to act as a general base and acid, respectively, as supported by mutational experiments. Free energy calculations further predict the electrostatic environment causes a shift of the microscopic pKa at the N3 position of A1 toward neutrality by approximately 5 pKa units. These results offer a unified interpretation of a broad range of currently available experimental data that points to a novel mode of general acid catalysis through the N3 position of an adenine nucleobase, thus expanding the repertoire of known mechanistic strategies employed by

  14. The ETS-5 transcription factor regulates activity states in Caenorhabditis elegans by controlling satiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juozaityte, Vaida; Pladevall-Morera, David; Podolska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    -induced quiescence. Nutritional status has a major influence on C. elegans behavior. When foraging, food availability controls behavioral state switching between active (roaming) and sedentary (dwelling) states; however, when provided with high-quality food, C. elegans become sated and enter quiescence. We show......Animal behavior is shaped through interplay among genes, the environment, and previous experience. As in mammals, satiety signals induce quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans Here we report that the C. elegans transcription factor ETS-5, an ortholog of mammalian FEV/Pet1, controls satiety......-regulated behavioral state switching. Taken together, our results identify a neuronal mechanism for controlling intestinal fat stores and organismal behavioral states in C. elegans, and establish a paradigm for the elucidation of obesity-relevant mechanisms....

  15. Bursting activity of substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons in mouse parkinsonism in awake and anesthetized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, C J; Jaeger, D

    2015-03-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Psychedelic State Induced by Ayahuasca Modulates the Activity and Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C.; Tofoli, Luis F.; Santos, Antonio C.; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  17. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN.

  18. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Palhano-Fontes

    Full Text Available The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN, a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN. Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC. Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic, meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN.

  19. Molecular simulations and solid-state NMR investigate dynamical structure in rhodopsin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Blake; Struts, Andrey V; Feller, Scott E; Brown, Michael F

    2012-02-01

    Rhodopsin has served as the primary model for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-the largest group in the human genome, and consequently a primary target for pharmaceutical development. Understanding the functions and activation mechanisms of GPCRs has proven to be extraordinarily difficult, as they are part of a complex signaling cascade and reside within the cell membrane. Although X-ray crystallography has recently solved several GPCR structures that may resemble the activated conformation, the dynamics and mechanism of rhodopsin activation continue to remain elusive. Notably solid-state ((2))H NMR spectroscopy provides key information pertinent to how local dynamics of the retinal ligand change during rhodopsin activation. When combined with molecular mechanics simulations of proteolipid membranes, a new paradigm for the rhodopsin activation process emerges. Experiment and simulation both suggest that retinal isomerization initiates the rhodopsin photocascade to yield not a single activated structure, but rather an ensemble of activated conformational states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance...... and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition....

  1. Methadone Pharmacokinetics are Independent of Cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A) Activity and Gastrointestinal Drug Transport: Insights from Methadone Interactions with Ritonavir/Indinavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharasch, Evan D.; Hoffer, Christine; Whittington, Dale; Walker, Alysa; Bedynek, Pamela Sheffels

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone clearance is highly variable and drug interactions are problematic. Both have been attributed to CYP3A, but actual mechanisms are unknown. Drug interactions can provide such mechanistic information. Ritonavir/indinavir, one of the earliest protease inhibitor combinations, may inhibit CYP3A. We assessed ritonavir/indinavir effects on methadone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, intestinal and hepatic CYP3A activity, and intestinal transporters (P-glycoprotein) activity. CYP3A and transporters were assessed with alfentanil and fexofenadine, respectively. Methods Twelve healthy human immunodeficiency virus-negative volunteers underwent a sequential 3-part crossover. On three consecutive days they received oral alfentanil/fexofenadine, intravenous alfentanil, and intravenous plus oral (deuterium-labeled) methadone, repeated after acute (3d) and steady-state (2 wk) ritonavir/indinavir. Plasma and urine analytes were measured by mass spectrometry. Opioid effects were assessed by miosis. Results Alfentanil apparent oral clearance was inhibited >97% by both acute and steady-state ritonavir/indinavir, and systemic clearance was inhibited >90%, due to diminished hepatic and intestinal extraction. Ritonavir/indinavir increased fexofenadine area under the plasma concentration-time curve 4-to 5-fold, suggesting significant inhibition of gastrointestinal P-glycoprotein. Ritonavir/indinavir slightly increased methadone N-demethylation, but had no significant effects on methadone plasma concentrations, or on systemic or apparent oral clearance, renal clearance, hepatic extraction or clearance, or bioavailability. Ritonavir/indinavir had no significant effects on methadone plasma concentration-effect relationships. Conclusions Inhibition of both hepatic and intestinal CYP3A activity is responsible for ritonavir/indinavir drug interactions. Methadone disposition was unchanged despite profound inhibition of CYP3A activity, suggesting little or no role for CYP

  2. A Study of Postwar Japan (1945-1950): What Insights and Lessons Can be Gained From the United States Led Rebirth of Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brinson, James D

    2006-01-01

    .... This is a study of the postwar military government and administration of Japan. It will examine the detailed preparation, the initial objectives, and the execution of the occupation by the United States (US)-led forces...

  3. Activities Contributing to Total Energy Expenditure in the United States: Results from the NHAPS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Block Gladys

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is increasingly recognized as an important factor influencing health and disease status. Total energy expenditure, both low-intensity and high-intensity, contributes to maintenance of healthy body weight. This paper presents the results of a quantitative approach to determining the activities that contribute to total energy expenditure in the United States. Methods Data from the National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS were used. In 1992–1994 the NHAPS sampled 4,185 females and 3,330 males, aged 18 years and over, weighted to be representative of the 48 contiguous United States. A detailed report of each activity performed in the previous 24 hours was obtained. A score was created for each activity, by multiplying duration and intensity for each individual and summing across individuals. This score was then used to rank each activity according to its contribution to total population energy expenditure, for the total sample and separately for each gender, race, age, region, and season. Results This analysis reveals our society to be primarily sedentary; leisure time physical activity contributed only approximately 5% of the population's total energy expenditure. Not counting sleeping, the largest contributor to energy expenditure was "Driving a car", followed by "Office work" and "Watching TV". Household activities accounted for 20.1% and 33.3% of energy expenditure for males and females respectively. Conclusion The information presented in this paper may be useful in identifying common activities that could be appropriate targets for behavioral interventions to increase physical activity.

  4. Prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Eboneé N; Evenson, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    The risk of stroke is greatest among adults who have experienced a previous stroke, transient ischemic attack, or myocardial infarction. Physical activity may reduce the secondary risk of stroke through mediating effects on blood pressure, vasoconstriction, and circulating lipid concentrations; however, little is known about the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we describe self-reported and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior among adults with a self-reported history of stroke. We also contrast physical activity among stroke survivors with that of adults without stroke (unexposed) to illustrate expected behavior in the absence of disease. Fewer participants with stroke met weekly physical activity guidelines as outlined in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans when compared with unexposed participants (17.9% vs 25.0%) according to self-reported data. In addition, participants with stroke reported less moderate (46.1% vs 54.7%) and vigorous (9.1% vs 19.6%) leisure activity compared with unexposed participants. As measured by accelerometer, time since diagnosis was inversely associated with physical activity engagement, and participants with stroke recorded more daily hours of sedentary behavior compared with unexposed participants (10.1 hours vs 8.9 hours). Findings from this study provide a basis for future work seeking to measure the impact of physical activity on the secondary prevention of stroke by characterizing the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

  5. The Relationship Between Beta Endorphins and Emotional State in Physically Active Individuals Aged 45-55 (A Report on a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundziņa Ieva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This sports-science-related article heavily relies on studies that have reported an increase in beta-endorphin (â-EP concentration in plasma in response to physical activity. It examines the psychological and physiological effects of physical activity and exercise and reports on a research-experiment-based, endorphin-hypotheses-related pilot study aimed at exploring mood-related â-EP effects occurring in physically active male and female individuals aged 45-55 in response to physical load. Material and methods. Six 45 to 55-year-old individuals (3 males and 3 females rated as exhibiting moderate and high levels of physical activity in sport's laboratory. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ was used to establish physical activity level. For facial expression analysis a short interview was applied, using software “FaceReader 3.0” (FR. As a load test a veloergometer exercise test was used, and Beta-endorphin (â-EP levels were measured from venous blood. Results. The findings demonstrated an increase in â-EP levels in 50% of the subjects. No positive relation between â-EP increase and happiness has been observed. In four subjects an increase in disgust was observed due to the laboratory conditions. Five minutes after the load test FR data recorded the reduction or disappearance of negative emotions for all research subjects. Conclusions. Further investigation into the relationship of plasma levels of â-EP and the emotional state of the individual involved in physical activities is needed. This necessitates a further insight into how exercise-elevated endorphins (â-EP affect mood state outside laboratory conditions. Therefore, a further investigation of people involved in physical recreation activities outdoors is envisaged.

  6. Sleep: A synchrony of cell activity-driven small network states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, James M.; Huang, Yanhua; Rector, David M.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We posit a bottom-up sleep regulatory paradigm in which state changes are initiated within small networks as a consequence of local cell activity. Bottom-up regulatory mechanisms are prevalent throughout nature, occurring in vastly different systems and levels of organization. Synchronization of state without top-down regulation is a fundamental property of large collections of small semi-autonomous entities. We posit that such synchronization mechanisms are sufficient and necessary for whole organism sleep onset. Within brain we posit that small networks of highly interconnected neurons and glia, e.g. cortical columns, are semi-autonomous units oscillating between sleep-like and wake-like states. We review evidence showing that cells, small networks, and regional areas of brain share sleep-like properties with whole animal sleep. A testable hypothesis focused on how sleep is initiated within local networks is presented. We posit that the release of cell activity-dependent molecules, such as ATP and nitric oxide, into the extracellular space initiates state changes within the local networks where they are produced. We review mechanisms of ATP induction of sleep regulatory substances (SRS) and their actions on receptor trafficking. Finally, we provide an example of how such local metabolic and state changes provide mechanistic explanations for clinical conditions such as insomnia. PMID:23651209

  7. Prevalence of physical activity in the United States: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macera, Caroline A; Ham, Sandra A; Yore, Michelle M; Jones, Deborah A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Kimsey, C Dexter; Kohl, Harold W

    2005-04-01

    The health benefits of regular cardiovascular exercise are well-known. Such exercise, however, has traditionally been defined as vigorous physical activity, such as jogging, swimming, or aerobic dance. Exercise of moderate intensity also promotes health, and many U.S. adults may be experiencing the health benefits of exercise through lifestyle activities of moderate intensity, such as yard work, housework, or walking for transportation. Until recently, public health surveillance systems have not included assessments of this type of physical activity, focusing on exercise of vigorous intensity. We used an enhanced surveillance tool to describe the prevalence and amount of both moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity physical activity among U.S. adults. We analyzed data from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey administered to U.S. adults aged 18 years and older (n = 82,834 men and 120,286 women). Physical activity behavior was assessed using questions designed to quantify th