WorldWideScience

Sample records for activation monitoring solution

  1. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Wallace, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 m in diameter) was found to produce several problems with astronaut s suits and helmets, mechanical seals and equipment, and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent of the lunar module from the lunar surface to rendezvous with the command module, much of the major portions of the contaminating soil and dust began to float, irritating the astronaut s eyes and being inhaled into their lungs. Our goal has been to understand some of the properties of lunar dust that could lead to possible hazards for humans. Due to the lack of an atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. In order to understand the possible toxic effects of the reactive dust, it is necessary to reactivate the dust, as samples returned during the Apollo missions were exposed to the atmosphere of the Earth. We have used grinding and UV exposure to mimic some of the processes occurring on the Moon. The level of activation has been monitored using two methods: fluorescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). These techniques allow the monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in solution. We have found that grinding of lunar dust produces 2-3 times the concentration of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and 10 times that of quartz. Exposure

  2. Digital Solution to Mining Image Monitor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘越男; 孙继平; 苏辉; 那景芳

    2001-01-01

    The thesis describes an advanced digital solution to mining digital image monitor system, which makes up the shortage of the traditional mining analog image monitor. It illustrates the system components and how to choose the encoder bandwidth of the system. The problem of image multicast and its solution in LAN are also discussed.

  3. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  4. An autonomous structural health monitoring solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherston, Carol A.; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys; Lees, Jonathan; Eaton, Mark; Pearson, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Combining advanced sensor technologies, with optimised data acquisition and diagnostic and prognostic capability, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time assessment of the integrity of bridges, buildings, aircraft, wind turbines, oil pipelines and ships, leading to improved safety and reliability and reduced inspection and maintenance costs. The implementation of power harvesting, using energy scavenged from ambient sources such as thermal gradients and sources of vibration in conjunction with wireless transmission enables truly autonomous systems, reducing the need for batteries and associated maintenance in often inaccessible locations, alongside bulky and expensive wiring looms. The design and implementation of such a system however presents numerous challenges. A suitable energy source or multiple sources capable of meeting the power requirements of the system, over the entire monitoring period, in a location close to the sensor must be identified. Efficient power management techniques must be used to condition the power and deliver it, as required, to enable appropriate measurements to be taken. Energy storage may be necessary, to match a continuously changing supply and demand for a range of different monitoring states including sleep, record and transmit. An appropriate monitoring technique, capable of detecting, locating and characterising damage and delivering reliable information, whilst minimising power consumption, must be selected. Finally a wireless protocol capable of transmitting the levels of information generated at the rate needed in the required operating environment must be chosen. This paper considers solutions to some of these challenges, and in particular examines SHM in the context of the aircraft environment.

  5. New solutions in IT Monitoring: cAdvisor and Collectd

    CERN Document Server

    Makai, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    IT Monitoring team constantly improves its solutions to provide reliable solutions and computation platforms for the whole organization. There is an increasing trend of using containers for the different computation platforms within CERNs IT department, so IT Monitoring team has to be ready to provide solutions for container monitoring. Therefore, the challenges of the student project were to find solutions for container monitoring which could be integrated to existing IT Monitoring systems for an easy adoption. When the solution was chosen, an initial prototype for the system had to be implemented, as well.

  6. Value activity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    de Alencar Silva, P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Current value modeling ontologies are grounded on the economic premise that profit sharing is a critical condition to be assessed during the configuration of a value constellation. Such a condition ought to be reinforced through a monitoring mechanism design, since a value model expresses only promises (but not assurances) of value creation. Hence there is a need to extend current value modeling ontologies with a monitoring ontology. This ontology will enable business practitioners ...

  7. Value activity monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Alencar Silva, P.

    2013-01-01

    Current value modeling ontologies are grounded on the economic premise that profit sharing is a critical condition to be assessed during the configuration of a value constellation. Such a condition ought to be reinforced through a monitoring mechanism design, since a value model expresses only promi

  8. Developing Automatic System Monitoring Solution for Accanto Systems Customer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkola, Markku

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the development work was to document the requirements, to develop and deploy an automatic system monitoring solution for Accanto Systems Customer Care. This final report describes Icinga Core as the backbone of the monitoring solution and presents the actual use case that was implemented for Accanto Systems. The client for this work was Accanto Systems Customer Care department which had been suffering a long time with high work load due to increased basic system monitoring tas...

  9. Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM) - Realizing Integrated Environmental Monitoring Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosch, Thomas; Fietzek, Peer

    2016-04-01

    In a variety of scientific and industrial application areas, ranging i.e. from the supervision of hydrate fields over the detection and localization of fugitive emissions from subsea oil and gas production to fish farming, fixed point observatories are useful and applied means. They monitor the water column and/or are placed at the sea floor over long periods of time. They are essential oceanographic platforms for providing valuable long-term time series data and multi-parameter measurements. Various mooring and observatory endeavors world-wide contribute valuable data needed for understanding our planet's ocean systems and biogeochemical processes. Continuously powered cabled observatories enable real-time data transmission from spots of interest close to the shore or to ocean infrastructures. Independent of the design of the observatories they all rely on sensors which demands for regular maintenance. This work is in most cases associated with cost-intensive maintenance on a regular time basis for the entire sensor carrying fixed platform. It is mandatory to encounter this asset for long-term monitoring by enhancing hardware efficiency. On the basis of two examples of use from the area of hydrate monitoring (off Norway and Japan) we will present the concept of the Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM). The modular, scalable and networking capabilities of the MSM allow for an easy adaptation to different monitoring tasks. Providing intelligent power management, combining chemical and acoustical sensors, adaptation of the payload according to the monitoring tasks, autonomous powering, modular design for easy transportation, storage and mobilization, Vessel of Opportunity-borne launching and recovery capability with a video-guided launcher system and a rope recovery system are key facts addressed during the development of the MSM. Step by step the MSM concept applied to the observatory hardware will also be extended towards the gathered data to maximize the

  10. Contamination monitoring activities in Kanupp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S.S. [Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Pakistan)

    1997-06-01

    The Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Kanupp) is a 137 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor, designed and erected by the Canadian General Electric Company as a turn key project. The plant is in operation since it was commissioned in the year 1972. It is located at the Arabian Sea Coast about 15 miles to the west of Karachi. During its more than two decades of operation, the plant has generated about 8 billion units of electricity with an average life time availability factor of 60%. In Kanupp, radioactive contamination may exit due to the release of fission product, activation products etc., which may somehow escape from its confinement and may contaminate surface or other media such as air, water etc. In this paper, following items are described: main aspects of contamination, status of contamination monitoring, need of contamination monitoring, radiation protection activity, instruments, contamination, current status of contamination survey materials and their disposal, and environmental monitoring. (G.K.)

  11. Several solutions of remote transmission for state monitoring of bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zong-bao; CHEN Wei-min; ZHU Yong; FU Yu-mei; XU Mou; YANG Hong

    2005-01-01

    The research for remote monitoring of bridges is expected to develop methodologies and tools for collecting state data, monitoring the real-time status of the bridge from distance, and more importantly seeking a best way for remote transmission of bridge monitoring system by comparing the characteristics of each scheme. This paper focuses on the solutions to remote transmission for state monitoring of bridges, which deals with the remote transmission system based on PSTN (Public Service Telephone Network), wireless sensor monitoring system and remote transmission using SDH (Synchronous Digital Hierarchy) network. As a result, a combination of wireless sensor monitoring system and the remote sensing system using SDH network is proposed to be the considered way for remote state monitoring of bridges.

  12. Middle infrared optoelectronic absorption systems for monitoring physiological glucose solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W. Blake

    Tight monitoring of the glucose levels for diabetic individuals is essential to control long-term complications. A definitive diabetes management system has yet to be developed for the diabetic. This research investigates the application of middle infrared absorption frequencies for monitoring glucose levels in biological solutions. Three frequencies were identified using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and correlated to changes in glucose concentrations. The 1035 +/- 1 cm-1 frequency was determined to be the best representative frequency. Other biological molecules contributed no significant interference to monitoring glucose absorption. A second frequency at 1193 cm-1 was suggested as a representative background absorption frequency, which could be used for more accurate glucose absorption values. Next, a quantum cascade laser optoelectronic absorption system was designed and developed to monitor glucose. After careful alignment and design, the system was used to monitor physiological glucose concentrations. Correlation at 1036 cm-1 with glucose changes was comparable to the previous results. The use of the background absorption frequency was verified. This frequency essentially acts as a calibrating frequency to adjust in real-time to any changes in the background absorption that may alter the accuracy of the predicted glucose value. An evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique was explored to monitor molecules in a biological solution. Visible light at 425 nm was used to monitor hemoglobin in control urine samples. An adsorption isotherm for hemoglobin was detectable to limit of 5.8 nM. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy would be useful for a glucose solution. Given an equivalent system designed for the middle infrared, the molar extinction coefficient of glucose allows for a detectable limit of 45 mg/dl for a free-floating glucose solution, which is below normal physiological concentrations. The future use of a hydrophobic

  13. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and...

  14. Solution for Monitoring the Flows through Web Dynpro ABAP Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Osaci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a monitoring solution for flow measurement through Web Dynpro ABAP interface. The use of integrated software systems in companies currently represents an essential condition for providing higher and more reliable access to information resources. The SAP Netweaver, a multilingual & multitasking system based on the three-tier client-server technology, is one of the mostly used integrated platforms implemented in companies.

  15. A Dual-Core System Solution for Wearable Health Monitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santana Arnaiz, O.A.; Bouwens, F.; Huisken, J.A.; De Groot, H.; Bennebroek, M.T.; Van Meerbergen, J.L.; Abbo, A.A.; Fraboulet, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a system design study for wearable sensor devices intended for healthcare and lifestyle applications based on ECG,EEG and activity monitoring. In order to meet the low-power requirement of these applications, a dual-core signal processing system is proposed which combines an ultr

  16. Infrared spectroscopy for monitoring gas hydrates in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, G.T.; Luzinova, Y.; Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Raichlin, Y.; Katzir, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Shool of Physics and Astronomy

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduced the first principles for monitoring gas hydrate formation and dissociation in aqueous solution by evaluating state-responsive infrared (IR) absorption features of water with fiberoptic evanescent field spectroscopy. A first order linear functional relationship was also derived according to Lambert Beer's law in order to quantify the percentage gas hydrate within the volume of water probed via the evanescent field. In addition, spectroscopic studies evaluating seafloor sediments collected from a gas hydrate site in the Gulf of Mexico revealed minimal spectral interferences from sediment matrix components. As such, evanescent field sensing strategies were established as a promising perspective for monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrates in oceanic environments. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  17. 7 CFR 800.216 - Activities that shall be monitored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... merchandising activities identified in this section shall be monitored in accordance with the instructions. (b) Grain merchandising activities. Grain merchandising activities subject to monitoring for compliance with...) Recordkeeping activities. Elevator and merchandising recordkeeping activities subject to monitoring...

  18. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Mumtaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and non-job related activities. Finally, the algorithm will compute the time which employee spent in job related and non-job related activities. This paper presents a novel architecture based upon video analytics that can facilitate Human Resource Managers in real time.

  19. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5dm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database.

  20. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/59a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and Azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database.

  1. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  2. Review of Trackside Monitoring Solutions: From Strain Gages to Optical Fibre Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Kouroussis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent research on structural monitoring in railway industry is proposed in this paper, with a special focus on stress-based solutions. After a brief analysis of the mechanical behaviour of ballasted railway tracks, an overview of the most common monitoring techniques is presented. A special attention is paid on strain gages and accelerometers for which the accurate mounting position on the track is requisite. These types of solution are then compared to another modern approach based on the use of optical fibres. Besides, an in-depth discussion is made on the evolution of numerical models that investigate the interaction between railway vehicles and tracks. These models are used to validate experimental devices and to predict the best location(s of the sensors. It is hoped that this review article will stimulate further research activities in this continuously expanding field.

  3. Monitoring solute fluxes: Integrating electrical resistivity with multi-compartment sampler techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; Fernandez, Perrine; French, Helen K.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of agriculture, industry, airport activities on soil and water quality is strongly influenced by soil heterogeneity. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and better methods for monitoring heterogeneous contaminated transport. Sufficient characterization of spatial and temporal distribution of contaminant transport requires measurements of water and solute fluxes at multiple locations with a high temporal resolution. During this presentation, we will show a newly developed instrument, which combines multi-compartment sampling with electrical resistivity measurements, to observe spatial and temporal fluxes of contaminants. Solute monitoring is often limited to observations of resident concentrations, while flux concentrations govern the movement of solutes in soils. Bloem et al. (2010) developed a multi-compartment sampler (MCS) which is capable of measuring fluxes at a high spatial resolution under natural conditions. The sampler is divided into 100 separate compartments of 31 by 31 mm. Flux data can be recorded at a high time resolution (every 5 minutes). Tracer leaching can be monitored by frequently sampling the collected leachate while leaving the sampler buried in situ. To optimize the monitoring of tracer leaching and measure real solute fluxes the multi-compartment sampler has been extended with 121 electrodes. The electrodes are mounted at each corner of each compartment to measure the electrical conductivity above each compartment while water percolates through the compartments. By using different electrode couples, the setup can also be used to image above the multi-compartment sampler. The instrument can be used for detailed studies both in the laboratory and in the field. For laboratory experiments a transparent column is used which fits perfect on top of the MCS. We present a selection of the integrated electrical

  4. Big Data Solution for CTBT Monitoring Using Global Cross Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, P.; Bobrov, D.; Dupont, A.; Grenouille, A.; Kitov, I. O.; Rozhkov, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the mismatch between data volume and the performance of the Information Technology infrastructure used in seismic data centers, it becomes more and more difficult to process all the data with traditional applications in a reasonable elapsed time. To fulfill their missions, the International Data Centre of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO/IDC) and the Département Analyse Surveillance Environnement of Commissariat à l'Energie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA/DASE) collect, process and produce complex data sets whose volume is growing exponentially. In the medium term, computer architectures, data management systems and application algorithms will require fundamental changes to meet the needs. This problem is well known and identified as a "Big Data" challenge. To tackle this major task, the CEA/DASE takes part during two years to the "DataScale" project. Started in September 2013, DataScale gathers a large set of partners (research laboratories, SMEs and big companies). The common objective is to design efficient solutions using the synergy between Big Data solutions and the High Performance Computing (HPC). The project will evaluate the relevance of these technological solutions by implementing a demonstrator for seismic event detections thanks to massive waveform correlations. The IDC has developed an expertise on such techniques leading to an algorithm called "Master Event" and provides a high-quality dataset for an extensive cross correlation study. The objective of the project is to enhance the Master Event algorithm and to reanalyze 10 years of waveform data from the International Monitoring System (IMS) network thanks to a dedicated HPC infrastructure operated by the "Centre de Calcul Recherche et Technologie" at the CEA of Bruyères-le-Châtel. The dataset used for the demonstrator includes more than 300,000 seismic events, tens of millions of raw detections and more than 30 terabytes of continuous seismic data

  5. Technology of remote monitoring for nuclear activity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, Ehn Ho; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Wan Ki; Park, Sung Sik; Na, Won Woo; An, Jin Soo; Cha, Hong Ryul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2000-05-01

    In a view of safeguards monitoring at nuclear facilities, the monitoring is changing to remote method so that this report is described to remote monitoring(RM) applying on commercial NPP in Korea. To enhance IAEA safeguards efficiency and effectiveness, IAEA is taking into account of remote monitoring system(RMS) and testing as a field trial. IRMP(International Remote Monitoring Project) in participating many nations for development of RMS is proceeding their project such as technical exchange and research etc. In case of our country are carrying out the research relevant RM since acceptance RMS at 7th ROK-IAEA safeguards implementation review meeting. With a view to enhancement the RMS, installation location and element technology of the RM equipment are evaluated in a view of safeguards in Korea LWRs, and proposed a procedure for national inspection application through remote data evaluation from Younggwang-3 NPP. These results are large valuable to use of national inspection at time point extending installation to all Korea PWR NPP. In case of CANDU, neutron, gamma measurement and basic concept of network using optical fiber scintillating detector as remote verification method for dry storage canister are described. Also RM basic design of spent fuel transfer campaign is described that unattended RM without inspector instead of performing in participating together with IAEA and national inspector. The transfer campaign means the spent fuel storage pond to dry storage canister for about two months every year. Therefore, positively participation of IAEA strength safeguards project will be increased transparency for our nuclear activity as well as contributed to national relevant industry.

  6. Performance evaluation of salivary amylase activity monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Kanemori, Takahiro; Kanemaru, Masashi; Takai, Noriyasu; Mizuno, Yasufumi; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2004-10-15

    In order to quantify psychological stress and to distinguish eustress and distress, we have been investigating the establishment of a method that can quantify salivary amylase activity (SMA). Salivary glands not only act as amplifiers of a low level of norepinephrine, but also respond more quickly and sensitively to psychological stress than cortisol levels. Moreover, the time-course changes of the salivary amylase activity have a possibility to distinguish eustress and distress. Thus, salivary amylase activity can be utilized as an excellent index for psychological stress. However, in dry chemistry system, a method for quantification of the enzymatic activity still needs to be established that can provide with sufficient substrate in a testing tape as well as can control enzymatic reaction time. Moreover, it is necessary to develop a method that has the advantages of using saliva, such as ease of collection, rapidity of response, and able to use at any time. In order to establish an easy method to monitor the salivary amylase activity, a salivary transcription device was fabricated to control the enzymatic reaction time. A fabricated salivary amylase activity monitor consisted of three devices, the salivary transcription device, a testing-strip and an optical analyzer. By adding maltose as a competitive inhibitor to a substrate Ga1-G2-CNP, a broad-range activity testing-strip was fabricated that could measure the salivary amylase activity with a range of 0-200 kU/l within 150 s. The calibration curve of the monitor for the salivary amylase activity showed R2=0.941, indicating that it was possible to use this monitor for the analysis of the salivary amylase activity without the need to determine the salivary volume quantitatively. In order to evaluate the assay variability of the monitor, salivary amylase activity was measured using Kraepelin psychodiagnostic test as a psychological stressor. A significant difference of salivary amylase activity was recognized

  7. Wearable and implantable wireless sensor network solutions for healthcare monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Ashraf; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies are considered one of the key research areas in computer science and the healthcare application industries for improving the quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of current developments and future direction of research on wearable and implantable body area network systems for continuous monitoring of patients. This paper explains the important role of body sensor networks in medicine to minimize the need for caregivers and help the chronically ill and elderly people live an independent life, besides providing people with quality care. The paper provides several examples of state of the art technology together with the design considerations like unobtrusiveness, scalability, energy efficiency, security and also provides a comprehensive analysis of the various benefits and drawbacks of these systems. Although offering significant benefits, the field of wearable and implantable body sensor networks still faces major challenges and open research problems which are investigated and covered, along with some proposed solutions, in this paper.

  8. Wearable and Implantable Wireless Sensor Network Solutions for Healthcare Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Ashraf; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies are considered one of the key research areas in computer science and the healthcare application industries for improving the quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of current developments and future direction of research on wearable and implantable body area network systems for continuous monitoring of patients. This paper explains the important role of body sensor networks in medicine to minimize the need for caregivers and help the chronically ill and elderly people live an independent life, besides providing people with quality care. The paper provides several examples of state of the art technology together with the design considerations like unobtrusiveness, scalability, energy efficiency, security and also provides a comprehensive analysis of the various benefits and drawbacks of these systems. Although offering significant benefits, the field of wearable and implantable body sensor networks still faces major challenges and open research problems which are investigated and covered, along with some proposed solutions, in this paper. PMID:22163914

  9. Wearable and Implantable Wireless Sensor Network Solutions for Healthcare Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Darwish

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network (WSN technologies are considered one of the key research areas in computer science and the healthcare application industries for improving the quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of current developments and future direction of research on wearable and implantable body area network systems for continuous monitoring of patients. This paper explains the important role of body sensor networks in medicine to minimize the need for caregivers and help the chronically ill and elderly people live an independent life, besides providing people with quality care. The paper provides several examples of state of the art technology together with the design considerations like unobtrusiveness, scalability, energy efficiency, security and also provides a comprehensive analysis of the various benefits and drawbacks of these systems. Although offering significant benefits, the field of wearable and implantable body sensor networks still faces major challenges and open research problems which are investigated and covered, along with some proposed solutions, in this paper.

  10. Monitoring Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: Measuring Coagulant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jorn

    daily anticoagulant therapy. The therapy necessitates close monitoring of coagulant activity, since excess doses of anticoagulant medicine may lead to life-threatening bleedings. Traditionally, patients on OAT are required to pay regular visits to a physician, who decides on drug dosage adjustments...... of the new concept is the training and continuous support and monitoring of the patients, and a center with these purposes has been established at Skejby Sygehus. The main instrument for monitoring the coagulant activity is the prothrombin time (PT). This is the time until clotting can be observed...... central aspects of the INR system, such as the inaccuracy of INR estimates based on a given path of calibrations. The main result states that, under weak regularity conditions, log (log (estimated INR)) is approximately normally distributed with mean log (log (true INR)). The variance is a function...

  11. Active system monitoring applied on wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Parbo, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A concept for active system monitoring (ASM) applied on wind turbines is presented in this paper. The concept is based on an injection of a small periodic auxiliary signal in the system. An investigation of the signature from the auxiliary input in residual (error) signals can then be applied...

  12. Development of a potassium-selective optode for hydroponic nutrient solution monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, Matthew; Berinstain, Alain; Dixon, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Highly efficient and reliable plant growth such as that required in biological life support systems for future space-based missions can be better achieved with knowledge of ion concentrations within the hydroponic nutrient solution. This paper reports on the development and application of ion-selective bulk optodes to plant growth systems. Membranes for potassium-selective sensing are reported that have been tailored so that their dynamic range is centred on potassium activities within typical nutrient solution recipes. The developed sensors have been shown to exhibit a potassium activity measuring range from 0.134 to 117 mM at pH 6.0. These bulk optodes show full scale response on the order of several minutes. They show minimal interference to other cations and meet worst-case selectivity requirements for potassium monitoring in the considered half strength Hoagland solution. When continuously immersed in nutrient solution, these sensors demonstrated predicable lifetimes on the order of 50h. The developed instrument for absorption-based measurements including light source, mini-spectrometer and optode probe is presented. Custom instrument control and monitoring software including a spectral normalization procedure, use of a dual-wavelength absorbance ratio technique and automatic adjustment for pH variation result in an instrument that is self-calibrating and one that can account for effects such as light source fluctuations, membrane thickness variations and a variety of other factors. The low mass, low volume nature of bulk optode sensing systems, make them a promising technology for future space-based plant production systems. Their low-cost and technology transfer potential suggest that they could provide terrestrial growers a new and reliable mechanism to obtain ion-selective knowledge of their nutrient solution, improving yields, reducing costs and aiding in compliance to continually more stringent environmental regulation.

  13. Development of Demo of Solution Measurement and Monitoring System in Reprocessing Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Qing-lei; CHANG; Li; LI; Jing-huai; LU; Jie; TIAN; Yuan

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous unattended measurement and monitoring systems at reprocessing plants,and the most important one is the solution measurement and monitoring system,which can monitor the stable operation of the process and account the nuclear material of the entire

  14. Wireless system for seismic activity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Безвесільна, Олена Миколаївна; Козько, Констянтин Сергійович

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the concepts and principles of sensor networks operations, especially the one that is used to monitor seismic activity and potential natural disasters. It also describes the operating principle of the geographically distributed wireless system, represented by block diagrams of typical sensor nodes and base station, as well as constructive electrical circuit sensor node and the frequency generator radio transmissions the base station and sensor nodes, we formulate to calcu...

  15. Spectrum Monitoring Using SpectrumAnalysis LabVIEW Software, Nanoceptors, and Various Digitizing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Spectrum Monitoring Using SpectrumAnalysis LabVIEW Software, Nanoceptors, and Various Digitizing Solutions by Joshua Smith ARL-TR-7217...1138 ARL-TR-7217 February 2015 Spectrum Monitoring Using SpectrumAnalysis LabVIEW Software, Nanoceptors, and Various Digitizing Solutions...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/2014–07/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spectrum Monitoring Using Spectrum Analysis LabVIEW

  16. Structural monitoring system with fiber Bragg grating sensors: Implementation and software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Aleksey; Makhrov, Ilya; Pozhar, Nikolay; Anufriev, Maxim; Pnev, Alexey; Karasik, Valeriy

    2014-01-01

    We present a structural health monitoring system for nondestructive testing of composite materials based on the fiber Bragg grating sensors and specialized software solution. Developed structural monitoring system has potential applications for preliminary tests of novel composite materials as well as real-time structural health monitoring of industrial objects. The software solution realizes control for the system, data processing and alert of an operator.

  17. Manual on SFR R and D and Technology Monitoring System Based on Enterprise Project Management Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Yong Bum; Won, Byung Chool; Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee

    2008-04-15

    This report is a manual on enterprise project management solution for R and D and technology monitoring system that is applicable for managing the generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor development. The prime goal of this system is to provide project manager with reliable and accurate information of status of progress, performance and resource allocation, and attain traceability and visibility of project implementation for effective project management. This report is composed of the three part. The first part is an introduction on microsoft project professional software that was used to monitor the progress, evaluate the results and analyze the resource distribution of the activities. The second makes a description of project plan and control, and the third part describes on collaboration and teamwork.

  18. Sentinel-1 Contribution to Monitoring Maritime Activity in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Carlos; Greidanus, Harm; Fournier, Melanie; Eriksen, Torkild; Vespe, Michele; Alvarez, Marlene; Arguedas, Virginia Fernandez; Delaney, Conor; Argentieri, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents results on the use of Sentinel-1 combined with satellite AIS to monitor maritime activity in the Arctic. Such activities are expected to increase, even if not uniformly across the Arctic, as the ice cover in the region retreats due to changes in climate. The objectives of monitoring efforts in the region can vary from country to country, but are generally related to increasing awareness on non- cooperative, small and cruise ships, fisheries, safety at sea, and Search and Rescue. A ship monitoring study has been conducted, involving more than 2,000 Sentinel-1 images acquired during one year in the central Arctic, where the ship densities are high. The main challenges to SAR-based monitoring in this area are described, solutions for some of them are proposed, and analyses of the results are shown. With the high detection thresholds needed to prevent false alarms from sea ice, 16% of the ships detected overall in the Sentinel-1 images have not been correlated to AIS- transmitting ships, and 48% of the AIS-transmitting ships are not correlated to ships detected in the images.

  19. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  20. Designing Intuitive Web Solutions for Monitoring Patients’ Rehabilitation at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihana Ferdous

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design of web-based remote monitoring interfaces aimed at supporting therapists and caregivers in supervising motor-cognitive rehabilitation plans of care to be performed by patients at home. This work was part of a three years’ research project where game-based environments for upper body motor rehabilitation of post-stroke patients were developed in collaboration with two main rehabilitation centers in Italy and Austria, for a subsequent deployment at patients’ homes. The paper will specifically focus on describing the iterative design of the home rehabilitation features for clinicians over the first two years of the project to enable the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care for home therapy by rehabilitation centers and services.

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-10-20

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans.

  2. A new neutron monitor with silver activation

    CERN Document Server

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Hohmann, E

    2010-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor has been developed, which registers delayed beta rays from neutron-induced silver activation and which is able to measure dose equivalent in pulsed fields with peak dose rates of several thousand Sv h(-1). The monitor uses four silicon diodes in the centre of a polyethylene moderator, 30 cm in diameter. Two of the diodes are covered by natural silver foils and two of them by tin foils. The latter are used to subtract photon-induced pulses. For registering signals, a pulse height threshold is set at 662 key, which minimizes the effect of Cs-137 and lower energy radiation and - in addition - enhances the detection of beta rays from the shorter half-life silver isotope Ag-110 (25 s) as compared to the longer half-life isotope Ag-108 (144 s). The results of measurements in neutron and photon calibration fields, of MCNPX neutron response calculations and of first measurements in a high-intensity pulsed field at the PSI accelerator are shown. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserv...

  3. Solution of magnetometry problems related to monitoring remote pipeline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Andrey V.; Denisov, Alexey Y.; Narkhov, Eugene D.; Sapunov, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve two fundamental tasks, i.e., to design the pipeline model with sufficient adequacy and reproducibility, and to solve the inverse problem for the transition from the experimental data on the magnetic field in the measurement area directly to the pipeline characteristics, which are necessary for mapping pipes location and finding coordinates of welds. The paper presents a mathematical ideal pipeline model in the geomagnetic field without considering the pipe material. The solution of the direct and inverse problems are described, and the directions of the model development and methods of data interpretation are presented.

  4. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  5. Liquid sample shuffler for gamma active solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, T.W.

    1987-02-01

    An instrument is proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for measuring low levels of fission-product-contaminated fissile solutions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The proposed unit uses neutrons from a /sup 252/Cf neutron source to induce fissions, and delayed neutrons from the induced fissions are counted once the neutron source is withdrawn. Lead is used to shield the neutron detectors from the gamma-ray dose of the fission products found in the solutions at the INEL plant. The designed sensitivity is 5 mg/l of /sup 235/U in 100 s with a 4-standard-deviation confidence.

  6. Activities of binary baths with 1% solute as standard states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relationships of activities with 1% solute as standard state and mass fraction of solute, and hot-dip temperature, were given on the base of Miedema's model, Tanaka expression, some basic thermodynamic relationships; and discussion was carried out on Zn-Mn and Zn-Ti binary alloys by calculation, in which varied colors can be achieved on the hot-dip steel sheets. The results indicate that the activity of solute shows positive deviation relative to Henry's law for both Zn-Mn and Zn-Ti binary dilute solution. The degree of deviation increases with increasing solute and decreases with increasing bath temperature. As the solution is very dilute solution (w(Mn)≤40% for Zn-Mn alloy,w(Ti)≤8% for Zn-Ti alloy), the two binary baths can all be treated as ideal dilute solutions.

  7. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  8. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing.

  9. New seismic array solution for earthquake observations and hydropower plant health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonovskaya, Galina N.; Kapustian, Natalya K.; Moshkunov, Alexander I.; Danilov, Alexey V.; Moshkunov, Konstantin A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the novel fusion of seismic safety monitoring data of the hydropower plant in Chirkey (Caucasus Mountains, Russia). This includes new hardware solutions and observation methods, along with technical limitations for three types of applications: (a) seismic monitoring of the Chirkey reservoir area, (b) structure monitoring of the dam, and (c) monitoring of turbine vibrations. Previous observations and data processing for health monitoring do not include complex data analysis, while the new system is more rational and less expensive. The key new feature of the new system is remote monitoring of turbine vibration. A comparison of the data obtained at the test facilities and by hydropower plant inspection with remote sensors enables early detection of hazardous hydrodynamic phenomena.

  10. Common Problems and Solutions for Being Physically Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems & Solutions for Being Active - FAQs About Physical Activity Managing Your Medicines - Introduction - Taking Control of Your Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker Communicating with Professionals - Introduction - Preparing for Medical Visits - ...

  11. Nordic monitoring on diet, physical activity and overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagt, Sisse; Andersen, Lene Frost; Anderssen, Sigmund A.;

    In 2007, a Nordic working group was established with the aim to describe a future Nordic monitoring system on diet, physical activity and overweight. The monitoring system should be simple and at relatively low cost. Therefore it has been decided to conduct the moni-toring as a telephone interview...

  12. Integration of structural health monitoring solutions onto commercial aircraft via the Federal Aviation Administration structural health monitoring research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, Paul; Doyle, Jon; Roach, Dennis

    2017-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) started a research program in structural health monitoring (SHM) in 2011. The program's goal was to understand the technical gaps of implementing SHM on commercial aircraft and the potential effects on FAA regulations and guidance. The program evolved into a demonstration program consisting of a team from Sandia National Labs Airworthiness Assurance NDI Center (AANC), the Boeing Corporation, Delta Air Lines, Structural Monitoring Systems (SMS), Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Corp (AEM) and the FAA. This paper will discuss the program from the selection of the inspection problem, the SHM system (Comparative Vacuum Monitoring-CVM) that was selected as the inspection solution and the testing completed to provide sufficient data to gain the first approved use of an SHM system for routine maintenance on commercial US aircraft.

  13. On-line Monitoring of Epoxy Resin Exposed to Acid Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuyan LIU; M.Kubouchi; H.Sembokuya; K.Tsuda; T.Tomiyama

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a new on-line health monitoring technology for the determination of the penetration of environment solution into epoxy resin was pursued. A corrosion sensor including plastic optical fiber and pH indicator was fabricated. The color-change layer of this sensor appeared after immersion in sulfuric acid solution, which could be examined by using optical fiber and spectrophotometer. The results showed that the penetration of sulfuric acid was detected by adding bromophenol blue (BPB) in the corrosion sensor. This system could be applied to on-line health monitoring of chemical equipment structures.

  14. A Systematic Review for Mobile Monitoring Solutions in M-Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Vladimir; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2016-09-01

    A systematic review allows us to identify, assess, and interpret all possible relevant work associated with a question in particular or the subject of an area. Different authors can use several methodologies to learn about research related to their own research in different fields. The main objective of this review is to identify work, research and publications made in the field of the mobile monitoring of patients through some application or commercial or non-commercial solutions in m-Health. Next, we compare the different solutions with our solution, MoMo (Mobile Monitoring) Framework. MoMo is a solution that allows for patient mobile monitoring through mobile phones and biometric devices (blood pressure meter, glucometer and others). Our systematic review is based on the methodology of B. Kitchenham. She proposed specific guidelines for carrying out a systematic review in software engineering. We prepare our systematic review base in the selection of primary and secondary research related to mobile monitoring solutions following criteria with a specific weight to compare with each part of our research.

  15. Stress monitoring versus microseismic ruptures in an active deep mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnellier, Alice; Bouffier, Christian; Bigarré, Pascal; Nyström, Anders; Österberg, Anders; Fjellström, Peter

    2015-04-01

    monitoring data coming from the mine in quasi-real time and facilitates information exchanges and decision making for experts and stakeholders. On the basis of these data acquisition and sharing, preliminary analysis has been started to highlight whether stress variations and seismic sources behaviour might be directly bound with mine working evolution and could improve the knowledge on the equilibrium states inside the mine. Knowing such parameters indeed will be a potential solution to understand better the response of deep mining activities to the exploitation solicitations and to develop, if possible, methods to prevent from major hazards such as rock bursts and other ground failure phenomena.

  16. Continuous monitoring of water flow and solute transport using vadose zone monitoring technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, O.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is usually attributed to pollution events that initiate on land surface. These may be related to various sources such as industrial, urban or agricultural, and may appear as point or non point sources, through a single accidental event or a continuous pollution process. In all cases, groundwater pollution is a consequence of pollutant transport processes that take place in the vadose zone above the water table. Attempts to control pollution events and prevent groundwater contamination usually involve groundwater monitoring programs. This, however, can not provide any protection against contamination since pollution identification in groundwater is clear evidence that the groundwater is already polluted and contaminants have already traversed the entire vadose zone. Accordingly, an efficient monitoring program that aims at providing information that may prevent groundwater pollution has to include vadose-zone monitoring systems. Such system should provide real-time information on the hydrological and chemical properties of the percolating water and serve as an early warning system capable of detecting pollution events in their early stages before arrival of contaminants to groundwater. Recently, a vadose-zone monitoring system (VMS) was developed to allow continuous monitoring of the hydrological and chemical properties of percolating water in the deep vadose zone. The VMS includes flexible time-domain reflectometry (FTDR) probes for continuous tracking of water content profiles, and vadose-zone sampling ports (VSPs) for frequent sampling of the deep vadose pore water at multiple depths. The monitoring probes and sampling ports are installed through uncased slanted boreholes using a flexible sleeve that allows attachment of the monitoring devices to the borehole walls while achieving good contact between the sensors and the undisturbed sediment column. The system has been successfully implemented in several studies on water flow and

  17. A monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution for research on plant physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzui, N.; Kawachi, N.; Ishioka, N.; Fujimaki, S. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The mechanism of nutrient uptake in plants has received considerable attention in the field of plant science. Here we describe the development of a new monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution, which enables the noninvasive measurement of radioactive tracer uptake by an intact plant. In addition, we incorporated a weighing instrument into this system in order to simultaneously monitor water uptake by the same plant. For an evaluation of this monitoring system, we conducted a tracer experiment with a rice plant and a positron-emitting radioactive tracer, and successfully obtained continuous data for the amounts of radioactive tracer and water taken up by the intact plant over 36 h. (authors)

  18. Application of refractometry to quality assurance monitoring of parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; Chao, You-Chen; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2008-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) solution contains various concentrations of dextrose, amino acids, lipids, vitamins, electrolytes, and trace elements. Incorrect preparation of PN solution could lead to patient death. In this study we used the refractive index as a quality assurance tool to monitor the preparation of PN solution. Refractive indices of single nutrient components and PN solutions consisting of various concentrations of dextrose, amino acids, electrolytes, and lipids were measured. A mathematical equation and its linear plot were generated then used to predict the refractive index of the PN solution. The best-fit refractive index for PN solution (i.e., the predicted refractive index)=0.9798x(% dextrose)+1.2889x(% amino acids)+1.1017x(% lipids)+0.9440x(% sum of the electrolytes)+0.5367 (r2=0.99). This equation was validated by comparing the measured refractive indices of 500 clinical PN solutions to their predicted refractive indices. We found that 2 of the 500 prepared samples (0.4%) had less than the predicted refractive index (<95%). Refractive index can be used as a reliable quality assurance tool for monitoring PN preparation. Such information can be obtained at the bedside and used to confirm the accuracy of the PN solution composition.

  19. Determination of the activity of a molecular solute in saturated solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstroem, Fredrik L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Rasmuson, Ake C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: rasmuson@ket.kth.se

    2008-12-15

    Prediction of the solubility of a solid molecular compound in a solvent, as well as, estimation of the solution activity coefficient from experimental solubility data both require estimation of the activity of the solute in the saturated solution. The activity of the solute in the saturated solution is often defined using the pure melt at the same temperature as the thermodynamic reference. In chemical engineering literature also the activity of the solid is usually defined on the same reference state. However, far below the melting temperature, the properties of this reference state cannot be determined experimentally, and different simplifications and approximations are normally adopted. In the present work, a novel method is presented to determine the activity of the solute in the saturated solution (=ideal solubility) and the heat capacity difference between the pure supercooled melt and solid. The approach is based on rigorous thermodynamics, using standard experimental thermodynamic data at the melting temperature of the pure compound and solubility measurements in different solvents at various temperatures. The method is illustrated using data for ortho-, meta-, and para-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylamide and paracetamol. The results show that complete neglect of the heat capacity terms may lead to estimations of the activity that are incorrect by a factor of 12. Other commonly used simplifications may lead to estimations that are only one-third of the correct value.

  20. Monitoring bat activity at the Dutch EEZ in 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.; Jonge Poerink, B.; Vries, de P.

    2015-01-01

    IMARES conducted studies in 2012 and 2013 to monitor offshore bat activity with passive acoustic ultrasonic recorders. In the follow-up project reported here, more data on the offshore occurrence of bats was collected in 2014. Using the same methodology as in 2012 and 2013, bat activity was monitore

  1. Instructional physical activity monitor video in english and spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ActiGraph activity monitor is a widely used method for assessing physical activity. Compliance with study procedures in critical. A common procedure is for the research team to meet with participants and demonstrate how and when to attach and remove the monitor and convey how many wear-days are ...

  2. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Geothermal solute flux monitoring and the source and fate of solutes in the Snake River, Yellowstone National Park, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Schaper, Jonas; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Heasler, Henry P.; Mahony, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The combined geothermal discharge from over 10,000 features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) can be can be estimated from the Cl flux in the Madison, Yellowstone, Falls, and Snake Rivers. Over the last 30 years, the Cl flux in YNP Rivers has been calculated using discharge measurements and Cl concentrations determined in discrete water samples and it has been determined that approximately 12% of the Cl flux exiting YNP is from the Snake River. The relationship between electrical conductivity and concentrations of Cl and other geothermal solutes was quantified at a monitoring site located downstream from the thermal inputs in the Snake River. Beginning in 2012, continuous (15 min) electrical conductivity measurements have been made at the monitoring site. Combining continuous electrical conductivity and discharge data, the Cl and other geothermal solute fluxes were determined. The 2013–2015 Cl fluxes (5.3–5.8 kt/yr) determined using electrical conductivity are comparable to historical data. In addition, synoptic water samples and discharge data were obtained from sites along the Snake River under low-flow conditions of September 2014. The synoptic water study extended 17 km upstream from the monitoring site. Surface inflows were sampled to identify sources and to quantify solute loading. The Lewis River was the primary source of Cl, Na, K, Cl, SiO2, Rb, and As loads (50–80%) in the Snake River. The largest source of SO4 was from the upper Snake River (50%). Most of the Ca and Mg (50–55%) originate from the Snake Hot Springs. Chloride, Ca, Mg, Na, K, SiO2, F, HCO3, SO4, B, Li, Rb, and As behave conservatively in the Snake River, and therefore correlate well with conductivity (R2 ≥ 0.97).

  4. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  5. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A J Block

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps.Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures, energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined.137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS (61 studies; stroke (41; Parkinson's Disease (PD (20; dementia (11; traumatic brain injury (2 and ataxia (1. Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering.These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability.

  6. Multiple Optimal Solutions and Sag Occurrence Index Based Placement of Voltage Sag Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents optimal placement of voltage sag monitors based on new Sag Occurrence Index (SOI which ensures observability even in case of monitor failure or line outages. Multiple solutions for optimal placement of voltage sag monitors for voltage sag detection have been obtained by genetic algorithm approach such that observability of the whole system is guaranteed. A new Sag Occurrence Index (SOI is proposed to obtain the severity of voltage sag at all the buses in the system. To obtain the best monitor arrangement in the system, the sum of SOI for each optimal combination is determined. IEEE 24-bus Reliability Test System (RTS and IEEE 57-bus system were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The details of implementation and simulation results are also presented.

  7. Monitoring of FR Cnc Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, A; Pavlenko, E; Kuznyetsova, Yu; Krushevska, V; Sergeev, A

    2007-01-01

    Being excited by the detection of the first ever-observed optical flare in FR Cnc, we decided to continue photometrical monitoring of this object. The observations were carried out at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine; CrAO - hereafter) and at the Terskol Observatory (Russia, Northern Caucasus). The obtained lightcurves are presented and discussed. No distinguishable flares were detected that could imply that flares on FR Cnc are very rare event.

  8. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  9. [The sociological monitoring as a tool to evaluate preventive activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazus, A I; Leven, I I; Vinogradova, O V; Zelenev, V V; Makarenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring of conditions of HIV-infection spreading includes qualitative research methods to reveal specified information from people relating immediately to the problem of HIV-infection prevalence. The acquired information can be used both for monitoring of the conditions of HIV-infection spreading (morbidity, prevalence, mortality) and adjustment of preventive activities at the level of specific administrative territory.

  10. Brain Activity Monitoring for Assessing Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Johanna Rodríguez Carrillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Satisfaction is a dimension of usability for which quantitative metrics cannot be calculated during user interactions. Measurement is subjective and depends on the ability to interpret questionnaires and on the memory of the user. This paper represents an attempt to develop an automatic quantitative metric of satisfaction, developed using a Brain Computer Interface to monitor the mental states (Attention/Meditation of users. Based on these results, we are able to establish a correlation between the state of Attention and the users' level of satisfaction.

  11. Label-free monitoring of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin in aqueous solution by terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojun; E, Yiwen; Xu, Xinlong; Wang, Li

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of applying terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to monitor the molecular reactions in aqueous solutions of anticancer drug oxaliplatin with λ-DNA and macrophages DNA. The reaction time dependent refractive index and absorption coefficient were extracted and analyzed. The reaction half-decaying time of about 4.0 h for λ-DNA and 12.9 h for M-DNA was established. The results suggest that the THz-TDS detection could be an effective label-free technique to sense the molecular reaction in aqueous solutions and could be very useful in biology, medicine, and pharmacy industry.

  12. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Navia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN. These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion or passive (low observability inside the nodes. This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART, serial peripheral interface (SPI, and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference, about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  13. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-09-18

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  14. Development and evaluation of methods for safeguards use of solution monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the effort to develop, implement, and evaluate data analysis methods for solution-monitoring measurements in the plutonium nitrate storage at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). The intent is to address TRP-specific issues to some extent, as well as to anticipate the data analysis needs at future reprocessing plants (especially the new Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)) in Japan. The essential difference between a plant like TRP and a more modern plant like RRP is that one expects more and better instrumentation in the tanks in a modern plant. Because the TRP solution monitoring hardware is scheduled to be upgraded, the authors de-emphasized the effort to handle information-poor plants like TRP. This report mostly describes the analysis methods and software for finding and identifying all key tank events. To a large extent they have to experiment with several candidate methods for implementing their analysis objectives. Therefore, they chose to use a prototyping software system called S-PLUS, which is an object-oriented statistical programming and graphics package. The intent is to eventually implement selected portions of their current solution-monitoring toolkit in a more robust and user-friendly system. The authors describe their current software system as being far more than they needed for their own in-house use (menus are provided for the user who doesn`t want to type any S-PLUS commands), but less than is needed for a fieldable system. Mostly as a result of working on this project, they have come to conclude that solution monitoring is a potentially very valuable asset to nuclear safeguards at a modern reprocessing plant.

  15. Signal Estimation Using Wavelet Analysis of Solution Monitoring Data for Nuclear Safeguards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Burr

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wavelets are explored as a data smoothing (or de-noising option for solution monitoring data in nuclear safeguards. In wavelet-smoothed data, the Gibbs phenomenon can obscure important data features that may be of interest. This paper compares wavelet smoothing to piecewise linear smoothing and local kernel smoothing, and illustrates that the Haar wavelet basis is effective for reducing the Gibbs phenomenon.

  16. FT-RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY FOR MONITORING THE POLYMERIZATION OF ACRYLIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yu; Hui-zhou Liu; Jia-yong Chen

    1999-01-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the polymerization of acrylic acid in aqueous solution. A simple method to avoid the noise in the background during the signal processing via Fourier transformation was used in this work. The effects of the amount of initiator used on the polymerization are studied. When the amount of the initiator in the polymerization was increased, both the rate and extent of polymerization of acrylic acid will be increased.

  17. Intelligent monitoring and fault diagnosis for ATLAS TDAQ: a complex event processing solution

    CERN Document Server

    Magnoni, Luca; Luppi, Eleonora

    Effective monitoring and analysis tools are fundamental in modern IT infrastructures to get insights on the overall system behavior and to deal promptly and effectively with failures. In recent years, Complex Event Processing (CEP) technologies have emerged as effective solutions for information processing from the most disparate fields: from wireless sensor networks to financial analysis. This thesis proposes an innovative approach to monitor and operate complex and distributed computing systems, in particular referring to the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system currently in use at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The result of this research, the AAL project, is currently used to provide ATLAS data acquisition operators with automated error detection and intelligent system analysis. The thesis begins by describing the TDAQ system and the controlling architecture, with a focus on the monitoring infrastructure and the expert system used for error detection and automated reco...

  18. Comparative study on ATR-FTIR calibration models for monitoring solution concentration in cooling crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangkun; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue Z.; Liu, Jingxiang; Jiang, Xiaobin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper calibration model building based on using an ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is investigated for in-situ measurement of the solution concentration during a cooling crystallization process. The cooling crystallization of L-glutamic Acid (LGA) as a case is studied here. It was found that using the metastable zone (MSZ) data for model calibration can guarantee the prediction accuracy for monitoring the operating window of cooling crystallization, compared to the usage of undersaturated zone (USZ) spectra for model building as traditionally practiced. Calibration experiments were made for LGA solution under different concentrations. Four candidate calibration models were established using different zone data for comparison, by using a multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) regression algorithm for the collected spectra together with the corresponding temperature values. Experiments under different process conditions including the changes of solution concentration and operating temperature were conducted. The results indicate that using the MSZ spectra for model calibration can give more accurate prediction of the solution concentration during the crystallization process, while maintaining accuracy in changing the operating temperature. The primary reason of prediction error was clarified as spectral nonlinearity for in-situ measurement between USZ and MSZ. In addition, an LGA cooling crystallization experiment was performed to verify the sensitivity of these calibration models for monitoring the crystal growth process.

  19. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera

    2014-01-01

    as the strongest inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (90% of DPI inhibition). Surprisingly, none of the uraemic retention solutes we investigated was found to increase NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, plasma from patients with CKD-5D before dialysis caused significantly higher inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase...... inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity in the presence of plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis compared with before dialysis, we investigated the effect of 48 known and commercially available uraemic retention solutes on the enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase. METHODS: Mononuclear leucocytes...... isolated from buffy coats of healthy volunteers were isolated, lysed and incubated with NADH in the presence of plasma from healthy controls and patients with CKD-5D. Furthermore, the leucocytes were lysed and incubated in the presence of uraemic retention solute of interest and diphenyleneiodonium...

  20. Chemical Sensor Platform for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Activity and Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Solovei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes’ coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  1. Management plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.; Pratt, D.R.

    1991-08-01

    The DOE/RL 89-19, United States Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1989), requires the Hanford Site to prepare an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) by November 9, 1991. The DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (1991), provides additional guidance and requires implementation of the EMP within 36 months of the effective data of the rule. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each US Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials to prepare an EMP. This EMP is to identify and discuss two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. At the Hanford Site, the site-wide EMP will consist of the following elements: (1) A conceptual plan addressing effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance; (2) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) site-wide environmental surveillance program; (3) Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) effluent monitoring program consisting of the near-field operations environmental monitoring activities and abstracts of each Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP). This management plan addresses the third of these three elements of the EMP, the FEMPs.

  2. Fabric-based integrated energy devices for wearable activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sungmook; Lee, Jongsu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Minbaek; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-09-01

    A wearable fabric-based integrated power-supply system that generates energy triboelectrically using human activity and stores the generated energy in an integrated supercapacitor is developed. This system can be utilized as either a self-powered activity monitor or as a power supply for external wearable sensors. These demonstrations give new insights for the research of wearable electronics.

  3. The methodical statutes monitoring of activity by innovative structures

    OpenAIRE

    Stoianovskii, Andrii; Baranovska, Sofia; Stoianovska, Iryna

    2012-01-01

    In the article it is suggested to perfect methodical recommendations in relation to monitoring of activity of innovative structures, which, among other, allow to mark off the results of activity of leading organ of management and contractors of innovative projects, registered in her limits an innovative structure.

  4. An overview of existing raptor contaminant monitoring activities in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ramírez, P; Shore, R F; van den Brink, N W; van Hattum, B; Bustnes, J O; Duke, G; Fritsch, C; García-Fernández, A J; Helander, B O; Jaspers, V; Krone, O; Martínez-López, E; Mateo, R; Movalli, P; Sonne, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomonitoring using raptors as sentinels can provide early warning of the potential impacts of contaminants on humans and the environment and also a means of tracking the success of associated mitigation measures. Examples include detection of heavy metal-induced immune system impairment, PCB-induced altered reproductive impacts, and toxicity associated with lead in shot game. Authorisation of such releases and implementation of mitigation is now increasingly delivered through EU-wide directives but there is little established pan-European monitoring to quantify outcomes. We investigated the potential for EU-wide coordinated contaminant monitoring using raptors as sentinels. We did this using a questionnaire to ascertain the current scale of national activity across 44 European countries. According to this survey, there have been 52 different contaminant monitoring schemes with raptors over the last 50years. There were active schemes in 15 (predominantly western European) countries and 23 schemes have been running for >20years; most monitoring was conducted for >5years. Legacy persistent organic compounds (specifically organochlorine insecticides and PCBs), and metals/metalloids were monitored in most of the 15 countries. Fungicides, flame retardants and anticoagulant rodenticides were also relatively frequently monitored (each in at least 6 countries). Common buzzard (Buteo buteo), common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), tawny owl (Strix aluco) and barn owl (Tyto alba) were most commonly monitored (each in 6-10 countries). Feathers and eggs were most widely analysed although many schemes also analysed body tissues. Our study reveals an existing capability across multiple European countries for contaminant monitoring using raptors. However, coordination between existing schemes and expansion of monitoring into Eastern Europe is needed. This would enable

  5. Monitoring the crystallization from solution of a reactive dye by ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Thomas; Tebbutt, John S.; Challis, Richard E.

    2000-05-01

    Ultrasound has potential to be used as a process monitoring tool alongside other techniques, such as pH, conductivity and dielectric measurements, tomography and optical turbidity. This paper outlines the development of a small volume test cell designed to monitor crystallization from solution in real time using low power ultrasound. The associated software is described and a series of experiments that have been carried out on a crystallizing orange reactive dye (BASF plc) are presented. Ultrasound has been used to monitor the crystallization process and the measurements yield data that separate into two distinct groups. These correspond to whether the dye is stirred or unstirred whilst crystallizing. Optical microscopy shows that well-dispersed crystals or extended networks of closely associated crystals are formed respectively. It was not possible to determine the principal physical constants of the crystallizing material due to its nature, so detailed theoretical modelling of the crystallization could not be achieved. Nevertheless, the phenomenological results indicate that the technique has potential to be incorporated into rugged instrumentation for monitoring crystallization in an industrial process environment.

  6. Microfluidic solutions enabling continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Marc; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-07-27

    The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in employing microfluidic solutions enabling Continuous Processing and Monitoring of Biological Samples (CPMBS), which is an essential requirement for the control of bio-processes. The microfluidic systems are superior to the traditional inline sensors due to their ability to implement complex analytical procedures, such as multi-step sample preparation, and enabling the online measurement of parameters. This manuscript provides a backgound review of microfluidic approaches employing laminar flow, hydrodynamic separation, acoustophoresis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, magnetophoresis and segmented flow for the continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples. The principles, advantages and limitations of each microfluidic approach are described along with its potential applications. The challenges in the field and the future directions are also provided.

  7. Coherent spectroscopic methods for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguilnaya, T.; Suminov, Y.; Botikov, A.; Ignatov, S.; Kononenko, A.; Agibalov, A.

    2016-12-01

    We developed the new automatic method that combines the method of forced luminescence and stimulated Brillouin scattering. This method is used for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution. We carried out the statistical spectral analysis of pathogens, genetically modified soy and nano-particles of silver in water from different regions in order to determine the statistical errors of the method. We studied spectral characteristics of these objects in water to perform the initial identification with 95% probability. These results were used for creation of the model of the device for monitor of pathogenic organisms and working model of the device to determine the genetically modified soy in meat.

  8. Coherent spectroscopic methods for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moguilnaya T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the new automatic method that combines the method of forced luminescence and stimulated Brillouin scattering. This method is used for monitoring pathogens, genetically modified products and nanostructured materials in colloidal solution. We carried out the statistical spectral analysis of pathogens, genetically modified soy and nano-particles of silver in water from different regions in order to determine the statistical errors of the method. We studied spectral characteristics of these objects in water to perform the initial identification with 95% probability. These results were used for creation of the model of the device for monitor of pathogenic organisms and working model of the device to determine the genetically modified soy in meat.

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  10. IMIS desktop & smartphone software solutions for monitoring spacecrafts' payload from anywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, J.; Queyrut, O.; Airaud, J.

    In the past years, the demand for satellite remote operations has increased guided by on one hand, the will to reduce operations cost (on-call operators out of business hours), and on the other hand, the development of cooperation space missions resulting in a world wide distribution of engineers and science team members. Only a few off-the-shelf solutions exist to fulfill the need of remote payload monitoring, and they mainly use proprietary devices. The recent advent of mobile technologies (laptops, smartphones and tablets) as well as the worldwide deployment of broadband networks (3G, Wi-Fi hotspots), has opened up a technical window that brings new options. As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, the French space agency) has developed a new software solution for monitoring spacecraft payloads. The Instrument Monitoring Interactive Software (IMIS) offers state-of-the-art operational features for payload monitoring, and can be accessed remotely. It was conceived as a generic tool that can be used for heterogeneous payloads and missions. IMIS was designed as a classical client/server architecture. The server is hosted at CNES and acts as a data provider while two different kinds of clients are available depending on the level of mobility required. The first one is a rich client application, built on Eclipse framework, which can be installed on usual operating systems and communicates with the server through the Internet. The second one is a smartphone application for any Android platform, connected to the server thanks to the mobile broadband network or a Wi-Fi connection. This second client is mainly devoted to on-call operations and thus only contains a subset of the IMIS functionalities. This paper describes the operational context, including security aspects, that led IMIS development, presents the selected software architecture and details the various features of both clients: the desktop and the sm

  11. A wireless solution for greenhouse monitoring and control system based on ZigBee technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless technologies, it is possible for Chinese greenhouses to be equipped with wireless sensor networks due to their low-cost, simplicity and mobility. In the current study, we compared the advantages of ZigBee with other two similar wireless networking protocols, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and proposed a wireless solution for greenhouse monitoring and control system based on ZigBee technology. As an explorative application of ZigBee technology in Chinese greenhouse, it may promote Chinese protected agriculture.

  12. Continuous gravity monitoring of geothermal activity; Renzoku juryoku sokutei ni yoru chinetsu katsudo no monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, M. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    To clarify the geothermal activity in the geothermal fields in New Zealand, gravity monitoring was conducted using SCINTREX automatic gravimeter. The measurements were conducted between the end of January and the beginning of March, 1996. Firstly, continuous monitoring was conducted at the standard point for about ten days, and the tidal components were estimated from the records. After that, continuous monitoring was conducted at Waimangu area for several days. Continuous monitoring was repeated at the standard point, again. At the Waimangu area, three times of changes in the pulse-shape amplitude of 0.01 mgal having a width of several hours were observed. For the SCINTREX gravimeter, the inclination of gravimeter is also recorded in addition to the change of gravity. During the monitoring, the gravimeter was also inclined with the changes of gravity. This inclination was useful not only for the correction of gravity measured, but also for evaluating the ground fluctuation due to the underground pressure source. It is likely that the continuous gravity monitoring is the relatively conventional technique which is effective for prospecting the change of geothermal reservoir. 2 figs.

  13. Applied research of environmental monitoring using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Young Ju

    1997-08-01

    This technical report is written as a guide book for applied research of environmental monitoring using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The contents are as followings; sampling and sample preparation as a airborne particulate matter, analytical methodologies, data evaluation and interpretation, basic statistical methods of data analysis applied in environmental pollution studies. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 9 figs.

  14. Leisure Time Activities, Parental Monitoring and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  15. Leisure time activities, parental monitoring and drunkenness in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Z.; Veselska, Z.; Madarasova Geckova, A.; van Dijk, J.P.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  16. Demonstration of TEG-powered wireless autonomous transducer solution for condition monitoring in industrial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziyang; Patrascu, Mihai; Su, Jiale; Vullers, Ruud J.M. [imec the Netherlands, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    Imec/Holst Centre focuses on the development of wireless autonomous transducer solution, which is poised to bring about huge impact in the sectors of health care, machinery, transportation and energy, etc. In this paper, we first showcase a TEG-powered demonstration for condition monitoring in industrial environment. Composing of sensor-actuator, front-end interface, digital signal processing unit and radio, the developed wireless sensor node can monitor the changing operating condition, i.e. the loading on a rolling-element bearing, on a rotating shaft. The use of a specially designed TEG, working in tandem with an energy storage device, can significantly improve the energy autonomy of the condition monitoring system as a whole. The different components in the demonstration are presented. Subsequently, the experimental results of vibration signature analysis are exhibited. On one hand, the presented demonstration sheds light on the huge potential of thermoelectric energy harvesting to achieve energy autonomy. On the other hand, it also points to the aspects that are in need of further development, namely miniaturization and cost reduction of energy harvesters. Aimed at the delivery of cost-effective miniaturized thermoelectric harvesting devices, imec/Holst Centre has been tackling with the relevant challenges by resorting to, but not limited to, its expertise in micromachining. An update on the latest research results is subsequently given with regard to various micromachined thermoelectric devices, fully fledged wearable TEGs with custom designed package and thermoelectric material property optimization. (orig.)

  17. Study of the Video Monitoring System Image Recognition Solutions Based on Mathematic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilong Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available objective: Through establishment a set of image recognition system based on mathematic models, to develop a auto alarm solution for the video monitoring system. Methods: compare the images the video monitoring system collected according to the time sequences. Then after binaryzation and wave filtering, the images were converted into numerical values using autocorrelation function, and the alarm threshold value was confirmed by experiences. Results: Through experiments, the change ratios of the two images before and after image processing were inversely proportional to the autocorrelation function. When the function value is less than 0.8, it indicates that there is an object volumes larger than 1m3 has invaded into 15m distances, and when the function value is less than 0.6, it indicates that there is an object volumes larger than 1m3 has invaded into 30m distances. Conclusion: Through calculation of autocorrelation functions, auto alarm for the images collected by video monitoring system could be effectively realized.

  18. Combination of Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Analysis Center from repro2 solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunegnaw, Addisu; Teferle, Felix Norman

    2016-04-01

    Recently the International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG) has completed their repro2 solutions by re-analyzing the full history of all relevant Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1995 to 2015. This re-processed data set will provide high-quality estimates of vertical land movements for more than 500 stations, enabling regional and global high-precision geophysical/geodetic studies. All the TIGA Analysis Centres (TACs) have processed the observations recorded by GPS stations at or close to tide gauges, which are available from the TIGA Data Center at the University of La Rochelle (www.sonel.org) besides those of the global IGS core network used for its reference frame implementations. Following the recent improvements in processing models, strategies (http://acc.igs.org/reprocess2.html), this is the first complete re-processing attempt by the TIGA WG to provide homogeneous position time series relevant to sea level changes. In this study we report on a first multi-year daily combined solution from the TIGA Combination Centre (TCC) at the University of Luxembourg (UL) with respect to the latest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2014). Using two independent combination software packages, CATREF and GLOBK, we have computed a first daily combined solution from TAC solutions already available to the TIGA WG. These combinations allow an evaluation of any effects from the combination software and of the individual TAC parameters and their influences on the combined solution with respect to the latest ITRF2014. Some results of the UL TIGA multi-year combinations in terms of geocentric sea level changes will be presented and discussed.

  19. Near real-time GRACE gravity field solutions for hydrological monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvas, Andreas; Gouweleeuw, Ben; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Güntner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Within the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, a demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service which provides daily GRACE gravity field solutions will be established. Compared to the official GRACE gravity products, these NRT solutions will increase the temporal resolution from one month to one day and reduce the latency from currently two months to five days. This fast availability allows the monitoring of total water storage variations and of hydrological extreme events as they occur, in contrast to a 'confirmation after occurrence' as is the situation today. The service will be jointly run by GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences) and Graz University of Technology, with each analysis center providing an independent solution. A Kalman filter framework, in which GRACE data is combined with prior information, serves as basis for the gravity field recovery in order to increase the redundancy of the gravity field estimates. The on-line nature of the NRT service necessitates a tailored smoothing algorithm as opposed to post-processing applications, where forward-backward smoothing can be applied. This contribution gives an overview on the near real-time processing chain and highlights differences between the computed NRT solutions and the standard GRACE products. We discuss the special characteristics of the Kalman filtered gravity field models as well as derived products and give an estimate of the expected error levels. Additionally, we show the added value of the NRT solutions through comparison of the first results of the pre-operational phase with in-situ data and monthly GRACE gravity field models.

  20. Performance improvement clarification for refrigeration system using active system monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of determining whether a refrigeration plant has the possibility of delivering a better performance of the operation. The controllers are wellknown but detailed knowledge about the underlying dynamics of the refrigeration plant is not available. Thus, the question...... is if it is possible to achieve a better performance by changing the controller parameter. An approach to active system monitoring, based on active fault diagnosis techniques, is employed in order to evaluate changes in the system performance under operation....

  1. Problem solution as a guided activity with Mexican schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovieva, Yulia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to describe the organization of a guided activity for problem solution in primary school. The method, which was applied to mathematical problems, allowed us to propose a specific orientation for the proper solution of arithmetic problems by pupils. The study was based on the activity-theory approach applied to the process of teaching and learning. It was carried out with pupils in the second grade of a private school in the city of Puebla (Mexico. The method was used in the classroom during 30 school sessions of 1 hour per day. The methodology of formative experiment was used in the study. Qualitative analysis of the pedagogical process of teaching and learning was conducted. The results show that, after participation in the formative process, the schoolchildren became able to identify essential elements, data, and all relationships among them in order to solve mathematical problems. At the end of the program the verbal external level was raised for the process of orientation and the solution of problems together with the ability to use logarithms independently. We conclude that orientation, as a guided form of activity in primary school, is essential for the development of the ability to analyze problems.

  2. Automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow using remote sensing for optimised treatment of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Beiderman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how a novel photonic remote sensing system assembled on a robotic platform can extract vital biomedical parameters from cattle including their heart beating, breathing and chewing activity. The sensor is based upon a camera and a laser using selfinterference phenomena. The whole system intends to provide an automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow. The detection algorithm is based upon image processing involving probability map construction. The identification algorithms involve well known image pattern recognition techniques. The sensor is used on top of an automated robotic platform in order to support animal decision making. Field tests and computer simulated results are presented.

  3. Active Reflectors: Possible Solutions Based on Reflectarrays and Fresnel Reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Cabria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview about some of the recent Spanish developments on active reflectors is presented. In the first part, a novel beamsteering active reflectarray is deeply studied. It is based on implementing in each elementary radiator an IQ modulator structure, in which amplitude and phase control of the scattered field is achieved. Finally, a special effort is made in offering solutions to overcome the active antenna integration problems. In the second part, the active concept is firstly extended to Fresnel reflectors. Thanks to the development of a proper simulator, this special structure can be easily analysed. This simulator allows the study of performance of this kind of reflectors and, applying evolutionary algorithms, to find optimal configurations of reflector in accordance with the given specifications for the conformal radiation pattern.

  4. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Babalik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic drug monitoring ensures optimal dosing while aiming to reduce toxicity. However, due to the high costs and complexity of testing, therapeutic drug monitoring is not routinely used in the treatment of individuals with active tuberculosis, despite the efficacy demonstrated in several randomized trials. This study reviewed data spanning five years regarding the frequency of finding low drug levels in patients with tuberculosis, the dosing adjustments that were required to achieve adequate levels and the factors associated with low drug levels.

  5. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  6. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  7. Remote monitoring of biodynamic activity using electric potential sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harl, C J; Prance, R J; Prance, H [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, Department of Engineering and Design, School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.j.harland@sussex.ac.uk

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in applying the electric potential sensor to the monitoring of body electrophysiological signals has shown that it is now possible to monitor these signals without needing to make any electrical contact with the body. Conventional electrophysiology makes use of electrodes which are placed in direct electrical contact with the skin. The electric potential sensor requires no cutaneous electrical contact, it operates by sensing the displacement current using a capacitive coupling. When high resolution body electrophysiology is required a strong (capacitive) coupling is used to maximise the collected signal. However, in remote applications where there is typically an air-gap between the body and the sensor only a weak coupling can be achieved. In this paper we demonstrate that the electric potential sensor can be successfully used for the remote sensing and monitoring of bioelectric activity. We show examples of heart-rate measurements taken from a seated subject using sensors mounted in the chair. We also show that it is possible to monitor body movements on the opposite side of a wall to the sensor. These sensing techniques have biomedical applications for non-contact monitoring of electrophysiological conditions and can be applied to passive through-the-wall surveillance systems for security applications.

  8. Corrosion in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products and biofuels identification, monitoring and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2014-01-01

    This book treats corrosion as it occurs and affects processes in real-world situations, and thus points the way to practical solutions. Topics described include the conditions in which petroleum products are corrosive to metals; corrosion mechanisms of petroleum products; which parts of storage tanks containing crude oils and petroleum products undergo corrosion; dependence of corrosion in tanks on type of petroleum products; aggressiveness of petroleum products to polymeric material; how microorganisms take part in corrosion of tanks and pipes containing petroleum products; which corrosion monitoring methods are used in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products; what corrosion control measures should be chosen; how to choose coatings for inner and outer surfaces of tanks containing petroleum products; and how different additives (oxygenates, aromatic solvents) to petroleum products and biofuels influence metallic and polymeric materials. The book is of interest to corrosion engineers, mat...

  9. Data mining spacecraft telemetry: towards generic solutions to automatic health monitoring and status characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, P.; De Ridder, J.; Vandenbussche, B.; Regibo, S.; Huygen, R.; De Meester, W.; Evans, D. J.; Martinez, J.; Korte-Stapff, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first results of a study aimed at finding new and efficient ways to automatically process spacecraft telemetry for automatic health monitoring. The goal is to reduce the load on the flight control team while extending the "checkability" to the entire telemetry database, and provide efficient, robust and more accurate detection of anomalies in near real time. We present a set of effective methods to (a) detect outliers in the telemetry or in its statistical properties, (b) uncover and visualise special properties of the telemetry and (c) detect new behavior. Our results are structured around two main families of solutions. For parameters visiting a restricted set of signal values, i.e. all status parameters and about one third of all the others, we focus on a transition analysis, exploiting properties of Poincare plots. For parameters with an arbitrarily high number of possible signal values, we describe the statistical properties of the signal via its Kernel Density Estimate. We demonstrate that this allows for a generic and dynamic approach of the soft-limit definition. Thanks to a much more accurate description of the signal and of its time evolution, we are more sensitive and more responsive to outliers than the traditional checks against hard limits. Our methods were validated on two years of Venus Express telemetry. They are generic for assisting in health monitoring of any complex system with large amounts of diagnostic sensor data. Not only spacecraft systems but also present-day astronomical observatories can benefit from them.

  10. QA/QC activities and ecological monitoring in the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is presented of Quality assurance/Quality control QA/QC activities and current features of the ecological monitoring in the frame of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia EANET. It is stressed that standardization of the methodologies applicable for new topics, such as the catchment analysis and ozone impacts, should be investigated for future monitoring.

  11. New solutions for standardization, monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royon, Arnaud; Papon, Gautier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopes have become ubiquitous in life sciences laboratories, including those focused on pharmaceuticals, diagnosis, and forensics. For the past few years, the need for both performance guarantees and quantifiable results has driven development in this area. However, the lack of appropriate standards and reference materials makes it difficult or impossible to compare the results of two fluorescence microscopes, or to measure performance fluctuations of one microscope over time. Therefore, the operation of fluorescence microscopes is not monitored as often as their use warrants - an issue that is recognized by both systems manufacturers and national metrology institutes. We have developed a new process that enables the etching of long-term stable fluorescent patterns with sub-micrometer sizes in three dimensions inside glass. In this paper, we present, based on this new process, a fluorescent multi-dimensional ruler and a dedicated software that are suitable for monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (wide-field, confocal, multiphoton, high content machines). In addition to fluorescence, the same patterns exhibit bright- and dark-field contrast, DIC, and phase contrast, which make them also relevant to monitor these types of microscopes. Non-exhaustively, this new solution enables the measurement of: The stage repositioning accuracy; The illumination and detection homogeneities; The field flatness; The detectors' characteristics; The lateral and axial spatial resolutions; The spectral response (spectrum, intensity and lifetime) of the system. Thanks to the stability of the patterns, microscope performance assessment can be carried out as well in a daily basis as in the long term.

  12. Cognitive Approach Based User Node Activity Monitoring for Intrusion Detection in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sunilkumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive networks are the solution for the problems existing on the current networks. Users maintain integrity of the networks and user node activity monitoring is required for provision of security. Cognitive Networks discussed in this paper not only monitor user node activity but also take preventive measures if user node transactions are malicious. The intelligence in cognitive engine is realized using self-organizing maps (CSOMs. Gaussian and Mexican Hat neighbor learning functions have been evaluated to realize CSOMs. Experimental study proves the efficiency of Gaussian Learning function is better for cognition engine. The cognition engine realized is evaluated for malicious node detection in dynamic networks. The proposed concept results in better Intrusion detection rate as compared to existing approaches.

  13. Active Geophysical Monitoring in Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Effective reservoir management is a Holy Grail of the oil and gas industry. Quest for new technologies is never ending but most often they increase effectiveness and decrease the costs. None of the newcomers proved to be a silver bullet in such a key metric of the industry as average oil recovery factor. This factor is still around 30 %, meaning that 70 % of hydrocarbon reserves are left in the ground in places where we already have expensive infrastructure (platforms, wells) to extract them. Main reason for this inefficiency is our inability to address realistic reservoir complexity. Most of the time we fail to properly characterize our reservoirs before production. As a matter of fact, one of the most important parameters -- permeability -- can not be mapped from remote geophysical methods. Therefore we always start production blind even though reservoir state before production is the simplest one. Once first oil is produced, we greatly complicate the things and quickly become unable to estimate the state and condition of the reservoir (fluid, pressures, faults etc) or oilfield hardware (wells, platforms, pumps) to make a sound next decision in the chain of reservoir management. Our modeling capabilities are such that if we know true state of the things - we can make incredibly accurate predictions and make extremely efficient decisions. Thus the bottleneck is our inability to properly describe the state of the reservoirs in real time. Industry is starting to recognize active monitoring as an answer to this critical issue. We will highlight industry strides in active geophysical monitoring from well to reservoir scale. It is worth noting that when one says ``monitoring" production technologists think of measuring pressures at the wellhead or at the pump, reservoir engineers think of measuring extracted volumes and pressures, while geophysicist may think of change in elastic properties. We prefer to think of monitoring as to measuring those parameters of the

  14. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  15. Automated monitoring: a potential solution for achieving sustainable improvement in hand hygiene practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Alexander I; Boscart, Veronique M; Fernie, Geoff R

    2014-08-01

    Adequate hand hygiene is often considered as the most effective method of reducing the rates of hospital-acquired infections, which are one of the major causes of increased cost, morbidity, and mortality in healthcare. Electronic monitoring technologies provide a promising direction for achieving sustainable hand hygiene improvement by introducing the elements of automated feedback and creating the possibility to automatically collect individual hand hygiene performance data. The results of the multiphase testing of an automated hand hygiene reminding and monitoring system installed in a complex continuing care setting are presented. The study included a baseline Phase 1, with the system performing automated data collection only, a preintervention Phase 2 with hand hygiene status indicator enabled, two intervention Phases 3 and 4 with the system generating hand hygiene reminding signals and periodic performance feedback sessions provided, and a postintervention Phase 5 with only hand hygiene status indicator enabled and no feedback sessions provided. A significant increase in hand hygiene performance observed during the first intervention Phase 3 was sustained over the second intervention Phase 4, with the postintervention phase also indicating higher hand hygiene activity rates compared with the preintervention and baseline phases. The overall trends observed during the multiphase testing, the factors affecting acceptability of the automated hand hygiene monitoring system, and various strategies of technology deployment are discussed.

  16. Active landslide monitoring using remote sensing data, GPS measurements and cameras on board UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Kavoura, Katerina; Depountis, Nikolaos; Argyropoulos, Nikolaos; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Sabatakakis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    An active landslide can be monitored using many different methods: Classical geotechnical measurements like inclinometer, topographical survey measurements with total stations or GPS and photogrammetric techniques using airphotos or high resolution satellite images. As the cost of the aerial photo campaign and the acquisition of very high resolution satellite data is quite expensive the use of cameras on board UAV could be an identical solution. Small UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) have started their development as expensive toys but they currently became a very valuable tool in remote sensing monitoring of small areas. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a cheap but effective solution for an active landslide monitoring. We present the first experimental results of the synergistic use of UAV, GPS measurements and remote sensing data. A six-rotor aircraft with a total weight of 6 kg carrying two small cameras has been used. Very accurate digital airphotos, high accuracy DSM, DGPS measurements and the data captured from the UAV are combined and the results are presented in the current study.

  17. Limited Activity Monitoring in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shic, Frederick; Bradshaw, Jessica; Klin, Ami; Scassellati, Brian; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    This study used eye-tracking to examine how 20-month old toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (N=28), typical development (TD) (N=34), and non-autistic developmental delays (DD) (N=16) monitored the activities occurring in a context of an adult-child play interaction. Toddlers with ASD, in comparison to control groups, showed less attention to the activities of others and focused more on background objects (e.g. toys). In addition, while all groups spent the same time overall looking ...

  18. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  19. Predicting of bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants using disinfection activity coefficient of solution

    OpenAIRE

    Gjorgjeska, Biljana

    2011-01-01

    There is the need for defining standard technique for quantitative determination of bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectant substances, as well as the need for defining parameter for comparing various chemical disinfectants. The methods which are usually used for evaluation of antiseptic activity of disinfectant aqueous solutions are microbiological.

  20. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrolis, Constantine [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  1. AAL Middleware Infrastructure for Green Bed Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Palumbo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a service-oriented middleware platform for ambient assisted living and its use in two different bed activity services: bedsore prevention and sleeping monitoring. A detailed description of the middleware platform, its elements and interfaces, as well as a service that is able to classify some typical user's positions in the bed is presented. Wireless sensor networks are supposed to be widely deployed in indoor settings and on people's bodies in tomorrow's pervasive computing environments. The key idea of this work is to leverage their presence by collecting the received signal strength measured among fixed general-purpose wireless sensor devices, deployed in the environment, and wearable ones. The RSS measurements are used to classify a set of user's positions in the bed, monitoring the activities of the user, and thus supporting the bedsores and the sleep monitoring issues. Moreover, the proposed services are able to decrease the energy consumption by exploiting the context information coming from the proposed middleware.

  2. LANDSLIDE ACTIVITY MONITORING WITH THE HELP OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Peterman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical example of a landslide monitoring through the use of a UAV - tracking and monitoring the movements of the Potoska Planina landslide located above the village of Koroska Bela in the western Karavanke Mountains in north-western Slovenia. Past geological research in this area indicated slope landmass movement of more than 10 cm per year. However, much larger movements have been detected since - significant enough to be observed photogrammetrically with the help of a UAV. With the intention to assess the dynamics of the landslide we have established a system of periodic observations carried out twice per year – in mid-spring and mid-autumn. This paper offers an activity summary along with the presentation of data acquisition, data processing and results.

  3. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Monomucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-08-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2+ in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MeImpU and 2-MeImpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-linked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of internucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MeImpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  4. Novel label-free biosensing technology for monitoring of aqueous solutions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Florian; Bielecki, Robert; Follonier, Stephane; Dorokhin, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Waste water, drinking water and other industrial water sources are more and more/increasingly polluted with a large variety of contaminants, such as pesticides or residuals of pharmaceuticals. These compounds can impact human and animal organisms and lead to serious health issues. Today, in order to analyze the presence and quantity of the abovementioned micropollutants, samples are typically sent to specialized centralized laboratories and their processing may take up to several days. In order to meet the demand for continuous and consistent monitoring of aqueous solutions we propose a novel label-free technology system comprising proprietary chip and reader device designs. The core of the system is constituted by a planar-grated-waveguide (PGW) chip. Label-free biosensors, based on PGWs are sensitive to effective refractive index changes caused by the adsorption of biomolecules (micropollutants) onto the sensor surface or due to refractive index changes of the bulk solution. The presented reader device operates with a novel readout concept based on a scanning MEMS mirror for the angular interrogation of input grating couplers at a high repetition rate. The reader has fully integrated optics, electronics and fluidics and at the same time consumes limited energy (portable, field use ready). In the recent experiments, the effectiveness of the technology has been demonstrated with various liquids and bioassays showing (i) an excellent refractometric sensitivity with a limit of detection towards effective refractive index changes of ▵neff < 2 x 10-7, and (ii) the capability to perform affinity measurements for large (<150 kDa) and small (<250 Da) molecules.

  5. Long term continuous radon monitoring in a seismically active area

    CERN Document Server

    Piersanti, A; Galli, G

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a long term, continuous radon monitoring experiment started in April 2010 in a seismically active area, affected during the 2010-2013 data acquisition time window by an intense micro seismic activity and by several small seismic events. We employed both correlation and cross-correlation analyses in order to investigate possible relationship existing between the collected radon data, seismic events and meteorological parameters. Our results do not support the feasibility of a robust one-to-one association between the small magnitude earthquakes characterizing the local seismic activity and single radon measurement anomalies, but evidence significant correlation patterns between the spatio-temporal variations of seismic moment release and soil radon emanations, the latter being anyway dominantly modulated by meteorological parameters variations.

  6. Heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions by activated phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elouear, Z. [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, Departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038, Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: zouheir.elouaer@tunet.tn; Bouzid, J.; Boujelben, N. [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, Departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038, Sfax (Tunisia); Feki, M. [Unite de chimie industriel I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Jamoussi, F. [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia); Montiel, A. [Societe Anonyme de Gestion des Eaux de Paris, 9 rue Schoelcher, 75675 Paris cedex 14 (France)

    2008-08-15

    The use of natural adsorbent such as phosphate rock to replace expensive imported synthetic adsorbent is particularly appropriate for developing countries such as Tunisia. In this study, the removal characteristics of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solution by activated phosphate rock were investigated under various operating variables like contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration and temperature. The kinetic and the sorption process of these metal ions were compared for phosphate rock (PR) and activated phosphate rock (APR). To accomplish this objective we have: (a) characterized both (PR) and (APR) using different techniques (XRD, IR) and analyses (EDAX, BET-N{sub 2}); and, (b) qualified and quantified the interaction of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} with these sorbents through batch experiments. Initial uptake of these metal ions increases with time up to 1 h for (PR) and 2 h for (APR), after then, it reaches equilibrium. The maximum sorption obtained for (PR) and (APR) is between pH 2 and 3 for Pb{sup 2+} and 4 and 6 for Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. The effect of temperature has been carried out at 10, 20 and 40 deg. C. The data obtained from sorption isotherms of metal ions at different temperatures fit to linear form of Langmuir sorption equation. The heat of sorption ({delta}H{sup o}), free energy ({delta}G{sup o}) and change in entropy ({delta}S{sup o}) were calculated. They show that sorption of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}on (PR) and (APR) an endothermic process. These findings are significant for future using of (APR) for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater under realistic competitive conditions in terms of initial heavy metals, concentrations and pH.

  7. Real-time monitoring and manipulation of single bio-molecules in free solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hung-Wing

    2005-08-01

    The observation and manipulation of single biomolecules allow their dynamic behaviors to be studied to provide insight into molecular genetics, biochip assembly, biosensor design, DNA biophysics. In a PDMS/glass microchannel, a nonuniform electroosmotic flow (EOF) was created. By using a scanning confocal fluorescence microscope and total internal-reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), we demonstrated that negatively charged DNA molecules were focused by the nonuniform EOF into a thin layer at the glass surface. This phenomenon was applied to selectively detect target DNA molecules without requiring the separation of excessive probes and can be applied continuously to achieve high throughput. A variable-angle-TIRFM was constructed for imaging single DNA molecule dynamics at a solid/liquid interface. Implications we have are that the measured intensities cannot be used directly to determine the distances of molecules from the surface and the experimental counting results depict the distance-dependent dynamics of molecules near the surface; Molecules at low ionic strengths experience electrostatic repulsion at distances much further away from the surface than the calculated thickness of the electrical double layer. {delta}-DNA was employed as a nanoprobe for different functionalized surfaces to elucidate adsorption in chromatography. The 12-base unpaired ends of this DNA provide exposed purine and pyrimidine groups for adsorption. Patterns of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and patterns of metal oxides are generated. By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the SAMs/aqueous interface, the various parameters governing the retention of an analyte during chromatographic separation can be studied. Even subtle differences among adsorptive forces can be revealed. Dynamic conformational changes of the prosthetic group, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), in flavoprotein NADH peroxidase, in thioredoxin reductase, and in free solution were monitored

  8. Real-time monitoring and manipulation of single bio-molecules in free solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hung-Wing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The observation and manipulation of single biomolecules allow their dynamic behaviors to be studied to provide insight into molecular genetics, biochip assembly, biosensor design, DNA biophysics. In a PDMS/glass microchannel, a nonuniform electroosmotic flow (EOF) was created. By using a scanning confocal fluorescence microscope and total internal-reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), we demonstrated that negatively charged DNA molecules were focused by the nonuniform EOF into a thin layer at the glass surface. This phenomenon was applied to selectively detect target DNA molecules without requiring the separation of excessive probes and can be applied continuously to achieve high throughput. A variable-angle-TIRFM was constructed for imaging single DNA molecule dynamics at a solid/liquid interface. Implications we have are that the measured intensities cannot be used directly to determine the distances of molecules from the surface and the experimental counting results depict the distance-dependent dynamics of molecules near the surface; Molecules at low ionic strengths experience electrostatic repulsion at distances much further away from the surface than the calculated thickness of the electrical double layer. {delta}-DNA was employed as a nanoprobe for different functionalized surfaces to elucidate adsorption in chromatography. The 12-base unpaired ends of this DNA provide exposed purine and pyrimidine groups for adsorption. Patterns of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and patterns of metal oxides are generated. By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the SAMs/aqueous interface, the various parameters governing the retention of an analyte during chromatographic separation can be studied. Even subtle differences among adsorptive forces can be revealed. Dynamic conformational changes of the prosthetic group, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), in flavoprotein NADH peroxidase, in thioredoxin reductase, and in free solution were monitored

  9. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  10. Performance Assessment and Active System Monitoring for Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben

    the controller set-point corresponds to a temperature deviation,which will eventually harm the stored goods. The energy eciency is measured by the coecient of performance, COP, which basically is the delivered cooling power divided by the consumed electrical power of the system. The reliability criteria...... of the refrigeration system has been addressed in the project. The proposed methods for improvement relies on a minimum of detailed knowledge about the refrigeration system. In addition, since a refrigeration system often operates in steady state an active system monitoring setup has been proposed, to enable...

  11. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor...... and carbon source during denitrification....

  12. Noncontact monitoring of cardiorespiratory activity by electromagnetic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Daniel; Foussier, Jérôme; Jia, Jing; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, the method of noncontact monitoring of cardiorespiratory activity by electromagnetic coupling with human tissue is investigated. Two measurement modalities were joined: an inductive coupling sensor based on magnetic eddy current induction and a capacitive coupling sensor based on displacement current induction. The system's sensitivity to electric tissue properties and its dependence on motion are analyzed theoretically as well as experimentally for the inductive and capacitive coupling path. The potential of both coupling methods to assess respiration and pulse without contact and a minimum of thoracic wall motion was verified by laboratory experiments. The demonstrator was embedded in a chair to enable recording from the back part of the thorax.

  13. Automated monitoring of activated sludge using image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Motta, Maurício da; M. N. Pons; Roche, N; A.L. Amaral; Ferreira, E. C.; Alves, M.M.; Mota, M.; Vivier, H.

    2000-01-01

    An automated procedure for the characterisation by image analysis of the morphology of activated sludge has been used to monitor in a systematic manner the biomass in wastewater treatment plants. Over a period of one year, variations in terms mainly of the fractal dimension of flocs and of the amount of filamentous bacteria could be related to rain events affecting the plant influent flow rate and composition. Grand Nancy Council. Météo-France. Brasil. Ministério da Ciênc...

  14. Monitoring Active Volcanos Using Aerial Images and the Orthoview Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marsella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In volcanic areas, where it can be difficult to perform direct surveys, digital photogrammetry techniques are rarely adopted for routine volcano monitoring. Nevertheless, they have remarkable potentialities for observing active volcanic features (e.g., fissures, lava flows and the connected deformation processes. The ability to obtain accurate quantitative data of definite accuracy in short time spans makes digital photogrammetry a suitable method for controlling the evolution of rapidly changing large-area volcanic phenomena. The systematic acquisition of airborne photogrammetric datasets can be adopted for implementing a more effective procedure aimed at long-term volcano monitoring and hazard assessment. In addition, during the volcanic crisis, the frequent acquisition of oblique digital images from helicopter allows for quasi-real-time monitoring to support mitigation actions by civil protection. These images are commonly used to update existing maps through a photo-interpretation approach that provide data of unknown accuracy. This work presents a scientific tool (Orthoview that implements a straightforward photogrammetric approach to generate digital orthophotos from single-view oblique images provided that at least four Ground Control Points (GCP and current Digital Elevation Models (DEM are available. The influence of the view geometry, of sparse and not-signalized GCP and DEM inaccuracies is analyzed for evaluating the performance of the developed tool in comparison with other remote sensing techniques. Results obtained with datasets from Etna and Stromboli volcanoes demonstrate that 2D features measured on the produced orthophotos can reach sub-meter-level accuracy.

  15. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  16. Carbohydrate Electrolyte Solutions Enhance Endurance Capacity in Active Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hua Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of supplementation with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES in active females during a prolonged session of submaximal running to exhaustion. Eight healthy active females volunteered to perform a session of open-ended running to exhaustion at 70% of their maximal oxygen consumption on a treadmill during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle on two occasions. During each run, the subjects consumed either 3mL·kg−1 body mass of a 6% CES or a placebo drink (PL every 20 min during exercise. The trials were administered in a randomized double-blind, cross-over design. During the run, the subjects ingested similar volumes of fluid in two trials (CES: 644 ± 75 mL vs. PL: 593 ± 66 mL, p > 0.05. The time to exhaustion was 16% longer during the CES trial (106.2 ± 9.4 min than during the PL trial (91.6 ± 5.9 min (p < 0.05. At 45 min during exercise, the plasma glucose concentration in the CES trial was higher than that in PL trial. No differences were observed in the plasma lactate level, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, perceived rate of exertion, sensation of thirst, or abdominal discomfort between the two trials (p > 0.05. The results of the present study confirm that CES supplementation improves the moderate intensity endurance capacity of active females during the follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. However, the exogenous oxidation of carbohydrate does not seem to explain the improved capacity after CES supplementation.

  17. Ultrafast studies of organometallic photochemistry: The mechanism of carbon-hydrogen bond activation in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    When certain organometallic compounds are photoexcited in room temperature alkane solution, they are able to break or activate the C-H bonds of the solvent. Understanding this potentially practical reaction requires a detailed knowledge of the entire reaction mechanism. Because of the dynamic nature of chemical reactions, time-resolved spectroscopy is commonly employed to follow the important events that take place as reactants are converted to products. For the organometallic reactions examined here, the electronic/structural characteristics of the chemical systems along with the time scales for the key steps in the reaction make ultrafast UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy along with nanosecond Step-Scan FTIR spectroscopy the ideal techniques to use for this study. An initial study of the photophysics of (non-activating) model metal carbonyls centering on the photodissociation of M(CO){sub 6} (M = Cr, W, Mo) was carried out in alkane solutions using ultrafast IR spectroscopy. Next, picosecond UV/vis studies of the C-H bond activation reaction of Cp{sup *}M(CO){sub 2} (M = Rh, Ir), conducted in room temperature alkane solution, are described in an effort to investigate the origin of the low quantum yield for bond cleavage ({approximately}1%). To monitor the chemistry that takes place in the reaction after CO is lost, a system with higher quantum yield is required. The reaction of Tp{sup *}Rh(CO){sub 2} (Tp{sup *} = HB-Pz{sub 3}{sup *}, Pz{sup *} = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) in alkanes has a quantum yield of {approximately}30%, making time resolved spectroscopic measurements possible. From ultrafast IR experiments, two subsequently formed intermediates were observed. The nature of these intermediates are discussed and the first comprehensive reaction mechanism for a photochemical C-H activating organometallic complex is presented.

  18. Active Volcano Monitoring using a Space-based Hyperspectral Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipar, J. J.; Dunn, R.; Cooley, T.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanoes occur on every continent, often in close proximity to heavily populated areas. While ground-based studies are essential for scientific research and disaster mitigation, remote sensing from space can provide rapid and continuous monitoring of active and potentially active volcanoes [Ramsey and Flynn, 2004]. In this paper, we report on hyperspectral measurements of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Hyperspectral images obtained by the US Air Force TacSat-3/ARTEMIS sensor [Lockwood et al, 2006] are used to obtain estimates of the surface temperatures for the volcano. ARTEMIS measures surface-reflected light in the visible, near-infrared, and short-wave infrared bands (VNIR-SWIR). The SWIR bands are known to be sensitive to thermal radiation [Green, 1996]. For example, images from the NASA Hyperion hyperspectral sensor have shown the extent of wildfires and active volcanoes [Young, 2009]. We employ the methodology described by Dennison et al, (2006) to obtain an estimate of the temperature of the active region of Kilauea. Both day and night-time images were used in the analysis. To improve the estimate, we aggregated neighboring pixels. The active rim of the lava lake is clearly discernable in the temperature image, with a measured temperature exceeding 1100o C. The temperature decreases markedly on the exterior of the summit crater. While a long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensor would be ideal for volcano monitoring, we have shown that the thermal state of an active volcano can be monitored using the SWIR channels of a reflective hyperspectral imager. References: Dennison, Philip E., Kraivut Charoensiri, Dar A. Roberts, Seth H. Peterson, and Robert O. Green (2006). Wildfire temperature and land cover modeling using hyperspectral data, Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 100, pp. 212-222. Green, R. O. (1996). Estimation of biomass fire temperature and areal extent from calibrated AVIRIS spectra, in Summaries of the 6th Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, Pasadena, CA

  19. Potential of multisyringe chromatography for the on-line monitoring of the photocatalytic degradation of antituberculosis drugs in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Almaraz, E; Hinojosa-Reyes, L; Caballero-Quintero, A; Ruiz-Ruiz, E; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Guzmán-Mar, J L

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a multisyringe chromatography system (MSC) using a C18 monolithic column was proposed for the on-line monitoring of the photocatalytic degradation of isoniazid (INH, 10 mg L(-1)) and pyrazinamide (PYRA, 5mgL(-1)) mixtures in aqueous solution using a small sample volume (200 μL) with an on-line filtration device in a fully automated approach. During the photocatalytic oxidation using TiO2 or ZnO semiconductor materials, total organic carbon (TOC) and the formed intermediates were analyzed off-line using ion chromatography, ion exclusion HPLC, and ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that TiO2 exhibits a better photocatalytic activity than ZnO under UV irradiation (365 nm) for the degradation of INH and PYRA mixtures, generating 97% and 92% degradation, respectively. The optimal oxidation conditions were identified as pH 7 and 1.0 g L(-1) of TiO2 as catalyst. The mineralization of the initial organic compounds was confirmed by the regular decrease in TOC, which indicated 63% mineralization, and the quantitative release of nitrate and nitrite ions, which represent 33% of the nitrogen in these compounds. The major intermediates of INH degradation included isonicotinamide, isonicotinic acid, and pyridine, while the ESI-MS/MS analysis of PYRA aqueous solution after photocatalytic treatment showed the formation of pyrazin-2-ylmethanol, pyrazin-2-ol, and pyrazine. Three low-molecular weight compounds, acetamide, acetic acid and formic acid, were detected during INH and PYRA decomposition. PYRA was more resistant to photocatalytic degradation due to the presence of the pyrazine ring, which provides greater stability against OH attack.

  20. Monitoring Residual Solvent Additives and Their Effects in Solution Processed Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Derek M.; Basham, James I.; Engmann, Sebastian; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Bittle, Emily G.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2015-03-01

    High boiling point solvent additives are a widely adopted approach for increasing bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell efficiency. However, experiments show residual solvent can persist for hours after film deposition, and certain common additives are unstable or reactive. We report here on the effects of residual 1,8-diiodooctane on the electrical performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT): phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC[71]BM) BHJ photovoltaic cells. We optimized our fabrication process for efficiency at an active layer thickness of 220 nm, and all devices were processed in parallel to minimize unintentional variations between test structures. The one variable in this study is the active layer post spin drying time. Immediately following the cathode deposition, we measured the current-voltage characteristics at one sun equivalent illumination intensity, and performed impedance spectroscopy to quantify charge density, lifetime, and recombination process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR, and XPS are also used to monitor residual solvent and correlated with electrical performance. We find that residual additive degrades performance by increasing the series resistance and lowering efficiency, fill factor, and free carrier lifetime.

  1. Li2MoO4 crystal growth from solution activated by low-frequency vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinova, Olga; Sadovskiy, Andrey; Ermochenkov, Ivan; Kirsanova, Svetlana; Sukhanova, Ekaterina; Kostikov, Vladimir; Belov, Stanislav; Mozhevitina, Elena; Khomyakov, Andrew; Kuchuk, Zhanna; Zharikov, Eugeny; Avetissov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of Li2MoO4 crystal growth from aqueous solutions activated by axial vibrational control (AVC) technique was investigated. It was found out that a low-frequency mechanical activation of the solution led to an increase of Li2MoO4 equilibrium solubility in aqueous solution for 11 rel% in the 25-29 °C temperature range. The changes in solution structure were analyzed in situ by Raman study of the solution. The AVC activation of solution resulted in a re-faceting of growing crystals, a smoothing of a face surface morphology and reduction of water content in the crystal.

  2. Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Thorndike

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise. METHODS: We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention or to a blinded monitor (control. Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1 median steps/day and 2 proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day. Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses. RESULTS: In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16 and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73. In Phase 2 (team competition, residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002; INTERVENTION: 7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13. Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, p<0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.004 and HDL cholesterol increased (p<0.001 among all participants at end of study compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Although the activity monitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more

  3. ADSORPTION FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ONTO NATURAL AND ACID ACTIVATED BENTONITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Al-Khatib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyes have long been used in dyeing, paper and pulp, textiles, plastics, leather, paint, cosmetics and food industries. Nowadays, more than 100,000 commercial dyes are available with a total production of 700,000 tones manufactured all over the world annually. About 10-15% of dyes are being disposed off as a waste into the environment after dyeing process. This poses certain hazards and environmental problems. The objective of this study is to investigate the adsorption behavior of Methylene Blue (MB from aqueous solution onto natural and acid activated Jordanian bentonite. Both bentonites are firstly characterized using XRD, FTIR and SEM techniques. Then batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of initial MB concentration, contact time, pH and temperature. It was found that the percentage of dye removal was improved from 75.8% for natural bentonite to reach 99.6% for acid treated bentonite. The rate of MB removal followed the pseudo second order model with a high correlation factor. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. The Langmuir isotherm model was found more representative. The results indicate that bentonite could be employed as a low cost adsorbent in wastewater treatment for the removal of colour and dyes.

  4. Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free-living activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, S; Hageberg, R; Aandstad, A;

    2010-01-01

    Media, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA), ActiGraph (7164, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, USA), ikcal (Teltronic AG, Biberist, Switzerland) and ActiReg (PreMed AS, Oslo, Norway) is different compared with indirect calorimetry, was determined. The secondary objective, whether these activity monitors estimate energy...... calorimetry. The cutoff points defining moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity were three, six and nine times resting metabolic rate. Results Time in MVPA was overestimated by 2.9% and 2.5% by Armband and ActiGraph, respectively, and was underestimated by 11.6% and 98.7% by ikcal and Acti......Reg, respectively. ActiReg (p = 0.004) and ActiGraph (p = 0.007) underestimated energy expenditure in MVPA, and all monitors underestimated total energy expenditure (by 5% to 21%). Conclusions Recorded time in MVPA and energy expenditure varies substantially among physical activity monitors. Thus, when comparing...

  5. Nanosensors for a Monitoring System in Intelligent and Active Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fuertes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical wireless nanosensor network (WNSN system that gives information about the food packaging condition is proposed. The protection effectiveness is estimated by measuring many factors, such as the existence of microorganisms, bacteria, gases, and contaminants. This study is focused on the detection of an antimicrobial agent (AA attached on a polymer forming an active integrated package. All monitoring technologies for food conservation are analyzed. Nanobiosensor nanomachine (NM, which converts biological or chemical signals into electrical signals, is used. A mathematical model, which describes the constituent’s emigration from the package to food, is programmed in MatLab software. The results show three nanobiosensors forming a WNSN. The nanobiosensors are able to carry out the average concentration for different spots in the package. This monitoring system shows reading percentages in three degrees and different colors: excellent (green, good (cyan, and lacking (red. To confirm the utility of the model, different simulations are performed. Using the WNSNs, results of AA existing in food package (FP through time were successfully obtained.

  6. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  7. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  8. Panel Endorses Active Monitoring for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An independent panel convened this week by NIH has concluded that many men with localized, low-risk prostate cancer should be closely monitored, permitting treatment to be delayed until warranted by disease progression. However, monitoring strategies—such

  9. Marsh Bird Monitoring Activities in Vermont in 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines a continuation of the black tern monitoring which was initiated in 1990, as well as the marsh bird monitoring program which was started in 1996....

  10. Analytical Solution and Numerical Simulation of Real-Time Dispersion Monitoring Using Tone Subcarrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG He; CHEN Fushen; JIANG Yi

    2003-01-01

    A method for online dispersion monitoring by adding a single in-band subcarrier tone is introduced. According to the theoretical analysis, the dispersion monitor and measurement range are determined by the specific frequency of the subcarrier tone. By using simulation tools, figures about relationship between power of subcarrier tone and transmission distance in ideal condition are shown.

  11. Active Learning Framework for Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xin

    2016-05-16

    Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) is a set of techniques that estimate the electricity usage of individual appliances from power measurements taken at a limited number of locations in a building. One of the key challenges in NILM is having too much data without class labels yet being unable to label the data manually for cost or time constraints. This paper presents an active learning framework that helps existing NILM techniques to overcome this challenge. Active learning is an advanced machine learning method that interactively queries a user for the class label information. Unlike most existing NILM systems that heuristically request user inputs, the proposed method only needs minimally sufficient information from a user to build a compact and yet highly representative load signature library. Initial results indicate the proposed method can reduce the user inputs by up to 90% while still achieving similar disaggregation performance compared to a heuristic method. Thus, the proposed method can substantially reduce the burden on the user, improve the performance of a NILM system with limited user inputs, and overcome the key market barriers to the wide adoption of NILM technologies.

  12. Active-active and active-sterile neutrino oscillation solutions to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción; Peres, O L G; Valle, José W F

    1999-01-01

    We perform a fit to the full data set corresponding to 25.5 kt-yr of data of the Super-Kamiokande experiment as well as to all other experiments in order to compare the two most likely solutions to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly in terms of oscillations in the $\

  13. Targeted Proteomics Approaches To Monitor Microbial Activity In Basalt Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszczynski, A. J.; Paidisetti, R.

    2007-12-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Information regarding microbial community composition can be very useful for environmental monitoring since the short generation times of microorganisms allows them to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Microbial mediated attenuation of toxic chemicals offers great potential for the restoration of contaminated environments in an ecologically acceptable manner. Current knowledge regarding the structure and functional activities of microbial communities is limited, but more information is being acquired every day through many genomic- and proteomic- based methods. As of today, only a small fraction of the Earth's microorganisms has been cultured, and so most of the information regarding the biodegradation and therapeutic potentials of these uncultured microorganisms remains unknown. Sequence analysis of DNA and/or RNA has been used for identifying specific microorganisms, to study the community composition, and to monitor gene expression providing limited information about metabolic state of given microbial system. Proteomic studies can reveal information regarding the real-time metabolic state of the microbial communities thereby aiding in understanding their interaction with the environment. In research described here the involvement of microbial communities in the degradation of anthropogenic contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The co- metabolic degradation of TCE in the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Test Area North (TAN) site of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was monitored by the characterization of peptide sequences of enzymes such as methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs, expressed by methanotrophic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of methane and non-specific co-metabolic oxidation of TCE. We developed a time- course cell lysis method to release proteins from complex microbial

  14. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland–Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices. Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland–Altman analysis. Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed. PMID:26962822

  15. Reliability and validity of the Mywellness Key physical activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverdes JC

    2013-01-01

    of physical activity.Keywords: physical activity, accelerometer, health monitor

  16. Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Activity within a Wetland Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.

    2007-05-01

    We performed Induced Polarization (IP) and Self Potential (SP) measurements to record the geoelectrical signatures of microbial activity within a wetland soil. The experiment was conducted in laboratory, utilizing an open flow column set up. Soil samples from Kearny Marsh (KM), a shallow water wetland, were collected and stored at 4o Celsius prior to the start of the experiment. Two columns were dry packed with a mix of KM soil and sterile Ottawa sand (50% by weight). One column was sterilized and used as a control while the other column retained the biologically active soil sample. Both columns were saturated with a minimal salts medium capable of supporting microbial life; after saturation, a steady flow rate of one pore volume per day was maintained throughout the experiment. Ambient temperature and pressure changes (at the inflow and outflow of each column) were continuously monitored throughout the experiment. Common geochemical parameters, such as Eh, pH, and fluid conductivity were measured at the inflow and outflow of each column at regular intervals. IP and SP responses were continuously recorded on both columns utilizing a series of electrodes along the column length; additionally for the SP measurements we used a reference electrode at the inflow tube. Strong SP anomalies were observed for all the locations along the active column. Black visible mineral precipitant also formed in the active column. The observed precipitation coincided with the times that SP anomalies developed at each electrode position. These responses are associated with microbial induced sulfide mineralization. We interpret the SP signal as the result of redox processes associated with this mineralization driven by gradients in ionic concentration and mobility within the column, similar to a galvanic cell mechanism. IP measurements show no correlation with these visual and SP responses. Destructive analysis of the samples followed the termination of the experiment. Scanning electron

  17. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  18. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  19. Monitoring activities in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network in 2000 and 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakker BG van; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML in Dutch) is one of the responsibilities of the Air Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment. The main objectives of the LML are to monitor ambient air quality, facilitate implementation of air quality s

  20. Jovian Dust Streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Horányi, M; Graps, A L; Kempf, S; Srama, R; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Moissl, R; Johnson, T V; Grün, E; Krueger, Harald; Geissler, Paul; Horanyi, Mihaly; Graps, Amara L.; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Moissl, Richard; Johnson, Torrence V.; Gruen, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over $\\rm 200 km s^{-1}$. Galileo, which was the first orbiter spacecraft of Jupiter, has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about the planet between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between $10^{-3}$ and $\\mathrm{10} \\rm kg s^{-1}$, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to $\\rm 1 kg s^{-1}$. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes.

  1. Induced modifications on algae photosynthetic activity monitored by pump-and-probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Tarzillo, G.; Carlozzi, P.; Pelosi, E. [CNR, Florence (Italy). Centro Studi Microorganismi Autotrofi

    1995-12-01

    The lidar fluorosensor system available at ENEA Frascati has been used for a series of laboratory measurements on brackish-water and marine phytoplankton grown in laboratory with the proper saline solution. The system, already used to measure the laser induced fluorescence spectra of different algae species and their detection limits, has been upgraded with a short pulse Nd:YAG laser and rearranged to test a new technique based on laser pump and probe excitation. Results of this new technique for remote monitoring of the in-vivo photosynthetic activity will be presented, as measured during a field campaign carried out in Florence during the Autumn 1993, where the effects of an actinic saturating light and different chemicals have also been checked.

  2. Step detection and activity recognition accuracy of seven physical activity monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A Storm

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the seven following commercially available activity monitors in terms of step count detection accuracy: Movemonitor (Mc Roberts, Up (Jawbone, One (Fitbit, ActivPAL (PAL Technologies Ltd., Nike+ Fuelband (Nike Inc., Tractivity (Kineteks Corp. and Sensewear Armband Mini (Bodymedia. Sixteen healthy adults consented to take part in the study. The experimental protocol included walking along an indoor straight walkway, descending and ascending 24 steps, free outdoor walking and free indoor walking. These tasks were repeated at three self-selected walking speeds. Angular velocity signals collected at both shanks using two wireless inertial measurement units (OPAL, ADPM Inc were used as a reference for the step count, computed using previously validated algorithms. Step detection accuracy was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error computed for each sensor. The Movemonitor and the ActivPAL were also tested within a nine-minute activity recognition protocol, during which the participants performed a set of complex tasks. Posture classifications were obtained from the two monitors and expressed as a percentage of the total task duration. The Movemonitor, One, ActivPAL, Nike+ Fuelband and Sensewear Armband Mini underestimated the number of steps in all the observed walking speeds, whereas the Tractivity significantly overestimated step count. The Movemonitor was the best performing sensor, with an error lower than 2% at all speeds and the smallest error obtained in the outdoor walking. The activity recognition protocol showed that the Movemonitor performed best in the walking recognition, but had difficulty in discriminating between standing and sitting. Results of this study can be used to inform choice of a monitor for specific applications.

  3. Individual Self-monitoring &Peer-monitoring In One Classroom in Writing Activities: Who Is at Disadvantage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zare Toofan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Writing is an important experience through which we are able to share ideas, arouse feelings, persuade and convince other people (white & Arndt, 1991. It is important to view writing not solely as the product of an individual, but as a cognitive, social and cultural act. Writing is an act that takes place within a context, that accomplishes a particular purpose and that is appropriately shaped for its intended audience (Hamplyones & Condon, 1989. Here, the present research considers the significance effects of two important independent variables self-monitoring and peer-monitoring in writing activities on Iranian EFL learners. In this research it was supposed to study new effects of two Meta cognitive strategies self-monitoring and peer-monitoring on 173 male and female learners' writing activities whose age ranged between the age 16-27, and they had a composing description writing paragraph as pre & post test in the same conditions. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of self-monitoring with a variety of students across a variety of settings (Amato-Zech, Hoff, & Doepke, 2006 Cooper et al., 2007, Dunlap, Dunlap, Koegel, & Koegel 1991. But goal of this study was to increase the participant’s on-task behavior in self & peer-monitoring (E. Johnson, 2007, Self &Peer-monitoring added. Although both of them were useful for providing challengeable students, and became useful for prosocial life, but self-monitoring helped them to become awareness of their weaknesses and strengths to increase positive way of the quality and quantity of their learning in written task, and peer-monitoring occurred when the students achieved recognition level to evaluate the other peers' behavior, and it was obviously understood that it needed more training time to arrive at the level of recognition of each others' behavior.

  4. A Ubiquitous and Low-Cost Solution for Movement Monitoring and Accident Detection Based on Sensor Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Felisberto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The low average birth rate in developed countries and the increase in life expectancy have lead society to face for the first time an ageing situation. This situation associated with the World’s economic crisis (which started in 2008 forces the need of equating better and more efficient ways of providing more quality of life for the elderly. In this context, the solution presented in this work proposes to tackle the problem of monitoring the elderly in a way that is not restrictive for the life of the monitored, avoiding the need for premature nursing home admissions. To this end, the system uses the fusion of sensory data provided by a network of wireless sensors placed on the periphery of the user. Our approach was also designed with a low-cost deployment in mind, so that the target group may be as wide as possible. Regarding the detection of long-term problems, the tests conducted showed that the precision of the system in identifying and discerning body postures and body movements allows for a valid monitorization and rehabilitation of the user. Moreover, concerning the detection of accidents, while the proposed solution presented a near 100% precision at detecting normal falls, the detection of more complex falls (i.e., hampered falls will require further study.

  5. CMX - A Generic Solution to Expose Monitoring Metrics in C and C++ Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ehm, F; Gorgogianni, G M; Jensen, S; Jurcso, P

    2014-01-01

    CERN’s Accelerator Control System is built upon a large number of C, C++ and Java services that are required for daily operation of the accelerator complex. The knowledge of the internal state of these processes is essential for problem diagnostic as well as for constant monitoring for pre-failure recognition. The CMX library follows similar principles as JMX (Java Management Extensions) and provides similar monitoring capabilities for C and C++ applications. It allows registering and exposing runtime information as simple counters, floating point numbers or character data. This can be subsequently used by external diagnostics tools for checking thresholds, sending alerts or trending. CMX uses shared memory to ensure non-blocking read/update actions, which is an important requirement in real-time processes. This paper introduces the topic of monitoring C/C++ applications and presents CMX as a building block to achieve this goal.

  6. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ∼650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption.

  7. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increased by adding increasing concentrations of glycerol, sucrose and trehalose, resulting in a decrease in the reaction rate of the H+-ATPase from the plasma membrane of Kluyveromyces lactis. A direct correlation was found between viscosity (&eegr; and the inhibition of the maximum rate of catalysis (V max. The protocol used to measure viscosity by means of a falling ball type viscometer is described, together with the determination of enzyme kinetics and the application of Kramers’ equation to evaluate the effect of viscosity on the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the H+-ATPase.

  8. A Comprehensive Study on Technologies of Tyre Monitoring Systems and Possible Energy Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali E. Kubba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview on the state of the art of Tyre Pressure Monitoring System related technologies. This includes examining the latest pressure sensing methods and comparing different types of pressure transducers, particularly their power consumption and measuring range. Having the aim of this research to investigate possible means to obtain a tyre condition monitoring system (TCMS powered by energy harvesting, various approaches of energy harvesting techniques were evaluated to determine which approach is the most applicable for generating energy within the pneumatic tyre domain and under rolling tyre dynamic conditions. This article starts with an historical review of pneumatic tyre development and demonstrates the reasons and explains the need for using a tyre condition monitoring system. Following this, different tyre pressure measurement approaches are compared in order to determine what type of pressure sensor is best to consider in the research proposal plan. Then possible energy harvesting means inside land vehicle pneumatic tyres are reviewed. Following this, state of the art battery-less tyre pressure monitoring systems developed by individual researchers or by world leading tyre manufacturers are presented. Finally conclusions are drawn based on the reviewed documents cited in this article and a research proposal plan is presented.

  9. A comprehensive study on technologies of tyre monitoring systems and possible energy solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubba, Ali E; Jiang, Kyle

    2014-06-11

    This article presents an overview on the state of the art of Tyre Pressure Monitoring System related technologies. This includes examining the latest pressure sensing methods and comparing different types of pressure transducers, particularly their power consumption and measuring range. Having the aim of this research to investigate possible means to obtain a tyre condition monitoring system (TCMS) powered by energy harvesting, various approaches of energy harvesting techniques were evaluated to determine which approach is the most applicable for generating energy within the pneumatic tyre domain and under rolling tyre dynamic conditions. This article starts with an historical review of pneumatic tyre development and demonstrates the reasons and explains the need for using a tyre condition monitoring system. Following this, different tyre pressure measurement approaches are compared in order to determine what type of pressure sensor is best to consider in the research proposal plan. Then possible energy harvesting means inside land vehicle pneumatic tyres are reviewed. Following this, state of the art battery-less tyre pressure monitoring systems developed by individual researchers or by world leading tyre manufacturers are presented. Finally conclusions are drawn based on the reviewed documents cited in this article and a research proposal plan is presented.

  10. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    edu, Janet. twomey@wichita. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-04-30

    This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

  11. Microwave-Based Microfluidic Sensor for Non-Destructive and Quantitative Glucose Monitoring in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chretiennot

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reliable microwave and microfluidic miniature sensor dedicated to the measurement of glucose concentration in aqueous solution. The device; which is integrated with microtechnologies; is made of a bandstop filter implemented in a thin film microstrip technology combined with a fluidic microchannel. Glucose aqueous solutions have been characterized for concentration ranging from 80 g/L down to 0.3 g/L and are identified with the normalized insertion loss at optimal frequency. The sensitivity of the sensor has consequently been estimated at 7.6 × 10−3 dB/(g/L; together with the experimental uncertainty; the resolution of the sensor comes to 0.4 g/L. These results demonstrate the potentialities of such a sensor for the quantitative analysis of glucose in aqueous solution.

  12. Physical activity - a neat solution to an impending crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Alison M

    2007-09-01

    Childhood obesity is arguably the most significant global public health threat, yet effective strategies to contain or prevent the disease are not available. This review examines the physical activity patterns of children and the role physical activity plays in daily energy expenditure. The prevailing focus on moderate to vigorous activity in childhood means there is limited objective information on either sedentary behaviour or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the energy expended during the activities of daily living. Most strategies targeting the prevention of childhood obesity have focused upon adding moderate to vigorous activity and have not been particularly successful. The low efficacy of more purposeful activity is perhaps not surprising because of the small variance in children's physical activity levels explained by moderate to vigorous activity. Subtle changes in NEAT have in contrast been shown to account for differences in fat-mass gain or resistance in adults. Theoretically, manipulating a child's living environment to enhance NEAT would create a positive gain in TDEE, a gain that could lead to the prevention of excess fat-mass. More careful consideration of the specific aspects of physical activity that are most influential in the maintenance of body weight in childhood is a priority. Appreciating the role NEAT may play in the variation of total daily energy expenditure in children is a future challenge for physical activity research. Key pointsExcessive weight gain affects children in both developed and developing countries alike, and results initially from small energy imbalances. Increasing the energy expended in daily living has the potential to re-adjust energy balance and prevent initial excess weight gain.Sedentary behaviour and light intensity movement, as opposed to moderate or vigorous movement, dominate a child's day. We need to understand more about which aspects of activity account for variance in total daily energy

  13. Marsh Bird Monitoring Activities in Vermont in 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marsh bird studies performed in 1997 were primarily a continuation of the basic population monitoring started in previous years. A complete census of known black...

  14. Marsh Bird Monitoring Activities in Vermont in 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marsh bird studies performed in 1998 were primarily a continuation of the basic population monitoring started in previous years. A complete census of known black...

  15. Comparison of two experimental speciation methods with a theoretical approach to monitor free and labile Cd fractions in soil solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, C; Cornu, J-Y; Schneider, A; Authier, L; Sapin-Didier, V; Denaix, L; Potin-Gautier, M

    2009-08-26

    This work focused on the suitability of two techniques to monitor cadmium speciation in soil solutions collected during a 7-day incubation of a contaminated soil. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and ion exchange were performed on soil solutions collected daily and results were compared with calculations obtained with the speciation software Visual MINTEQ. The electrochemically labile Cd fraction was greater than the exchange-estimated free Cd fraction during the first 6 days, after which it decreased sharply during the last 2 days to reach values close to the exchange-estimated free Cd fraction. Further investigations showed that the increase in pH was mainly responsible for the reduction. However, calculations performed with Visual MINTEQ software clearly demonstrated that a change in the nature of organic matter and/or its complexing capacity also needed to be taken into consideration.

  16. Comparison of two experimental speciation methods with a theoretical approach to monitor free and labile Cd fractions in soil solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parat, C., E-mail: corinne.parat@univ-pau.fr [IPREM, UMR 5254, E.C.A.B.I.E., Avenue P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Cornu, J.-Y.; Schneider, A. [INRA, UMR 1220, T.C.E.M., BP 81, 33883 Villenave d' Ornon (France); Authier, L. [IPREM, UMR 5254, E.C.A.B.I.E., Avenue P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Sapin-Didier, V.; Denaix, L. [INRA, UMR 1220, T.C.E.M., BP 81, 33883 Villenave d' Ornon (France); Potin-Gautier, M. [IPREM, UMR 5254, E.C.A.B.I.E., Avenue P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-08-26

    This work focused on the suitability of two techniques to monitor cadmium speciation in soil solutions collected during a 7-day incubation of a contaminated soil. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and ion exchange were performed on soil solutions collected daily and results were compared with calculations obtained with the speciation software Visual MINTEQ. The electrochemically labile Cd fraction was greater than the exchange-estimated free Cd fraction during the first 6 days, after which it decreased sharply during the last 2 days to reach values close to the exchange-estimated free Cd fraction. Further investigations showed that the increase in pH was mainly responsible for the reduction. However, calculations performed with Visual MINTEQ software clearly demonstrated that a change in the nature of organic matter and/or its complexing capacity also needed to be taken into consideration.

  17. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor); Rabolt, John (Inventor); Casper, Cheryl (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A functionalized electrospun matrix for the controlled-release of biologically active agents, such as growth factors, is presented. The functionalized matrix comprises a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin.

  18. GRID based Thermal Images Processing for volcanic activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiagli, S.; Coco, S.; Drago, L.; Laudani, A.,; Lodato, L.; Pollicino, G.; Torrisi, O.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Catania Section of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) has been running the video stations recording the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, Stromboli and the Fossa Crater of Vulcano island. The video signals of 11 video cameras (seven operating in the visible band and four in infrared) are sent in real time to INGV Control Centre where they are visualized on monitors and archived on a dedicated NAS storage. The video surveillance of the Sicilian volcanoes, situated near to densely populated areas, helps the volcanologists providing the Civil Protection authorities with updates in real time on the on-going volcanic activity. In particular, five video cameras are operating on Mt. Etna and they record the volcano from the south and east sides 24 hours a day. During emergencies, mobile video stations may also be used to better film the most important phases of the activity. Single shots are published on the Catania Section intranet and internet websites. On June 2006 a A 40 thermal camera was installed in Vulcano La Fossa Crater. The location was in the internal and opposite crater flank (S1), 400 m distant from the fumarole field. The first two-year of data on temperature distribution frequency were recorded with this new methodology of acquisition, and automatically elaborated by software at INGV Catania Section. In fact a dedicated software developed in IDL, denominated Volcano Thermo Analysis (VTA), was appositely developed in order to extract a set of important features, able to characterize with a good approssimation the volcanic activity. In particular the program first load and opportunely convert the thermal images, then according to the Region Of Interest (ROI) and the temperature ranges defined by the user provide to automatic spatial and statistic analysis. In addition the VTA is able to analysis all the temporal series of images available in order to achieve the time-event analysis and the dynamic of the volcanic

  19. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  20. Monitoring dietary intake and physical activity electronically: Feasibility, usability, and ecological validity of a mobile-based ecological momentary assessment tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spook, J.E.; Paulussen, T.; Kok, G.; Empelen, P. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the growing body of research on complex lifestyle behaviors (eg, Dietary Intake [DI] and Physical Activity [PA]), monitoring of these behaviors has been hampered by a lack of suitable methods. A possible solution to this deficiency is mobile-based Ecological Momentary Assessment

  1. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-02

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

  2. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Peci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARMTM processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (DebianTM as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

  3. Technical Note: Demonstrating a 24/7 solution for monitoring water quality loads in rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jordan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying nutrient and sediment loads in catchments is difficult owing to diffuse controls related to storm hydrology. Coarse sampling and interpolation methods are prone to very high uncertainties due to under-representation of high discharge, short duration events. Additionally, important low-flow processes such as diurnal signals linked to point source impacts are missed. Here we demonstrate a solution based on a time-integrated approach to sampling with a standard 24 bottle autosampler configured to take a sample every 7 h over a week. This is evaluated with a number of other sampling strategies using a two-year dataset of sub-hourly discharge and phosphorus concentration data. The 24/7 solution is shown to be the least uncertain in estimating load (inter-quartile range is 96 % to 110 % of actual load in year 1 and 97 % to 104 % in year 2 due to the increased frequency raising the probability of sampling storm events and point source signals. The 24/7 solution would appear to be most parsimonious in terms of technology requirements, the ability to be widely deployed and to represent important nutrient transfer processes in complex catchments.

  4. MONITORING OF LANDSLIDES WITH MASS MARKET GPS: AN ALTERNATIVE LOW COST SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cina

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the actual performance of a mass market GPS receiver was tested, with the purpose of verifying if these sensors can be used for landslide monitoring. A special slide was realized, in order to conduct a dedicated test of the detection of displacements. Tests were carried out considering two factors: acquisition time and distance from the Virtual Station. The accuracy and precision of movement determination were evaluated and compared, for each test, considering the different factors. The tests and results are described in this contribution.

  5. STRATEGIC PLANNING AT THE ENTERPRISE: APPLICATION OF A METHOD OF THE ANALYSIS OF HIERARCHIES FOR THE STRATEGIC ACTIVITY MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V. Samarin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of application of a method of the analysis of hierarchiesfor the solution of problems of monitoring of activity of the enterprise onadvance to a strategic objective in the course of implementation of thecurrent medium-term plan is presented. Problems of an assessment of astate and situation forecasting to the termination of the current planningperiod are considered. The matrix method which is the return method ofthe analysis of hierarchies, allowing to estimate and predict a situationwith implementation of the plan in all structures of the enterprise andrealizing procedure of strategic monitoring at the enterprise is developed. Statistical and analytical methods of the solution of a problemof forecasting are presented. For the solution of a task the statisticalmethod developed algorithm of the numerical solution of a task and itsflowchart is submitted. An algorithm for solving the problem of determination of the integral strategic risk the implementation of the set ofevents. Shows an example of solving the problem of determination ofthe degree of achievement of the intermediate objectives for the knownvalues of the degree of implementation of all stipulated by a plan ofactions (works for the six-level hierarchical scheme.

  6. Results of the marine biota monitoring during drilling activity on Campos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petta, Claudia Brigagao de; Bastos, Fabio; Danielski, Monica; Ferreira, Mariana; Gama, Mariana; Coelho, Ana Paula Athanazio; Maia, Decio [Aecom do Brasil Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Project (PMA) aims to report environmental changes arising from drilling activity, in relation to the marine fauna. This project can also help in the monitoring of accidental spills. Since the professionals spend six hours of the day monitoring the ocean around the rigs, they can locate and identify oil stains, notify the responsible onboard, and also help in the monitoring of the oil stain. Such Project has been developed onboard a drilling unit working in Campos Basin. The results presented here were collected during the drilling activity in Bijupira and Salema fields, by Shell Brasil Petroleo Ltda, from July 13th to October 8th, 2011.

  7. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwakura M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Iwakura,1,2 Kazuki Okura,2 Kazuyuki Shibata,1,2 Atsuyoshi Kawagoshi,2 Keiyu Sugawara,2 Hitomi Takahashi,2 Takanobu Shioya1 1Department of Rehabilitation, Akita City Hospital, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Akita University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Akita, Japan Background: Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods: Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST] and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]. Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results: The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033, Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013, 4 m gait speed (P<0.001, five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002, daily steps (P=0.003, and MV-PA (P=0.022 compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001 and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014 in the COPD group after adjusting for

  8. Ubiquitous Monitoring Solution for Wireless Sensor Networks with Push Notifications and End-to-End Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. L. Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs belongs to a new trend in technology in which tiny and resource constrained devices are wirelessly interconnected and are able to interact with the surrounding environment by collecting data such as temperature and humidity. Recently, due to the huge growth in the use of mobile devices with Internet connection, smartphones are becoming the center of future ubiquitous wireless networks. Interconnecting WSNs with smartphones and the Internet is a big challenge and new architectures are required due to the heterogeneity of these devices. Taking into account that people are using smartphones with Internet connection, there is a good opportunity to propose a new architecture for wireless sensors monitoring using push notifications and smartphones. Then, this paper proposes a ubiquitous approach for WSN monitoring based on a REST Web Service, a relational database, and an Android mobile application. Real-time data sensed by WSNs are sent directly to a smartphone or stored in a database and requested by the mobile application using a well-defined RESTful interface. A push notification system was created in order to alert mobile users when a sensor parameter overcomes a given threshold. The proposed architecture and mobile application were evaluated and validated using a laboratory WSN testbed and are ready for use.

  9. Activities of the components in a spinel solid solution of the Fe-Al-O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykasov, A. A.; Kimyashev, A. A.

    2011-09-01

    The conditions of the equilibrium between the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution and wustite are determined by measuring the EMF of galvanic cells containing a solid electrolyte, and the activities of the components in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution are calculated by treating the results of the experiment on the equilibrium between the spinel solution and wustite. Their properties are found to be different from those of ideal solutions at temperatures of 1000-1300 K. A significant positive deviation from the Raoult's law is believed to indicate the tendency of the solution to decompose. The experimental data are treated in terms of the theory of regular solutions, assuming the energy of mixing to be a function of temperature only. The critical temperature of decomposition for the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution is found to be 1084 K.

  10. ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTION OF ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR SYSTEMS FOR NONLINEAR REACTION DIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi MO; Wantao LIN

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear reaction diffusion equations for activator inhibitor systems is considered. Under suitable conditions, firstly, the outer solution of the original problem is obtained, secondly, using the variables of multiple scales and the expanding theory of power series the formal asymptotic expansions of the solution are constructed, and finally, using the theory of differential inequalities the uniform validity and asymptotic behavior of the solution are studied.

  11. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta; Hribar, J.; Simčić, M.

    2009-01-01

    Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP) content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, re...

  12. The Feasibility of Using a Galvanic Cell Array for Corrosion Detection and Solution Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolody, Mark; Calle, Luz-Marina; Zeitlin, Nancy P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An initial investigation into the response of the individual galvanic couples was conducted using potentiodynamic polarization measurements of solutions under conditions of varying corrosivity. It is hypothesized that the differing electrodes may provide a means to further investigate the corrosive nature of the analyte through genetic algorithms and pattern recognition techniques. The robust design of the electrochemical sensor makes its utilization in space exploration particularly attractive. Since the electrodes are fired on a ceramic substrate at 900 C, they may be one of the most rugged sensors available for the anticipated usage.

  13. Oil Industry Activities in Ghana: Community Perceptions and Sustainable Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Agyei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and exploitation of oil reserves in Ghana has generated different expectations and reactions from the local population about the inevitable consequences for industrialization and economic development in the oil producing area. In pursuit of the perceptions and expectations of communities closer to the offshore operations, a mixture of semi-structured, open ended questions were randomly administered. In analyzing the perceptions and reactions of the local population to the prospects created by the oil discovery in commercial quantities, insights in sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR were considered. The study reveals that the people in the communities closer to the offshore operations share the same convictions and aspirations; that is they are comfortable with their existing sources of livelihood, afraid that these sources might be hurt from oil-related activities and demanding a just allocation of the expected economic benefits through a harmonization of local fishing, farming and oil extraction activities.

  14. Big Data solution for CTBT monitoring: CEA-IDC joint global cross correlation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, Dmitry; Bell, Randy; Brachet, Nicolas; Gaillard, Pierre; Kitov, Ivan; Rozhkov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Waveform cross-correlation when applied to historical datasets of seismic records provides dramatic improvements in detection, location, and magnitude estimation of natural and manmade seismic events. With correlation techniques, the amplitude threshold of signal detection can be reduced globally by a factor of 2 to 3 relative to currently standard beamforming and STA/LTA detector. The gain in sensitivity corresponds to a body wave magnitude reduction by 0.3 to 0.4 units and doubles the number of events meeting high quality requirements (e.g. detected by three and more seismic stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). This gain is crucial for seismic monitoring under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The International Data Centre (IDC) dataset includes more than 450,000 seismic events, tens of millions of raw detections and continuous seismic data from the primary IMS stations since 2000. This high-quality dataset is a natural candidate for an extensive cross correlation study and the basis of further enhancements in monitoring capabilities. Without this historical dataset recorded by the permanent IMS Seismic Network any improvements would not be feasible. However, due to the mismatch between the volume of data and the performance of the standard Information Technology infrastructure, it becomes impossible to process all the data within tolerable elapsed time. To tackle this problem known as "BigData", the CEA/DASE is part of the French project "DataScale". One objective is to reanalyze 10 years of waveform data from the IMS network with the cross-correlation technique thanks to a dedicated High Performance Computer (HPC) infrastructure operated by the Centre de Calcul Recherche et Technologie (CCRT) at the CEA of Bruyères-le-Châtel. Within 2 years we are planning to enhance detection and phase association algorithms (also using machine learning and automatic classification) and process about 30 terabytes of data provided by the IDC to

  15. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Masahiro; Okura, Kazuki; Shibata, Kazuyuki; Kawagoshi, Atsuyoshi; Sugawara, Keiyu; Takahashi, Hitomi; Shioya, Takanobu

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted) and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years) participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST]) and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]). Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033), Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013), 4 m gait speed (P<0.001), five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002), daily steps (P=0.003), and MV-PA (P=0.022) compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001) and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014) in the COPD group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion Impairments in balance and reductions in physical activity were observed in the COPD group. Deficits in balance are independently associated with physical inactivity. PMID:27445470

  16. Comparison of Orbicularis Oculi Muscle Activity during Computer Work with Single and Dual Monitors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the orbicularis oculi muscle activity during computer work with single and dual monitors. [Subjects] Ten computer workers 22–27 years of age were included in this study. [Methods] Subjects performed computer work with single or dual monitors, and the activity of the right orbicularis oculi muscle was measured with a MP150 system. [Results] The muscle activity of the orbicularis oculi under condition 1 was significantly decreased compared with that under condition...

  17. Inverse Problem Solution in Landmines Detection Based on Active Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szymanik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Landmines still affect numerous territories in the whole world and pose a serious threat, mostly to civilians. Widely used non-metallic landmines are undetectable using metal detector. Therefore, there is an urging need to improve methods of detecting such objects. In the present study we introduce relatively new method of landmines' detection: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation. In this paper we present the optimization based method of solving inverse problem for microwave heating. This technique will be used in the reconstruction of detected landmines geometric and material properties.

  18. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthetic Training Data Generation for Activity Monitoring and Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monekosso, Dorothy; Remagnino, Paolo

    This paper describes a data generator that produces synthetic data to simulate observations from an array of environment monitoring sensors. The overall goal of our work is to monitor the well-being of one occupant in a home. Sensors are embedded in a smart home to unobtrusively record environmental parameters. Based on the sensor observations, behavior analysis and modeling are performed. However behavior analysis and modeling require large data sets to be collected over long periods of time to achieve the level of accuracy expected. A data generator - was developed based on initial data i.e. data collected over periods lasting weeks to facilitate concurrent data collection and development of algorithms. The data generator is based on statistical inference techniques. Variation is introduced into the data using perturbation models.

  20. CORROSION MONITORING OF LY12 IN SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTION WITH ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J.M. Wang; H.B. Shao; C.N. Cao

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous electrochemical noise (EN) can be a rich source of information concerning the processes simultaneously occurring on a corroding interface. But the noise signal is often difficult to be analyzed due to the complicated nature of the specific systems being investigated. In this paper, the potential noise fluctuations during the free corrosion of commercial aluminum alloy LY12 in sodium chloride solution was recorded and analyzed with different techniques. The typical results showed that the fractal dimension (D,n) obtained from spectral power density (SPD) is mainly directly proportional to the intensity of pitting corrosion and to the value of pitting parameter (SE) derived from dimensional analysis, while the fractal dimension (DE) obtained from EIS is mainly related to the uniform corrosion.

  1. Development and Integration of Hardware and Software for Active-Sensors in Structural Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overly, Timothy G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) promises to deliver great benefits to many industries. Primarily among them is a potential for large cost savings in maintenance of complex structures such as aircraft and civil infrastructure. However, several large obstacles remain before widespread use on structures can be accomplished. The development of three components would address many of these obstacles: a robust sensor validation procedure, a low-cost active-sensing hardware and an integrated software package for transition to field deployment. The research performed in this thesis directly addresses these three needs and facilitates the adoption of SHM on a larger scale, particularly in the realm of SHM based on piezoelectric (PZT) materials. The first obstacle addressed in this thesis is the validation of the SHM sensor network. PZT materials are used for sensor/actuators because of their unique properties, but their functionality also needs to be validated for meaningful measurements to be recorded. To allow for a robust sensor validation algorithm, the effect of temperature change on sensor diagnostics and the effect of sensor failure on SHM measurements were classified. This classification allowed for the development of a sensor diagnostic algorithm that is temperature invariant and can indicate the amount and type of sensor failure. Secondly, the absence of a suitable commercially-available active-sensing measurement node is addressed in this thesis. A node is a small compact measurement device used in a complete system. Many measurement nodes exist for conventional passive sensing, which does not actively excite the structure, but there are no measurement nodes available that both meet the active-sensing requirements and are useable outside the laboratory. This thesis develops hardware that is low-power, active-sensing and field-deployable. This node uses the impedance method for SHM measurements, and can run the sensor diagnostic algorithm also developed here

  2. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  3. A step towards seascape scale conservation: using vessel monitoring systems (VMS to map fishing activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Witt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conservation of marine ecosystems will require a holistic understanding of fisheries with concurrent spatial patterns of biodiversity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from the UK Government Vessel Monitoring System (VMS deployed on UK-registered large fishing vessels we investigate patterns of fisheries activity on annual and seasonal scales. Analysis of VMS data shows that regions of the UK European continental shelf (i.e. Western Channel and Celtic Sea, Northern North Sea and the Goban Spur receive consistently greater fisheries pressure than the rest of the UK continental shelf fishing zone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: VMS provides a unique and independent method from which to derive patterns of spatially and temporally explicit fisheries activity. Such information may feed into ecosystem management plans seeking to achieve sustainable fisheries while minimising putative risk to non-target species (e.g. cetaceans, seabirds and elasmobranchs and habitats of conservation concern. With multilateral collaboration VMS technologies may offer an important solution to quantifying and managing ecosystem disturbance, particularly on the high-seas.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast, Devens, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    Double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. In this project, Building Science Corporation monitored moisture conditions in double-stud walls from 2011 through 2014 at a new production house located in Devens, Massachusetts. The builder, Transformations, Inc., has been using double-stud walls insulated with 12 in. of open cell polyurethane spray foam (ocSPF); however, the company has been considering a change to netted and blown cellulose insulation for cost reasons. Cellulose is a common choice for double-stud walls because of its lower cost (in most markets). However, cellulose is an air-permeable insulation, unlike spray foams, which increases interior moisture risks. The team compared three double-stud assemblies: 12 in. of ocSPF, 12 in. of cellulose, and 5-½ in. of ocSPF at the exterior of a double-stud wall (to approximate conventional 2 × 6 wall construction and insulation levels, acting as a control wall). These assemblies were repeated on the north and south orientations, for a total of six assemblies.

  5. Interaction design challenges and solutions for ALMA operations monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietriga, Emmanuel; Cubaud, Pierre; Schwarz, Joseph; Primet, Romain; Schilling, Marcus; Barkats, Denis; Barrios, Emilio; Vila Vilaro, Baltasar

    2012-09-01

    The ALMA radio-telescope, currently under construction in northern Chile, is a very advanced instrument that presents numerous challenges. From a software perspective, one critical issue is the design of graphical user interfaces for operations monitoring and control that scale to the complexity of the system and to the massive amounts of data users are faced with. Early experience operating the telescope with only a few antennas has shown that conventional user interface technologies are not adequate in this context. They consume too much screen real-estate, require many unnecessary interactions to access relevant information, and fail to provide operators and astronomers with a clear mental map of the instrument. They increase extraneous cognitive load, impeding tasks that call for quick diagnosis and action. To address this challenge, the ALMA software division adopted a user-centered design approach. For the last two years, astronomers, operators, software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers have been involved in participatory design workshops, with the aim of designing better user interfaces based on state-of-the-art visualization techniques. This paper describes the process that led to the development of those interface components and to a proposal for the science and operations console setup: brainstorming sessions, rapid prototyping, joint implementation work involving software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers, feedback collection from a broader range of users, further iterations and testing.

  6. Characteristics of Zinc Phosphate Coating Activated by Different Concentrations of Nickel Acetate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Khalid; Zuhailawati, H.; Rahmat, Azmi; Azizan, A.

    2017-02-01

    Activation pretreatment with nickel acetate solution at various concentrations was performed prior to the phosphating step to enhance the corrosion resistance of carbon steel substrates. The activation solution was studied over various concentrations: 10, 50, and 100 g/L. The effects of these concentrations on surface characteristics and microstructural evolution of the coated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion test in a 3.5 pct NaCl solution. Significant increases in the nucleation sites and surface coverage of zinc phosphate coating were observed as the concentration of activation solution reached 50 g/L. The electrochemical analysis revealed that the activation treatment with 50 g/L nickel acetate solution significantly improved the protection ability of the zinc phosphate coating. The corrosion current density of activated phosphate coating with 50 g/L was reduced by 64.64 and 13.22 pct, compared to the coatings obtained with activation solutions of 10 and 100 g/L, respectively.

  7. Exercise Sensing and Pose Recovery Inference Tool (ESPRIT) - A Compact Stereo-based Motion Capture Solution For Exercise Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mun Wai

    2015-01-01

    Crew exercise is important during long-duration space flight not only for maintaining health and fitness but also for preventing adverse health problems, such as losses in muscle strength and bone density. Monitoring crew exercise via motion capture and kinematic analysis aids understanding of the effects of microgravity on exercise and helps ensure that exercise prescriptions are effective. Intelligent Automation, Inc., has developed ESPRIT to monitor exercise activities, detect body markers, extract image features, and recover three-dimensional (3D) kinematic body poses. The system relies on prior knowledge and modeling of the human body and on advanced statistical inference techniques to achieve robust and accurate motion capture. In Phase I, the company demonstrated motion capture of several exercises, including walking, curling, and dead lifting. Phase II efforts focused on enhancing algorithms and delivering an ESPRIT prototype for testing and demonstration.

  8. Thermodynamic and transport properties of some biologically active compounds in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhondge, Sudhakar S., E-mail: s_dhondge@hotmail.co [P.G. Department of Chemistry, S.K. Porwal College, Kamptee, Nagpur 441 002 (India); Zodape, Sangesh P.; Parwate, Dilip V. [Department of Chemistry, R.T.M. Nagpur University, Nagpur 440 033 (India)

    2011-01-15

    The experimental data of density and viscosity have been obtained for aqueous solutions of biologically active compounds like salbutamol sulphate (SS), diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC), and chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) in the concentration range (0 to 0.15) mol . kg{sup -1} at three different temperatures. The derived parameters, such as apparent molar volume of solute ({phi}{sub V})), limiting apparent molar volume of solute ({phi}{sub V}{sup 0}), limiting apparent molar expansivity ({phi}{sub E}{sup 0}), thermal expansion coefficient ({alpha}*) and Jones-Dole equation viscosity A and B coefficients, were obtained using the density and viscosity results. It has been observed that the electrolyte-salt (SS) as well as adducts exhibit a positive viscosity B coefficient having negative ((dB)/(dT)). These results are interpreted in the light of possible solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions.

  9. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  10. HPLC monitoring of spontaneous non-linear peptidization dynamics of selected amino acids in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godziek, Agnieszka; Maciejowska, Anna; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Kowalska, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    This is our new study in a series of publications devoted to exploration of applicability of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to providing answers to difficult questions from the area of the reaction kinetics and mechanisms with non-linear reactions. Although an excellent analytical performance of HPLC is an indisputable fact, so far its performance as a tool in the kinetic and mechanistic studies has been tested to a lesser extent. In our earlier studies, spontaneous peptidization dynamics of amino acids in solution was demonstrated by means of HPLC upon a few amino acid examples, and on that basis a theoretical model has been developed, anticipating an interdependence of dynamics on chemical structures of amino acids involved. In order to expand the spectrum of experimentally investigated amino acid cases, in this study we present the results valid for three novel amino acids of significant life sciences importance, which differ in terms of peptidization dynamics. Experimental evidence originates from the achiral HPLC with the evaporative light scattering detection and MS detection. A conclusion is drawn that different spontaneous peptidization dynamics of amino acids may significantly influence chemical composition of proteins encountered in living organisms. Hence, a need emerges for systematic physicochemical studies on spontaneous non-linear peptidization dynamics of proteinogenic amino acids in liquid abiotic (but also in the biotic) systems.

  11. Project Catch: A space based solution to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Part I: Vessel monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detsis, Emmanouil; Brodsky, Yuval; Knudtson, Peter; Cuba, Manuel; Fuqua, Heidi; Szalai, Bianca

    2012-11-01

    Space assets have a unique opportunity to play a more active role in global resource management. There is a clear need to develop resource management tools in a global framework. Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing is placing pressure on the health and size of fishing stocks around the world. Earth observation systems can provide fishery management organizations with cost effective monitoring of large swaths of ocean. Project Catch is a fisheries management project based upon the complimentary, but independent Catch-VMS and Catch-GIS systems. Catch-VMS is a Vessel Monitoring System with increased fidelity over existing offerings. Catch-GIS is a Geographical Information System that combines VMS information with existing Earth Observation data and other data sources to identify Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing. Project Catch was undertaken by 19 Masters students from the 2010 class of the International Space University. In this paper, the space-based system architecture of Project Catch is presented and analyzed. The rationale for the creation of the system, as well as the engineering trade-off studies in its creation, are discussed. The Catch-VMS proposal was envisaged in order to address two specific problems: (1) the expansion of illegal fishing to high-latitude regions where existing satellite systems coverage is an issue and (2) the lack of coverage in remote oceanic regions due to reliance on coastal-based monitoring. Catch-VMS utilizes ship-borne transponders and hosted-payload receivers on a Global Navigation Satellite System in order to monitor the position and activity of compliant fishing vessels. Coverage is global and continuous with multiple satellites in view providing positional verification through multilateration techniques. The second part of the paper briefly describes the Catch-GIS system and investigates its cost of implementation.

  12. Permafrost and Active Layer Monitoring in the Maritime Antarctic: A Contribution to TSP and ANTPAS projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, G.; Ramos, M.; Batista, V.; Caselli, A.; Correia, A.; Fragoso, M.; Gruber, S.; Hauck, C.; Kenderova, R.; Lopez-Martinez, J.; Melo, R.; Mendes-Victor, L. A.; Miranda, P.; Mora, C.; Neves, M.; Pimpirev, C.; Rocha, M.; Santos, F.; Blanco, J. J.; Serrano, E.; Trigo, I.; Tome, D.; Trindade, A.

    2008-12-01

    Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the Maritime Antarctic (PERMANTAR) is a Portuguese funded International Project that, in cooperation with the Spanish project PERMAMODEL, will assure the installation and the maintenance of a network of boreholes and active layer monitoring sites, in order to characterize the spatial distribution of the physical and thermal properties of permafrost, as well as the periglacial processes in Livingston and Deception Islands (South Shetlands). The project is part of the International Permafrost Association IPY projects Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Permafrost, Soils and Periglacial Environments (ANTPAS). It contributes to GTN-P and CALM-S networks. The PERMANTAR-PERMAMODEL permafrost and active layer monitoring network includes several boreholes: Reina Sofia hill (since 2000, 1.1m), Incinerador (2000, 2.3m), Ohridski 1 (2008, 5m), Ohridski 2 (2008, 6m), Gulbenkian-Permamodel 1 (2008, 25m) and Gulbenkian- Permamodel 2 (2008, 15m). For active layer monitoring, several CALM-S sites have been installed: Crater Lake (2006), Collado Ramos (2007), Reina Sofia (2007) and Ohridski (2007). The monitoring activities are accompanied by detailed geomorphological mapping in order to identify and map the geomorphic processes related to permafrost or active layer dynamics. Sites will be installed in early 2009 for monitoring rates of geomorphological activity in relation to climate change (e.g. solifluction, rockglaciers, thermokarst). In order to analyse the spatial distribution of permafrost and its ice content, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and seismic refraction surveys have been performed and, in early 2009, continuous ERT surveying instrumentation will be installed for monitoring active layer evolution. The paper presents a synthesis of the activities, as well as the results obtained up to the present, mainly relating to ground temperature monitoring and from permafrost characteristics and

  13. Active structural health monitoring of composite plates and sandwiches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadílek P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented work is to design, assemble and test a functional system, that is able to reveal damage from impact loading. This is done by monitoring of change of spectral characteristics on a damaged structure that is caused by change of mechanical properties of material or by change of structure’s geometry. Excitation and monitoring of structures was done using piezoelectric patches. Unidirectional composite plate was tested for eigenfrequencies using chirp signal. The eigenfrequencies were compared to results from experiments with an impact hammer and consequently with results from finite element method. Same method of finding eigenfrequencies was used on a different unidirectional composite specimen. Series of impacts were performed. Spectrum of eigenfrequencies was measured on undamaged plate and then after each impact. Measurements of the plate with different level of damage were compared. Following experiments were performed on sandwich materials where more different failures may happen. Set of sandwich beams (cut out from one plate made of two outer composite layers and a foam core was investigated and subjected to several impacts. Several samples were impacted in the same manner to get comparable results. The impacts were performed with growing impact energy.

  14. Monitoring and modeling of water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system of poplar trees to evaluate the effectiveness of phytoremediation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Mario; Di Fiore, Paola; Speranza, Giuseppe; Sica, Benedetto; Romano, Nunzio

    2015-04-01

    This work is part of a series of studies being carried out within the EU-Life+ project ECOREMED (Implementation of eco-compatible protocols for agricultural soil remediation in Litorale Domizio-Agro Aversano NIPS). The project refers to Litorale Domitio-Agro Aversano that has been identified as National Interest Priority Site (NIPS) and includes some polluted agricultural land belonging to more than 61 municipalities in the Naples and Caserta provinces of the Campania Region. The major aim of the project is to define an operating protocol for agriculture-based bioremediation of contaminated agricultural soils, also including the use of plant extracting pollutants to be used as biomasses for renewable energy production. This contribution specifically address the question of evaluating the effectiveness of phytoremediation actions selected by the project in the pilot area of Trentola-Ducenta and will provide some preliminary results of monitoring and modeling activities. A physical and hydraulic characterization has been carried out in this area where poplar trees were planted. Monitoring of water flow, root water uptake and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere is under way with reference to two trees using capacitance soil moisture and matric potential sensors located at three different soil depths, whereas plant water status and evapotranspiration fluxes are indirectly estimated using fast-responding stem dendrometers.

  15. A Decentralized Wireless Solution to Monitor and Diagnose PV Solar Module Performance Based on Symmetrized-Shifted Gompertz Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Angel; Campelo, José Carlos; Blanc, Sara; Serrano, Juan José; García-Sánchez, Tania; Bueso, María C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes and assesses an integrated solution to monitor and diagnose photovoltaic (PV) solar modules based on a decentralized wireless sensor acquisition system. Both DC electrical variables and environmental data are collected at PV module level using low-cost and high-energy efficiency node sensors. Data is real-time processed locally and compared with expected PV module performances obtained by a PV module model based on symmetrized-shifted Gompertz functions (as previously developed and assessed by the authors). Sensor nodes send data to a centralized sink-computing module using a multi-hop wireless sensor network architecture. Such integration thus provides extensive analysis of PV installations, and avoids off-line tests or post-processing processes. In comparison with previous approaches, this solution is enhanced with a low-cost system and non-critical performance constraints, and it is suitable for extensive deployment in PV power plants. Moreover, it is easily implemented in existing PV installations, since no additional wiring is required. The system has been implemented and assessed in a Spanish PV power plant connected to the grid. Results and estimations of PV module performances are also included in the paper. PMID:26230694

  16. A Decentralized Wireless Solution to Monitor and Diagnose PV Solar Module Performance Based on Symmetrized-Shifted Gompertz Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Angel; Campelo, José Carlos; Blanc, Sara; Serrano, Juan José; García-Sánchez, Tania; Bueso, María C

    2015-07-29

    This paper proposes and assesses an integrated solution to monitor and diagnose photovoltaic (PV) solar modules based on a decentralized wireless sensor acquisition system. Both DC electrical variables and environmental data are collected at PV module level using low-cost and high-energy efficiency node sensors. Data is real-time processed locally and compared with expected PV module performances obtained by a PV module model based on symmetrized-shifted Gompertz functions (as previously developed and assessed by the authors). Sensor nodes send data to a centralized sink-computing module using a multi-hop wireless sensor network architecture. Such integration thus provides extensive analysis of PV installations, and avoids off-line tests or post-processing processes. In comparison with previous approaches, this solution is enhanced with a low-cost system and non-critical performance constraints, and it is suitable for extensive deployment in PV power plants. Moreover, it is easily implemented in existing PV installations, since no additional wiring is required. The system has been implemented and assessed in a Spanish PV power plant connected to the grid. Results and estimations of PV module performances are also included in the paper.

  17. A Decentralized Wireless Solution to Monitor and Diagnose PV Solar Module Performance Based on Symmetrized-Shifted Gompertz Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Molina-García

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and assesses an integrated solution to monitor and diagnose photovoltaic (PV solar modules based on a decentralized wireless sensor acquisition system. Both DC electrical variables and environmental data are collected at PV module level using low-cost and high-energy efficiency node sensors. Data is real-time processed locally and compared with expected PV module performances obtained by a PV module model based on symmetrized-shifted Gompertz functions (as previously developed and assessed by the authors. Sensor nodes send data to a centralized sink-computing module using a multi-hop wireless sensor network architecture. Such integration thus provides extensive analysis of PV installations, and avoids off-line tests or post-processing processes. In comparison with previous approaches, this solution is enhanced with a low-cost system and non-critical performance constraints, and it is suitable for extensive deployment in PV power plants. Moreover, it is easily implemented in existing PV installations, since no additional wiring is required. The system has been implemented and assessed in a Spanish PV power plant connected to the grid. Results and estimations of PV module performances are also included in the paper.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of nanocrystalline silver-derived solutions in porcine contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JianFei

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanocrystalline silver dressings have anti-inflammatory activity, unlike solutions containing Ag+ only, which may be due to dissolution of multiple silver species. These dressings can only be used to treat surfaces. Thus, silver-containing solutions with nanocrystalline silver properties could be valuable for treating hard-to-dress surfaces and inflammatory conditions of the lungs and bowels. This study tested nanocrystalline silver-derived solutions for anti-inflammatory activity. Methods Inflammation was induced on porcine backs using dinitrochlorobenzene. Negative and positive controls were treated with distilled water. Experimental groups were treated with solutions generated by dissolving nanocrystalline silver in distilled water adjusted to starting pHs of 4 (using CO2, 5.6 (as is, 7, and 9 (using Ca(OH2. Solution samples were analyzed for total silver. Daily imaging, biopsying, erythema and oedema scoring, and treatments were performed for three days. Biopsies were processed for histology, immunohistochemistry (for IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, EGF, KGF, KGF-2, and apoptotic cells, and zymography (MMP-2 and -9. One-way ANOVAs with Tukey-Kramer post tests were used for statistical analyses. Results Animals treated with pH 7 and 9 solutions showed clear visual improvements. pH 9 solutions resulted in the most significant reductions in erythema and oedema scores. pH 4 and 7 solutions also reduced oedema scores. Histologically, all treatment groups demonstrated enhanced re-epithelialisation, with decreased inflammation. At 24 h, pMMP-2 expression was significantly lowered with pH 5.6 and 9 treatments, as was aMMP-2 expression with pH 9 treatments. In general, treatment with silver-containing solutions resulted in decreased TNF-α and IL-8 expression, with increased IL-4, EGF, KGF, and KGF-2 expression. At 24 h, apoptotic cells were detected mostly in the dermis with pH 4 and 9 treatments, nowhere with pH 5.6, and in both the

  19. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  20. Validity of activity monitors in health and chronic disease : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Remoortel, Hans; Giavedoni, Santiago; Raste, Yogini; Burtin, Chris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Langer, Daniel; Glendenning, Alastair; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Peterson, Barry T; Wilson, Frederick; Mann, Bridget; Rabinovich, Roberto; Puhan, Milo A; Troosters, Thierry; de Jong, Corina

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of physical activity in healthy populations and in those with chronic diseases is challenging. The aim of this systematic review was to identify whether available activity monitors (AM) have been appropriately validated for use in assessing physical activity in these groups. Following

  1. Probes to monitor activity of the paracaspase MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmann, Janna; Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Poreba, Marcin; Sanman, Laura E; Drag, Marcin; Bogyo, Matthew; Salvesen, Guy S

    2015-01-22

    The human paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) plays a central role in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling as both a protease and scaffolding protein. Knocking out MALT1 leads to impaired NF-κB signaling and failure to mount an effective immune response. However, it is unclear to which degree it is the scaffolding function versus the proteolytic activity of MALT1 that is essential. Previous work involving a MALT1 inhibitor with low selectivity suggests that the enzymatic function plays an important role in different cell lines. To help elucidate this proteolytic role of MALT1, we have designed activity-based probes that inhibit its proteolytic activity. The probes selectively label active enzyme and can be used to inhibit MALT1 and trace its activity profile, helping to create a better picture of the significance of the proteolytic function of MALT1.

  2. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  3. Fluorescence-Based Sensor for Monitoring Activation of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, William T.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2012-01-01

    This sensor unit is designed to determine the level of activation of lunar dust or simulant particles using a fluorescent technique. Activation of the surface of a lunar soil sample (for instance, through grinding) should produce a freshly fractured surface. When these reactive surfaces interact with oxygen and water, they produce hydroxyl radicals. These radicals will react with a terephthalate diluted in the aqueous medium to form 2-hydroxyterephthalate. The fluorescence produced by 2-hydroxyterephthalate provides qualitative proof of the activation of the sample. Using a calibration curve produced by synthesized 2-hydroxyterephthalate, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced as a function of sample concentration can also be determined.

  4. Contamination monitoring in radiation protection activities in Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thin, K.T.; Htoon, S. [Yangon Univ. (Myanmar). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    The radioactive contamination in rainwater, seawater, air, milk powder and other eatables were measured with low level counter assembly. The measured activities are found to be very low and well within the maximum permissible level. (author)

  5. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  6. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  7. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data Products for National Drought Monitor Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Drought effects are either direct or indirect depending on location, population, and regional economic vitality. Common direct effects of drought are reduced crop, rangeland, and forest productivity; increased fire hazard; reduced water levels; increased livestock and wildlife mortality rates; and damage to wildlife and fish habitat. Indirect impacts follow on the heels of direct impacts. For example, a reduction in crop, rangeland, and forest productivity may result in reduced income for farmers and agribusiness, increased prices for food and timber, unemployment, reduced tax revenues, increased crime, foreclosures on bank loans to farmers and businesses, migration, and disaster relief programs. In the United States alone, drought is estimated to result in annual losses of between $6 - 8 billion. Recent sustained drought in the United States has made decision-makers aware of the impacts of climate change on society and environment. The eight major droughts that occurred in the United States between 1980 and 1999 accounted for the largest percentage of weather-related monetary losses. Monitoring drought and its impact that occurs at a variety of scales is an important government activity -- not only nationally but internationally as well. The NDMC (National Drought Mitigation Center) and the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) RMA (Risk Management Agency) have partnered together to develop a DM-DSS (Drought Monitoring Decision Support System). This monitoring system will be an interactive portal that will provide users the ability to visualize and assess drought at all levels. This candidate solution incorporates atmospherically corrected VIIRS data products, such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and Ocean SST (sea surface temperature), and AMSR-E soil moisture data products into two NDMC vegetation indices -- VegDRI (Vegetation Drought Response Index) and VegOUT (Vegetation Outlook) -- which are then input into the DM-DSS.

  8. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  9. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer's solution for anti-tumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-08

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer's solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer's lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer's lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  10. Subsidence monitoring network: an Italian example aimed at a sustainable hydrocarbon E&P activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacome, M. C.; Miandro, R.; Vettorel, M.; Roncari, G.

    2015-11-01

    According to the Italian law in order to start-up any new hydrocarbon exploitation activity, an Environmental Impact Assessment study has to be presented, including a monitoring plan, addressed to foresee, measure and analyze in real time any possible impact of the project on the coastal areas and on those ones in the close inland located. The occurrence of subsidence, that could partly be related to hydrocarbon production, both on-shore and off-shore, can generate great concern in those areas where its occurrence may have impacts on the local environment. ENI, following the international scientific community recommendations on the matter, since the beginning of 90's years, implemented a cutting-edge monitoring network, with the aim to prevent, mitigate and control geodynamics phenomena generated in the activity areas, with a particular attention to conservation and protection of environmental and territorial equilibrium, taking care of what is known as "sustainable development". The current ENI implemented monitoring surveys can be divided as: - Shallow monitoring: spirit levelling surveys, continuous GPS surveys in permanent stations, SAR surveys, assestimeter subsurface compaction monitoring, ground water level monitoring, LiDAR surveys, bathymetrical surveys. - Deep monitoring: reservoir deep compaction trough radioactive markers, reservoir static (bottom hole) pressure monitoring. All the information, gathered through the monitoring network, allow: 1. to verify if the produced subsidence is evolving accordingly with the simulated forecast. 2. to provide data to revise and adjust the prediction compaction models 3. to put in place the remedial actions if the impact exceeds the threshold magnitude originally agreed among the involved parties. ENI monitoring plan to measure and monitor the subsidence process, during field production and also after the field closure, is therefore intended to support a sustainable field development and an acceptable exploitation

  11. Monitoring and validating active site redox states in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hough, Michael A

    2011-06-01

    High resolution protein crystallography using synchrotron radiation is one of the most powerful tools in modern biology. Improvements in resolution have arisen from the use of X-ray beamlines with higher brightness and flux and the development of advanced detectors. However, it is increasingly recognised that the benefits brought by these advances have an associated cost, namely deleterious effects of X-ray radiation on the sample (radiation damage). In particular, X-ray induced reduction and damage to redox centres has been shown to occur much more rapidly than other radiation damage effects, such as loss of resolution or damage to disulphide bridges. Selection of an appropriate combination of in-situ single crystal spectroscopies during crystallographic experiments, such as UV-visible absorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS), allows for effective monitoring of redox states in protein crystals in parallel with structure determination. Such approaches are also essential in cases where catalytic intermediate species are generated by exposure to the X-ray beam. In this article, we provide a number of examples in which multiple single crystal spectroscopies have been key to understanding the redox status of Fe and Cu centres in crystal structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  12. Removal of Cadmium and Lead Ions from Aqueous Solution by Nanocrystalline Magnetite Through Mechanochemical Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Hosseinzadeh; Seyyed Ali Seyyed Ebrahimi; Shahram Raygan; Seyed Morteza Masoudpanah

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the removal of cadmium and lead ions from aqueous solution by nanocrystalline magnetite was investigated. The nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized by mechanochemical activation of hematite in a high energy planetary mill in argon atmosphere for 45 hours. The ability of the synthesized nanocrystalline magnetite for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions was studied in a batch reactor under different experimental conditions with different pHs, contact times, ini...

  13. [Telomerase activity in esophageal carcinoma and lesions unstained with Lugol's solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, K; Aoyama, N; Koizumi, H; Tamai, S

    1998-05-01

    Telomerase is a specific enzyme required for the replication of telomeres. Its activity is detected in almost human cancers. We examined in esophageal carcinoma and lesions unstained with Lugol's solution telomerase activity by using telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Telomerase activity was detected in all 22 esophageal carcinomas, regardless of histopathological findings. In unstained lesions, telomerase activity was detected in 15 of 22; 10 squamous cell carcinomas, four dysplasia, one regenerative epithelium, no telomerase activity was found in seven; four normal esophageal epithelia, two Barrett's esophagi, one regenerative epithelium. These results suggest that telomerase activity may be a useful molecular marker for the diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma and of the early esophageal carcinoma in area unstained with Lugol's solution.

  14. A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

    2004-01-01

    Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

  15. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a sample of how to record your hourly activities, eating and medication so you can see patterns based on your tests – ... a Diabetes Educator Diabetes Goal Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care ...

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetries in the Activation and Monitoring of Memory Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammattei, Jeannette; Arndt, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the lateralization of memory errors suggests that the right hemisphere's tendency to produce more memory errors than the left hemisphere reflects hemispheric differences in semantic activation. However, all prior research that has examined the lateralization of memory errors has used self-paced recognition judgments. Because…

  17. Monitoring active filters under automotive aging scenarios with embedded instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Jinbo; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2012-01-01

    In automotive mixed-signal SoCs, the analogue/mixed-signal front-ends are of particular interest with regard to dependability. Because of the many electrical disturbances at the front-end, often (active) filters are being used. Due to the harsh environments, in some cases, degradation of these filte

  18. Monitoring Affect States during Effortful Problem Solving Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Sidney K.; Lehman, Blair; Person, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    We explored the affective states that students experienced during effortful problem solving activities. We conducted a study where 41 students solved difficult analytical reasoning problems from the Law School Admission Test. Students viewed videos of their faces and screen captures and judged their emotions from a set of 14 states (basic…

  19. Experiment study on water-rock interaction about gold activation and migration in different solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions on gold active and migratory quantities and rates between tuffaceous slate and solu-tions with different compositions were experimentally studied at 200 ℃, 20 MPa, in a high-pressure apparatus. After reaction, tuffaceous slate became light colored and soft, and its mass density reduced. The amount of gold extracted from tuffaceous slate ranges widely, from 0.027 to 0.234 μg/g. Chlorine solution may activate appreciable amount of gold, and the gold migratory rate is high enough, from 50.70% to 92.30%, which reveals that sulphur and chlorine work together in solutions to accelerate gold activation and migration, and to realize gold mineralization in favorable places.

  20. Simulations of mean ionic activity coefficients and solubilities in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios

    Aqueous electrolyte solutions play an important role in industrial, geochemical and biological applications. The mean ionic activity coefficients quantify the deviation of salt chemical potential from ideal solution behavior; experimental measurements are available for many salts over broad ranges of concentration and temperature, but there have been practically no prior simulation results, because if sampling difficulties for explicit-solvent electrolyte solutions. We have developed a new approach for determination of activity coefficients of aqueous electrolytes. Common fixed-point-charge models for water and ions are unable to reproduce simultaneously activity coefficients and solubilities. Polarizable models perform better, but still predict an incorrect temperature dependence of these properties. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science.

  1. Monitoring Monitoring Evolving Activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-DelPozzo, A.; Aceves, F.; Bonifaz, R.; Humberto, S.

    2001-12-01

    After 6 years of small eruptions, activity at Mexico's 5,452m high Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico, peaked in the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions. Precursors included an important increase in seismicity as well as in magmatic components of spring water and small scale deformation which resulted in growth of a new crater dome from January 16 on. Evacuation of the towns nearest the volcano over Christmas was decided because of the possibility of pyroclastic flows. During the previous years, crater dome growth, contraction and explosive clearing has dominated the activity. The January 22 eruption produced an eruption column approximately 17km high with associated pyroclastic flows. Ejecta was composed of both basic and evolved scoria and pumice and dome lithics. A large proportion of the juvenile material was intermediate between these 2 endmenbers (59-63percent SiO2 and 3.5 to 5.5 MgO) consistent with a small basic pulse entering a more evolved larger batch of magma. The January eruption left a large pit which has been partially infilled by another crater dome this August 2001.

  2. Phosphate-Modified Nucleotides for Monitoring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Susanne; Marx, Andreas; Hacker, Stephan M

    2017-04-01

    Nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been proven to be interesting entities to study the activity of a variety of different protein classes. In this chapter, we present various types of modifications that were attached as reporter molecules to the phosphate chain of nucleotides and briefly describe the chemical reactions that are frequently used to synthesize them. Furthermore, we discuss a variety of applications of these molecules. Kinase activity, for instance, was studied by transfer of a phosphate modified with a reporter group to the target proteins. This allows not only studying the activity of kinases, but also identifying their target proteins. Moreover, kinases can also be directly labeled with a reporter at a conserved lysine using acyl-phosphate probes. Another important application for phosphate-modified nucleotides is the study of RNA and DNA polymerases. In this context, single-molecule sequencing is made possible using detection in zero-mode waveguides, nanopores or by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mechanism between the polymerase and a fluorophore-labeled nucleotide. Additionally, fluorogenic nucleotides that utilize an intramolecular interaction between a fluorophore and the nucleobase or an intramolecular FRET effect have been successfully developed to study a variety of different enzymes. Finally, also some novel techniques applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based detection of nucleotide cleavage or the detection of the cleavage of fluorophosphates are discussed. Taken together, nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been applied to study the activity of a large diversity of proteins and are valuable tools to enhance the knowledge of biological systems.

  3. Solutions for future pellet burning technologies - Pellet systems with active control with combined CO/O2 sensors - Pellet system with energy measuring and monitoring; Loesningar foer framtidens pelletsteknik - Pelletssystem med aktiv styrning med CO/O2-sensorer - Pelletssystem med energimaetning och fjaerroevervakning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulrud, Susanne; Ryde, Daniel; Roennbaeck, Marie

    2011-07-01

    To meet the consumer demands and the upcoming environmental regulations for the future Swedish heating system, development and improvement of the existing methods for combustion of fuel pellets are urged. In this study, two potential concepts - to be considered as important for the continued state-of-the-art improvement - for monitoring of the combustion process, have been demonstrated and evaluated. Within the project, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden has, in co-operation with SenSiC, tested a new type of combined CO/O2 sensor. The sensor has been adapted to real combustion environment in a Jan Fire furnace, to which its control capacity has been verified. Moreover, a system for measuring the use of energy, EnergySaver, has, in co-operation with Effecta, been tested in a field study at the premises of a fuel pellet consumer. The SenSiC combined CO/O2 sensor has during the study progressively been developed and the resulting conclusion states that the product version FEI300-2 now is ready for further tests and market introduction. The trials show that the sensor reacts to an increase in emission levels, where after it manages to control the combustion process back to optimal level. The field study of the Effecta Energy Saver system shows that it, to a large part, is ready for commercial introduction. According to the fuel pellet consumer, the Effecta system increases the interest/awareness of energy saving.

  4. Optogenetic Monitoring of Synaptic Activity with Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryuichi; Jung, Arong; Yoon, Bong-June; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    The age of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) has matured to the point that changes in membrane potential can now be observed optically in vivo. Improving the signal size and speed of these voltage sensors has been the primary driving forces during this maturation process. As a result, there is a wide range of probes using different voltage detecting mechanisms and fluorescent reporters. As the use of these probes transitions from optically reporting membrane potential in single, cultured cells to imaging populations of cells in slice and/or in vivo, a new challenge emerges—optically resolving the different types of neuronal activity. While improvements in speed and signal size are still needed, optimizing the voltage range and the subcellular expression (i.e., soma only) of the probe are becoming more important. In this review, we will examine the ability of recently developed probes to report synaptic activity in slice and in vivo. The voltage-sensing fluorescent protein (VSFP) family of voltage sensors, ArcLight, ASAP-1, and the rhodopsin family of probes are all good at reporting changes in membrane potential, but all have difficulty distinguishing subthreshold depolarizations from action potentials and detecting neuronal inhibition when imaging populations of cells. Finally, we will offer a few possible ways to improve the optical resolution of the various types of neuronal activities. PMID:27547183

  5. Size-selective QD@MOF core-shell nanocomposites for the highly sensitive monitoring of oxidase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Li, Nan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhiqi; Dang, Fuquan

    2017-01-15

    In this work, we proposed a novel and facile method to monitor oxidase activities based on size-selective fluorescent quantum dot (QD)@metal-organic framework (MOF) core-shell nanocomposites (CSNCPs). The CSNCPs were synthesized from ZIF-8 and CdTe QDs in aqueous solution in 40min at room temperature with stirring. The prepared CdTe@ZIF-8 CSNCPs , which have excellent water dispersibility and stability, displays distinct fluorescence responses to hole scavengers of different molecular sizes (e.g., H2O2, substrate, and oxidase) due to the aperture limitation of the ZIF-8 shell. H2O2 can efficiently quench the fluorescence of CdTe@ZIF-8 CSNCPs over a linearity range of 1-100nM with a detection limit of 0.29nM, whereas large molecules such as substrate and oxidase have very little effect on its fluorescence. Therefore, the highly sensitive detection of oxidase activities was achieved by monitoring the fluorescence quenching of CdTe@ZIF-8 CSNCPs by H2O2 produced in the presence of substrate and oxidase, which is proportional to the oxidase activities. The linearity ranges of the uricase and glucose oxidase activity are 0.1-50U/L and 1-100U/L, respectively, and their detection limits are 0.024U/L and 0.26U/L, respectively. Therefore, the current QD@MOF CSNCPs based sensing system is a promising, widely applicable means of monitoring oxidase activities in biochemical research.

  6. An Index (PC) Aimed at Monitoring the (P)olar (C)ap for Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PC is an index for magnetic activity in the (P)olar (C)ap. It is based on data from a single nearpole station, and aimed to monitor the polar cap magnetic activity...

  7. FRAME DESIGN OF REMOTE SENSING MONITORING FOR VOLCANIC ACTIVITIES IN CHANGBAI MOUNTAINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Li-qun; ZHAO Yun-ping; HUA Ren-kui

    2003-01-01

    Volcanic eruption is one of the most serious geological disasters, however, a host of facts have proven that the Changbai Mountains volcano is a modem dormant one and has ever erupted disastrously. With the rapid development of remote sensing technology, space monitoring of volcanic activities has already become possible, particularly in the application of thermal infrared remote sensing. The paper, through the detailed analysis of geothermal anomaly factors such as heat radiation, heat conduction and convection, depicts the monitoring principles by which volcano activities would be monitored efficiently and effectively. Reasons for abrupt geothermal anomaly are mainly analyzed, and transmission mechanism of geothermal anomaly in the volcanic regions is explained. Also, a variety of noises disturbing the transmission of normal geothermal anomaly are presented. Finally, some clues are given based on discussing thermal infrared remote sensing monitoring mechanism toward the volcanic areas.

  8. Poisson-Fermi model of single ion activities in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2015-09-01

    A Poisson-Fermi model is proposed for calculating activity coefficients of single ions in strong electrolyte solutions based on the experimental Born radii and hydration shells of ions in aqueous solutions. The steric effect of water molecules and interstitial voids in the first and second hydration shells play an important role in our model. The screening and polarization effects of water are also included in the model that can thus describe spatial variations of dielectric permittivity, water density, void volume, and ionic concentration. The activity coefficients obtained by the Poisson-Fermi model with only one adjustable parameter are shown to agree with experimental data, which vary nonmonotonically with salt concentrations.

  9. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  10. Evaluation Clinical Effects of Anti-Septic Solution Based on Propolis in Caries-Active Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Vanessa Dantas de ALMEIDA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed validate the action of one anti-septic solution based on propolis against the clinical indexes and levels of S. mutans. Method: The antimicrobial activity of the extract was done on solid plates to determinate the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC using sorts of S. mutans. With the MIC of the extract, was made a mouthrinse solution of propolis (6.25%, which was used clinically as a test solution and compared with positive control solution, the chlorexidine (0.12%. Through the crossover design, fifteen children used the mouthrinse solution of propolis during 15 consecutive days and after a break of 21 days, they used daily mouthrinse with the chlorexidine. Were collected indexes for accumulation of oral biofilm (OHI-S and for gun disease (GBI before (T0 and 24 hours after (T1 the use of the solutions, besides of the couting of the S. mutans from saliva's samples before (T0 and 24 hours (T0, 7 days (T7, 15 days (T15 e 21 days (T21 after the end of both mouthrinses. Results: The results demonstrated significative reduction of the S. mutans levels 24 hours (p0.05. Conclusion: The propolis extract showed satisfactory antimicrobial activity and close to the chlorexidine's action, besides of act against clinical conditions of oral biofilm's presence and gun disease what becomes it useful as therapeutic agent.

  11. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Using NASA Sensors to Perform Crop Type Assessment for Monitoring Insect Resistance in Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David; Copenhaver, Ken; Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent

    2007-01-01

    The EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) is tasked to monitor for insect pest resistance to transgenic crops. Several models have been developed to understand the resistance properties of insects. The Population Genetics Simulator model is used in the EPA PIRDSS (Pest Infestation and Resistance Decision Support System). The EPA Office of Pesticide Programs uses the DSS to help understand the potential for insect pest resistance development and the likelihood that insect pest resistance will negatively affect transgenic corn. Once the DSS identifies areas of concern, crews are deployed to collect insect pest samples, which are tested to identify whether they have developed resistance to the toxins in transgenic corn pesticides. In this candidate solution, VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) vegetation index products will be used to build hypertemporal layerstacks for crop type and phenology assessment. The current phenology attribute is determined by using the current time of year to index the expected growth stage of the crop. VIIRS might provide more accurate crop type assessment and also might give a better estimate on the crop growth stage.

  12. Solid-, solution-, and gas-state NMR monitoring of ¹³C-cellulose degradation in an anaerobic microbial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Shino, Amiu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-07-29

    Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. ¹³C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and ¹³C-¹³C/¹³C-¹²C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of ¹³C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  13. Solid-, Solution-, and Gas-state NMR Monitoring of 13C-Cellulose Degradation in an Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Date

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. 13C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and 13C-13C/13C-12C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of 13C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  14. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data.

  15. Individual differences in epistemic motivation and brain conflict monitoring activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowska, Małgorzata; Czarnek, Gabriela; Wronka, Eligiusz; Wyczesany, Miroslaw; Bukowski, Marcin

    2014-06-06

    It is well documented that motivation toward closure (NFC), defined as a desire for a quick and unambiguous answer to a question and an aversion to uncertainty, is linked to more structured, rigid, and persistent cognitive styles. However, the neurocognitive correlates of NFC have never been tested. Thus, using event-related potentials, we examined the hypothesis that NFC is associated with the neurocognitive process for detecting discrepancies between response tendencies and higher level intentions. We found that greater NFC is associated with lower conflict-related anterior cingulate activity, suggesting lower sensitivity to cues for altering a habitual response pattern and lower sensitivity to committing errors. This study provides evidence that high NFC acts as a bulwark against anxiety-producing uncertainty and minimizes the experience of error.

  16. High Accuracy Human Activity Monitoring using Neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Annapurna; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the designing of a neural network for the classification of Human activity. A Triaxial accelerometer sensor, housed in a chest worn sensor unit, has been used for capturing the acceleration of the movements associated. All the three axis acceleration data were collected at a base station PC via a CC2420 2.4GHz ISM band radio (zigbee wireless compliant), processed and classified using MATLAB. A neural network approach for classification was used with an eye on theoretical and empirical facts. The work shows a detailed description of the designing steps for the classification of human body acceleration data. A 4-layer back propagation neural network, with Levenberg-marquardt algorithm for training, showed best performance among the other neural network training algorithms.

  17. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  18. Activity Calculation by Application of Sub-Regular Solution Model in Binary Oxide Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yan-qing; XIE Gang; TAO Dong-ping; LI Rong-xing; YU Xiao-hua

    2012-01-01

    To confirm sub-regular solution model valid for predicting the activity of component in binary oxide systems, seven systems in the whole concentration and twelve systems presenting saturation concentration have been studied. The total average relative errors of component 1 and 2 are 3.2 % and 4.1% respectively by application of the sub-regular solution model into the systems within the whole concentration. However, the total average relative errors are 16 % and 1088 % in the systems presenting saturation concentration. The results show that sub-regular solu- tion model is not good for predicting the systems presenting saturation concentration, especially for the systems con- taining acidic or neutral oxide. The reason may be that the influence of the two types of oxide on the configuration is greater in binary oxide systems. These oxides can be present in the form of complex anion partly, Si-O, Al-O, Ti-O and so on, for example (SiO4)4-. That is contrary to sub-regular solution model which is supposed that the oxide systems consist of cation and O2-. But compared with regular solution model and quasi-regular solution model, sub- regular solution model is closer to the characteristics of actual solution and the calculated results are superior.

  19. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  20. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2017-01-06

    An effective multifaceted strategy is demonstrated to increase active edge site concentration in NiCoSe solid solutions prepared by in situ selenization process of nickel cobalt precursor. The simultaneous control of surface, phase, and morphology result in as-prepared ternary solid solution with extremely high electrochemically active surface area (C = 197 mF cm), suggesting significant exposure of active sites in this ternary compound. Coupled with metallic-like electrical conductivity and lower free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt. Specifically, the NiCoSe solid solutions show a low overpotential of 65 mV at -10 mV cm, with onset potential of mere 18 mV, an impressive small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec, and a large exchange current density of 184 μA cm in acidic electrolyte. Further, it is shown that the as-prepared NiCoSe solid solution not only works very well in acidic electrolyte but also delivers exceptional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance in alkaline media. The outstanding HER performance makes this solid solution a promising candidate for mass hydrogen production.

  1. Estimation of component activities in some oxide solid solutions by the molecular interaction vacancy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongping TAO

    2011-01-01

    The molecular interaction vacancy model (MIVM) is used to estimate simultaneously activities of all components in a range of entire composition of six binary oxide solid solutions and the MnO-FeO-CaO ternary solid solution by their binary infinite dilute activity coefficients.The average errors are the 0.03%-5.0% for the binaries and the 4.11%-25.2% for the ternary which is less than that (4.84%-41.2%) of the sub-regular solution model (SRSM).This shows that MIVM is more effective and reliable than SRSM for the ternary and does not depend on a polynomial approximation with some ternary adjustable parameters.

  2. Removal of trivalent samarium from aqueous solutions by activated biochar derived from cactus fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loukia Hadjittofi; Styliana Charalambous; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of activated biochar fibres obtained fromOpuntia Ficus Indica regarding the sorption of trivalent samarium (Sm(III)) from aqueous solutions was investigated by batch experiments. The effect of various physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, initial metal concentration, ionic strength, temperature and contact time) on the Sm(III) adsorption was studied and the surface species were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy prior to and after the lanthanide sorption. The experimental results showed that the acti-vated biochar fibres possessed extraordinary sorption capacity for Sm(III) in acidic solutions (qmax=90 g/kg, pH 3.0) and near neutral solutions (qmax=350 g/kg, pH 6.5). This was attributed to the formation of samarium complexes with the surface carboxylic moieties, available in high density on the lamellar structures of the bio-sorbent.

  3. Sonochemical degradation of textile dyes in aqueous solution using sulphate radicals activated by immobilized cobalt ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, P; Praveena Juliya Dorathi, R; Palanivelu, K

    2010-03-01

    Decolorisation of dye solutions by cobalt activated persulphate and ultrasonication has been investigated. Rhodamine B, Methylene Blue dye (basic dyes) and Acid orange II, Acid scarlet red 3R (acid dyes) were used as model compounds in this study. Immobilized cobalt ions, activated the persulphate to form highly reactive sulphate radicals. The degradation studies were conducted with only persulphate (PS), cobalt activated persulphate (PS+Co), persulphate+ultrasonication (PS+US) and cobalt activated persulphate+ultrasonication (PS+US+Co). The decolorisation efficiency were in the order of PSsolutions. The effect of pH, dosage of persulphate as well as catalyst and contact time was investigated. Under the optimum condition, the decolorisation obeyed first-order kinetics. Nearly 90-97% of decolorisation was achieved with COD and TOC removal of about 65-73% and 53-62%, respectively, were achieved within an hour.

  4. The study of the antimicrobial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles prepared using food stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, G V; Suvorov, O A; Shaburova, L N; Podkopaev, D O; Frolova, Yu V; Ermolaeva, G A

    2015-06-01

    The bactericidal effect of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles based on food stabilizers, gum arabic and chitosan, against bacterial cultures of microorganisms in food production is described. The antibacterial activity of nanotechnology products containing different amounts of stabilizing additives when applied to solid pH-neutral substrates is studied. For its evaluation a method making it possible to take into account the capability of nanoparticles to diffuse in solid media was applied. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of nanoparticles used against Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina flava were found. A suggestion was made concerning the influence of the spatial structure of bacteria on the antibacterial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles. The data concerning the antibacterial activity and minimal inhibiting concentrations of nanoparticles may be used for development of products suppressing activity of microorganisms hazardous for food production.

  5. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganbavale

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200–273 K. Water activity (aw at low temperatures (T is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxyethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for TTaw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice nucleation ability of organic–water systems.

  6. A Mobile Application for Easy Design and Testing of Algorithms to Monitor Physical Activity in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses approaches to Human Activity Recognition (HAR with the aim of monitoring the physical activity of people in the workplace, by means of a smartphone application exploiting the available on-board accelerometer sensor. In fact, HAR via a smartphone or wearable sensor can provide important information regarding the level of daily physical activity, especially in situations where a sedentary behavior usually occurs, like in modern workplace environments. Increased sitting time is significantly associated with severe health diseases, and the workplace is an appropriate intervention setting, due to the sedentary behavior typical of modern jobs. Within this paper, the state-of-the-art components of HAR are analyzed, in order to identify and select the most effective signal filtering and windowing solutions for physical activity monitoring. The classifier development process is based upon three phases; a feature extraction phase, a feature selection phase, and a training phase. In the training phase, a publicly available dataset is used to test among different classifier types and learning methods. A user-friendly Android-based smartphone application with low computational requirements has been developed to run field tests, which allows to easily change the classifier under test, and to collect new datasets ready for use with machine learning APIs. The newly created datasets may include additional information, like the smartphone position, its orientation, and the user’s physical characteristics. Using the mobile tool, a classifier based on a decision tree is finally set up and enriched with the introduction of some robustness improvements. The developed approach is capable of classifying six activities, and to distinguish between not active (sitting and active states, with an accuracy near to 99%. The mobile tool, which is going to be further extended and enriched, will allow for rapid and easy benchmarking of new algorithms based

  7. Physical Activity Monitoring in Extremely Obese Adolescents from the Teen-LABS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Renee M.; Inge, Thomas H.; Jenkins, Todd M; King, Wendy; Oruc, Vedran; Douglas, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The accuracy of physical activity (PA) monitors to discriminate between PA, sedentary behavior, and non-wear in extremely obese (EO) adolescents is unknown. Methods Twenty-five subjects (9 male/16 female; age=16.5±2.0 y; BMI=51±8 kg/m2) wore three activity monitors (StepWatch [SAM], Actical [AC], Actiheart [AH]) during a 400 meter walk test (400MWT), two standardized PA bouts of varying duration, and one sedentary bout. Results For the 400MWT, percent error between observed and monitor recorded steps was 5.5±7.1% and 82.1±38.6% for the SAM and AC steps, respectively (observed vs. SAM steps: −17.2±22.2 steps; observed vs. AC steps: −264.5±124.8 steps). All activity monitors were able to differentiate between PA and sedentary bouts but only SAM steps and AH heart rate were significantly different between sedentary behavior and non-wear (ptested, the SAM was most accurate in terms of counting steps and differentiating levels of PA, and thus, most appropriate for EO adolescents. The ability to accurately characterize PA intensity in EO adolescents critically depends on activity monitor selection. PMID:25205688

  8. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Piperazine Activated MDEA Absorption Solution with Methane and Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative chemical absorption process is widely used in industry for removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas, with activated aqueous solutions of alkanolamines considered a beneficial blend. One of the most promising blends is the aqueous mixture of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) activated by small amount of piperazine, due to the fairly high rate of reaction of piperazine as a cyclic diamine with carbon dioxide and the low heat of regeneration of MDEA as a te...

  10. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  11. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University

    2014-10-31

    Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, involves the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic porous media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in porous media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which involves stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of porous media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and

  12. Computerized monitoring of physical activity and sleep in postoperative abdominal surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Kjaersgaard, M; Bernhard, A;

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Assessment of early postoperative activity is important in the documentation of improvements of peri-operative care. This study was designed to validate computerized activity-based monitoring of physical activity and sleep (actigraphy) in patients after abdominal surgery. METHODS...... physical activity and sleep-wake cycles after major abdominal surgery.......: The study included twelve hospitalized patients after major abdominal surgery studied on day 2 to 4 after operation and twelve unhospitalized healthy volunteers. Measurements were performed for 24 consecutive hours. The actigraphy measurements were compared with self-reported activity- and sleep...

  13. Biosorption of copper (II) ions from synthetic aqueous solutions by drying bed activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaissa, H., E-mail: ho_benaissa@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Sorbent Materials and Water Treatment, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Tlemcen, P.O. Box 119, 13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Elouchdi, M.A. [Laboratory of Sorbent Materials and Water Treatment, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Tlemcen, P.O. Box 119, 13000 Tlemcen (Algeria)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} Dried activated sludge has been investigated for the removal of copper ions from aqueous synthetic solutions, in batch conditions. {yields} Copper uptake was time contact, initial copper concentration, initial pH solution and copper salt type dependent. {yields} Maximum copper uptake obtained was q{sub m} = 62.50 mg/g (0.556 mmol/g) under the investigated experimental conditions. - Abstract: In the present work, the usefulness of dried activated sludge has been investigated for the removal of copper ions from synthetic aqueous solutions. Kinetic data and equilibrium sorption isotherm were measured in batch conditions. The influence of some parameters such as: contact time, initial copper concentration, initial pH of solution and copper salt nature on copper biosorption kinetics has been studied. Copper uptake was time contact, initial copper concentration, initial pH solution and copper salt type dependent. Maximum copper sorption was found to occur at initial pH 5. Two simplified kinetic models including a first-order rate equation and a pseudo second-order rate equation were selected to describe the biosorption kinetics. The process followed a pseudo second-order rate kinetics. The process mechanism was found to be complex, consisting of external mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer diffusion. Copper biosorption process was particle-diffusion-controlled, with some predominance of some external mass transfer at the initial stages for the different experimental parameters studied. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe sorption equilibrium data at natural pH of solution. Results indicated that the Langmuir model gave a better fit to the experimental data than the Freundlich model. Maximum copper uptake obtained was q{sub m} = 62.50 mg/g (0.556 mmol/g) under the investigated experimental conditions. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray energy dispersed analysis for copper-equilibrated dried activated sludge

  14. Probability-Based Diagnostic Imaging Technique Using Error Functions for Active Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Gorgin,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel probability-based diagnostic imaging (PDI technique using error functions for active structural health monitoring (SHM. To achieve this, first the changes between baseline and current signals of each sensing path are measured, and by taking the root mean square of such changes, the energy of the scattered signal at different times can be calculated. Then, for different pairs of signal acquisition paths, an error function based on the energy of the scattered signals is introduced. Finally, the resultant error function is fused to the final estimation of the probability of damage presence in the monitoring area. As for applications, developed methods were employed to various damage identification cases, including cracks located in regions among an active sensor network with different configurations (pulse-echo and pitch-catch, and holes located in regions outside active network sensors with pitch-catch configuration. The results identified using experimental Lamb wave signals at different central frequencies corroborated that the developed PDI technique using error functions is capable of monitoring structural damage, regardless of its shape, size and location. The developed method doesn’t need direct interpretation of overlaid and dispersed lamb wave components for damage identification and can monitor damage located anywhere in the structure. These bright advantages, qualify the above presented PDI method for online structural health monitoring.

  15. Activity and Structure Changes of Arginine Kinase from Shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis Muscle in Trifluoroethanol Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于振行; 高丹; 潘继承; 陆捷; 周海梦

    2003-01-01

    Trifluoroethanol has often been used in protein folding studies.The changes in activity and unfolding of arginine kinase from shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis muscle during denaturation in different concentrations of trifuoroethanol were investigated using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence emission spectra.Arginine kinase was inactivated in trifluoroethanol solutions.The tertiary and secondary structures of arginine kinase were also destroyed in the trifluoroethanol solutions.The unfolding and inactivation courses were measured and compared.Inactivation occurred prior to unfolding, which suggests that the arginine kinase active site is more easily damaged by the denaturant than the enzyme as a whole.The result also indicates that the arginine kinase active site is situated in a limited and flexible region of the enzyme molecule.

  16. Study on CO{sub 2} absorption enhancement by adding active carbon particles into MEA solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Juan; Sun, Rui; Ma, Lian; Sun, Shaozeng [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The chemical absorption of CO{sub 2} is generally recognized as the most efficient post-combustion technology of CO{sub 2} separation at present. A study on CO{sub 2} absorption enhancement by adding small particles of active carbon into MEA solution is investigated within a self-designed glass stirring tank. Experiments of different particle loadings and different particle sizes have been conducted. When active carbon particle concentration is fewer, compared to the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} gas absorbed by MEA aqueous solution, the role of active carbon adsorption CO{sub 2} gas is negligible. The enhancement efficiency of CO{sub 2} absorption could be improved by 10% to the upmost in this liquid-particle system.

  17. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  18. Global Stability Analysis for Periodic Solution in Discontinuous Neural Networks with Nonlinear Growth Activations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Huaiqin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a new class of additive neural networks where the neuron activations are modelled by discontinuous functions with nonlinear growth. By Leray-Schauder alternative theorem in differential inclusion theory, matrix theory, and generalized Lyapunov approach, a general result is derived which ensures the existence and global asymptotical stability of a unique periodic solution for such neural networks. The obtained results can be applied to neural networks with a broad range of activation functions assuming neither boundedness nor monotonicity, and also show that Forti's conjecture for discontinuous neural networks with nonlinear growth activations is true.

  19. Pattern of active and inactive sequences of diabetes self-monitoring in mobile phone and paper diary users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Nikhil S; Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    In a pilot randomized controlled trial involving overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes, we find that smartphone users have sharply higher adherence to self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, blood glucose, and body weight, as compared to paper diary users. By characterizing the pattern of adherence with the probability of continuation of active and inactive sequences of self-monitoring, we find that smartphone users have longer active sequences of self-monitoring of all four behaviors that were being monitored. Smartphone users are also quicker to resume self-monitoring of diet and physical activity after a lapse in self-monitoring, whereas paper diary users have shorter inactive sequences for monitoring blood glucose and body weight. The findings are informative for data collection methodology in this burgeoning area of research.

  20. Geochemical monitoring of thermal waters in Slovenia: relationships to seismic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmazek, B; Italiano, F; Zivcić, M; Vaupotic, J; Kobal, I; Martinelli, G

    2002-12-01

    Thermally anomalous fluids released in seismic areas in Slovenia were the subjects of geochemical monitoring. Thermal waters were surveyed from the seismically active area of Posocje (Bled and Zatolmin; NW Slovenia) and from Rogaska Slatina in eastern Slovenia. Continuous monitoring of geochemical parameters (radon concentration, electrical conductivity, and water temperature) was performed with discrete gas sampling for their (3)He/(4)He ratio. The observed values were correlated with meteorological parameters (rainfall, barometric pressure and air temperature) and with seismic activity. Only a few earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of the measuring sites during the monitoring period. Nevertheless, changes in radon concentration, water temperature, electrical conductivity and helium isotopic ratio were detected at the three thermal springs in the periods preceding the earthquakes. A close correlation was also observed of both water temperature and electrical conductivity with the Earth tide, making the observations in the selected sites a promising tool for addressing the widely debated question of earthquake prediction.

  1. Influence of social connectedness, communication and monitoring on adolescent sexual activity in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Kyereme, Akwasi; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi; Biddlecom, Ann; Tanle, Augustine

    2007-12-01

    This paper examines connectedness to, communication with and monitoring of unmarried adolescents in Ghana by parents, other adults, friends and key social institutions and the roles these groups play with respect to adolescent sexual activity. The paper draws on 2004 nationally-representative survey data and qualitative evidence from focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with adolescents in 2003. Adolescents show high levels of connectedness to family, adults, friends, school and religious groups. High levels of adult monitoring are also observed, but communication with family about sex-related matters was not as high as with non-family members. The qualitative data highlight gender differences in communication. Multivariate analysis of survey data shows a strong negative relationship between parental monitoring and recent sexual activity for males and females, and limited effects of communication. Creating a supportive environment and showing interest in the welfare of adolescents appear to promote positive sexual and reproductive health outcomes.

  2. In-plane shear piezoelectric wafer active sensor phased arrays for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Zhou, Wensong; Wang, Peng; Wang, Chonghe; Li, Hui

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new way for guided wave structural health monitoring using in-plane shear (d36 type) piezoelectric wafer active sensors phased arrays. Conventional piezoelectric wafer active sensors phased arrays based on inducing into specific Lamb wave modes (d31 type) has already widely used for health monitoring of the thin-wall structures. Rather than Lamb wave modes, the in-plane shear piezoelectric wafer active sensors phased arrays induces in-plane shear horizontal (SH) guided waves. The SH guided waves are distinct with the Lamb waves with simple waveform and less additional converted wave modes and the zero symmetric mode (SH0) is non-dispersive. In this paper, the advantage of the shear horizontal wave and the in-plane shear piezoelectric wafers capability to generate SH waves is first reviewed. Then finite element analysis of a 4-in-plane shear wafer active sensors phased array embedded on a rectangular aluminium plate is performed. In addition, numerical simulations with respect to creaks with different sizes as well as locations are implemented by the in-plane shear wafer active sensors phased array. For comparison purposes, the same numerical simulations using the conventional piezoelectric wafer active sensors phased arrays are also employed at the same time. Results indicate that the in-plane shear (d36 type) piezoelectric wafer active sensors phased arrays has the potential to identify damage location and assess damage severity in structural health monitoring.

  3. Quantitative impedimetric NPY-receptor activation monitoring and signal pathway profiling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Kamp, Verena; Lindner, Ricco; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Krinke, Dana; Kostelnik, Katja B; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2015-05-15

    Label-free and non-invasive monitoring of receptor activation and identification of the involved signal pathways in living cells is an ongoing analytic challenge and a great opportunity for biosensoric systems. In this context, we developed an impedance spectroscopy-based system for the activation monitoring of NPY-receptors in living cells. Using an optimized interdigital electrode array for sensitive detection of cellular alterations, we were able for the first time to quantitatively detect the NPY-receptor activation directly without a secondary or enhancer reaction like cAMP-stimulation by forskolin. More strikingly, we could show that the impedimetric based NPY-receptor activation monitoring is not restricted to the Y1-receptor but also possible for the Y2- and Y5-receptor. Furthermore, we could monitor the NPY-receptor activation in different cell lines that natively express NPY-receptors and proof the specificity of the observed impedimetric effect by agonist/antagonist studies in recombinant NPY-receptor expressing cell lines. To clarify the nature of the observed impedimetric effect we performed an equivalent circuit analysis as well as analyzed the role of cell morphology and receptor internalization. Finally, an antagonist based extensive molecular signal pathway analysis revealed small alterations of the actin cytoskeleton as well as the inhibition of at least L-type calcium channels as major reasons for the observed NPY-induced impedance increase. Taken together, our novel impedance spectroscopy based NPY-receptor activation monitoring system offers the opportunity to identify signal pathways as well as for novel versatile agonist/antagonist screening systems for identification of novel therapeutics in the field of obesity and cancer.

  4. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped...... back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241-251), computations predict that 60-80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate...

  5. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-03-31

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  6. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Drugs Intended to Treat Life-threatening...

  7. Physical Activity Monitoring: Gadgets and Uses. Article #6 in a 6-Part Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Derrick

    2010-01-01

    An early 15th century drawing by Leonardo da Vinci depicted a device that used gears and a pendulum that moved in synchronization with the wearer as he or she walked. This is believed to be the early origins of today's physical activity monitoring devices. Today's devices have vastly expanded on da Vinci's ancient concept with a myriad of options…

  8. Exercise Therapy for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Superior Efficacy of Activity Monitors over Pedometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezono, Tomoya; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of activity monitor (which displays exercise intensity and number of steps) versus that of pedometer in exercise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were divided into the activity monitor group (n = 92) and pedometer group (n = 95). The primary goal was improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The exercise target was set at 8,000 steps/day and 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents). The activity monitor is equipped with a triple-axis accelerometer sensor capable of measuring medium-intensity walking duration, number of steps, walking distance, calorie consumption, and total calorie consumption. The pedometer counts the number of steps. Blood samples for laboratory tests were obtained during the visits. The first examination was conducted at the start of the study and repeated at 2 and 6 months. A significant difference in the decrease in HbA1c level was observed between the two groups at 2 months. The results suggest that the use of activity level monitor that displays information on exercise intensity, in addition to the number of steps, is useful in exercise therapy as it enhances the concept of exercise therapy and promotes lowering of HbA1c in diabetic patients. PMID:27761471

  9. Exercise Therapy for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Superior Efficacy of Activity Monitors over Pedometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Miyauchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the efficacy of activity monitor (which displays exercise intensity and number of steps versus that of pedometer in exercise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were divided into the activity monitor group (n=92 and pedometer group (n=95. The primary goal was improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. The exercise target was set at 8,000 steps/day and 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents. The activity monitor is equipped with a triple-axis accelerometer sensor capable of measuring medium-intensity walking duration, number of steps, walking distance, calorie consumption, and total calorie consumption. The pedometer counts the number of steps. Blood samples for laboratory tests were obtained during the visits. The first examination was conducted at the start of the study and repeated at 2 and 6 months. A significant difference in the decrease in HbA1c level was observed between the two groups at 2 months. The results suggest that the use of activity level monitor that displays information on exercise intensity, in addition to the number of steps, is useful in exercise therapy as it enhances the concept of exercise therapy and promotes lowering of HbA1c in diabetic patients.

  10. Wearable systems for monitoring mobility-related activities in older people : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Eling D.; Hartmann, Antonia; Uebelhart, Daniel; Murer, Kurt; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The use of wearable motion-sensing technology offers important advantages over conventional methods for obtaining measures of physical activity and/or physical functioning in aged individuals. This review aims to identify the actual state of applying wearable systems for monitoring mobili

  11. Interrupt-Based Step-Counting to Extend Battery Life in an Activity Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Young Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most activity monitors use an accelerometer and gyroscope sensors to characterize the wearer’s physical activity. The monitor measures the motion by polling an accelerometer or gyroscope sensor or both every 20–30 ms and frequent polling affects the battery life of a wearable device. One of the key features of a commercial daily-activity monitoring device is longer battery life so that the user can keep track of his or her activity for a week or so without recharging the battery of the monitoring device. Many low-power approaches for a step-counting system use either a polling-based algorithm or an interrupt-based algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that uses the tap interrupt of an accelerometer to count steps while consuming low power. We compared the accuracy of step counting and measured system-level power consumption to a periodic sensor-reading algorithm. Our tap interrupt approach shows a battery lifetime that is 175% longer than that of a 30 ms polling method without gyroscope. The battery lifetime can be extended up to 863% with a gyroscope by putting both the processor and the gyroscope into sleep state during the majority of operation time.

  12. IDEA Fiscal Monitoring and Support Activities 2011-2012 Quick Reference Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Quick Reference Document is being distributed by the Regional Resource Center Program ARRA/Fiscal Priority Team to provide RRCP state liaisons and other (Technical Assistance) TA providers with a summary of critical fiscal monitoring and support activities they may be involved in during calendar years 2011 and 2012. Like other documents in…

  13. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans.

  14. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    sources the observation periods extended over more than 100 days. A number of X-ray transients with durations between one and five days were discovered, and, additionally two long duration X-ray transients (GRS 1915+10 and GRO J0422+32) were active and could be monitored. Towards the end of the mission...

  15. Eliciting caregivers’ needs for remote activity monitoring in early dementia at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, S.T.; Brul, M.; Willems, C.; Hermens, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: With an increasing prevalence of dementia in the Netherlands from 235.000 in 2008 (1 per 70 inhabitants) up to an estimated 500.000 in 2050 (1 per 34 inhabitants), assisting technologies are needed to support care delivery in the home environment. Remote activity monitoring systems sho

  16. CRITERIA AND DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR MONITORING QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS’ TRAINING FOR PRACTICE-ORIENTED RESEARCH ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara А. Strokova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present publication is to disclose the contents of the monitoring initial stage including theoretical understanding of observed object, comprehension of its essence, definition of assessment criteria, the choice of diagnostic means and sources of information. Methods. The problem analysis of scientific prerequisites for pedagogical interpretation of education quality phenomenon, comparison and assessment of various approaches in definition of its essence are carried out from the system approach; the author’s understanding of quality of future teachers training to research activity and criteria of its assessment is proved. The studying and analysis of official documents, educational programs and scientific publications, systematization, substantial generalization, structuring, differentiation and expert assessment are used while the problem solution of main research actions for scientific and pedagogical search selection, which are essential result of high school training. Results. Criteria and estimated complex of quality of learners training to research activity, developed according to requirements of the monitoring assessment, reflecting its intrinsic properties (quality of educational process, quality of its conditions, quality of the received results and their specific indicators are proposed. Stage-by-stage procedure of research actions selection is developed. Diagnostic means and sources of information are defined. Scientific novelty. Definition of the concepts «education quality», in terms of its understanding as a set of intrinsic aspect characteristics and the quality principle of process and its conditions quality reflection (A. I. Subetto, and the «practice-oriented research activity» defined as a set of the research actions reflecting its subject contents which are carried out in the context of the scientific solution of actual professional and pedagogical tasks is given. The list of research actions for

  17. Studies on adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution on activated carbons prepared from walnut shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihi, M; Haghighi Asl, A; Ahmadpour, A

    2010-02-15

    The adsorption ability of a powdered activated carbons (PAC) derived from walnut shell was investigated in an attempt to produce more economic and effective sorbents for the control of Hg(II) ion from industrial liquid streams. Carbonaceous sorbents derived from local walnut shell, were prepared by chemical activation methods using ZnCl(2) as activating reagents. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions was carried out under different experimental conditions by varying treatment time, metal ion concentration, pH and solution temperature. It was shown that Hg(II) uptake decreases with increasing pH of the solution. The proper choice of preparation conditions were resulted in microporous activated carbons with different BET surface areas of 780 (Carbon A, 1:0.5 ZnCl(2)) and 803 (Carbon B, 1:1 ZnCl(2))m(2)/g BET surface area. The monolayer adsorption capacity of these particular adsorbents were obtained as 151.5 and 100.9 mg/g for carbons A and B, respectively. It was determined that Hg(II) adsorption follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms as well as pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  18. Activity Concentration Monitoring for Alpha Radioactive Aerosol in CRARL after Reprocessing Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiang-li; LIU; Ning; WANG; Xiao-rong; BAI; Yang; JIAO; Xiao-yan; XU; Xin; MA; Hao-ran

    2015-01-01

    The activity concentration for alpha radioactive aerosol in CRARL after reprocessing experiments was analyzed.Through the decay method of activity concentration monitoring,the processed result shows the background is 3.05×10-3 s-1,σ(0)=2.25×10-3,LC=2.33×10-3 Bq/m3,LD=4.66×10-3 Bq/m3.The result indicated

  19. Human Daily Activities Indexing in Videos from Wearable Cameras for Monitoring of Patients with Dementia Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Karaman, Svebor; Mégret, Rémi; Dovgalecs, Vladislavs; Dartigues, Jean-François; Gaëstel, Yann

    2010-01-01

    Our research focuses on analysing human activities according to a known behaviorist scenario, in case of noisy and high dimensional collected data. The data come from the monitoring of patients with dementia diseases by wearable cameras. We define a structural model of video recordings based on a Hidden Markov Model. New spatio-temporal features, color features and localization features are proposed as observations. First results in recognition of activities are promising.

  20. High-throughput metabarcoding of eukaryotic diversity for environmental monitoring of offshore oil-drilling activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzén, Anders; Lekang, Katrine; Jonassen, Inge; Thompson, Eric M; Troedsson, Christofer

    2016-09-01

    As global exploitation of available resources increases, operations extend towards sensitive and previously protected ecosystems. It is important to monitor such areas in order to detect, understand and remediate environmental responses to stressors. The natural heterogeneity and complexity of communities means that accurate monitoring requires high resolution, both temporally and spatially, as well as more complete assessments of taxa. Increased resolution and taxonomic coverage is economically challenging using current microscopy-based monitoring practices. Alternatively, DNA sequencing-based methods have been suggested for cost-efficient monitoring, offering additional insights into ecosystem function and disturbance. Here, we applied DNA metabarcoding of eukaryotic communities in marine sediments, in areas of offshore drilling on the Norwegian continental shelf. Forty-five samples, collected from seven drilling sites in the Troll/Oseberg region, were assessed, using the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene as a taxonomic marker. In agreement with results based on classical morphology-based monitoring, we were able to identify changes in sediment communities surrounding oil platforms. In addition to overall changes in community structure, we identified several potential indicator taxa, responding to pollutants associated with drilling fluids. These included the metazoan orders Macrodasyida, Macrostomida and Ceriantharia, as well as several ciliates and other protist taxa, typically not targeted by environmental monitoring programmes. Analysis of a co-occurrence network to study the distribution of taxa across samples provided a framework for better understanding the impact of anthropogenic activities on the benthic food web, generating novel, testable hypotheses of trophic interactions structuring benthic communities.

  1. Separable solutions of force-free spheres and applications to solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, A; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic study of the force-free field equation for simple axisymmetric configurations in spherical geometry and apply it to the solar active regions. The condition of separability of solutions in the radial and angular variables leads to two classes of solutions: linear and non-linear force-free fields. We have studied these linear solutions Chandrasekhar (1956) and extended the non-linear solutions given in Low & Lou (1990) for the radial power law index to the irreducible rational form $n= p/q$, which is allowed for all cases of odd $p$ and cases of $q>p$ for even $p$ (the poloidal flux $\\psi\\propto1/r^n$ and field $\\mathbf{B}\\propto 1/r^{n+2}$). We apply these solutions to simulate photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the spectro-polarimeter onboard Hinode. The effectiveness of our search strategy is first demonstrated on test inputs of dipolar, axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric linear force-free fields. Using the best fit to these magnetograms, we build 3D axi...

  2. Removal of Cadmium and Lead Ions from Aqueous Solution by Nanocrystalline Magnetite Through Mechanochemical Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Hosseinzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the removal of cadmium and lead ions from aqueous solution by nanocrystalline magnetite was investigated. The nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized by mechanochemical activation of hematite in a high energy planetary mill in argon atmosphere for 45 hours. The ability of the synthesized nanocrystalline magnetite for removal of Cd(II and Pb(II from aqueous solutions was studied in a batch reactor under different experimental conditions with different pHs, contact times, initial metal ion concentrations and temperatures. The solution’s pH was found to be a key factor in the adsorption of heavy metal ions on Fe3O4. The optimum pH of the solution for adsorption of Cd(II and Pb(II from aqueous solutions was found to be 6.5 and 5.5, respectively. The best models to describe the kinetics and isotherms of single adsorption were both the pseudo first and second-order kinetic models and Langmuir models, respectively, indicating the monolayer chemisorption of Cd(II and Pb(II on Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ∆H°, ∆S°, ∆G° were evaluated which indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic. The results suggested that the synthesized material (magnetite nanocrystalline particles may be used as effective and economic absorbent for removal of Cd(II and Pb(II from aqueous solutions.

  3. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Gao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs, the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA on procoagulant activity (PCA of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients. Phosphatidylserine (PS exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+] with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process.

  4. Wearable Systems for Monitoring Mobility-Related Activities in Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eling D. de Bruin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of wearable motion sensing technology offers important advantages over conventional methods for obtaining measures of physical activity and/or physical functioning in individuals with chronic diseases. This review aims to identify the actual state of applying wearable systems for monitoring mobility-related activity in individuals with chronic disease conditions. In this review we focus on technologies and applications, feasibility and adherence aspects, and clinical relevance of wearable motion sensing technology. PubMed (Medline since 1990, PEdro, and reference lists of all relevant articles were searched. Two authors independently reviewed randomised trials systematically. The quality of selected articles was scored and study results were summarised and discussed. 163 abstracts were considered. After application of inclusion criteria and full text reading, 25 articles were taken into account in a full text review. Twelve of these papers evaluated walking with pedometers, seven used uniaxial accelerometers to assess physical activity, six used multiaxial accelerometers, and two papers used a combination approach of a pedometer and a multiaxial accelerometer for obtaining overall activity and energy expenditure measures. Seven studies mentioned feasibility and/or adherence aspects. The number of studies that use movement sensors for monitoring of activity patterns in chronic disease (postural transitions, time spent in certain positions or activities is nonexistent on the RCT level of study design. Although feasible methods for monitoring human mobility are available, evidence-based clinical applications of these methods in individuals with chronic diseases are in need of further development.

  5. Properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solution crosslinked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihui; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2011-03-01

    The effect of N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) on the properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solutions was examined. The residual amino group content in crosslinked collagen, determined by trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) assay, was decreased with increasing NHS-AA concentration. The results from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the maximum denaturation temperature ( T d) of crosslinked collagen solution was about 4.2°C higher than that of un-crosslinked collagen solution (36.6°C). Moreover, the values of storage modulus ( G'), loss modulus ( G″) and complex viscosity ( η*), obtained by means of dynamic frequency sweeps, were increased as NHS-AA concentration added up to 1.5 mM, and then decreased slightly when further increased NHS-AA concentration. Besides, for collagen solution crosslinked with 1.5 mM NHS-AA, dynamic denaturation temperature ( T dd) was about 1.1°C lower than T d (40.8°C), and the Arrhenius-type time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle was applied to yield the activation energy to be 474.4 kJmol-1.

  6. Optimization of activator solution and heat treatment of ground lignite type fly ash geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Z.; Szabó, R.; Rácz, Á.; Lakatos, J.; Debreczeni, Á.; Mucsi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers which can be produced by the reaction between silico aluminate oxides and alkali silicates in alkaline medium. Materialscontaining silica and alumina compounds are suitable for geopolymer production. These can beprimary materials or industrial wastes, i. e. fly ash, metallurgical slag and red mud. In this paper, the results of the systematic experimental series are presented which were carried out in order to optimize the geopolymer preparation process. Fly ash was ground for different residence time (0, 5, 10, 30, 60 min) in order to investigate the optimal specific surface area. NaOH activator solution concentration also varied (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 M). Furthermore, sodium silicate was added to NaOH as a network builder solution. In this last serie different heat curing temperatures (30, 60, 90°C) were also applied. After seven days of ageing the physical properties of the geopolymer(compressive strength and specimen density)were measured. Chemical leaching tests on the rawmaterial and the geopolymers were carried out to determine the elements which can be mobilized by different leaching solutions. It was found that the above mentioned parameters (fly ash fineness, molar concentration and composition of activator solution, heat curing) has great effect on the physical and chemical properties of geopolymer specimens. Optimal conditions were as follows: specific surface area of the fly ash above 2000 cm2/g, 10 M NaOH, 30°C heat curing temperature which resulted in 21 MPa compressive strength geopolymer.

  7. AUSTRALIAN PINE CONES-BASED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ADSORPTION OF COPPER IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSLIM A.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Pine cones (APCs was utilised as adsorbent material by physical and chemical activation for the adsorption Cu(II in aqueous solution. FTIR and SEM analysis were conducted to obtain the active site and to characterise the surface morphology of the APCs activated carbon (APCs AC prepared through pyrolysis at 1073.15 K and alkaline activation of NaOH. The independent variables effect such as contact time, Cu(II initial concentration and the activator ratio in the ranges of 0-150 min, 84.88-370.21 mg/l and 0.2-0.6 (NaOH:APCs AC, respectively on the Cu(II adsorption capacity were investigated in the APCs activated carbon-solution (APCs ACS system with 1 g the APCs AC in 100 mL Cu(II aqueous solution with magnetic stirring at 75 rpm, room temperature of 298.15 K (± 2 K, 1 atm and pH 5 (±0.25. As the results, Cu(II adsorption capacity dramatically increased with increasing contact time and Cu(II initial concentration. The optimal Cu(II adsorption capacity of 26.71 mg/g was obtained in the APCs ACS system with 120-min contact time, 340.81 m/l initial Cu(II and 0.6 activator ratio. The kinetics study showed the Cu(II adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with 27.03 mg/g of adsorption capacity, 0.09 g/mg.min of rate constant and 0.985-R2. In addition, the Cu(II adsorption isotherm followed the Langmuir model with 12.82 mg/g of the mono-layer adsorption capacity, 42.93 l/g of the over-all adsorption capacity and 0.954-R2.

  8. Electrocatalytic Activity of Ti/TiO2 Electrodes in H2SO4 Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雅琼; 童宏扬; 许文林

    2003-01-01

    Ti/TiO2 electrodes were prepared with the polymeric precursor method (PPM). The structure and morphology of Ti/TiO2 electrodes were examined with XRD and ESEM. The voltammetric charge (q*) of Ti/TiO2 electrodes as cathode in 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution was investigated with cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrocatalytic activity of the Ti/TiO2 electrodes was affected by the structure and morphology of the Ti/TiO2 electrodes, in other words, was affected by the calcination conditions of preparing the electrodes. The value of q*ln was considerably larger than that of q*out,which means that the 'inner' active surface area was much larger than the 'outer' active surface area, and 'inner' active surface played a main role in the electrocatalytic activity of the Ti/TiO2 electrodes.

  9. Devices for Self-Monitoring Sedentary Time or Physical Activity: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Adam; Pearson, Natalie; Edwardson, Charlotte; Yates, Thomas; Biddle, Stuart JH; Esliger, Dale W

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well documented that meeting the guideline levels (150 minutes per week) of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) is protective against chronic disease. Conversely, emerging evidence indicates the deleterious effects of prolonged sitting. Therefore, there is a need to change both behaviors. Self-monitoring of behavior is one of the most robust behavior-change techniques available. The growing number of technologies in the consumer electronics sector provides a unique opportunity for individuals to self-monitor their behavior. Objective The aim of this study is to review the characteristics and measurement properties of currently available self-monitoring devices for sedentary time and/or PA. Methods To identify technologies, four scientific databases were systematically searched using key terms related to behavior, measurement, and population. Articles published through October 2015 were identified. To identify technologies from the consumer electronic sector, systematic searches of three Internet search engines were also performed through to October 1, 2015. Results The initial database searches identified 46 devices and the Internet search engines identified 100 devices yielding a total of 146 technologies. Of these, 64 were further removed because they were currently unavailable for purchase or there was no evidence that they were designed for, had been used in, or could readily be modified for self-monitoring purposes. The remaining 82 technologies were included in this review (73 devices self-monitored PA, 9 devices self-monitored sedentary time). Of the 82 devices included, this review identified no published articles in which these devices were used for the purpose of self-monitoring PA and/or sedentary behavior; however, a number of technologies were found via Internet searches that matched the criteria for self-monitoring and provided immediate feedback on PA (ActiGraph Link, Microsoft Band, and Garmin Vivofit) and sedentary time

  10. Adsorption of mexiletine onto activated charcoal in macrogol-electrolyte solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimori, K; Deshimaru, M; Furukawa, E; Nakano, M

    1993-04-01

    Adsorption studies in vitro of mexiletine onto activated charcoal were performed in macrogol (polyethylene glycol)-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS) and JP XII disintegration medium No. 2 (second medium). Mexiletine was adsorbed more extensively onto activated charcoal in PEG-ELS than that in JP XII second medium. The maximum adsorptive capacity of activated charcoal for the drug was 328 and 284 mg per gram of charcoal in PEG-ELS and JP XII second medium, respectively. In addition, the equilibrium constant of activated charcoal estimated according to the Langmuir equation was 0.079 and 0.034 l per gram of charcoal in PEG-ELS and JP XII second medium, respectively. Adsorption of mexiletine onto activated charcoal was decreased by omitting macrogol, sodium sulfate or sodium bicarbonate from a standard PEG-ELS formulation. Oral activated charcoal will be useful in combination with whole bowel irrigation with PEG-ELS in mexiletine overdose because of its excellent adsorbability in the solution.

  11. Removal of insecticide carbofuran from aqueous solutions by banana stalks activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salman, J.M. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Hameed, B.H., E-mail: chbassim@eng.usm.my [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-04-15

    In this work, activated carbon was prepared from banana stalks (BSAC) waste to remove the insecticide carbofuran from aqueous solutions. The effects of contact time, initial carbofuran concentration, solution pH and temperature (30, 40 and 50 deg. C) were investigated. Adsorption isotherm, kinetics and thermodynamics of carbofuran on BSAC were studied. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models and the data best represented by the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}), standard entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) and standard free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}) were evaluated. Regeneration efficiency of spent BSAC was studied using ethanol as a solvent. The efficiency was found to be in the range of 96.97-97.35%. The results indicated that the BSAC has good regeneration and reusability characteristics and can be used as alternative to present commercial activated carbon.

  12. Removal of insecticide carbofuran from aqueous solutions by banana stalks activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, J M; Hameed, B H

    2010-04-15

    In this work, activated carbon was prepared from banana stalks (BSAC) waste to remove the insecticide carbofuran from aqueous solutions. The effects of contact time, initial carbofuran concentration, solution pH and temperature (30, 40 and 50 degrees C) were investigated. Adsorption isotherm, kinetics and thermodynamics of carbofuran on BSAC were studied. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models and the data best represented by the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard enthalpy (DeltaH(o)), standard entropy (DeltaS(o)) and standard free energy (DeltaG(o)) were evaluated. Regeneration efficiency of spent BSAC was studied using ethanol as a solvent. The efficiency was found to be in the range of 96.97-97.35%. The results indicated that the BSAC has good regeneration and reusability characteristics and can be used as alternative to present commercial activated carbon.

  13. Pore solution chemistry of alkali-activated ground granulated blast-furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, S.; Jennings, H.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The chemical composition and pH of the pore solution extracted from six different ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS) pastes were determined. The concentrations of Si, Ca, Al, and Mg are functions of the pH of the aqueous phase, with high pH associated with the higher concentrations of Si and Al and the lower concentrations of Ca and Mg. When GGBFS is mixed with an aqueous phase with pH higher than 11.5, the reaction is activated or accelerated. The main hydration product was identified as C-S-H, and hydrotalcite, at later stages of hydration, was observed in the pastes with an aqueous phase of a high pH. The effect of pore solution on the alkali activation of GGBFS is discussed with reference to the hydration products.

  14. Water activity of aqueous solutions of ethylene oxide-propylene oxide block copolymers and maltodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. D. Carareto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The water activity of aqueous solutions of EO-PO block copolymers of six different molar masses and EO/PO ratios and of maltodextrins of three different molar masses was determined at 298.15 K. The results showed that these aqueous solutions present a negative deviation from Raoult's law. The Flory-Huggins and UNIFAC excess Gibbs energy models were employed to model the experimental data. While a good agreement was obtained with the Flory-Huggins equation, discrepancies were observed when predicting the experimental behavior with the UNIFAC model. The water activities of ternary systems formed by a synthetic polymer, maltodextrin and water were also measured and used to test the predictive capability of both models.

  15. High catalytic activity of anatase titanium dioxide for decomposition of electrolyte solution in lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; He, Yan-Bing; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2014-12-01

    It has been indicated that anatase TiO2 is a promising anode material for lithium ion power battery from many previous researches. Whereas, in this work, we find that the anatase TiO2, when used as an anode for lithium ion battery, has high catalytic activity to initiate the decarboxylation reaction of electrolyte solution, resulting in the large generation of sole gaseous component, CO2. The ROLi species and the new phase of flake-like Li2TiF6 material are the main reaction products between anatase TiO2 and LiPF6 based electrolyte solution. This work provides important and urgent information that the surface chemistry of anatase TiO2 used as the anode material of lithium ion battery must be modified to suppress its catalytic activity for the decomposition of solvents.

  16. Ant-mediated effects on spruce litter decomposition, solution chemistry, and microbial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, B.; Schramm, Andreas; Kalbitz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Forest management practices often generate clear-cut patches, which may be colonized by ants not present in the same densities in mature forests. In addition to the associated changes in abiotic conditions ants can initiate processes, which do not occur in old-growth stands. Here, we analyse...... the effects of ants and aphid honeydew on litter solution of Norway spruce, microbial enzyme activities, and needle decomposition in a field and greenhouse experiment during summer 2003. In the field, low ant densities had relatively little effects on litter solution 30 cm away from a tree trunk....... The presence of ants resulted in a changed composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with more aromatic and complex compounds, and microbial enzyme activity was significantly higher in litter extracts from the ant treatment compared to the honeydew and control treatment. However, mass loss, litter %C...

  17. Activity and stability of recombinant human superoxide dismutase in buffer solutions and hypothermic perfusates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senoo,Yoshimasa

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability of recombinant human superoxide dismutase (r-hSOD in buffer solutions was studied in solutions at various pH and temperatures. Additionally, we studied the effects of incubation with proteases, serum and two types of hypothermic perfusates. R-hSOD was stable in the pH range of 6-11 and at temperatures up to 80 degrees C for 30 min. R-hSOD activity was not affected by incubation with trypsin, aminopeptidase M or serum for 2 h. R-hSOD activity determined at various temperatures (4-37 degrees C did not vary remarkably. R-hSOD in hypothermic perfusates was stable at 4-37 degrees C for 24 h.

  18. Interest of Monitoring Diaphragmatic Electrical Activity in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ducharme-Crevier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi is a new minimally invasive bedside technology that was developed for the neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA mode of ventilation. In addition to its role in NAVA ventilation, this technology provides the clinician with previously unavailable and essential information on diaphragm activity. In this paper, we review the clinical interests of EAdi in the pediatric intensive care setting. Firstly, the monitoring of EAdi allows the clinician to tailor the ventilatory settings on an individual basis, avoiding frequent overassistance leading potentially to diaphragmatic atrophy. Increased inspiratory EAdi levels can also suggest insufficient support, while a strong tonic activity may reflect the patient efforts to increase its lung volume. EAdi monitoring also allows detection of patient-ventilator asynchrony. It can play a role in evaluation of extubation readiness. Finally, EAdi monitoring provides the clinician with better understanding of the ventilatory capacity of patients with acute neuromuscular disease. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical impact of these potential benefits.

  19. Monitoring activities of daily living based on wearable wireless body sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kańtoch, E; Augustyniak, P; Markiewicz, M; Prusak, D

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor chip technology, wireless communication, and biomedical engineering it is possible to develop miniaturized ubiquitous health monitoring devices that are capable of recording physiological and movement signals during daily life activities. The aim of the research is to implement and test the prototype of health monitoring system. The system consists of the body central unit with Bluetooth module and wearable sensors: the custom-designed ECG sensor, the temperature sensor, the skin humidity sensor and accelerometers placed on the human body or integrated with clothes and a network gateway to forward data to a remote medical server. The system includes custom-designed transmission protocol and remote web-based graphical user interface for remote real time data analysis. Experimental results for a group of humans who performed various activities (eg. working, running, etc.) showed maximum 5% absolute error compared to certified medical devices. The results are promising and indicate that developed wireless wearable monitoring system faces challenges of multi-sensor human health monitoring during performing daily activities and opens new opportunities in developing novel healthcare services.

  20. Intensive monitoring of forest ecosystems in Europe; 2: atmospheric deposition and its impacts on soil solution chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Reinds, G.J.; Vel, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the effects of air pollution and other stress factors on forests, a Pan-European programme for intensive and continuous monitoring of forest ecosystems has been implemented in 1994. Results of this intensive monitoring programme presented in this paper are

  1. Degradation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution by calcium peroxide activated with ferrous ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Fu, Xiaori; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2015-03-02

    The application of calcium peroxide (CaO2) activated with ferrous ion to stimulate the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) was investigated. The experimental results showed that TCE could be completely degraded in 5 min at a CaO2/Fe(II)/TCE molar ratio of 4/8/1. Probe compound tests demonstrated the presence of reactive oxygen species HO· and O2(-·) in CaO2/Fe(II) system, while scavenging tests indicated that HO· was the dominant active species responsible for TCE removal, and O2(-·) could promote TCE degradation in CaO2/Fe(II) system. In addition, the influences of initial solution pH and solution matrix were evaluated. It suggested that the elevation of initial solution pH suppressed TCE degradation. Cl(-) had significant scavenging effect on TCE removal, whereas HCO3(-) of high concentration showed favorable function. The influences of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) could be negligible, while natural organic matter (NOM) had a negative effect on TCE removal at a relatively high concentration. The results demonstrated that the technique of CaO2 activated with ferrous ion is a highly promising technique in in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) remediation in TCE contaminated sites.

  2. THORON-SCOUT - first diffusion based active Radon and Thoron monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Streil, T.; Oeser, V.; Horak, G.; Duzynski, M.

    2016-10-01

    THORON-SCOUT is a stand-alone diffusion based active Radon and Thoron monitor for long term indoor measurements to evaluate the human health risk due to activity concentration in the breathing air. Alpha-particle spectroscopy of Po isotopes, being the progeny of the decay of the radioactive noble gas Radon, is applied to separately monitor activity contributions of 222Rn and 220Rn (Thoron) as well. In this work we show that the portion of Thoron (Tn) may locally be remarkable and even dominating and cannot be neglected as often has been assumed up to now. Along with tobacco consumption, Rn radioactivity turned out to be a dangerous cause of lung cancer, especially in older badly vented buildings situated in regions of radioactive geological formations. THORON-SCOUT allows a precise examination of the indoor atmosphere with respect to Rn and Inactivity concentration and, therefore, a realistic evaluation of corresponding health risk.

  3. Solution behavior and activity of a halophilic esterase under high salt concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Rao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Halophiles are extremophiles that thrive in environments with very high concentrations of salt. Although the salt reliance and physiology of these extremophiles have been widely investigated, the molecular working mechanisms of their enzymes under salty conditions have been little explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A halophilic esterolytic enzyme LipC derived from archeaon Haloarcula marismortui was overexpressed from Escherichia coli BL21. The purified enzyme showed a range of hydrolytic activity towards the substrates of p-nitrophenyl esters with different alkyl chains (n = 2-16, with the highest activity being observed for p-nitrophenyl acetate, consistent with the basic character of an esterase. The optimal esterase activities were found to be at pH 9.5 and [NaCl] = 3.4 M or [KCl] = 3.0 M and at around 45 degrees C. Interestingly, the hydrolysis activity showed a clear reversibility against changes in salt concentration. At the ambient temperature of 22 degrees C, enzyme systems working under the optimal salt concentrations were very stable against time. Increase in temperature increased the activity but reduced its stability. Circular dichroism (CD, dynamic light scattering (DLS and small angle neutron scattering (SANS were deployed to determine the physical states of LipC in solution. As the salt concentration increased, DLS revealed substantial increase in aggregate sizes, but CD measurements revealed the maximal retention of the alpha-helical structure at the salt concentration matching the optimal activity. These observations were supported by SANS analysis that revealed the highest proportion of unimers and dimers around the optimal salt concentration, although the coexistent larger aggregates showed a trend of increasing size with salt concentration, consistent with the DLS data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The solution alpha-helical structure and activity relation also matched the highest proportion of enzyme unimers

  4. Effect of arsenic on the activity of oxygen dissolved in dilute liquid copper solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walqui, H.; Seetharaman, S.; Staffansson, L. I.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of arsenic additions on the activity of oxygen in liquid copper was studied by the solid-electrolyte galvanic cell (-) Pt, W/Cu-O-As ∥ ZrO2-CaO ∥ NiO-Ni/Pt (+) in the temperature range 1373 to 1473 K. The activity coefficient of oxygen in liquid copper was found to be unaffected by the addition of arsenic. The interaction parameter values for group V B elements in the periodic table with respect to oxygen are discussed in the light of the solute interactions in copper.

  5. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  6. ELISPOT Assay for Monitoring Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL Activity in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Sayers

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The profiling and monitoring of immune responses are key elements in the evaluation of the efficacy and development of new biotherapies, and a number of assays have been introduced for analyzing various immune parameters before, during, and after immunotherapy. The choice of immune assays for a given clinical trial depends on the known or suggested immunomodulating mechanisms associated with the tested therapeutic modality. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity represents a key mechanism in the immune response to various pathogens and tumors. Therefore, the selection of monitoring methods for the appropriate assessment of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is thought to be crucial. Assays that can detect both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL frequency and function, such as the IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT have gained increasing popularity for monitoring clinical trials and in basic research. Results from various clinical trials, including peptide and whole tumor cell vaccination and cytokine treatment, have shown the suitability of the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay for monitoring T cell responses. However, the Granzyme B ELISPOT assay and Perforin ELISPOT assay may represent a more direct analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity as compared to the IFN-γ ELISPOT, since Granzyme B and perforin are the key mediators of target cell death via the granule-mediated pathway. In this review we analyze our own data and the data reported by others with regard to the application of various modifications of ELISPOT assays for monitoring CTL activity in clinical vaccine trials.

  7. Adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) from aqueous solutions. 1. Adsorption on powdered activated charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, G; Venkatachalam, S; Ninan, K N; Sadhana, R; Alwan, S; Abarna, V; Joseph, M A

    2003-03-17

    Investigations on the adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (NH(4)N(NO(2))(2)) (ADN) from aqueous solutions on powdered activated charcoal (PAC) were carried out in order to find out an effective and easier method of separating ADN from aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of PAC in the selective adsorption of ADN from aqueous solutions of ADN (ADN-F) and ADN in presence of sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) ions (ADN-PS) was examined and compared using batch and column methods. The adsorption process follows both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and the isotherm parameters for the models were determined. The observed data favor the formation of monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacities were found to be 63.3, 119, 105.3 and 82 mg of ADN per g of PAC for ADN-F (batch), ADN-PS (batch), ADN-F (column) and ADN-PS (column), respectively. Break-through curves for ADN-F and ADN-PS were obtained for the optimization of separation of ADN from aqueous solutions. Elution curves were generated for the desorption of ADN from PAC using hot water as eluent.

  8. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  9. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  10. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Sorption of 4-Nitrophenol on Activated Kaolinitic Clay and Jatropha Curcas Activated Carbon from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsudeen Olanrewaju Azeez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption behaviour of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP on activated kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas activated carbon was investigated. The kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas were activated with 1 M HNO3 and 0.5 M NaOH respectively and were characterized by XRF, XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. The effects of processing parameters, such as initial 4-NP concentration, temperature, pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption process were investigated. The results obtained showed that Jatropha curcas activated carbon exhibited higher performance than activated kaolinitic clay for the removal of 4-nitrophenol from aqueous solution. Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were used to describe the adsorption isotherms. The adsorption data were best fitted with Freundlich model. The experimental data of the two adsorbate-adsorbent systems fitted very well with the pseudo-second order kinetic model with r2 values of 0.999 respectively. Adsorption thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. The results revealed that the adsorption of 4-nitrophenol onto both adsorbents were exothermic processes and spontaneous for Jatropha curcas activated carbon but non spontaneous for activated kaolinitic clay.

  11. Outward electron transfer by Saccharomyces cerevisiae monitored with a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell-type activity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducommun, Raphaël; Favre, Marie-France; Carrard, Delphine; Fischer, Fabian

    2010-03-01

    A Janus head-like bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell was constructed to monitor the electron transfer from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a woven carbon anode. The experiments were conducted during an ethanol cultivation of 170 g/l glucose in the presence and absence of yeast-peptone medium. First, using a basic fuel-cell type activity sensor, it was shown that yeast-peptone medium contains electroactive compounds. For this purpose, 1% solutions of soy peptone and yeast extract were subjected to oxidative conditions, using a microbial fuel cell set-up corresponding to a typical galvanic cell, consisting of culture medium in the anodic half-cell and 0.5 M K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in the cathodic half-cell. Second, using a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell, it was shown that electrons were transferred from yeast cells to the carbon anode. The participation of electroactive compounds in the electron transport was separated as background current. This result was verified by applying medium-free conditions, where only glucose was fed, confirming that electrons are transferred from yeast cells to the woven carbon anode. Knowledge about the electron transfer through the cell membrane is of importance in amperometric online monitoring of yeast fermentations and for electricity production with microbial fuel cells.

  12. Development of a real time activity monitoring Android application utilizing SmartStep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Footwear based activity monitoring systems are becoming popular in academic research as well as consumer industry segments. In our previous work, we had presented developmental aspects of an insole based activity and gait monitoring system-SmartStep, which is a socially acceptable, fully wireless and versatile insole. The present work describes the development of an Android application that captures the SmartStep data wirelessly over Bluetooth Low energy (BLE), computes features on the received data, runs activity classification algorithms and provides real time feedback. The development of activity classification methods was based on the the data from a human study involving 4 participants. Participants were asked to perform activities of sitting, standing, walking, and cycling while they wore SmartStep insole system. Multinomial Logistic Discrimination (MLD) was utilized in the development of machine learning model for activity prediction. The resulting classification model was implemented in an Android Smartphone. The Android application was benchmarked for power consumption and CPU loading. Leave one out cross validation resulted in average accuracy of 96.9% during model training phase. The Android application for real time activity classification was tested on a human subject wearing SmartStep resulting in testing accuracy of 95.4%.

  13. Engineering the development of systems for multisensory monitoring and activity interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascueña, José Manuel; Castillo, José Carlos; Navarro, Elena; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Multisensory monitoring and activity interpretation systems are being increasingly used as a suitable means to detect situations and make decisions in an intelligent manner. However, there is a lack of formalised processes that guide the stakeholders in their development. Most of the current proposals focus on the implementation and evaluation of low-level algorithms. In order to overcome this lack, a process called INT3-SDP that guides stakeholders in the development of systems capable of carrying out multisensory monitoring and INTerpretation of behaviours and situations for an INTelligent INTervention in complex and dynamic environments is described in this paper. In this work, it is described how INT3-SDP provides the analysts with the guidelines and models necessary for the description of the environment to be monitored and the sensors to be installed, as well as in the implementation of the software components that perform the monitoring and activity interpretation tasks. Moreover, a case study is also presented in order to illustrate how INT3-SDP is put into practice.

  14. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  15. Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by adsorption onto activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, K; Pattabhi, S; Kadirvelu, K

    2001-10-01

    Activated carbon (AC) prepared from coconut tree sawdust was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Batch mode adsorption studies were carried out by varying agitation time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, carbon concentration and pH. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to model the adsorption data. Adsorption capacity was calculated from the Langmuir isotherm and was 3.46 mg/g at an initial pH of 3.0 for the particle size 125-250 microm. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was pH dependent and maximum removal was observed in the acidic pH range. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.01-1 M NaOH solutions.

  16. ADSORPTION OF COPPER FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY ELAIS GUINEENSIS KERNEL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAJUA DELAILA TUMIN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series of batch laboratory experiments were conducted in order to investigate the feasibility of Elais Guineensis kernel or known as palm kernel shell (PKS-based activated carbon for the removal of copper from aqueous solution by the adsorption process. Investigation was carried out by studying the influence of initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage and initial concentration of copper. The particle size of PKS used was categorized as PKS–M. All batch experiments were carried out at a constant temperature of 30°C (±2°C using mechanical shaker that operated at 100 rpm. The single component equilibrium data was analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin and Toth adsorption isotherms.

  17. Dy3+ activated LaVO4 films synthesized by precursors with different solution concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Dandan; MA Yongqing; ZHANG Xian; QIAN Shibing; ZHENG Ganhong; WU Mingzai; LI Guang; SUN Zhaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Using different-solution-concentration precursors with citric acid as chelating agent and polyvinyl alcohol as dispersing media,Dy3+ activated LaVO4 films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates.The scanning electronic microscope (SEM) showed that the compact and crack-free LaVO4:Dy3+ film could be obtained at a suitable solution concentration.The deposited films could absorb the ultraviolet light below 400 nm and were transparent in the visible and infrared region as evidenced by the transmission spectra,and the photoluminescence spectra exhibited the characteristic emissions of Dy3+ peaking at 484 (blue) and 576 (yellow) nm due to the transitions of 4F9/2→6H15/2 and 4Fg/2→6H13/2,respectively.The potential application of LaVO4:Dy3+ film in the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) was also discussed.

  18. Tunable catalytic activity of solid solution metal-organic frameworks in one-pot multicomponent reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Gándara, Felipe; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this research is to establish how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of more than one metal in equivalent crystallographic sites (solid solution MOFs) exhibit catalytic activity, which is tunable by virtue of the metal ions ratio. New MOFs with general formula [InxGa1-x(O2C2H4)0.5(hfipbb)] were prepared by the combination of Ga and In. They are isostructural with their monometal counterparts, synthesized with Al, Ga, and In. Differences in their behavior as heterogeneous catalysts in the three-component, one pot Strecker reaction illustrate the potential of solid solution MOFs to provide the ability to address the various stages involved in the reaction mechanism.

  19. Effects of passive computer use time and non-computer work time on the performance of electronic activity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yeh, Jao-Yu; Liang, Huey-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of passive and non-computer work time on the estimation of computer use times by electronic activity monitoring. A total of 20 subjects with computers were monitored for 3 h. Average relative error for total computer use time estimation was about 4%, given that non-computer work time was 20% of the 3-h monitored period. No significant impact of passive computer use time was found in this study. Non-computer work time of 40% or less is suggested as criteria for the application of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the physical work loading assessment. Statement of Relevance: This research studied the criteria of non-computer work time for the appropriate use of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the assessment of physical work loading. It is suggested that it should be set to 40% or less of the 3-h monitoring period.

  20. Adsorption of phenol and reactive dye from aqueous solution on activated carbons derived from solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Namba, Akio; Mukai, Shin R; Tamon, Hajime; Ariyadejwanich, Pisit; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2004-04-01

    Activated carbons were produced from several solid wastes, namely, waste PET, waste tires, refuse derived fuel and wastes generated during lactic acid fermentation from garbage. Activated carbons having various pore size distributions were obtained by the conventional steam-activation method and via the pre-treatment method (i.e., mixture of raw materials with a metal salt, carbonization and acid treatment prior to steam-activation) that was proposed by the authors. The liquid-phase adsorption characteristics of organic compounds from aqueous solution on the activated carbons were determined to confirm the applicability of these carbons, where phenol and a reactive dye, Black5, were employed as representative adsorbates. The hydrophobic surface of the carbons prepared was also confirmed by water vapor adsorption. The characteristics of a typical commercial activated carbon were also measured and compared. It was found that the activated carbons with plentiful mesopores prepared from PET and waste tires had quite high adsorption capacity for large molecules. Therefore they are useful for wastewater treatment, especially, for removal of bulky adsorbates.

  1. Modified activated carbons with amino groups and their copper adsorption properties in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Mahaninia; Paria Rahimian; Tahereh Kaghazchi

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by two chemical methods and the adsorption of Cu (II) on activated carbons from aqueous solution containing amino groups was studied. The first method involved the chlorination of activated carbon following by substitution of chloride groups with amino groups, and the second involved the nitrilation of activated carbon with reduction of nitro groups to amino groups. Resultant activated carbons were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, XPS, Boehm titration, and pHzpc. Kinetic and equilibrium tests were performed for copper adsorption in the batch mode. Also, adsorption mechanism and effect of pH on the adsorption of Cu (II) ions were discussed. Adsorption study shows enhanced adsorption for copper on the modified activated carbons, mainly by the presence of amino groups, and the Freundlich model is applicable for the activated carbons. It is suggested that binding of nitrogen atoms with Cu (II) ions is stronger than that with H+ions due to relatively higher divalent charge or stronger electrostatic force.

  2. Adsorption of Cu(II from aqueous solution using activated carbon derived from mangosteen peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandan Chen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the mixing method of K2CO3 with the source biomass and thermal history on the properties of the mangosteen peel activated carbons (MSACs were investigated. The one-step impregnation activation process was found to be remarkably effective in increasing the mesoporosity of the activated carbon (L-MSAC as well as BET surface area (SBET and total pore volume, compared to the solid-solid dry mixing method in a two-stage process. The better fit of Langmuir isotherm indicates a maximum adsorption capacity of Cu(II to be 21.74 mg•g−1 for L-MSAC, which makes it a promising adsorbent for the removal of copper ion from aqueous solutions.

  3. Removal of Lead (II Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of lead (II ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous.

  4. Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and ActiGraph™ GT3X+ Activity Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh John

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare raw acceleration output of the ActiGraph™ GT3X+ and GENEA activity monitors. Methods: A GT3X+ and GENEA were oscillated in an orbital shaker at frequencies ranging from 0.7 to 4.0 Hz (ten 2-min trials/frequency on a fixed radius of 5.08 cm. Additionally, 10 participants (age = 23.8 ± 5.4 years wore the GT3X+ and GENEA on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking (2.0 and 3.5 mph and running (5.5 and 7.5 mph and simulated free-living activities (computer work, cleaning a room, vacuuming and throwing a ball for 2-min each. A linear mixed model was used to compare the mean triaxial vector magnitude (VM from the GT3X+ and GENEA at each oscillation frequency. For the human testing protocol, random forest machine-learning technique was used to develop two models using frequency domain (FD and time domain (TD features for each monitor. We compared activity type recognition accuracy between the GT3X+ and GENEA when the prediction model was fit using one monitor and then applied to the other. Z-statistics were used to compare the proportion of accurate predictions from the GT3X+ and GENEA for each model. Results: GENEA produced significantly higher (p < 0.05, 3.5 to 6.2% mean VM than GT3X+ at all frequencies during shaker testing. Training the model using TD input features on the GENEA and applied to GT3X+ data yielded significantly lower (p < 0.05 prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy was not compromised when interchangeably using FD models between monitors. Conclusions: It may be inappropriate to apply a model developed on the GENEA to predict activity type using GT3X+ data when input features are TD attributes of raw acceleration.

  5. Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and ActiGraph™ GT3X+ Activity Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Dinesh; Sasaki, Jeffer; Staudenmayer, John; Mavilia, Marianna; Freedson, Patty S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare raw acceleration output of the ActiGraph™ GT3X+ and GENEA activity monitors. Methods: A GT3X+ and GENEA were oscillated in an orbital shaker at frequencies ranging from 0.7 to 4.0 Hz (ten 2-min trials/frequency) on a fixed radius of 5.08 cm. Additionally, 10 participants (age = 23.8 ± 5.4 years) wore the GT3X+ and GENEA on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking (2.0 and 3.5 mph) and running (5.5 and 7.5 mph) and simulated free-living activities (computer work, cleaning a room, vacuuming and throwing a ball) for 2-min each. A linear mixed model was used to compare the mean triaxial vector magnitude (VM) from the GT3X+ and GENEA at each oscillation frequency. For the human testing protocol, random forest machine-learning technique was used to develop two models using frequency domain (FD) and time domain (TD) features for each monitor. We compared activity type recognition accuracy between the GT3X+ and GENEA when the prediction model was fit using one monitor and then applied to the other. Z-statistics were used to compare the proportion of accurate predictions from the GT3X+ and GENEA for each model. Results: GENEA produced significantly higher (p < 0.05, 3.5 to 6.2%) mean VM than GT3X+ at all frequencies during shaker testing. Training the model using TD input features on the GENEA and applied to GT3X+ data yielded significantly lower (p < 0.05) prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy was not compromised when interchangeably using FD models between monitors. Conclusions: It may be inappropriate to apply a model developed on the GENEA to predict activity type using GT3X+ data when input features are TD attributes of raw acceleration. PMID:24177727

  6. Confidence-based multiclass AdaBoost for physical activity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Attila; Hendeby, Gustaf; Stricker, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity monitoring has recently become an important topic in wearable computing, motivated by e.g. healthcare applications. However, new benchmark results show that the difficulty of the complex classification problems exceeds the potential of existing classifiers. Therefore, this paper proposes the ConfAdaBoost.M1 algorithm. The proposed algorithm is a variant of the AdaBoost.M1 that incorporates well established ideas for confidence based boosting. The method is compared to the mo...

  7. Genetically encoded optical sensors for monitoring of intracellular chloride and chloride-selective channel activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bregestovski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly discusses the main approaches for monitoring chloride (Cl−, the most abundant physiological anion. Noninvasive monitoring of intracellular Cl− ([Cl−]i is a challenging task owing to two main difficulties: (i the low transmembrane ratio for Cl−, approximately 10:1; and (ii the small driving force for Cl−, as the Cl− reversal potential (ECl is usually close to the resting potential of the cells. Thus, for reliable monitoring of intracellular Cl−, one has to use highly sensitive probes. From several methods for intracellular Cl− analysis, genetically encoded chloride indicators represent the most promising tools. Recent achievements in the development of genetically encoded chloride probes are based on the fact that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP exhibits Cl−-sensitivity. YFP-based probes have been successfully used for quantitative analysis of Cl− transport in different cells and for high-throughput screening of modulators of Cl−-selective channels. Development of a ratiometric genetically encoded probe, Clomeleon, has provided a tool for noninvasive estimation of intracellular Cl− concentrations. While the sensitivity of this protein to Cl− is low (EC50 about 160 mM, it has been successfully used for monitoring intracellular Cl− in different cell types. Recently a CFP–YFP-based probe with a relatively high sensitivity to Cl− (EC50 about 30 mM has been developed. This construct, termed Cl-Sensor, allows ratiometric monitoring using the fluorescence excitation ratio. Of particular interest are genetically encoded probes for monitoring of ion channel distribution and activity. A new molecular probe has been constructed by introducing into the cytoplasmic domain of the Cl−-selective glycine receptor (GlyR channel the CFP–YFP-based Cl-Sensor. This construct, termed BioSensor-GlyR, has been successfully expressed in cell lines. The new genetically encoded chloride probes offer means of screening

  8. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  9. A label-free bioluminescent sensor for real-time monitoring polynucleotide kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiao; Xu, Qinfeng; Lu, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-08-19

    Polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays a crucial role in maintaining the genomic stability of cells and is becoming a potential target in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancers. The fluorescent method is usually used to measure the PNK activity, but it is impossible to obtain the real-time monitoring without the employment of the labeled DNA probes. Here, we report a label-free bioluminescent sensor for PNK activity assay through real-time monitoring of the phosphorylation-dependent DNA ligation reaction. In this bioluminescent sensor, two hairpin DNA probes with 5'-protruding terminal are designed as the phosphate acceptor, and the widely used phosphate donor of ATP is substituted by dCTP. In the absence of PNK, the ligation reaction cannot be triggered due to the lack of 5'-phosphoryl groups in the probes, and the background signal is negligible. With the addition of PNK, the phosphorylation-ligation reaction of the probes is initiated with the release of AMP, and the subsequent conversion of AMP to ATP leads to the generation of distinct bioluminescence signal. The PNK activity assay can be performed in real time by continuously monitoring the bioluminescence signal. This bioluminescent sensor is much simpler, label-free, cost-effective, and free from the autofluorescence interference of biological matrix, and can be further used for quantitative, kinetic, and inhibition assay.

  10. Solution plasma synthesis of Au nanoparticles for coating titanium dioxide to enhance its photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasugi, Yuki; Saito, Genki [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamashita, Toru [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Norihito [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomohiro, E-mail: takiyama@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2015-05-29

    A convenient method for coating titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) is demonstrated in solution plasma to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}. AuNPs from a metallic Au electrode were bonded to the surface of a commercial TiO{sub 2} powder, which acted as a catalyst support, with the reaction taking place in an electrolyte solution. The effect of diverse plasma conditions on the size and productivity of the AuNPs was investigated initially to provide a reference in the absence of TiO{sub 2}. At 290 V, “partial plasma” was attained, with only a weak light emission surrounding the Au electrode. Conditions then evolved to “full plasma”, with a strong orange emission at 330 V. Partial or full status was maintained for 1 h at 300 and 400 V, respectively. At the transition to full, the AuNP particle size increased from 3.72 to 6.09 nm and the productivity increased dramatically from 0.025 to 0.87 mg h{sup −1} mm{sup −2}. Stronger plasma very efficiently synthesized AuNPs, and therefore, it was adopted for further study. AuNP-TiO{sub 2} combinations were formed by applying 400 V to a TiO{sub 2}-dispersed solution. In these experiments, TiO{sub 2} coated with AuNPs was synthesized; these combinations of AuNP-TiO{sub 2} had 0.44 mol% of Au. The photocatalytic activity of AuNP-TiO{sub 2} was investigated by measuring the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB). Under UV irradiation, the AuNP-TiO{sub 2} particles removed up to 95% of the dye in 70 min. Commercial TiO{sub 2} achieves values closer to 85%. The results thus raise the possibility that solution plasma methods can be generalized as a means for achieving catalysis-enhancing coatings. - Highlights: • Au nanoparticles with a diameter of several nm were synthesized by solution plasma. • The effect of plasma conditions on the Au nanoparticles formation was investigated. • High resolution TEM was conducted to investigate the crystal structure. • Au nanoparticles were coated

  11. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with questionnai

  12. Validity of an Accelerometer-Based Activity Monitor System for Measuring Physical Activity in Frail Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollewand, Anne M; Spijkerman, Anouk G; Bilo, Henk J; Kleefstra, Nanne; Kamsma, Yvo; van Hateren, Kornelis J

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the validity of the accelerometer-based DynaPort system to detect physical activity in frail elderly subjects. Eighteen home-dwelling subjects (Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI) score ≥4, ≥75 years) were included. Activities in their home environment were simultaneous

  13. Direct monitoring of the strand passage reaction of DNA topoisomerase II triggers checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Furniss

    Full Text Available By necessity, the ancient activity of type II topoisomerases co-evolved with the double-helical structure of DNA, at least in organisms with circular genomes. In humans, the strand passage reaction of DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II is the target of several major classes of cancer drugs which both poison Topo II and activate cell cycle checkpoint controls. It is important to know the cellular effects of molecules that target Topo II, but the mechanisms of checkpoint activation that respond to Topo II dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a checkpoint mechanism monitors the strand passage reaction of Topo II. In contrast, cells do not become checkpoint arrested in the presence of the aberrant DNA topologies, such as hyper-catenation, that arise in the absence of Topo II activity. An overall reduction in Topo II activity (i.e. slow strand passage cycles does not activate the checkpoint, but specific defects in the T-segment transit step of the strand passage reaction do induce a cell cycle delay. Furthermore, the cell cycle delay depends on the divergent and catalytically inert C-terminal region of Topo II, indicating that transmission of a checkpoint signal may occur via the C-terminus. Other, well characterized, mitotic checkpoints detect DNA lesions or monitor unattached kinetochores; these defects arise via failures in a variety of cell processes. In contrast, we have described the first example of a distinct category of checkpoint mechanism that monitors the catalytic cycle of a single specific enzyme in order to determine when chromosome segregation can proceed faithfully.

  14. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  15. Development of standardized extractive solution from Lippia sidoides by factorial design and their redox active profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of variables of preparation on total flavonoids content from extractive solution of Lippia sidoides Cham., Verbenaceae. Thus a 23 factorial design was used to study the importance of plant proportion, the extraction method and solvent on the extraction of flavonoid. The methodology of determination of chemicals in factorial design was validated according to the parameters required by Brazilian Health Agency. The extraction solution was selected through a full factorial design where the best conditions to achieve the highest content of flavonoids were: 7.5% (w/v of plant with ethanol 50% (v/v as solvent. The polyphenols content was determined by LC method and its relationship with the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities was evaluated. The free radical scavenging activities and antioxidant potentials were determined for different concentrations using various in vitro models. Our results indicate that extracts exhibited a significant dose-dependent antioxidant effect as evaluated by TRAP/TAR assays. Besides, we observed an antioxidant activity against hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide, and protection against lipid peroxidation in vitro. Our results suggest that the extract presents significant in vitro antioxidant potential indicating promising perspectives for its use as pharmaceutical/or food additive.

  16. Extension of the lower bound of monitor solutions of maximally permissive supervisors to non-α net systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W. H.; Chao, D. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional region-based liveness-enforcing supervisors focus on (1) maximal permissiveness of not losing legal states, (2) structural simplicity of minimal number of monitors, and (3) fast computation. Lately, a number of similar approaches can achieve minimal configuration using efficient linear programming. However, it is unclear as to the relationship between the minimal configuration and the net structure. It is important to explore the structures involved for the fewest monitors required. Once the lower bound is achieved, further iteration to merge (or reduce the number of) monitors is not necessary. The minimal strongly connected resource subnet (i.e., all places are resources) that contains the set of resource places in a basic siphon is an elementary circuit. Earlier, we showed that the number of monitors required for liveness-enforcing and maximal permissiveness equals that of basic siphons for a subclass of Petri nets modelling manufacturing, called α systems. This paper extends this to systems more powerful than the α one so that the number of monitors in a minimal configuration remains to be lower bounded by that of basic siphons. This paper develops the theory behind and shows examples.

  17. Smart interactive electronic system for monitoring the electromagnetic activities of biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Sorin G.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-08-01

    A novel electronic device capable of sensing and monitoring the myoelectric, polarization wave and electromagnetic activities of the biological systems and in particular the human body is presented. It is known that all the physical and chemical processes within biological systems are associated with polarization, depolarization waves from the brain, neural signals and myoelectric processes that manifest themselves in ionic and dipole motion. The technology developed in our laboratory is based on certain charge motion sensitive electronics. The electronic system developed is capable of sensing the electromagnetic activities of biological systems. The information obtained is then processed by specialized software in order to interpret it from physical and chemical point of view.

  18. Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and ActiGraph™ GT3X+ Activity Monitors

    OpenAIRE

    Dinesh John; Jeffer Sasaki; John Staudenmayer; Marianna Mavilia; Freedson, Patty S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare raw acceleration output of the ActiGraph™ GT3X+ and GENEA activity monitors. Methods: A GT3X+ and GENEA were oscillated in an orbital shaker at frequencies ranging from 0.7 to 4.0 Hz (ten 2-min trials/frequency) on a fixed radius of 5.08 cm. Additionally, 10 participants (age = 23.8 ± 5.4 years) wore the GT3X+ and GENEA on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking (2.0 and 3.5 mph) and running (5.5 and 7.5 mph) and simulated free-living activities (computer work, ...

  19. MONITORING AND MODELING OF THE MAIN TRENDS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina U. Archipova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to monitoring of the scientific sphere in Russia in comparison to thedeveloped countries. Attention is paid especially to analysis of interrelation between scientifi c researches costs and the results of scientifi c activity,as well as to the modeling of innovative activityin Russia on the based on the systems of therecursive simultaneous equations. The conductedresearch allows to follow the diffusion of scientific knowledge and their influence on innovative activity in the country.

  20. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien, Andrew B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-01-10

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage

  1. Adsorption of naphthalene from aqueous solution on activated carbons obtained from bean pods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belen; Budinova, Temenuzhka; Ania, Conchi O; Tsyntsarski, Boyko; Parra, José B; Petrova, Bilyana

    2009-01-30

    The preparation of activated carbons from bean pods waste by chemical (K(2)CO(3)) and physical (water vapor) activation was investigated. The carbon prepared by chemical activation presented a more developed porous structure (surface area 1580 m(2) g(-1) and pore volume 0.809 cm(3) g(-1)) than the one obtained by water vapor activation (258 m(2) g(-1) and 0.206 cm(3) g(-1)). These carbons were explored as adsorbents for the adsorption of naphthalene from water solutions at low concentration and room temperature and their properties are compared with those of commercial activated carbons. Naphthalene adsorption on the carbons obtained from agricultural waste was stronger than that of carbon adsorbents reported in the literature. This seems to be due to the presence of large amounts of basic groups on the bean-pod-based carbons. The adsorption capacity evaluated from Freundlich equation was found to depend on both the textural and chemical properties of the carbons. Naphthalene uptake on biomass-derived carbons was 300 and 85 mg g(-1) for the carbon prepared by chemical and physical activation, respectively. Moreover, when the uptake is normalized per unit area of adsorbent, the least porous carbon displays enhanced naphthalene removal. The results suggest an important role of the carbon composition including mineral matter in naphthalene retention. This issue remains under investigation.

  2. Activity Calculation in Complex Metallurgical Molten Slag Systems Based on Regular Solution Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The activity of FetO is very important in ironmaking and steelmaking process. In order to predict the activ- ity of Fe, O and optimize the operation conditions in ironmaking and steelmaking process, by application of regular so lution model in molten slag systems, FeO-Fe2 O3-SIO2 ternary system, FeO-Fe2 O3-SiO2-CaO and FeO-Fe2 O3-SiO2-NiO quaternary systems have been studied by the chemical equilibrium between H2/H20 gas mixture and liquid slag con tained in solid iron. The values of interaction energy between cations concerning steelmaking slags have been deter- mined by application of ferric-ferrous iron equilibrium and iron-ferric iron equilibrium. And then the activity of Fe, O can be calculated. The results show that the relative error is 3.9% in FeO-Fe203-SiO2 system and 18% in FeO- Fe203-SiO2 CaO system. The prediction of activities of FetO in the systems are in good agreement with the measure- ments and the regular solution model is valid for predicting the activity of FetO in complex molten slags systems. The activity of Fe, O in FeO-Fe20a-NiO system have not been tested presently, and the calculated result can not be assessed.

  3. Effective adsorption of phenolic compound from aqueous solutions on activated semi coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Dai, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Activated Semi coke was prepared by KOH activation and employed as adsorbent to study adsorption function of phenolic compound from aqueous solutions. The adsorption result showed that the adsorption capacity of the activated semi coke for phenolic compound increased with contact time and adsorbent dosage, and slightly affected by temperature. The surface structure property of the activated semi coke was characterized by N2 adsorption, indicating that the activated semi coke was essentially macroporous, and the BET surface area was 347.39 m2 g-1. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the surface of the activated semi coke had a high developed pore. The adsorption kinetics were investigated according to pseudofirst order, pseudosecond order and intraparticle diffusion, and the kinetics data were fitted by pseudosecond order model, and intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Adsorption isotherm was studied by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Sips and Toth models. The result indicated that adsorption isotherm data could fit well with Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson, Sips and Toth models.

  4. Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solution and Flue Gas by Adsorption on Activated Carbon Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The use of two activated carbon fibres, one laboratorial sample prepared from a commercial acrylic textile fibre and one commercial sample of Kynol1, as prepared/received and modified by reaction with powdered sulfur and H2S gas in order to increase the sulfur content were studied for the removal of mercury from aqueous solution and from flue gases from a fluidized bed combustor. The sulfur introduced ranged from 1 to 6 wt.% depending on the method used. The most important parameter ...

  5. Scour Monitoring System for Subsea Pipeline Based on Active Thermometry: Numerical and Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A scour monitoring system for subsea pipeline based on active thermometry is proposed in this paper. The temperature reading of the proposed system is based on a distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensing technique. A thermal cable acts as the main component of the system, which consists of a heating belt, armored optical fibers and heat-shrinkable tubes which run parallel to the pipeline. The scour-induced free span can be monitored through different heat transfer behaviors of in-water and in-sediment scenarios during heating and cooling processes. Two sets of experiments, including exposing different lengths of the upper surface of the pipeline to water and creating free spans of various lengths, were carried out in laboratory. In both cases, the scour condition was immediately detected by the proposed monitoring system, which confirmed the system is robust and very sensitive. Numerical study of the method was also investigated by using the finite element method (FEM with ANSYS, resulting in reasonable agreement with the test data. This brand new system provides a promising, low cost, highly precise and flexible approach for scour monitoring of subsea pipelines.

  6. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  7. A LiBr-H2O Absorption Refrigerator Incorporating a Thermally Activated Solution Pumping Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W. Eames

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an illustrated description of a proposed LiBr-H2O vapour absorption refrigerator which uses a thermally activated solution pumping mechanism that combines controlled variations in generator vapour pressure with changes it produces in static-head pressure difference to circulate the absorbent solution between the generator and absorber vessels. The proposed system is different and potentially more efficient than a bubble pump system previously proposed and avoids the need for an electrically powered circulation pump found in most conventional LiBr absorption refrigerators. The paper goes on to provide a sample set of calculations that show that the coefficient of performance values of the proposed cycle are similar to those found for conventional cycles. The theoretical results compare favourably with some preliminary experimental results, which are also presented for the first time in this paper. The paper ends by proposing an outline design for an innovative steam valve, which is a key component needed to control the solution pumping mechanism.

  8. Catalytic ozonation of pentachlorophenol in aqueous solutions using granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Samiee, Fateme; Ahmadian, Mohammad; Poormohammadi, Ali; solimanzadeh, Bahman

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated in this study as a catalyst for the elimination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated streams in a laboratory-scale semi-batch reactor. The influence of important parameters including solution pH (2-10), radical scavenger (tert-butanol, 0.04 mol/L), catalyst dosage (0.416-8.33 g/L), initial PCP concentration (100-1000 mg/L) and ozone flow rate (2.3-12 mg/min) was examined on the efficiency of the catalytic ozonation process (COP) in degradation and mineralization of PCP in aqueous solution. The experimental results showed that catalytic ozonation with GAC was most effective at pH of 8 with ozone flow rate of 12 mg/min and a GAC dosage of 2 g. Compared to the sole ozonation process (SOP), the removal levels of PCP and COP were, 98, and 79 %, respectively. The degradation rate of kinetics was also investigated. The results showed that using a GAC catalyst in the ozonation of PCP produced an 8.33-fold increase in rate kinetic compared to the SOP under optimum conditions. Tert-butanol alcohol (TBA) was used as a radical scavenger. The results demonstrated that COP was affected less by TBA than by SOP. These findings suggested that GAC acts as a suitable catalyst in COP to remove refractory pollutants from aqueous solution.

  9. Mercury adsorption on granular activated carbon in aqueous solutions containing nitrates and chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, F; Erto, A; Lancia, A; Musmarra, D

    2011-09-15

    Adsorption is an effective process to remove mercury from polluted waters. In spite of the great number of experiments on this subject, the assessment of the optimal working conditions for industrial processes is suffering the lack of reliable models to describe the main adsorption mechanisms. This paper presents a critical analysis of mercury adsorption on an activated carbon, based on the use of chemical speciation analysis to find out correlations between mercury adsorption and concentration of dissolved species. To support this analysis, a comprehensive experimental study on mercury adsorption at different mercury concentrations, temperatures and pH was carried out in model aqueous solutions. This study pointed out that mercury capture occurs mainly through adsorption of cationic species, the adsorption of anions being significant only for basic pH. Furthermore, it was shown that HgOH(+) and Hg(2+) are captured to a higher extent than HgCl(+), but their adsorption is more sensitive to solution pH. Tests on the effect of temperature in a range from 10 to 55 °C showed a peculiar non-monotonic trend for mercury solution containing chlorides. The chemical speciation and the assumption of adsorption exothermicity allow describing this experimental finding without considering the occurrence of different adsorption mechanisms at different temperature.

  10. POSSIBILITIES OF USING THE SENSEWEAR MOBILE MONITOR IN THE ASSESSMENT OF THE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Włodarek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented case study analysis was to present the possibilities of using the SenseWear PRO3 Armband mobile monitor in the assessment of physical activities. During the measurement, the SenseWear PRO3 Armband recorded the following parameters: total energy expenditure [kcal], average METs (for the whole analyzed period [-], number of steps [-], active energy expenditure [kcal], lying down duration [min], sleep duration [min], sedentary physical activity duration [min], physical activity duration [min], including moderate physical activity duration [min], vigorous physical activity duration [min] and very vigorous physical activity duration [min]. The results for chosen participant were analyzed – in various periods of time (for the 24 on-body hours sessions of wearing the SenseWear PRO3 Armband and the whole session, as well as for basic and broaden analysis. The graphical reports from the session were also presented. It was concluded that the SenseWear PRO3 Armband device is a valuable tool in everyday medical practice to specify the physical activity of individuals and to verify their declarations. For users, the SenseWear PRO3 Armband device is easy to handle, while measurement is not onerous and does not disturb typical activities.

  11. Smartphone-Based Patients' Activity Recognition by Using a Self-Learning Scheme for Medical Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junqi; Zhou, Xi; Sun, Yunchuan; Ping, Gong; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Zhuorong

    2016-06-01

    Smartphone based activity recognition has recently received remarkable attention in various applications of mobile health such as safety monitoring, fitness tracking, and disease prediction. To achieve more accurate and simplified medical monitoring, this paper proposes a self-learning scheme for patients' activity recognition, in which a patient only needs to carry an ordinary smartphone that contains common motion sensors. After the real-time data collection though this smartphone, we preprocess the data using coordinate system transformation to eliminate phone orientation influence. A set of robust and effective features are then extracted from the preprocessed data. Because a patient may inevitably perform various unpredictable activities that have no apriori knowledge in the training dataset, we propose a self-learning activity recognition scheme. The scheme determines whether there are apriori training samples and labeled categories in training pools that well match with unpredictable activity data. If not, it automatically assembles these unpredictable samples into different clusters and gives them new category labels. These clustered samples combined with the acquired new category labels are then merged into the training dataset to reinforce recognition ability of the self-learning model. In experiments, we evaluate our scheme using the data collected from two postoperative patient volunteers, including six labeled daily activities as the initial apriori categories in the training pool. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed self-learning scheme for activity recognition works very well for most cases. When there exist several types of unseen activities without any apriori information, the accuracy reaches above 80 % after the self-learning process converges.

  12. Monitoring of immune activation using biochemical changes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Amann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal models, immune activation is often difficult to assess because of the limited availability of specific assays to detect cytokine activities. In human monocytes/macrophages, interferon-γ induces increased production of neopterin and an enhanced activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which degrades tryptophan via the kynurenine pathway. Therefore, monitoring of neopterin concentrations and of tryptophan degradation can serve to detect the extent of T helper cell 1-type immune activation during cellular immune response in humans. In a porcine model of cardiac arrest, we examined the potential use of neopterin measurements and determination of the tryptophan degradation rate as a means of estimating the extent of immune activation. Urinary neopterin concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and radioimmunoassay (RIA (BRAHMS Diagnostica, Berlin, Germany. Serum and plasma tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations were also determined using HPLC. Serum and urine neopterin concentrations were not detectable with HPLC in these specimens, whereas RIA gave weakly (presumably false positive results. The mean serum tryptophan concentration was 39.0 Ī 6.2 μmol/l, and the mean kynurenine concentration was 0.85 Ī 0.33 μmol/l. The average kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient in serum was 21.7Ī 8.4 nmol/μmol, and that in plasma was 20.7Ī 9.5 nmol/μmol (n = 7, which corresponds well to normal values in humans. This study provides preliminary data to support the monitoring of tryptophan degradation but not neopterin concentrations as a potential means of detecting immune activation in a porcine model. The kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient may serve as a short-term measurement of immune activation and hence permit an estimate of the extent of immune activation.

  13. Adsorptive Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solution Using Nitrogen Doped Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Motoi; Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Iida, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely applied for adsorptive removal of organic contaminants from aqueous phase, but not for ionic pollutants. In this study, nitrogen doped AC was prepared to increase the adsorption capacity of nitrate from water. AC was oxidized with (NH4)2S2O8 solution to maximize oxygen content for the first step, and then NH3 gas treatment was carried out at 950°C to aim at forming quaternary nitrogen (N-Q) species on AC surface (Ox-9.5AG). Influence of solution pH was examined so as to elucidate the relationship between surface charge and adsorption amounts of nitrate. The results showed that Ox-9.5AG exhibited about twice higher adsorption capacity than non-treatment AC at any initial nitrate concentration and any equilibrium solution pH (pHe) investigated. The more decrease in pHe value, the more adsorption amount of negatively charged nitrate ion, because the surface charge of AC and Ox-9.5AG could become more positive in acidic solution. The oxidation and consecutive ammonia treatments lead to increase in nitrogen content from 0.35 to 6.4% and decrease in the pH of the point of zero charge (pHpzc) from 7.1 to 4.0 implying that positively charged N-Q of a Lewis acid was created on the surface of Ox-9.5AG. Based on a Langmuir data analysis, maximum adsorption capacity attained 0.5-0.6 mmol/g of nitrate and adsorption affinity was 3.5-4.0 L/mmol at pHe 2.5 for Ox-9.5AG.

  14. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-05-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  15. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G; Gerst, Katharine L; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J; Tierney, Geraldine L; Crimmins, Theresa M; Enquist, Carolyn A F; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H; Schwartz, Mark D; Thomas, Kathryn A; Weltzin, Jake F

    2014-05-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  16. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species’ phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological “status”, or the ability to track presence–absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  17. POST-LAUNCHING MONITORING ACTIVITIES FOR NEW TRANSACTIONAL BANKING PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO SMES (CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuca Simona-Mihaela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current paper has the aim to provide guidelines for post-launching monitoring activities and steps related to new transactional banking products addressed to SMEs. While the pre-launching activities have the purpose of accurately defining the objectives, assumptions and estimations, the purpose of the post-launching plan is to identify: if the final objectives of a product launching have been met, on one hand, to analyze results in the sense of identifying an efficient action plan in order to overcome the lack of results (if case, but most important, to identify opportunities for optimizing the products and for communicating properly the value proposition. This paper also presents schemes for monitoring the results from a business case and for motivating the sales force, as an essential step in increasing the sales. Therefore, alternatives of incentive campaigns are presented, as sustainable campaigns with to purpose to achieve an expected success rate. As an additional support guideline for the sales force, some scenarios and post-sales actions are presented, together with an example of portfolio analysis considering potential per client. Considering the methods and details presented in the current paper, one can identify the importance and find out how to monitor the results after launching a new transactional product addressed to SMEs, can understand and design an incentive scheme and also define actions to be taken in order to increase revenues from a newly launched transactional product.

  18. Chemistry of ash-leachates to monitor volcanic activity: An application to Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armienta, M.A., E-mail: victoria@geofisica.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); De la Cruz-Reyna, S. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Soler, A. [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Fac. Geologia, Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Cruz, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    Monitoring volcanic activity and assessing volcanic risk in an on-going eruption is a problem that requires the maximum possible independent data to reduce uncertainty. A quick, relatively simple and inexpensive method to follow the development of an eruption and to complement other monitoring parameters is the chemical analysis of ash leachates, particularly in the case of eruptions related to dome emplacement. Here, the systematic analysis of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} concentrations in ash leachates is proposed as a valuable tool for volcanic activity monitoring. However, some results must be carefully assessed, as is the case for S/Cl ratios, since eruption of hydrothermally altered material may be confused with degassing of incoming magma. Sulfur isotopes help to identify SO{sub 4} produced by hydrothermal processes from magmatic SO{sub 2}. Lower S isotopic values correlated with higher F{sup -} percentages represent a better indicator of fresh magmatic influence that may lead to stronger eruptions and emplacement of new lava domes. Additionally, multivariate statistical analysis helps to identify different eruption characteristics, provided that the analyses are made over a long enough time to sample different stages of an eruption.

  19. Solution phase synthesis of halogenated graphene and the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuang-Hsu Wu; Da-Wei Wang; Qingcong Zeng; Yang Li; Ian R. Gentle

    2014-01-01

    Metal-free carbon electrocatalyts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are attractive for their high activity and economic advantages. However, the origin of the activity has never been clearly elucidated in a systematic manner. Halogen group elements are good candidates for elucidating the effect, although it has been a difficult task due to safety issues. In this report, we demonstrate the synthesis of Cl-, Br-and I-doped reduced graphene oxide through two solution phase syntheses. We have evaluated the effectiveness of doping and performed electrochemical measurements of the ORR activity on these halogenated graphene materials. Our results suggest that the high electroneg-ativity of the dopant is not the key factor for high ORR activity;both Br-and I-doped graphene pro-moted ORR more efficiently than Cl-doped graphene. Furthermore, an unexpected sulfur-doping in acidic conditions suggests that a high level of sulfide can degrade the ORR activity of the graphene material.

  20. The removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon developed from grinded used tire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgacem, Ahmed; Rebiai, Rachid; Hadoun, Hocine; Khemaissia, Sihem; Belmedani, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, activated carbon was prepared from waste tire by KOH chemical activation. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and average pore diameter were characterized. BET surface area of the activated carbon was determined as 558 m(2)/g. The adsorption of uranium ions from the aqueous solution using this activated carbon has been investigated. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied by a batch method. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 3. The removal efficiency has also been determined for the adsorption system as a function of initial concentration. The experimental results were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. A comparison of best-fitting was performed using the coefficient of correlation and the Langmuir isotherm was found to well represent the measured sorption data. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir equation, the saturated monolayer sorption capacity of uranium ions onto waste tire activated carbon was 158.73 mg/g. The thermodynamic equilibrium constant and the Gibbs free energy were determined and results indicated the spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second-order model.

  1. FEASIBILITY OF REMOVING FURFURALS FROM SUGAR SOLUTIONS USING ACTIVATED BIOCHARS MADE FROM AGRICULTURAL RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Lima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic feedstocks are often prepared for ethanol fermentation by treatment with a dilute mineral acid catalyst that hydrolyzes the hemicellulose and possibly cellulose into soluble carbohydrates. The acid-catalyzed reaction scheme is sequential, whereby the released monosaccharides are further degraded to furans and other chemicals that are inhibitory to the subsequent fermentation step. This work tests the use of agricultural residues (e.g., plant waste as starting materials for making activated biochars to adsorb these degradation products. Results show that both furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF are adsorbed by phosphoric acid-activated and steam-activated biochars prepared from residues collected from cotton and linen production. Best results were obtained with steam-activated biochars. The activated biochars adsorbed about 14% (by weight of the furfurals at an equilibrium concentration of 0.5 g/L, and by adding 2.5% of char to a sugar solution, with either furfural or HMF (at 1 g/L, 99% of the furans were removed.

  2. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite by solution plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiulan; Xu, QiuCheng; Ge, Chao; Su, Nan; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Huihong; Zhu, Shoufeng; Xu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Jiexu

    2017-01-27

    In this paper, Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were prepared by solution plasma technology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) were used to verify their chemical composition. The size and morphology of the Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results indicate that about 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and dispersed on the pyramid-like ZnO (20-60 nm) surface. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) demonstrates that the Pt (5 wt%)-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite has better photocatalytic activity than commercial P25 because Pt NPs restrain the photogenerated electron/hole recombination and increase the catalyst activity.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON CHROMIUM(VI REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING ACTIVATED CARBON RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE XEROGELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghe A. Oyedoh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium(VI metal ion in aqueous solutions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels (ACRF was investigated. The results showed that pore structure, surface area and the adsorbent surface chemistry are important factors in the control of the adsorption of chromium(VI metal ions. The isotherm parameters were obtained from plots of the isotherms and from the application of Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherms. Based on regression analysis, the Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit. The maximum adsorption capacity of ACRF for chromium (VI was 241.9 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was the best fit to the experimental data for the adsorption of chromium metal ions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels. The thermodynamics of Cr(VI ions adsorption onto ACRF was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  4. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  5. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite by solution plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiulan; Xu, QiuCheng; Ge, Chao; Su, Nan; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Huihong; Zhu, Shoufeng; Xu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Jiexu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were prepared by solution plasma technology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) were used to verify their chemical composition. The size and morphology of the Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results indicate that about 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and dispersed on the pyramid-like ZnO (20-60 nm) surface. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) demonstrates that the Pt (5 wt%)-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite has better photocatalytic activity than commercial P25 because Pt NPs restrain the photogenerated electron/hole recombination and increase the catalyst activity.

  6. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities.

  7. Removal of Ni (II) from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto Ricinus communis seed shell activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilarasu, P; Karunakaran, K

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption studies on the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution using Ricinus communis seed shells activated carbon and polypyrrole coated Ricinus communis seed shells activated carbon were carried out under various experimental conditions. The effects of various process parameters have been investigated by following the batch adsorption technique. Adsorption data was modeled with Freundlich, Langmuir and tempkin adsorption isotherms. Thermodynamics parameters such as DeltaH0, DeltaS0, and DeltaG0 were calculated indicating that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic nature. A mechanism, involving intra particle diffusion and surface adsorption, has been proposed for the adsorption of Ni(II) onto the adsorbent. Adsorbent used in this study is characterized by FTIR and SEM before and after the adsorption of metal ions.

  8. Adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions on activated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiya, Tarun Kumar; Bhattacharya, Ashim Kumar; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2009-05-01

    The ability of activated alumina as synthetic adsorbent was investigated for adsorptive removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied. The optimum solution pH for adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions was found to be 5. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second order model. The effective particle diffusion coefficient of Cd(II) and Pb(II) are of the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s. Values of mass transfer coefficient were estimated as 4.868x10(-6) cm/s and 6.85x10(-6) cm/s for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were better fitted to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic for Cd(II) adsorption and endothermic for Pb(II). The sorption energy calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm were 11.85 kJ/mol and 11.8 kJ/mol for the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) respectively which indicated that both the adsorption processes were chemical in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using dilute mineral acids. Application studies carried out using industrial waste water samples containing Cd(II) and Pb(II) showed the suitability of activated alumina in waste water treatment plant operation.

  9. Field and Laboratory GPR Monitoring of Biological Activity in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoflias, Georgios; Schillig, Peter; McGlashan, Michael; Roberts, Jennifer; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of "biogeophysics". The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present a field study and a laboratory experiment that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Three competing mechanisms are postulated to cause the changes observed in the radar data: 1) biogenic gas production, 2) mineral dissolution, and 3) biomass growth. However, due to the inherent complexity and uncertainties associated with field experimentation, the relative effect of each mechanism on the GPR signal could not be confirmed. To overcome the limitations of field observations in assessing the response of GPR signals to biomass formation, a 90-day laboratory

  10. Conformation of sulfated galactan and sulfated fucan in aqueous solutions: implications to their anticoagulant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Camila F; Guimarães, Jorge A; Mourão, Paulo A S; Verli, Hugo

    2007-07-01

    The discovery of sulfated galactans and sulfated fucans in marine invertebrates with simple and ordered structures opened new perspectives to investigate the biological activity of these molecules and to determine whether different structures confer high affinity for a particular protein. We undertook a conformational analysis of a 2-sulfated, 3-linked alpha-L-galactan and of a alpha-L-fucan with similar structure. Through comparison between theoretical and NMR derived coupling constants, we observed that the pyranose rings are predominantly in the (1)C(4) conformation in these polysaccharides. Additionally, the geometry of the glycosidic linkages was determined based on force field calculations, indicating that the two polysaccharides have similar conformations in solution. Since the sulfated alpha-L-galactan, but not the alpha-L-fucan potentiates antithrombin (AT) inhibition of thrombin, the solution conformations of the compounds were docked into AT and the complexes obtained were refined through molecular dynamics calculations. The obtained results indicates extremely different orientations for the two polysaccharides, which well correlates and explain their distinct anticoagulant activities. Finally, the molecular mechanism of a selective 2-desulfation reaction, observed among sulfated fucans, was explained as a consequence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond capable of assisting in the removal of the charged group.

  11. Asymmetry of the Active Site Loop Conformation between Subunits of Glutamate-1-semialdehyde Aminomutase in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Campanini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.

  12. Adsorption of mercury (II from liquid solutions using modified activated carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Soé Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the most toxic metals present in the environment. Adsorption has been proposed among the technologies for mercury abatement. Activated carbons are universal adsorbents which have been found to be a very effective alternative for mercury removal from water. The effectiveness with which a contaminant is adsorbed by the solid surface depends, among other factors, on the charge of the chemical species in which the contaminant is in solution and on the net charge of the adsorbent surface which depend on the pH of the adsorption system. In this work, activated carbon from carbonized eucalyptus wood was used as adsorbent. Two sulphurization treatments by impregnation with sulphuric acid and with carbon disulphide, have been carried out to improve the adsorption capacity for mercury entrapment. Batch adsorption tests at different temperatures and pH of the solution were carried out. The influence of the textural properties, surface chemistry and operation conditions on the adsorption capacity, is discussed.

  13. Mercury removal from aqueous solution and flue gas by adsorption on activated carbon fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabais, João Valente; Carrott, P. J. M.; Carrott, M. M. L. Ribeiro; Belchior, Marisa; Boavida, Dulce; Diall, Tatiana; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim

    2006-06-01

    The use of two activated carbon fibres, one laboratorial sample prepared from a commercial acrylic textile fibre and one commercial sample of Kynol ®, as prepared/received and modified by reaction with powdered sulfur and H 2S gas in order to increase the sulfur content were studied for the removal of mercury from aqueous solution and from flue gases from a fluidized bed combustor. The sulfur introduced ranged from 1 to 6 wt.% depending on the method used. The most important parameter for the mercury uptake is the type of sulfur introduced rather than the total amount and it was found that the H 2S treatment of ACF leads to samples with the highest mercury uptake, despite the lower sulfur amount introduced. The modified samples by both methods can remove HgCl 2 from aqueous solutions at pH 6 within the range 290-710 mg/g (ACF) which can be favourably compared with other studies already published. The use of a filter made with an activated carbon fibre modified by powdered sulfur totally removed the mercury species present in the flue gases produced by combustion of fossil fuel.

  14. PREDICTING WATER ACTIVITY IN ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS WITH THE CISTERNAS-LAM MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS JG; GREER DA; DISSELKAMP RL

    2011-03-01

    Water activity is an important parameter needed to predict the solubility of hydrated salts in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. A number of models available in the scientific literature predict water activity from electrolyte solution composition. The Cisternas-Lam model is one of those models and has several advantages for nuclear waste application. One advantage is that it has a single electrolyte specific parameter that is temperature independent. Thus, this parameter can be determined from very limited data and extrapolated widely. The Cisternas-Lam model has five coefficients that are used for all aqueous electrolytes. The present study aims to determine if there is a substantial improvement in making all six coefficients electrolyte specific. The Cisternas-Lam model was fit to data for six major electrolytes in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. The model was first fit to all data to determine the five global coefficients, when they were held constant for all electrolytes it yielded a substantially better fit. Subsequently, the model was fit to each electrolyte dataset separately, where all six coefficients were allowed to be electrolyte specific. Treating all six coefficients as electrolyte specific did not make sufficient difference, given the complexity of applying the electrolyte specific parameters to multi-solute systems. Revised water specific parameters, optimized to the electrolytes relevant to Hanford waste, are also reported.

  15. Ultrafiltration Enhanced with Activated Carbon Adsorption for Efficient Dye Removal from Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董亚楠; 苏延磊; 陈文娟; 彭金明; 张岩; 姜忠义

    2011-01-01

    In this study, orange G dye was efficiently removed from aqueous solution by ultraflltration (UF) membrane separation enhanced with activated carbon adsorption. The powdered activated carbon (PAC) was deposited onto the UF membrane surface, forming an intact filter cake. The enhanced UF process simultaneously exploited the high water permeation flux of porous membrane and the high adsorption ability of PAC toward dye molecules. The influencing factors on the dye removal were investigated. The results indicated that with sufficient PAC incorporation, the formation of intact PAC filtration cake led to nearly complete rejection for dye solution under opti-mized dye concentration and operation pressure, without large sacnticlng the permeation tlux ot the filtration process. Typically, the dye rejection ratio increased from 43.6% for single UF without adsorption to nearly 100% for the enhanced UF process, achieving long time continuous treatment with water permeation flux of 47 L·m^-2·h^-1. The present study demonstrated that adsorption enhanced UF may be a feasible method for the dye wastewater treatment.

  16. Antifactor Xa levels versus activated partial thromboplastin time for monitoring unfractionated heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandiver, Jeremy W; Vondracek, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) remains an important therapeutic agent, particularly in the inpatient setting, for anticoagulation. Historically, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) has been the primary laboratory test used to monitor and adjust UFH. The aPTT test has evolved since the 1950s, and the historical goal range of 1.5-2.5 times the control aPTT, which first gained favor in the 1970s, has fallen out of favor due to a high degree of variability in aPTT readings from one laboratory to another, and even from one reagent to another. As a result, it is now recommended that the aPTT goal range be based on a corresponding heparin concentration of 0.2-0.4 unit/ml by protamine titration or 0.3-0.7 unit/ml by antifactor Xa assay. Given that several biologic factors can influence the aPTT independent of the effects of UFH, many institutions have transitioned to monitoring heparin with antifactor Xa levels, rather than the aPTT. Clinical data from the last 10-20 years have begun to show that a conversion from aPTT to antifactor Xa monitoring may offer a smoother dose-response curve, such that levels remain more stable, requiring fewer blood samples and dosage adjustments. Given the minimal increased acquisition cost of the antifactor Xa reagents, it can be argued that the antifactor Xa is a cost-effective method for monitoring UFH. In this review, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of the aPTT, antifactor Xa, and protamine titration tests, and provide a clinical framework to guide practitioners who are seeking to optimize UFH monitoring within their own institutions.

  17. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  18. Preliminary study on activity monitoring using an android smart-watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanathapillai, Vijayalakshmi; Amor, James D; Goodwin, Zoe; James, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    The global trend for increasing life expectancy is resulting in aging populations in a number of countries. This brings to bear a pressure to provide effective care for the older population with increasing constraints on available resources. Providing care for and maintaining the independence of an older person in their own home is one way that this problem can be addressed. The EU Funded Unobtrusive Smart Environments for Independent Living (USEFIL) project is an assistive technology tool being developed to enhance independent living. As part of USEFIL, a wrist wearable unit (WWU) is being developed to monitor the physical activity (PA) of the user and integrate with the USEFIL system. The WWU is a novel application of an existing technology to the assisted living problem domain. It combines existing technologies and new algorithms to extract PA parameters for activity monitoring. The parameters that are extracted include: activity level, step count and worn state. The WWU, the algorithms that have been developed and a preliminary validation are presented. The results show that activity level can be successfully extracted, that worn state can be correctly identified and that step counts in walking data can be estimated within 3% error, using the controlled dataset.

  19. Use of cholinesterase activity in monitoring organophosphate pesticide exposure of cattle produced in tropical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardío, V T; Ibarra, N; Rodríguez, M A; Waliszewski, K N

    2001-12-01

    The use of cholinesterase activity as a biochemical method for monitoring organophosphate pesticide exposure in cattle is described herein. Determination of cholinesterase activity of whole blood, erythrocyte, and plasma was carried out according to the Ellman modified kinetic method. The mean baseline acetylcholinesterase activities of 9.549 +/- 3.619 IU/mL in whole blood, 9.444 +/- 3.006 IU/mL in erythrocytes, and 0.149 +/- 0.063 IU/mL in plasma were estimated for steers from the control group. Results of multivariate analysis showed that the general responses between the control and experimental groups (in vivo, monitoring and case studies) treated with Coumaphos and Fenthion were statistically different, and the general responses of these experimental groups were statistically different over time as well. Among the fractions that were analyzed, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase activity could be adequate for the diagnosis of exposure or acute poisoning in cattle as it showed a good within-run and between-run precision with CVs <10% better than those in plasma.

  20. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  1. Monitoring and Analyzing of Circadian and Ultradian Locomotor Activity Based on Raspberry-Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Pasquali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new device based on the Raspberry-Pi to monitor the locomotion of Arctic marine invertebrates and to analyze chronobiologic data has been made, tested and deployed. The device uses infrared sensors to monitor and record the locomotor activity of the animals, which is later analyzed. The software package consists of two separate scripts: the first designed to manage the acquisition and the evolution of the experiment, the second designed to generate actograms and perform various analyses to detect periodicity in the data (e.g., Fourier power spectra, chi-squared periodograms, and Lomb–Scargle periodograms. The data acquisition hardware and the software has been previously tested during an Arctic mission with an arctic marine invertebrate.

  2. Research on an active and continuous monitoring system for human respiratory system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Continuous and dynamic measurements of human respiratory parameters are very important for vital diseases of respiratory system during mechanical ventilation. This paper analyzed the structure and mechanical properties of the human respiratory system, and designed an active intervening monitoring micro system for it. The mobile mechanism of the micro system is soft and earthworm-like movement actuated by pneumatic rubber actuator, the measurement and therapy unit of the system is an extensible mechanism with sensors in the front. The micro monitoring system can move in respiratory tract and measure the respiratory parameters in bronchium continuously. Experiments had been done in swine's respiratory tract,the results proved that the micro robot system could measure the respiratory parameters in real-time successfully and its movement was smooth in swine's respiratory tract.

  3. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Enzyme Catalysis; Enzyme Activity in Formulations for Lactose-Intolerant Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altas, Margarida C; Kudryashov, Evgeny; Buckin, Vitaly

    2016-05-03

    The paper introduces ultrasonic technology for real-time, nondestructive, precision monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in solutions and in complex opaque media. The capabilities of the technology are examined in a comprehensive analysis of the effects of a variety of diverse factors on the performance of enzyme β-galactosidase in formulations for reduction of levels of lactose in infant milks. These formulations are added to infant's milk bottles prior to feeding to overcome the frequently observed intolerance to lactose (a milk sugar), a serious issue in healthy development of infants. The results highlight important impediments in the development of these formulations and also illustrate the capability of the described ultrasonic tools in the assessment of the performance of enzymes in complex reaction media and in various environmental conditions.

  4. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation.

  5. Combining GPS with heart rate monitoring to measure physical activity in children: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J Scott; Badland, Hannah M; Schofield, Grant

    2009-09-01

    The recent development of global positioning system (GPS) receivers with integrated heart rate (HR) monitoring has provided a new method for estimating the energy expenditure associated with children's movement. The purpose of this feasibility study was to trial a combination of GPS surveillance and HR monitoring in 39 primary-aged children from New Zealand. Spatial location and HR data were recorded during a school lunch break using an integrated GPS/HR receiver (1Hz). Children averaged a total distance of 1.10+/-0.56km at speeds ranging from 0 to 18.6kmh(-1). Activity patterns were characterised by short bursts of moderate to high speeds followed by longer periods of slow speeds. In addition, boys averaged higher speeds than girls (1.77+/-0.62kmh(-1) and 1.36+/-0.50kmh(-1), respectively; p=0.003). The percentage of time spent at 0kmh(-1) (stationary) ranged from 0.1% to 21.3% with a mean of 6.4+/-4.6%. These data suggest that while children were relatively active during the lunch period, they spent a substantial portion of time engaged in slow or stationary physical activities. Furthermore, associations between HR, average speed, and stationary time demonstrated that children who moved at faster speeds expended more energy than those who moved at slower speeds. We conclude that the combined approach of GPS and HR monitoring is a promising new method for investigating children's play-related energy expenditure. There is also scope to integrate GPS data with geographic information systems to examine where children play and accumulate physical activity.

  6. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p speed (0.442 km·h(-1); -2.676 to 3.561; p = .018) and 1.9% for distance (0.045 km; -0.140 to 0.232; p measured by PRO. In contrast, compared to PRO, WISPI overestimated average speed (0.232 km·h(-1); -0.376 to 0.088; p speed by 2.5% (0.474 km·h(-1); -1.152 to 2.099; p measures intensity of physical activity, with a similar error as WISPI, to an acceptable level for population-based monitoring in unimpeded open-air environments. This presents a low-cost, minimal burden opportunity to remotely monitor physical activity participation to improve the prescription of exercise as medicine.

  7. VEPP Exercise: Volcanic Activity and Monitoring of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    A 10-week project will be tested during the Fall semester 2010, for a Volcanic Hazards elective course, for undergraduate Geology students of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. This exercise was developed during the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `O`o (VEPP) Workshop, held on the Big Island of Hawaii in July 2010. For the exercise the students will form groups (of 2-4 students), and each group will be assigned a monitoring technique or method, among the following: seismic (RSAM data), deformation (GPS and tilt data), observations (webcam and lava flow maps), gas and thermal monitoring. The project is designed for Geology undergraduates who have a background in introductory geology, types of volcanoes and eruptions, magmatic processes, characteristics of lava flows, and other related topics. It is divided in seven tasks, starting with an introduction and demonstration of the VEPP website and the VALVE3 software, which is used to access monitoring data from the current eruption of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The students will also familiarize themselves with the history of Kilauea volcano and its current eruption. At least weekly the groups will acquire data (mostly near-real-time) from the different monitoring techniques, in the form of time series, maps, videos, and images, in order to identify trends in the data. The groups will meet biweekly in the computer laboratory to work together in the analysis and interpretation of the data, with the support of the instructor. They will give reports on the progress of the exercise, and will get feedback from the instructor and from the other expert groups. All groups of experts will relate their findings to the recent and current activity of Kilauea volcano, and the importance of their specific type of monitoring. The activity will culminate with a written report and an oral presentation. The last task of the project consists of a wrap-up volcano monitoring exercise, in which the students will

  8. Solar activity monitoring and forecasting capabilities at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gallagher

    Full Text Available The availability of full-disk, high-resolution Ha images from Big Bear Solar Observatory (USA, Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (China allows for the continual monitoring of solar activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Typically, this Global Ha Network (GHN provides almost uninterrupted Ha images with a cadence of 1 min and an image scale of 1'' per pixel. 

    Every hour, GHN images are transferred to the web-based BBSO Active Region Monitor (ARM; www.bbso.njit.edu/arm, which includes the most recent EUV, continuum, and magnetogram data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, together with magnetograms from the Global Oscillation Network Group. ARM also includes a variety of active region properties from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Environment Center, such as up-to-date active region positions, GOES 5-min X-ray data, and flare identification. Stokes I, V, Q, and U images are available from the recently operational BBSO Digital Vector Magnetograph and the Vector Magnetograph at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of Beijing Observatory. Vector magnetograms provide complete information on the photospheric magnetic field, and allow for magnetic flux gradients, electric currents, and shear forces to be calculated: these measurements are extremely sensitive to conditions resulting in flaring activity. Furthermore, we have developed a Flare Prediction System which estimates the probability for each region to produce C-, M-, or X-class flares based on nearly eight years of NOAA data from cycle 22. This, in addition to BBSO’s daily solar activity reports, has proven a useful resource for activity forecasting.

    Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections; instruments and techniques

  9. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions on sulfurized activated carbon prepared from nut shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi Tajar, Amir; Kaghazchi, Tahereh; Soleimani, Mansooreh

    2009-06-15

    Low-cost activated carbon, derived from nut shells, and its modified sample have been used as replacements for the current expensive methods of removing cadmium from aqueous solutions and waste waters. Adsorption of cadmium onto four kinds of activated carbons has been studied; prepared activated carbon (PAC), commercial activated carbon (CAC), and the sulfurized ones (SPAC & SCAC). The activated carbon has been derived, characterized, treated with sulfur and then utilized for the removal of Cd(2+). Sulfurizing agent (SO(2) gas) was successfully used in adsorbents' modification process at the ambient temperature. Samples were then characterized and tested as adsorbents of cadmium. Effect of some parameters such as contact time, initial concentration and pH were examined. With increasing pH, the adsorption of cadmium ions was increased and maximum removal, 92.4% for SPAC, was observed in pH>8.0 (C(0)=100mg/L). The H-type adsorption isotherms, obtained for the adsorbents, indicated a favorable process. Adsorption data on both prepared and commercial activated carbon, before and after sulfurization, followed both the Frendlich and Langmuir models. They were better fitted by Frendlich isotherm as compared to Langmuir. The maximum adsorption capacities were 90.09, 104.17, 126.58 and 142.86 mg/g for CAC, PAC, SCAC and SPAC, respectively. Accordingly, surface modification of activated carbons using SO(2) greatly enhanced cadmium removal. The reversibility of the process has been studied in a qualitative manner and it shows that the spent SPAC can be effectively regenerated for further use easily.

  10. 78 FR 57668 - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal... availability of ``U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Plan for Monitoring Disposal Actions Taken by the...

  11. A Novel Experimental Technique to Monitor the Time-Dependent Water and Ions Uptake when Shale Interacts with Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Bazali, Talal

    2013-09-01

    The time-dependent water and ions uptake when shale interacts with aqueous solutions is quantified using a combination of immersion and gravimetric techniques. Results show that when shale interacts with salt solutions, water uptake into shale goes through three distinct stages; water movement out of shale (due to chemical osmosis), water movement into shale (due to diffusion osmosis) and stationary state (equilibrium stage). This work shows that chemical osmosis dominates water movement in early times while diffusion osmosis takes over later. In addition, it is shown that the amount of water movement due to chemical osmosis depends on the chemical potential gradient while the amount of water movement due to diffusion osmosis is highly related to the ionic concentration imbalance. In addition, the amount of ions uptake into shale at equilibrium is shown to depend on the type and concentration of salt solution. Furthermore, this work shows that potassium ion has a strengthening effect on shale while sodium and calcium ions have a weakening effect on shale. Results also show that the shale's compressive strength alteration is greatly influenced by the type and concentration of the salt solution. Furthermore, the shale's compressive strength alteration is shown to be time dependent and correlates very well with the time-dependent flux of water and ions. Finally, it is shown that chemical osmosis and diffusion osmosis take place simultaneously when shale interacts with water-based muds. The overall impact on shale stability is governed by the net water flow resulting from chemical osmosis and diffusion osmosis.

  12. Removal of fluoride in aqueous solution by adsorption on acid activated water treatment sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinitnantharat, Soydoa; Kositchaiyong, Sriwilai; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports the use of a pellet of adsorbent made from water treatment sludge (S) and acid activated water treatment sludge (SH) for removal of fluoride in the batch equilibration technique. The influence of pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature and effect of other ions were employed to find out the feasibility of acid activated adsorbent to remove fluoride to the permissible concentration of 0.7 mg/L. The results from the adsorption isotherm followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models and the highest fluoride removal was found for adsorbent activated with acetic acid at 2.0 mol/L. The optimum adsorbent dosage was found at 40 g/L, 0.01 mol/L acid activated adsorbent which was able to adsorb fluoride from 10 down to 0.11 mg/L. The adsorption capacity was decreased when the temperature increased. This revealed that the adsorption of fluoride on SH was exothermic. In the presence of nitrate and carbonate ions in the aqueous solution, fluoride removal efficiency of SH decreased from 94.4% to 86.6% and 90.8%, respectively. However, there is no significant effect in the presence of sulfate and chloride ions.

  13. [Methodological aspects in environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to low doses of benzene: problems and possible solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfo, Giovanna; Paci, Enrico; Fustinoni, Silvia; Barbieri, Anna; Carrieri, Mariella

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some methods to measure human exposure to benzene, both in life and occupational environments, through environmental and biological monitoring, examining the critical issues and optimal conditions of use. The overall performance of environmental monitoring, from the analytical point of view, strongly depend on the choice of an appropriate method of sampling and analysis. Urinary SPMA and t, t-MA are the biomarkers listed by ACGIH to evaluate occupational exposure: most of the recent studies use HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry, but since t, t-MA is present in the urine in larger quantities it is also determinable with UV detectors. The urinary benzene is an index not officially included in the list of the ACGIH BEIs, but it is useful to assess exposure and benzene at low concentrations, that most frequently are found today in the occupational and life environments.

  14. An Integrated Solution for both Monitoring and Controlling for Automization Using Wireless Sensor Networks: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gnana Seelan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature monitoring plays a major role in controlling it according to its varied conditions. Thisprocess is common in all critical areas like data centre, server rooms, grid rooms and other datacommunication equipped rooms. This is mandatory for each organization/industry to impart suchprocess, as most of the critical data would be in data centre along with their network infrastructure whichhaving various electronic, electrical and mechanical devices are involved for data transmissions. Thesedevices are very much depend on the environmental factors such as temperature, moisture, humidity etc.,and also emit heat in the form of thermal energy when they are in functional. To overcome these heats,the server/data centre room(s would be engaged with multiple (distributed air-conditioning (ac systemsto provide cooling environment and maintain the temperature level of the room. The proposed paper isthe study of automization of monitoring and controlling temperature as per desired requirements withwsn network

  15. Multidisciplinary approach to study the effect of water status and mobility on the activity of peroxidase in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Giampiero; Neri, Lilia; Laghi, Luca; Capozzi, Francesco; Mastrocola, Dino; Pittia, Paola

    2014-02-01

    The effect of water mobility on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity in solutions was investigated by measuring water activity (aw), freezable water content, (1)H proton transverse relaxation time and water self-diffusivity determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The effect of system mobility as described by viscosity and glass transition temperature (T'g) was also studied. The aw and viscosity of aqueous solutions were modulated using ligands (glucose, sorbitol and trehalose) and a thickener (maltodextrin). The effectiveness of a solute in the inhibition of HRP activity was better related to its ability to reduce the mobility of the system than to its water mobility depleting effect. The relationship among viscosity and peroxidase activity was influenced by the type of enzyme but not by the substrate. Bovine lactoperoxidase activity was hindered by viscosity changes more than HRP activity (tested in the same system) due to the higher molecular weight of the former enzyme.

  16. A computerized system for the simultaneous monitoring of place conditioning and locomotor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockwell, N T; Ferguson, D S; Beninger, R J

    1996-02-01

    Place conditioning is one of the most popular behavioral methods for assessing the rewarding properties of various substances. Many substances that are rewarding also influence motor activity. This report describes a computerized system designed to simultaneously monitor both place conditioning and locomotor activity. The system consists of 4 independent conditioning boxes, each equipped with 6 pairs of photosensors connected to an Experiment Controller, an electronic board containing a microprocessor, a programable timer, and 16 K of RAM used to store both instructions and data. The effects of the stimulant (+)-amphetamine were assessed using this system and found to produce a place preference comparable to that obtained from a previously utilized mechanical timer system. The computerized system also demonstrated that amphetamine increased unconditioned activity. There are a number of advantages and broader applications of the new methodology.

  17. A Review of Accelerometry-Based Wearable Motion Detectors for Physical Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Chang Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of physical activity are indicative of one’s mobility level, latent chronic diseases and aging process. Accelerometers have been widely accepted as useful and practical sensors for wearable devices to measure and assess physical activity. This paper reviews the development of wearable accelerometry-based motion detectors. The principle of accelerometry measurement, sensor properties and sensor placements are first introduced. Various research using accelerometry-based wearable motion detectors for physical activity monitoring and assessment, including posture and movement classification, estimation of energy expenditure, fall detection and balance control evaluation, are also reviewed. Finally this paper reviews and compares existing commercial products to provide a comprehensive outlook of current development status and possible emerging technologies.

  18. Objective evaluation of stress with the blind by the monitoring of autonomic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Bertrand; Baltenneck, Nicolas; Gehin, Claudine; Dittmar, Andre; McAdams, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Accessibility for the blind in an urban space must be studied under real conditions in their daily environment. A new approach for evaluating the impact of environmental conditions on blind pedestrians is the objective measure of stress by the monitoring of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Original techniques of data analysis and spatial representation are proposed for the detection of the ANS activity through the assessment of the electrodermal activity. Skin resistance was recorded with an EmoSense system on 10 blind subjects who followed a charted course independently. The course was 1065 meters long and consisted of various environmental conditions in an urban space. The spatial frequency of the non-specific skin resistance responses was used to provide a more relevant representation of geographic hotspots. Results of statistical analysis based on this new parameter are discussed to conclude on phenomena causing mental stress with the blind moving in an urban space.

  19. Effective solutions for monitoring the electrostatic separation of metal and plastic granular waste from electric and electronic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senouci, Khouira; Medles, Karim; Dascalescu, Lucian

    2013-02-01

    The variability of the quantity and purity of the recovered materials is a serious drawback for the application of electrostatic separation technologies to the recycling of granular wastes. In a series of previous articles we have pointed out how capability and classic control chart concepts could be employed for better mastering the outcome of such processes. In the present work, the multiple exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart is introduced and shown to be more effective than the Hotelling T2 chart for monitoring slow varying changes in the electrostatic separation of granular mixtures originating from electric and electronic equipment waste. The operation of the industrial process was simulated by using a laboratory roll-type electrostatic separator and granular samples resulting from shredded electric cable wastes. The 25 tests carried out during the observation phase enabled the calculation of the upper and lower control limits for the two control charts considered in the present study. The 11 additional tests that simulated the monitoring phase pointed out that the MEWMA chart is more effective than Hotelling's T(2) chart in detecting slow varying changes in the outcome of a process. As the reverse is true in the case of abrupt alterations of monitored process performances, simultaneous usage of the two control charts is strongly recommended. While this study focused on a specific electrostatic separation process, using the MEWMA chart together with the well known Hotelling's T(2) chart should be applicable to the statistical control of other complex processes in the field of waste processing.

  20. Absorption of the selenite anion from aqueous solutions by thermally activated layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Frost, Ray L; Martens, Wayde N

    2009-03-01

    The presence of selenite or selenate in potable water is a health hazard especially when consumed over a long period of time. Its removal from potable water is of importance. This paper reports technology for the removal of selenite from water through the use of thermally activated layered double hydroxides. Mg/Al hydrotalcites with selenite in the interlayer were prepared at different times from 0.5 to 20 h through ion exchange. X-ray diffraction of the MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcites indicates that the selenite anion entered the interlayer spacing of Mg/Al hydrotalcite and MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcite was formed. Raman spectra proved the presence of selenite anion in the hydrotalcite interlayer as the counter anion. The band intensity and width of MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcite in the region of 3800-3000 cm(-1) increase with the adsorption of selenite by the Mg/Al hydrotalcite. The characteristic bands of free selenite anions in the MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcites are located between the region between 850 and 800 cm(-1). The Raman spectra of the lower wave number region of 550-500 cm(-1) show a shift toward higher wave numbers with adsorption of the selenite. An estimation of the amount of selenite anion removed by the thermally activated layered double hydroxide was obtained through the measurement of the intensity of the selenite Raman bands at 814 and 835 cm(-1) resulting from the amount of selenite anion remaining in solution. Thermally activated LDHs provide a mechanism for removing selenite anions from aqueous solutions.

  1. Trichloroethylene degradation by persulphate with magnetite as a heterogeneous activator in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaoxin; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide-magnetite (Fe3O4) as a heterogeneous activator to activate persulphate anions (S2O8(2-)) for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation was investigated in this study. The experimental results showed that TCE could be completely oxidized within 5 h by using 5 g L(-1) magnetite and 63 mM S2O8(2-), indicating the effectiveness of the process for TCE removal. Various factors of the process, including. (S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, and initial solution pH, were evaluated, and TCE degradation fitted well to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The calculated kinetic rate constant was increased with increasing S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, but it was independent of solution pH. In addition, the changes of magnetite morphology examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, respectively, confirmed the slight corrosion with α-Fe2O3 coated on the magnetite surface. The probe compounds tests clearly identified the generation of the reactive oxygen species in the system. While the free radical quenching studies further demonstrated that •SO4- and •OH were the major radicals responsible for TCE degradation, whereas •O2- contributed less in the system, and therefore the roles of reactive oxygen species on TCE degradation mechanisms were proposed accordingly. To our best knowledge, this is the first time the performance and mechanism of magnetite-activated persulphate oxidation for TCE degradation are reported. The findings of this study provided a new insight into the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism and showed a great potential for the practical application of this technique in in situ TCE-contaminated groundwater remediation.

  2. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Haule, Antelmo; Reither, Klaus; Ngwenyama, Njabulo; Rachow, Andrea; Meyerhans, Andreas; Maboko, Leonard; Koup, Richard A; Hoelscher, Michael; Geldmacher, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB) disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD) using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ). Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(-) phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(-) (p = 0.0003) and HIV(+) (p = 0.057) subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(-) subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+) TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(-) cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  3. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schuetz

    Full Text Available The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ. Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(- phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(- (p = 0.0003 and HIV(+ (p = 0.057 subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(- subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+ TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(- cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  4. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy.

  5. The Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea active bioassay for water monitoring: evaluating and comparing methodological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Betânia Brizola Cassanego

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea cuttings with flower buds are utilized in bioassays to diagnose genotoxic effects of water. The literature describes different substances used to adapt and recover the cuttings before and after exposure to water samples and also describes the effects of different exposure times. This study evaluated and compared the micronuclei (MCN frequencies in T. pallida when cuttings with flower buds were submitted to different methodological conditions. The bioassay was then applied bimonthly during seven months to assess the genotoxic potential of a site located on the Sinos River in Campo Bom, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Micronuclei frequencies in buds of cuttings adapted and recovered in distilled water and in Hoagland solution were 3.0 and 2.9, respectively, for cuttings exposed to river water, and 1.19 and 1.23 in controls. No significant differences among MCN frequencies were observed when cuttings were exposed for 8, 24 or 32 hours to river water (from 3.07 to 4.73 and in controls (from 1.13 to 2.00 in all samplings during a year. Adaptation and recovery of cuttings in distilled water or Hoagland solution and exposure for different times did not influence the response of T. pallida, indicating that all the conditions tested are viable for biomonitoring of water genotoxicity. Water samples from the Sinos River presented genotoxicity during the period monitored, evidenced by the MCN frequencies recorded which were significantly higher than the frequencies of the controls.

  6. High-resolution seismic monitoring of geomorphic activity in a catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J.; McArdell, B.; Vergne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous survey of the surface activity in a river catchment is essential for the understanding of the landscape dynamics. In steep mountain catchments, a detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of geomorphic processes is generally impossible. The classic techniques (imagery and in situ channel approaches) are not adapted to the extreme conditions that occur during strong rainstorms. There is a real need to develop a method and to define the procedures that will allow the study of surface processes without any environmental dependency. Nowadays, more and more studies explore the use of the seismic instruments to survey the catchment activity. Seismometers can be deployed in sheltered area, which allow us to record in continuous the ground vibrations induced by surface processes, like the sediment transport and mass movements. To continue the exploration of this potential, we deployed a dense array of 10 seismometers in the Illgraben, a 10-km2 catchment in the Swiss Alps, during the summer 2011. This catchment is highly prone to hillslope and debris flow activity, so almost every summer convective storms trigger geomorphic events. The network was designed to monitor the spatial and temporal features of every type of surface activity. Thus during rainstorms, the stations located along the main stream well record the channel activity like the passage of sediment flows, while the instruments installed around the catchment reveal the occurrences of many rockfalls. These latter events show a spectral seismic signature at high frequencies (> 1 Hz), whereas the channel activity is dominant between 10 and 30 Hz. For the largest debris flow of the summer, we are able to identify the location of its initiation from the hillslope. Then, we can map the secondary events, which were triggered by the propagation of the debris flow. With these preliminary results, we demonstrate that the use of a dense seismic array is relevant to map in real time the landscape dynamics at the

  7. A Monitoring Network to Map and Assess Landslide Activity in a Highly Anthropized Area

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    Giulia Bossi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping landslide activity in a highly anthropized area entails specific problems. The integration of different monitoring techniques in order to measure the displacements rate within the slope is mandatory. We describe our activity for the Mortisa landslide which is located on the western flank of the Cortina d’Ampezzo valley (northeastern Italy in a highly anthropized area in the heart of the Dolomites, a UNESCO world heritage site. The mass movement threatens some houses, an important national road, and part of the area that will be the venue for the upcoming 2021 Alpine Skiing World Championship. The hazardous context along with its prestigious location makes the construction of new settlements and infrastructure very challenging. Owing to that, precise mapping and assessment of the activity of the Mortisa landslide is extremely important. To achieve this task, multitemporal aerial photo interpretation, A-DInSAR analysis, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS surveys, and inclinometric measurements were performed. Through the integration of the monitoring data and geomorphological interpretation, a hazard map of the Mortisa area was produced with the intent to assist the local authorities in the definition of the new urban development plan.

  8. Predicting the activity coefficients of free-solvent for concentrated globular protein solutions using independently determined physical parameters.

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    Devin W McBride

    Full Text Available The activity coefficient is largely considered an empirical parameter that was traditionally introduced to correct the non-ideality observed in thermodynamic systems such as osmotic pressure. Here, the activity coefficient of free-solvent is related to physically realistic parameters and a mathematical expression is developed to directly predict the activity coefficients of free-solvent, for aqueous protein solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. The model is based on the free-solvent model, which has previously been shown to provide excellent prediction of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded globular proteins in aqueous solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. Thus, this model uses only the independently determined, physically realizable quantities: mole fraction, solvent accessible surface area, and ion binding, in its prediction. Predictions are presented for the activity coefficients of free-solvent for near-saturated protein solutions containing either bovine serum albumin or hemoglobin. As a verification step, the predictability of the model for the activity coefficient of sucrose solutions was evaluated. The predicted activity coefficients of free-solvent are compared to the calculated activity coefficients of free-solvent based on osmotic pressure data. It is observed that the predicted activity coefficients are increasingly dependent on the solute-solvent parameters as the protein concentration increases to near-saturation concentrations.

  9. Predicting the activity coefficients of free-solvent for concentrated globular protein solutions using independently determined physical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2013-01-01

    The activity coefficient is largely considered an empirical parameter that was traditionally introduced to correct the non-ideality observed in thermodynamic systems such as osmotic pressure. Here, the activity coefficient of free-solvent is related to physically realistic parameters and a mathematical expression is developed to directly predict the activity coefficients of free-solvent, for aqueous protein solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. The model is based on the free-solvent model, which has previously been shown to provide excellent prediction of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded globular proteins in aqueous solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. Thus, this model uses only the independently determined, physically realizable quantities: mole fraction, solvent accessible surface area, and ion binding, in its prediction. Predictions are presented for the activity coefficients of free-solvent for near-saturated protein solutions containing either bovine serum albumin or hemoglobin. As a verification step, the predictability of the model for the activity coefficient of sucrose solutions was evaluated. The predicted activity coefficients of free-solvent are compared to the calculated activity coefficients of free-solvent based on osmotic pressure data. It is observed that the predicted activity coefficients are increasingly dependent on the solute-solvent parameters as the protein concentration increases to near-saturation concentrations.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of sol-gel transition of gelatin in terms of water activity in various solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Omote, Chiaki; Matsuhira, Keiko

    2015-12-01

    Sol-gel transition of gelatin was analyzed as a multisite stoichiometric reaction of a gelatin molecule with water and solute molecules. The equilibrium sol-gel transition temperature, Tt , was estimated from the average of gelation and melting temperature measured by differential scanning calorimetry. From Tt and the melting enthalpy, ΔHsol , the equilibrium sol-to-gel ratio was estimated by the van't Hoff equation. The reciprocal form of the Wyman-Tanford equation, which describes the sol-to-gel ratio as a function of water activity, was successfully applied to obtain a good linear relationship. From this analysis, the role of water activity on the sol-gel transition of gelatin was clearly explained and the contributions of hydration and solute binding to gelatin molecules were separately discussed in sol-gel transition. The general solution for the free energy for gel-stabilization in various solutions was obtained as a simple function of solute concentration.

  11. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

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    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  12. Photometric Monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Center for Automated Space Science: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ryan; Deckard, Monica; Guilaran, Fonsie; Watson, Casey; Carini, Michael; Gelderman, Richard; Neely, William

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, we will present preliminary results of our program to photometrically monitor a set of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) known as Blazars. Using CCDs as N-star photometers and a technique known as aperture photometry, we can achieve close to 0.02 magnitude precision with small to midsize telescopes. Blazars are highly luminous and highly variable; studying these variations provides insight into the central engines producing the high luminosities. we report on our reduction and analysis of CCD data obtained at one of our collaborating institutions, the NF Observatory at Western New Mexico University. CCD data obtained at the Western Kentucky University 24 inch telescope will also be discussed.

  13. An inductively powered telemetry system for temperature, EKG, and activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, T. B.; Lund, G. F.; Williams, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    An implant telemetry system for the simultaneous monitoring of temperature, activity, and EKG from small animals, such as rats, was designed with the feature that instead of a battery the system is energized by an inductive field. A 250 kHz resonant coil surrounds the cage (30 x 30 x 20 cm) and provides the approximately 100 microns of power required to operate the implant transmitter while allowing the animal unrestrained movement in the cage. The implant can also be battery operated if desired. RF transmission is in the 8-10 MHz band, which allows the use of a simple, essentially single IC chip, receiver.

  14. JEM spotlight: Nuclear desalination--environmental impacts and implications for planning and monitoring activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasov, Vladimir; Khamis, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear desalination has been identified as an option since the 1960s, but only recently, as climate change intensifies, has it gained interest again. Although environmental impacts of nuclear desalination have not been paid a lot of attention in the few implemented projects, now more than ever, it is essential to provide an overview of their nature and magnitude. The gathered information and basic analysis allow for a general comparison of a 200,000 m(3)/d nuclear desalination facility using a once-through cooling system as a reference case, with alternative co-location options. Results of the review indicate that the potential for marine impacts requires careful planning and monitoring. They also reveal that adverse coastal, atmospheric and socio-economic impacts are minor in comparison with other co-location alternatives. The issues regarding public health are discussed and experiences presented. Nuclear desalination facilities are expected to show a better environmental performance than other co-located power/desalination options. Environmental planning and monitoring activities are thus much simpler and their scope smaller, with the most important monitoring parameters listed. In conclusion, the application of nuclear desalination is recommended as a less environmentally harmful option.

  15. Utilization of activated CO2-neutralized red mud for removal of arsenate from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ramesh Chandra; Patel, Rajkishore; Ray, Bankim Chandra

    2010-07-15

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the ability of activated CO(2)-neutralized red mud (ANRM) for the removal of arsenate from the aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were conducted with respect to adsorbent dose, equilibrium pH, contact time, initial arsenate concentration, kinetics, Langmuir isotherms. The mechanisms involved in adsorption of arsenate ions on ANRM were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis, SEM/EDX, and chemical methods. The percentage removal was found to increase gradually with decrease of pH and maximum removal was achieved at pH approximately 4. Adsorption kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and equilibrates within 24 h. FT-IR spectra of ANRM before and after adsorption reveals the binding of arsenate to the adsorbent. The adsorption data were fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with R(2) (correlation coefficient)>0.99. Arsenate adsorbed ANRM can be regenerated using NaOH solution at pH 12.0.

  16. Biodegradation of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine in Solution and Soil by Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qili Liao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradation effect and pathway of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH, which is a major rocket propellant with highly toxic properties, with two strains isolated from the acclimated activated sludge were investigated in solution and in soil. The results demonstrated that Stenotrophomonas sp. M12 (M12 was able to degrade UDMH of 50 mg·L−1 as the sole carbon source in aqueous mineral salt medium (MSM, but could not degrade UDMH in soil. Comamonas sp. P4 (P4 barely degraded UDMH of 50 mg·L−1 as the sole carbon source in aqueous MSM, but the degrading capacity of P4 could be improved by the addition of an extra carbon source. Meanwhile, P4 was able to degrade UDMH of 100–600 mg·kg−1 in the soil. The degradation of UDMH in the soil was influenced by organic matter, autochthonous microorganisms, and metal ions. UDMH could inhibit metabolism of M12 and P4, and the inhibition influence was more severe in aqueous MSM than in soil. Oxygen content was important for M12 biodegrading UDMH, and co-metabolism helped P4 to self-detoxify and self-recover. The main intermediates of UDMH were identified by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS qualitative analysis, and the concentrations of UDMH and its important transformation products were determined in solution and soil. According to the determination results, the synchronous degradation theory was proposed, and the degradation pathway was discussed.

  17. Inhibition Effect of Substituted Thiadiazoles on Corrosion Activity of N80 Steel in HCl Solution

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    M. Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition effect of some prepared compounds, namely, thiadiazole derivatives, on N80 steel corrosion in 15% HCl solutions has been studied by using the weight loss, electrochemical polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. It was found that the inhibition efficiency of the thiadiazole derivatives, namely, 2-amino-5-(4-methoxyphenyl-1,3,4-thiazole (AMPT, 2-amino-5-phenyl-1,3,4-thiazole (APT, and 2-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl-1,3,4-thiazole (ACPT, increases with the increase in concentration. Inhibition efficiency follows the order AMPT > APT > ACPT. The effect of temperature on the corrosion was investigated by the weight loss method, and some thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The inhibitive action may be attributed to the adsorption of inhibitor molecules on the active sites of the metal surface following Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Polarization measurements indicated that thiadiazole derivatives act as mixed-type corrosion inhibitor. The adsorption of thiadiazole derivatives on N80 surface exposed to inhibitor-containing solutions was confirmed using SEM and FT-IR spectra.

  18. Adsorptive removal of nickel from aqueous solutions by activated carbons from doum seed (Hyphaenethebaica coat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal El-Sadaawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the possibility of using low cost agriculture waste as doum-palm seed coat for the removal of nickel ions from aqueous solutions. Two activated carbons had been prepared from raw doum-palm seed coat (DACI and DACII; as well, the raw material was used as an adsorbent (RD. Batch adsorption experiments were performed as a function of pH of solution, initial nickel ions concentration, dose of adsorbent and contact time. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and D–R Models. Different error analysis conforms that the isotherm data followed Freundlich models for all adsorbents. Adsorption kinetic data were tested using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Elovich model. Adsorption mechanism was investigated using the intra-particle diffusion model. Diffusion coefficients were calculated using the film and intraparticle diffusion models. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Ni2+ ions onto RD, DACI and DACII followed pseudo-second order kinetic model, and indicates that the intra-particle diffusion controls the rate of adsorption but it is not the rate limiting step.

  19. Degradation of triclosan in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lu; Sun, Yabing; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Jian; He, Dong

    2016-02-01

    The degradation of triclosan (TCS) in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with activated carbon fibers (ACFs) was investigated. In this study, ACFs and DBD plasma coexisted in a planar DBD plasma reactor, which could synchronously achieve degradation of TCS, modification and in situ regeneration of ACFs, enhancing the effect of recycling of ACFs. The properties of ACFs before and after modification by DBD plasma were characterized by BET and XPS. Various processing parameters affecting the synergetic degradation of TCS were also investigated. The results exhibited excellent synergetic effects in DBD plasma-ACFs system on TCS degradation. The degradation efficiency of 120 mL TCS with initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1) could reach 93% with 1 mm thick ACFs in 18 min at input power of 80 W, compared with 85% by single DBD plasma. Meanwhile, the removal rate of total organic carbon increased from 12% at pH 6.26-24% at pH 3.50. ACFs could ameliorate the degradation efficiency for planar DBD plasma when treating TCS solution at high flow rates or at low initial concentrations. A possible degradation pathway of TCS was investigated according to the detected intermediates, which were identified by liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) combined with theoretical calculation of Gaussian 09 program.

  20. Diagnosis and characterization of mania: Quantifying increased energy and activity in the human behavioral pattern monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; McIlwain, Meghan; Kloezeman, Karen; Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi

    2016-06-30

    Increased energy or activity is now an essential feature of the mania of Bipolar Disorder (BD) according to DSM-5. This study examined whether objective measures of increased energy can differentiate manic BD individuals and provide greater diagnostic accuracy compared to rating scales, extending the work of previous studies with smaller samples. We also tested the relationship between objective measures of energy and rating scales. 50 hospitalized manic BD patients were compared to healthy subjects (HCS, n=39) in the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM) which quantifies motor activity and goal-directed behavior in an environment containing novel stimuli. Archival hBPM data from 17 schizophrenia patients were used in sensitivity and specificity analyses. Manic BD patients exhibited higher motor activity than HCS and higher novel object interactions. hBPM activity measures were not correlated with observer-rated symptoms, and hBPM activity was more sensitive in accurately classifying hospitalized BD subjects than observer ratings. Although the findings can only be generalized to inpatient populations, they suggest that increased energy, particularly specific and goal-directed exploration, is a distinguishing feature of BD mania and is best quantified by objective measures of motor activity. A better understanding is needed of the biological underpinnings of this cardinal feature.

  1. The Use of Microwave Derived Activated Carbon for Removal of Heavy Metal in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeah Wahi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil processing waste which is palm oil kernel shell (POKS was converted to activated carbon (POKS AC through 7 min microwave pyrolysis at temperature 270 °C followed by chemical activation using NaOH and HCl. The adsorption study on Ni(II, Cu(II and Cr(IV was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the prepared activated carbon to remove heavy metal. The adsorption capacity was determined as a function of adsorbate initial concentration and adsorbent dosage. Based on Langmuir isotherm, Ni(II showed highest adsorption capacity of 40.98 mg/g, followed by Cr(IV and Cu(II with adsorption capacity of 40.60 mg/g and 13.69 mg/g, respectively. Cr(IV and Cu(II showed better fitting to Freundlich isotherm model with high correlation regression indicating the applicability of heterogeneous adsorption. Ni(II show better fitting with Langmuir isotherm that indicate monolayer coverage. The use of POKS AC is not only effective for adsorption of Cr(IV, Ni(II and Cu(II in aqueous solution but also helps to overcome the over abundance of POKS waste problem.

  2. Active lower limb prosthetics: a systematic review of design issues and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrich, Michael; Grimmer, Martin; Christ, Oliver; Rinderknecht, Stephan; Beckerle, Philipp

    2016-12-19

    This paper presents a review on design issues and solutions found in active lower limb prostheses. This review is based on a systematic literature search with a methodical search strategy. The search was carried out across four major technical databases and the retrieved records were screened for their relevance. A total of 21 different active prostheses, including 8 above-knee, 9 below-knee and 4 combined knee-ankle prostheses were identified. While an active prosthesis may help to restore the functional performance of an amputee, the requirements regarding the actuation unit as well as for the control system are high and the development becomes a challenging task. Regarding mechanical design and the actuation unit high force/torque delivery, high efficiency, low size and low weight are conflicting goals. The actuation principle and variable impedance actuators are discussed. The control system is paramount for a "natural functioning" of the prosthesis. The control system has to enable locomotion and should react to the amputee's intent. For this, multi-level control approaches are reviewed.

  3. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction.

  4. Adsorption of Paraquat dichloride from aqueous solution by activated carbon derived from used tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadi, Nadhem K; Sri Swaminathan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2004-08-09

    The removal of pesticide from wastewater under different batch experimental conditions, using a car tire derived activated carbon was investigated. The pesticide utilized in the study was Paraquat dichloride (1,1-dimethyl-4,4-bipyridyl dichloride), which is a well known herbicide. The adsorbent was produced from the pyrolysis and activation of used tires (TAC). The performances of this adsorbent and a commercial activated carbon F300 (CAC) have been compared. It was determined that the adsorption of Paraquat was weakly pH dependent. The effects of particle size, carbon dosage, temperature and the initial concentration of the Paraquat were studied. Further experiments investigating the regeneration capabilities of the tire-supplied carbon were performed. The regenerated carbons that were washed with basic pH solution were found to have the best sorption capacity recovery. It was found that the rate of sorption of Paraquat onto the carbon is very fast with almost 90% of the maximum possible adsorption taking place in the first 5 min. Nevertheless, the batch sorption kinetics was fitted for a first-order reversible reaction, a pseudo-first-order reaction and a pseudo-second-order reaction. The pseudo-second-order chemical reaction model appears to provide the best correlation. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm for the present system has been evaluated at different temperatures. The isotherms show that the sorption capacity of CAC decreases with temperature and the dominant mechanism of CAC adsorption is physical sorption.

  5. Pb2+ adsorption from aqueous solutions on activated carbons obtained from lignocellulosic residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giraldo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from cane sugar bagasse (ACB, African palm pit (ACP and sawdust (ACS were prepared through an impregnated with HNO3 and thermal treatment in an atmosphere in N2/steam water at 1173 K. Adsorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and of CO2 at 273 K were determined for the activated carbons for which surface area and pore volume values were from 868 to 1100 m²g-1 and from 0.27 to 0.55cm³ g-1, respectively. These results were correlated, with the ones obtained for adsorption the adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ in aqueous solutions. Impregnation of the lignocellulosic materials with nitric acid produced acid-type activated carbons with total acid site contents between 4.13 and 6.93 mmol g-1 and pH at the point of zero charge values between 2.7 and 4.1, which were within range of the adsorption, at different pH values, since they determined, the surface charge of the activated carbons. Adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ at different pH values (2-8 at 298 K were determined. The ion adsorption capacity on ACB, ACP and ACS were 13.7, 15.2 and 17.5 mg.g-1, respectively. Experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models and all cases the former fit better. The highest values for the quantity adsorbed on the monolayer, qm, were at pH 4, whereas the surface, charge of activated carbons was negative and the lead species mainly present was Pb2+. For higher pHs, the quantity of Pb2+ adsorbed decreased, and this had an important effect on adsorption, the surface characteristics of the solids and the hydroxilated lead species that were formed in the system.

  6. Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G. sulfurreducens PCA and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290 ± 29 A m−3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200 mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189 ± 44 A m−3) or the type strains (Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance.

  7. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  8. Finite Element Based Solution of Laplace's Equation Applied to Electrical Activity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab T. Baqer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer models are used in the study of electrocardiography to provide insight into physiological phenomena that are difficult to measure in the lab or in a clinical environment. The electrocardiogram is an important tool for the clinician in that it changes characteristically in a number of pathological conditions. Many illnesses can be detected by this measurement. By simulating the electrical activity of the heart one obtains a quantitative relationship between the electrocardiogram and different anomalies. Because of the inhomogeneous fibrous structure of the heart and the irregular geometries of the body, finite element method is used for studying the electrical properties of the heart. This work describes the implementation of the Conjugate Gradient iterative method for the solution of large linear equation systems resulting from the finite element method. A diagonal Jacobi preconditioner is used in order to accelerate the convergence. Gaussian elimination is also implemented and compared with the Precondition Conjugate Gradient (PCG method and with the iterative method. Different types of matrix storage schemes are implemented such as the Compressed Sparse Row (CSR to achieve better performance. In order to demonstrate the validity of the finite element analysis, the technique is adopted to solve Laplace's equation that describes the electrical activity of the human body with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. An automatic mesh generator is built using C++ programming language. Initially a complete finite element program is built to solve Laplace's equation. The same accuracy is obtained using these methods. The results show that the CSR format reduces computation time compared to the order format. The PCG method is better for the solution of large linear system (sparse matrices than the Gaussian Elimination and back substitution method, while Gaussian elimination is better than iterative method.

  9. Monitoring activities of teenagers to comprehend their habits: study protocol for a mixed-methods cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bélanger, Mathieu; Caissie, Isabelle; Beauchamp, Jacinthe; O’Loughlin, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine; Mancuso, Michelina

    2013-01-01

    Background Efforts to increase physical activity in youth need to consider which activities are most likely to be sustained over time in order to promote lifelong participation in physical activity. The Monitoring Activities of Teenagers to Comprehend their Habits (MATCH) study is a prospective cohort study that uses quantitative and qualitative methods to develop new knowledge on the sustainability of specific physical activities. Methods/design Eight hundred and forty-three grade 5 and 6 st...

  10. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  11. Monitoring of disease biomarkers activity and immunophenotyping as important factors in SLE clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Djemo; Karamehic, Jasenko; Delic-Sarac, Marina; Kasumovic, Mersija; Mekic, Mevludin; Eminovic, Izet; Hasanagic, Nermina

    2012-01-01

    The highly specific biomarkers for monitoring of SLE disease activity are not yet defined up to date, due to existing of different clinical SLE phenotypes caused by individual genetic variation. Basically, numerous clinical complications follow SLE patients such as nephritis, atherosclerosis and cardial, CNS, gastrointestinal and ophthalmological complications, as well. Their monitoring in clinical SLE management can be evaluated by analysing of specific biochemical parameters and require permanent clinical observation. The presence of ANAs and anti-ds-DNAs are usual diagnostic SLE autoimmunity parameters, while SLE disease activity biomarkers are C3 and C4 level, anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-Sm/RNPs and, recently level of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. However, the number of TCR molecules on the T-cells surface at SLE patients is lower then in normal condition, and otherwise for these receptors CD molecules make specific connection. On the other hand, the T lymphocytes can be also, therapeutical targets at SLE patients, because of their clear direct involving in SLE pathogenesis. The SLE phenotypes are characterized by double CD negativity ( CD3 +/-, CD4-) caused by abnormal level of IL-2 and IL-17. T-lymphocytes have usually alpha-beta and gamma-delta TCR receptors, but for SLE patients is characteristic lower number gama-delta TCR molecules, detected in the peripheral blood specimens. Taking into account all of the facts, we investigated the level of specific usual SLE activity biomarkers (anti-ds-DNAs, C3, C4, anticardiolipin antibodies (beta-2-IgG, beta-2-IgM, ACA-G, ACA-M, CD4 and CD8 level) in serum specimens of SLE patients who underwent to the corresponding chemotherapy in combination with other biochemical and clinical parameters. Once again proved to be, that SLE biomarker monitoring, could be useful aproach for SLE activity disease and prediction organ damage, as well. In our investigation we used the following methods: immunofluorescence microscopy (IFA

  12. Active fire monitoring and fire danger potential detection from space: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J. QU; Wanting WANG; Swarvanu DASGUPTA; Xianjun HAO

    2008-01-01

    Wildland fire is both one of the major natural hazards and a natural process for ecosystem persistence. Accurate assessment of fire danger potential and timely detection of active fires are critical for fire fighting and fuel management. Space-borne measurements have become the primary approaches for these efforts. Many research works have been conducted and some data pro-ducts have been generated for practical applications. This paper presents a review of the major sensors and algo-rithms for active fire monitoring and fire danger potential detection from space. Major sensors and their character-istics, physical principles of the major algorithms are sum-marized. Limitations of these algorithms and future improvements are also discussed.

  13. Activities of the US-Japan Safety Monitor Joint Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Savercool; Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    This paper documents the activities of the US-Japan exchange in the area of personnel safety at magnetic and laser fusion experiments. A near-miss event with a visiting scientist to the US in 1992 was the impetus for forming the Joint Working Group on Fusion Safety. This exchnge has been under way for over ten years and has provided many safety insights for both US and Japanese facility personnel at national institutes and at universities. The background and activities of the Joint Working Group are described, including the facilities that have been visited for safety walkthroughs, the participants from both countries, and the main safety issues examined during visits. Based on these visits, some operational safety ideas to enhance experiment safety are given. The near-term future plans of the Safety Monitor Joint Working group are also discussed.

  14. FM-CW radar sensors for vital signs and motor activity monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Adrian Postolache

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes on-going research on vital signs and motor activity monitoring based on radar sensors embedded in wheelchairs, walkers and crutches for in home rehabilitation. Embedded sensors, conditioning circuits, real-time platforms that perform data acquisition, auto-identification, primary data processing and data communication contribute to convert daily used objects in home rehabilitation into smart objects that can be accessed by caregivers during the training sessions through human–machine interfaces expressed by the new generation of smart phones or tablet computers running Android OS or iOS operating systems. The system enables the management of patients in home rehabilitation by providing more accurate and up-to-date information using pervasive computing of vital signs and motor activity records.

  15. Liquid crystal based sensors monitoring lipase activity: a new rapid and sensitive method for cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zakir; Zafiu, Christian; Küpcü, Seta; Pivetta, Lucineia; Hollfelder, Nadine; Masutani, Akira; Kilickiran, Pinar; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2014-06-15

    In this work we present liquid crystal (LC) based sensor devices to monitor cell viability. The sensing layer is composed by the LC and a planar monolayer of phospholipids. In the presence of minute traces of phospholipases, which hydrolyze enzymatically phospholipids, the LC-lipid interface is disintegrated. This event causes a change in orientation of the LC, which was followed in a polarized microscope. The lipase activity can be used to measure the cell viability, since members of this enzyme family are released by cells, as they undergo necrosis. The described sensor was used to monitor the presence of the lipases released from three different cell lines, which were either exposed to highly cytotoxic model compounds (sodium azide and paracetamol) or subjected to freeze-thaw cycles to induce cell death by a non-chemical based inducer for apoptosis, such as temperature. Finally, the comparison of lipase activity detected by a state-of-the-art fluorescence assay to the LC based system resulted in the superiority of the LC system concerning incubation time and sensitivity.

  16. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  17. Activity monitoring reflects cardiovascular and metabolic variations in COPD patients across GOLD stages II to IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortianou, E A; Louvaris, Z; Vasilopoulou, M; Nasis, I; Kaltsakas, G; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether activity monitoring reliably reflects variations in oxygen transport and utilization during walking in COPD patients. Forty-two patients (14 in each GOLD stage II, III and IV) performed an incremental treadmill protocol to the limit of tolerance. Breath-by-breath gas exchange, central hemodynamic variables and activity monitoring were simultaneously recorded. Physiological variables and accelerometer outputs rose linearly with walking speeds. Strong correlations (r[interquartile range, IQR]) were found between treadmill walking intensity (WI: range 0.8-2.0 ms(-2)) and oxygen consumption (0.95 [IQR 0.87-0.97]), (range 7.6-15.5 ml kg(-1)min(-1)); minute ventilation (0.95 [IQR 0.86-0.98]), (range 20-37 l min(-1)); cardiac output (0.89 [IQR 0.73-0.94]), (range 6.8-11.5 l min(-1)) and arteriovenous oxygen concentration difference (0.84 [IQR 0.76-0.90]), (range 7.7-12.1 ml O2100 ml(-1)). Correlations between WI and gas exchange or central hemodynamic parameters were not different across GOLD stages. In conclusion, central hemodynamic, respiratory and muscle metabolic variations during incremental treadmill exercise are tightly associated to changes in walking intensity as recorded by accelerometry across GOLD stages II to IV. Interestingly, the magnitude of these associations is not different across GOLD stages.

  18. Estimating youth locomotion ground reaction forces using an accelerometer-based activity monitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Neugebauer

    Full Text Available To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9 ± 0.9 years and 15 boys (12.5 ± 0.6 years wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g and pVGRF (N during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10-12, boys 12-14 years while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl, type of locomotion (run, and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation and 9% (4.2% standard deviation using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation.

  19. Validity of activity monitors in health and chronic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Remoortel Hans

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of physical activity in healthy populations and in those with chronic diseases is challenging. The aim of this systematic review was to identify whether available activity monitors (AM have been appropriately validated for use in assessing physical activity in these groups. Following a systematic literature search we found 134 papers meeting the inclusion criteria; 40 conducted in a field setting (validation against doubly labelled water, 86 in a laboratory setting (validation against a metabolic cart, metabolic chamber and 8 in a field and laboratory setting. Correlation coefficients between AM outcomes and energy expenditure (EE by the criterion method (doubly labelled water and metabolic cart/chamber and percentage mean differences between EE estimation from the monitor and EE measurement by the criterion method were extracted. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to pool the results across studies where possible. Types of devices were compared using meta-regression analyses. Most validation studies had been performed in healthy adults (n = 118, with few carried out in patients with chronic diseases (n = 16. For total EE, correlation coefficients were statistically significantly lower in uniaxial compared to multisensor devices. For active EE, correlations were slightly but not significantly lower in uniaxial compared to triaxial and multisensor devices. Uniaxial devices tended to underestimate TEE (−12.07 (95%CI; -18.28 to −5.85 % compared to triaxial (−6.85 (95%CI; -18.20 to 4.49 %, p = 0.37 and were statistically significantly less accurate than multisensor devices (−3.64 (95%CI; -8.97 to 1.70 %, p

  20. Observing Campaign to Monitor Magnetically-Active Dwarfs for Long-Term Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2009-10-01

    Dr. Styliani (Stella) Kafka of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, requests AAVSO observers to perform long-term photometric monitoring on a number of magnetically active dwarf stars, with an observing frequency of one observation every three days taken with one or more filters. When multiple filters are available, the preferred observations are (in order of precedence): Rc, V, Ic, and B. Please observe such that you obtain a signal to noise of at least 50 (100 or higher is preferred). These objects are all nearby dwarfs known or suspected to have magnetic activity, primarily of the UV Ceti (flare star) or BY Draconis subtypes. Long-term photometric monitoring of these objects will be used in conjunction with other multiwavelength observations from ground-based facilities including the Magellan 6.5-meter and DuPont 2.5-meter telescopes in Chile to understand the long-term magnetic activity cycles of these stars. Such a study can reveal information about the physical natures of these stars, but also about their near space environments and habitability for life. These objects are red, and the variability amplitudes are low, often well below 0.1 magnitudes. The long-term variability due to stellar activity cycles may be much lower. Photometric accuracy rather than the number of observations are key to the success of this project. Unaccounted-for atmospheric effects such as extinction will likely overwhelm any long-term signal from these stars. Observers are strongly urged to fully calibrate their systems and to carefully reduce and transform their photometry to standard photometric passbands, including corrections for airmass/atmospheric extinction. Parameters for 40 objects are given. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database.

  1. Fluorescence-based monitoring of in vivo neural activity using a circuit-tracing pseudorabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Granstedt

    Full Text Available The study of coordinated activity in neuronal circuits has been challenging without a method to simultaneously report activity and connectivity. Here we present the first use of pseudorabies virus (PRV, which spreads through synaptically connected neurons, to express a fluorescent calcium indicator protein and monitor neuronal activity in a living animal. Fluorescence signals were proportional to action potential number and could reliably detect single action potentials in vitro. With two-photon imaging in vivo, we observed both spontaneous and stimulated activity in neurons of infected murine peripheral autonomic submandibular ganglia (SMG. We optically recorded the SMG response in the salivary circuit to direct electrical stimulation of the presynaptic axons and to physiologically relevant sensory stimulation of the oral cavity. During a time window of 48 hours after inoculation, few spontaneous transients occurred. By 72 hours, we identified more frequent and prolonged spontaneous calcium transients, suggestive of neuronal or tissue responses to infection that influence calcium signaling. Our work establishes in vivo investigation of physiological neuronal circuit activity and subsequent effects of infection with single cell resolution.

  2. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) monitoring of the photolysis of diazinon in aqueous solution: degradation route and toxicity of by-products against Artemia salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Amauri G; Cardeal, Zenilda L; Augusti, Rodinei

    2013-01-01

    The photolytic degradation of diazinon, an organophosphorus pesticide, in aqueous medium under assorted pH values was continuously monitored by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results indicated that the UV radiation was quite efficient in promoting the pesticide degradation at the three pH levels evaluated (5, 7 and 8). The m/z of the most abundant ions observed in the mass spectra (MS), in conjunction with the fragmentation patterns of such ionic species (MS/MS data), made possible the proposition of chemical structures for the main by-products formed. As a result, routes for the photodegradation of diazinon in aqueous solution could thus be suggested. In the assays using Artemia salina (brine shrimp) it was verified that the photodegradation products exhibited much lower toxicity than the primary substrate. Aiming at mimicking the conditions ordinarily found in water treatment plants, an additional series of tests was conducted with a solution containing sodium hypochlorite and diazinon. This solution, when not exposed to UV radiation, exhibited high toxicity against the microorganisms. Under the influence of UV radiation, however, the toxicity rates decreased dramatically. This result is relevant because it points toward the confident application of UV radiation to neutralize the deleterious effects caused by diazinon (and perhaps other organophosphorus pesticides) as well as sodium hypochlorite to the environment.

  3. The effect of triphenylphosphane on corrosion inhibition of benzotriazole at Ag electrode monitored by SERS in nonaqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ya-Xian; Yang, Feng-Zhu; Morag, Clark-Heptinstall; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Ren-Ao; Yao, Jian-Lin

    2013-03-01

    The corrosion inhibition behavior of benzotriazole (BTAH) on Ag electrodes and the influence of triphenylphosphane (pph3) were investigated by electrochemical method, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and direct electrochemical synthesis of surface complexes in nonaqueous solution. The results indicated that the BTA- ion was coordinated to the Ag surface to form a highly cross-linked surface polymer complex of [Ag(BTA)]n, which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. The introduction of a neutral ligand of pph3 blocked the surface coordination processes of BTAH with the Ag electrode. It resulted in a decrease of inhibition efficiency to Ag surface. The ligand of pph3 played a negative role on the corrosion inhibition of BTAH to the Ag electrode. The SERS results were well consistent with the cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves measurements. For modeling, two different surface complexes were prepared in acetonitrile with and without pph3 by direct electrochemical synthesis. A polymer-like complex of [Ag(BTA)]n attached to the Ag surface was obtained in the absence of pph3, which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. A new binuclear compound, Ag2(BTA)2(pph3)4, was produced in acetonitrile with pph3 and the final coordination process occurred in solution leading to difficulties in forming a compact surface film, thus decreasing the corrosion inhibition efficiency of BTAH. The role of pph3 and the mechanism were proposed.

  4. The effect of triphenylphosphane on corrosion inhibition of benzotriazole at Ag electrode monitored by SERS in nonaqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ya-Xian; Yang, Feng-Zhu; Morag, Clark-Heptinstall; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Ren-Ao; Yao, Jian-Lin

    2013-03-15

    The corrosion inhibition behavior of benzotriazole (BTAH) on Ag electrodes and the influence of triphenylphosphane (pph(3)) were investigated by electrochemical method, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and direct electrochemical synthesis of surface complexes in nonaqueous solution. The results indicated that the BTA(-) ion was coordinated to the Ag surface to form a highly cross-linked surface polymer complex of [Ag(BTA)](n), which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. The introduction of a neutral ligand of pph(3) blocked the surface coordination processes of BTAH with the Ag electrode. It resulted in a decrease of inhibition efficiency to Ag surface. The ligand of pph(3) played a negative role on the corrosion inhibition of BTAH to the Ag electrode. The SERS results were well consistent with the cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves measurements. For modeling, two different surface complexes were prepared in acetonitrile with and without pph(3) by direct electrochemical synthesis. A polymer-like complex of [Ag(BTA)](n) attached to the Ag surface was obtained in the absence of pph(3), which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. A new binuclear compound, Ag(2)(BTA)(2)(pph(3))(4), was produced in acetonitrile with pph(3) and the final coordination process occurred in solution leading to difficulties in forming a compact surface film, thus decreasing the corrosion inhibition efficiency of BTAH. The role of pph(3) and the mechanism were proposed.

  5. Validation of MODIS and SEVIRI Active Fire Monitoring products over Western Romania. Case study: Arad County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanea, Lavinia; Alina Ristea, Mihaela

    2014-05-01

    At the national level, the issue of wildfire monitoring represents a long debated topic. However, in the present situation, fire management requires various improvements in terms of detection, monitoring and post-fire analysis. The objectives of this study are to validate the data provided by MODIS (Terra and Aqua) Active Fire Monitoring and SEVIRI (MSG) FIR (Active Fire Monitoring) satellite products, with wildfires field data from The Romanian General Inspectorate for Emergency Situations (IGSU) (1), to chart the efficiency of satellite products in locating fires and study their strengths and weaknesses using a SWOT analysis (2). This is the initial step of a larger project that aims to implement an online Geographic Information System for fire management that will ease wildfire data manipulation and facilitate the decision making process. In order to do so, the current study objectives must be achieved. Our general strategy is to determine the consistency of direct (field measurements) and indirect (satellite data) observations. Depending on the amount of field information, the fire characteristics (location, frequency, extension area, moment of occurrence, type of fire, and others) will be studied through a statistical analysis. The products show some peculiar restrictiveness like spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, we will process and interpret satellite products to identify wildfires according to the data from IGSU using specialized software. The case study for the application of these procedures is a set of fire events from Arad county - Romania, that occurred between 2007 and 2013. In order to do so, it is important to compare results from different sensors with field information through various methods and to use only consistent results. The results will play an important role in achieving the above mentioned informational system, which will integrate field information, satellite data and values of parameters that influence the evolution of

  6. Integrated Interpretation of Geophysical, Geotechnical, and Environmental Monitoring Data to Define Precursors for Landslide Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, S.; Chambers, J.; Merritt, A.; Wilkinson, P.; Meldrum, P.; Gunn, D.; Maurer, H.; Dixon, N.

    2014-12-01

    To develop a better understanding of the failure mechanisms leading to first time failure or reactivation of landslides, the British Geological Survey is operating an observatory on an active, shallow landslide in North Yorkshire, UK, which is a typical example of slope failure in Lias Group mudrocks. This group and the Whitby Mudstone Formation in particular, show one of the highest landslide densities in the UK. The observatory comprises geophysical (i.e., ERT and self-potential monitoring, P- and S-wave tomography), geotechnical (i.e. acoustic emission and inclinometer), and hydrological and environmental monitoring (i.e. weather station, water level, soil moisture, soil temperature), in addition to movement monitoring using real-time kinematic GPS. In this study we focus on the reactivation of the landslide at the end of 2012, after an exceptionally wet summer. We present an integrated interpretation of the different data streams. Results show that the two lobes (east and west), which form the main focus of the observatory, behave differently. While water levels, and hence pore pressures, in the eastern lobe are characterised by a continuous increase towards activation resulting in significant movement (i.e. metres), water levels in the western lobe are showing frequent drainage events and thus lower pore pressures and a lower level of movement (i.e. tens of centimetres). This is in agreement with data from the geoelectrical monitoring array. During the summer season, resistivities generally increase due to decreasing moisture levels. However, during the summer of 2012 this seasonal pattern was interrupted, with the reactivated lobe displaying strongly decreasing resistivities (i.e. increasing moisture levels). The self-potential and soil moisture data show clear indications of moisture accumulation prior to the reactivation, followed by continuous discharge towards the base of the slope. Using the different data streams, we present 3D volumetric images of

  7. G eobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2014-07-16

    © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Summary: An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G.sulfurreducensPCA and Geobacter metallireducensGS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290±29Am-3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189±44Am-3) or the type strains (<70Am-3). In a highly saline water (SW; 50mM PBS and 650mM NaCl), current by SD-1 (158±4Am-3) was reduced by 28% compared with 50mM PBS (220±4Am-3), but it was still higher than that of the mixed culture (147±19Am-3), and strains PCA and GS-15 did not produce any current. Electrochemical tests showed that the improved performance of SD-1 was due to its lower charge transfer resistance and more negative potentials produced at higher current densities. These results show that the electrochemical activity of SD-1 was significantly different than other Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance.

  8. Backscattering characteristics Analyses of winter wheat covered area and Drought Monitoring Based on active microwave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C., Sr.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    The advantage of active microwave remote sensing on the sensitivity of polarization characteristic, backscatter intensity and phase characteristics to soil moisture demonstrates its potential to map and monitor relative soil moisture changes and drought information with high spatial resolution. However, the existence of soil surface condition and vegetation effects confounds the retrieval of soil moisture from active microwave, and therefore limits its applications on soil moisture retrieval and drought monitoring. To research how to reduce the effect of soil roughness and wheat cover with multi- incident angles and multi polarization active microwave remote sensing data, MIMICS and AIEM models were used to simulate the backscattering coefficient of winter wheat covered field. The interaction between winter wheat at main growth stages and microwave was analyzed. The effects of surface roughness and physical parameters of wheat on the backscattering characteristics and the variation of different incident angles and different polarization conditions are simulated and analyzed emphatically. Then scattering coefficient information of winter wheat covered area at different wheat growth stage was measured with a C band ground-based scattering meter. At the same time, biomass, leaf area index and soil rough degree, soil water content and other related parameters are collected. After comparing and analyzing the measured data and the simulated data at different incident angles and different polarization modes, we propose an approach of using multi polarization and multi angle data to eliminate the soil roughness and wheat vegetation effects and performing the inversion of soil moisture. Using the Radarsat2 satellite SAR data and ground-based scatter data gotten at the same period in 2012, soil moisture information of greater area is obtained, and then the drought information is obtained, which is consistent with the measured results.

  9. Monitoring soil moisture through assimilation of active microwave remote sensing observation into a hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Yingshi

    2015-08-01

    Soil moisture can be estimated from point measurements, hydrologic models, and remote sensing. Many researches indicated that the most promising approach for soil moisture is the integration of remote sensing surface soil moisture data and computational modeling. Although many researches were conducted using passive microwave remote sensing data in soil moisture assimilation with coarse spatial resolution, few researches were carried out using active microwave remote sensing observation. This research developed and tested an operational approach of assimilation for soil moisture prediction using active microwave remote sensing data ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) in Heihe Watershed. The assimilation was based on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a forward radiative transfer model and the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM). The forward radiative transfer model, as a semi-empirical backscattering model, was used to eliminate the effect of surface roughness and vegetation cover on the backscatter coefficient. The impact of topography on soil water movement and the vertical and lateral exchange of soil water were considered. We conducted experiments to assimilate active microwave remote sensing data (ASAR) observation into a hydrologic model at two field sites, which had different underlying conditions. The soil moisture ground-truth data were collected through the field Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) tools, and were used to assess the assimilation method. The temporal evolution of soil moisture measured at point-based monitoring locations were compared with EnKF based model predictions. The results indicated that the estimate of soil moisture was improved through assimilation with ASAR observation and the soil moisture based on data assimilation can be monitored in moderate spatial resolution.

  10. Evaluation of activity of selected antioxidants on proteins in solution and in emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Caroline P; Berner, Lis; Skibsted, Leif H; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2005-07-01

    Protection against protein oxidation by lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants in model systems using bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution alone, or in an emulsion with linolenic acid methyl ester (LnMe) was found to be strongly dependent on the oxidation initiator. Tocopherol, Trolox, or the carotenoids astaxanthin and canthaxanthin were incubated with BSA or BSA/LnMe and oxidation was initiated either with the water-soluble azo-initiator 2,2' azo-bis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH), or FeCl3 and ascorbate, or the Fenton system using FeCl2/EDTA/H2O2, or with the singlet oxygen generating species anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid disodium 1,4 endoperoxide (NDPO2). The results show that all the antioxidants tested were inefficient in the system with FeCl3/ascorbate. However, with the other initiating agents, the hydrophilic antioxidant, Trolox, was the most effective in preventing both protein and lipid oxidation. In contrast the lipophilic antioxidants were ineffective in preventing oxidation of BSA in aqueous solution, but did show some moderate antioxidative activity on protein and lipid in the BSA/LnMe system. Using the singlet oxygen generating system it was also demonstrated that Trolox always provided better protection of the protein than tocopherol and the carotenoids in both the BSA and the BSA/LnMe systems. In conclusion, prevention of protein oxidation using a water-soluble antioxidant has a protective effect on the lipid fraction and this approach deserves further attention in complex biological systems.

  11. Label-free molecular beacon for real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changbei; Liu, Haisheng; Wang, Jun; Jin, Shunxin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for assaying DNA polymerase activity are discontinuous, time consuming, and laborious. Here, we report a new approach for label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity using a Thioflavin T (ThT) probe. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the DNA primer could be elongated through polymerase reaction to open MB1, leading to the release of the G-quartets. These then bind to ThT to form ThT/G-quadruplexes with an obvious fluorescence generation. It exhibits a satisfying detection result for the activity of DNA polymerase with a low detection limit of 0.05 unit/ml. In addition, no labeling with a fluorophore or a fluorophore-quencher pair is required; this method is fairly simple, fast, and low cost. Furthermore, the proposed method was also applied to assay the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. This approach may offer potential applications in drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and some other related biomedical research.

  12. Monitoring of posture allocations and activities by a shoe-based wearable sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Edward S; Fulk, George; Hill, James; Schutz, Yves; Browning, Raymond

    2011-04-01

    Monitoring of posture allocations and activities enables accurate estimation of energy expenditure and may aid in obesity prevention and treatment. At present, accurate devices rely on multiple sensors distributed on the body and thus may be too obtrusive for everyday use. This paper presents a novel wearable sensor, which is capable of very accurate recognition of common postures and activities. The patterns of heel acceleration and plantar pressure uniquely characterize postures and typical activities while requiring minimal preprocessing and no feature extraction. The shoe sensor was tested in nine adults performing sitting and standing postures and while walking, running, stair ascent/descent and cycling. Support vector machines (SVMs) were used for classification. A fourfold validation of a six-class subject-independent group model showed 95.2% average accuracy of posture/activity classification on full sensor set and over 98% on optimized sensor set. Using a combination of acceleration/pressure also enabled a pronounced reduction of the sampling frequency (25 to 1 Hz) without significant loss of accuracy (98% versus 93%). Subjects had shoe sizes (US) M9.5-11 and W7-9 and body mass index from 18.1 to 39.4 kg/m2 and thus suggesting that the device can be used by individuals with varying anthropometric characteristics.

  13. An automated method to quantify microglia morphology and application to monitor activation state longitudinally in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleopatra Kozlowski

    Full Text Available Microglia are specialized immune cells of the brain. Upon insult, microglia initiate a cascade of cellular responses including a characteristic change in cell morphology. To study the dynamics of microglia immune response in situ, we developed an automated image analysis method that enables the quantitative assessment of microglia activation state within tissue based solely on cell morphology. Per cell morphometric analysis of fluorescently labeled microglia is achieved through local iterative threshold segmentation, which reduces errors caused by signal-to-noise variation across large volumes. We demonstrate, utilizing systemic application of lipopolysaccharide as a model of immune challenge, that several morphological parameters, including cell perimeter length, cell roundness and soma size, quantitatively distinguish resting versus activated populations of microglia within tissue comparable to traditional immunohistochemistry methods. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-concept data that monitoring soma size enables the longitudinal assessment of microglia activation in the mouse neocortex imaged via 2-photon in vivo microscopy. The ability to quantify microglia activation automatically by shape alone allows unbiased and rapid analysis of both fixed and in vivo central nervous system tissue.

  14. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer’s solution for anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer’s solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer’s lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer’s lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  15. A Smart Washer for Bolt Looseness Monitoring Based on Piezoelectric Active Sensing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyue Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Piezoceramic based active sensing methods have been researched to monitor preload on bolt connections. However, there is a saturation problem involved with this type of method. The transmitted energy is sometimes saturated before the maximum preload which is due to it coming into contact with flat surfaces. When it comes to flat contact surfaces, the true contact area will easily saturate with the preload. The design of a new type of bolt looseness monitoring sensor, a smart washer, is to mitigate the saturation problem. The smart washer is composed of two annular disks with contact surfaces that are machined into convex and concave respectively, to eliminate the complete flat contact surfaces and to reduce the saturation effect. One piezoelectric patch is bonded on the non-contact surface of each annular disk. These two mating annular disks form a smart washer. One of the two piezoelectric patches serves as an actuator to generate an ultrasonic wave that propagates through the contact surface; the other one serves as a sensor to detect the propagated waves. The wave energy propagated through the contact surface is proportional to the true contact area which is determined by the bolt preload. The time reversal method is used to extract the peak of the focused signal as the index of the transmission wave energy; then, the relationship between the signal peak and bolt preload is obtained. Experimental results show that the focused signal peak value changes with the bolt preload and presents an approximate linear relationship when the saturation problem is experienced. The proposed smart washer can monitor the full range of the rated preload.

  16. Electrodic voltages in the presence of dissolved sulfide: Implications for monitoring natural microbial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, L.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2008-10-01

    There is growing interest in the development of new monitoring strategies for obtaining spatially extensive data diagnostic of microbial processes occurring in the earth. Open-circuit potentials arising from variable redox conditions in the fluid local-to-electrode surfaces (electrodic potentials) were recorded for a pair of silver-silver chloride electrodes in a column experiment, whereby a natural wetland soil containing a known community of sulfate reducers was continuously fed with a sulfate-rich nutrient medium. Measurements were made between five electrodes equally spaced along the column and a reference electrode placed on the column inflow. The presence of a sulfate reducing microbial population, coupled with observations of decreasing sulfate levels, formation of black precipitate (likely iron sulfide),elevated solid phase sulfide, and a characteristic sulfurous smell, suggest microbial-driven sulfate reduction (sulfide generation) in our column. Based on the known sensitivity of a silver electrode to dissolved sulfide concentration, we interpret the electrodic potentials approaching 700 mV recorded in this experiment as an indicator of the bisulfide (HS-) concentration gradients in the column. The measurement of the spatial and temporal variation in these electrodic potentials provides a simple and rapid method for monitoring patterns of relative HS- concentration that are indicative of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our measurements have implications both for the autonomous monitoring of anaerobic microbial processes in the subsurface and the performance of self-potential electrodes, where it is critical to isolate, and perhaps quantify, electrochemical interfaces contributing to observed potentials.

  17. Applicability of the theory of volume filling of micropores to adsorption of caprolactam from aqueous solutions with active carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodorov, E.I.; Kazakov, V.A.; Semerikova, V.V.; Surinova, S.I.

    1985-06-10

    The absence of a scientifically based method of selecting adsorbents in the extraction of organic substances from waste water and solution which would allow for their multicycle use in adsorption-desorption stages often prevents the introduction of adsorption technology into industrial practice. This paper demonstrates the possibility of calculating the adsorption equilibrium of highly soluble organic compounds with the theory of volume filling of micropores equations in consideration of the activities of the extracted component in the solution and the change in the partial affinity coefficient with the degree of filling of the adsorption volume on the example of extraction of caprolactam from aqueous solutions.

  18. Kinetics of Evaporation and Growth of Drops of Aqueous Solutions of Surface Active Substances at Negative Temperatures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-Ri56 961 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION FIND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS i/i SOLUTIONS OF SURFA .(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AlFB OH Y I...Jall IN ,I" FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 t FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION Lfl -• KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE ACTIVE...TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 25 June 1985 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-85-C-000451 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE

  19. Obtaining of barium sulfate from solution formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kalko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of literature data about processes for solution utilization formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries is performed. Optimal conditions for obtaining of barium sulfate sediment from ammonium sulfate solute and chemically pure Ba(OH2×8H2O и BaCl2×2H2O were found experimentally. In laboratory the commercial barium sulfate from sulfate solutions, that are waste of recycling process of battery scrap, with application of chloride and barium hydroxide was production. The possibility of using this product were discussed.

  20. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  1. Active Monitoring of Travelers Arriving from Ebola-Affected Countries - New York City, October 2014-April 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J; Chamany, Shadi; Guthartz, Seth; Thihalolipavan, Sayone; Porter, Michael; Schroeder, Andrew; Vora, Neil M; Varma, Jay K; Starr, David

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa has claimed approximately 11,300 lives (1), and the magnitude and course of the epidemic prompted many nonaffected countries to prepare for Ebola cases imported from affected countries. In October 2014, CDC and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) implemented enhanced entry risk assessment and management at five U.S. airports: John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport in New York City (NYC), O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, and Dulles International Airport in Virginia (2). Enhanced entry risk assessment began at JFK on October 11, 2014, and at the remaining airports on October 16 (3). On October 21, DHS exercised its authority to direct all travelers flying into the United States from an Ebola-affected country to arrive at one of the five participating airports. At the time, the Ebola-affected countries included Guinea, Liberia, Mali, and Sierra Leone. On October 27, CDC issued updated guidance for monitoring persons with potential Ebola virus exposure (4), including recommending daily monitoring of such persons to ascertain the presence of fever or symptoms for a period of 21 days (the maximum incubation period of Ebola virus) after the last potential exposure; this was termed "active monitoring." CDC also recommended "direct active monitoring" of persons with a higher risk for Ebola virus exposure, including health care workers who had provided direct patient care in Ebola-affected countries. Direct active monitoring required direct observation of the person being monitored by the local health authority at least once daily (5). This report describes the operational structure of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's (DOHMH) active monitoring program during its first 6 months (October 2014-April 2015) of operation. Data collected on persons who required direct active monitoring

  2. The Geodetic Monitoring of the Engineering Structure - A Practical Solution of the Problem in 3D Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak-Kowszyk, Daria; Janowski, Artur; Kamiński, Waldemar; Makowska, Karolina; Szulwic, Jakub; Wilde, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    The study raises the issues concerning the automatic system designed for the monitoring of movement of controlled points, located on the roof covering of the Forest Opera in Sopot. It presents the calculation algorithm proposed by authors. It takes into account the specific design and location of the test object. High forest stand makes it difficult to use distant reference points. Hence the reference points used to study the stability of the measuring position are located on the ground elements of the sixmeter-deep concrete foundations, from which the steel arches are derived to support the roof covering (membrane) of the Forest Opera. The tacheometer used in the measurements is located in the glass body placed on a special platform attached to the steel arcs. Measurements of horizontal directions, vertical angles and distances can be additionally subject to errors caused by the laser beam penetration through the glass. Dynamic changes of weather conditions, including the temperature and pressure also have a significant impact on the value of measurement errors, and thus the accuracy of the final determinations represented by the relevant covariance matrices. The estimated coordinates of the reference points, controlled points and tacheometer along with the corresponding covariance matrices obtained from the calculations in the various epochs are used to determine the significance of acquired movements. In case of the stability of reference points, the algorithm assumes the ability to study changes in the position of tacheometer in time, on the basis of measurements performed on these points.

  3. Monitoring human parvovirus B19 virus-like particles and antibody complexes in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Jouni; Michel, Patrik O; Gilbert, Leona; Lahtinen, Tomi; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hedman, Klaus; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used in monitoring human parvovirus B19 virus-like particle (VLP) antibody complexes from acute phase and past-immunity serum samples. The Oregon Green 488-labeled VLPs gave an average diffusion coefficient of 1.7 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1) with an apparent hydrodynamic radius of 14 nm. After incubation of the fluorescent VLPs with an acute phase serum sample, the mobility information obtained from the fluorescence intensity fluctuation by autocorrelation analysis showed an average diffusion coefficient of 1.5 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1), corresponding to an average radius of 157 nm. In contrast, incubation of the fluorescent VLPs with a past-immunity serum sample gave an average diffusion coefficient of 3.5 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) and a radius of 69 nm. A control serum devoid of B19 antibodies caused a change in the diffusion coefficient from 1.7 x 10(-7) to 1.6 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1), which is much smaller than that observed with acute phase or past-immunity sera. Thus, VLP-antibody complexes with different diffusion coefficients could be identified for the acute phase and past-immunity sera. FCS measurement of VLP-immune complexes could be useful in distinguishing between antibodies present in acute phase or past-immunity sera as well as in titration of the VLPs.

  4. The Geodetic Monitoring of the Engineering Structure – A Practical Solution of the Problem in 3D Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipiak-Kowszyk Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study raises the issues concerning the automatic system designed for the monitoring of movement of controlled points, located on the roof covering of the Forest Opera in Sopot. It presents the calculation algorithm proposed by authors. It takes into account the specific design and location of the test object. High forest stand makes it difficult to use distant reference points. Hence the reference points used to study the stability of the measuring position are located on the ground elements of the sixmeter-deep concrete foundations, from which the steel arches are derived to support the roof covering (membrane of the Forest Opera. The tacheometer used in the measurements is located in the glass body placed on a special platform attached to the steel arcs. Measurements of horizontal directions, vertical angles and distances can be additionally subject to errors caused by the laser beam penetration through the glass. Dynamic changes of weather conditions, including the temperature and pressure also have a significant impact on the value of measurement errors, and thus the accuracy of the final determinations represented by the relevant covariance matrices. The estimated coordinates of the reference points, controlled points and tacheometer along with the corresponding covariance matrices obtained from the calculations in the various epochs are used to determine the significance of acquired movements. In case of the stability of reference points, the algorithm assumes the ability to study changes in the position of tacheometer in time, on the basis of measurements performed on these points.

  5. Predicting the Activity Coefficients of Free-Solvent for Concentrated Globular Protein Solutions Using Independently Determined Physical Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The activity coefficient is largely considered an empirical parameter that was traditionally introduced to correct the non-ideality observed in thermodynamic systems such as osmotic pressure. Here, the activity coefficient of free-solvent is related to physically realistic parameters and a mathematical expression is developed to directly predict the activity coefficients of free-solvent, for aqueous protein solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. The model is based on the free-solvent...

  6. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. M. Michel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available International attention to the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of the this paper is to present active layer temperature data for one CALM-S site located at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica over an fifth seven month period (2008–2012. The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C, arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a~high capacity data logger. A series of statistical analysis were performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trend and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA models were tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The controls of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights about the influence of climate chance over the permafrost. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environment, with extreme variation at the surface during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active layer thickness (ALT over the studied period showed variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model was considered appropriate to treat the dataset, enabling more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and active layer thickness over the studied period, no warming trend was detected.

  7. Prioritization methodology for the monitoring of active pharmaceutical ingredients in hospital effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouk, Silwan; Chèvre, Nathalie; Vernaz, Nathalie; Bonnabry, Pascal; Dayer, Pierre; Daali, Youssef; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine

    2015-09-01

    The important number of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) available on the market along with their potential adverse effects in the aquatic ecosystems, lead to the development of prioritization methods, which allow choosing priority molecules to monitor based on a set of selected criteria. Due to the large volumes of API used in hospitals, an increasing attention has been recently paid to their effluents as a source of environmental pollution. Based on the consumption data of a Swiss university hospital, about hundred of API has been prioritized following an OPBT approach (Occurrence, Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity). In addition, an Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) allowed prioritizing API based on predicted concentrations and environmental toxicity data found in the literature for 71 compounds. Both prioritization approaches were compared. OPBT prioritization results highlight the high concern of some non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiviral drugs, whereas antibiotics are revealed by ERA as potentially problematic to the aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, according to the predicted risk quotient, only the hospital fraction of ciprofloxacin represents a risk to the aquatic organisms. Some compounds were highlighted as high-priority with both methods: ibuprofen, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ritonavir, gabapentin, amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, raltegravir, propofol, etc. Analyzing consumption data and building prioritization lists helped choosing about 15 API to be monitored in hospital wastewaters. The API ranking approach adopted in this study can be easily transposed to any other hospitals, which have the will to look at the contamination of their effluents.

  8. A Sensor Web and Web Service-Based Approach for Active Hydrological Disaster Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advancements in Earth-observing sensor systems have led to the generation of large amounts of remote sensing data that can be used for the dynamic monitoring and analysis of hydrological disasters. The management and analysis of these data could take advantage of distributed information infrastructure technologies such as Web service and Sensor Web technologies, which have shown great potential in facilitating the use of observed big data in an interoperable, flexible and on-demand way. However, it remains a challenge to achieve timely response to hydrological disaster events and to automate the geoprocessing of hydrological disaster observations. This article proposes a Sensor Web and Web service-based approach to support active hydrological disaster monitoring. This approach integrates an event-driven mechanism, Web services, and a Sensor Web and coordinates them using workflow technologies to facilitate the Web-based sharing and processing of hydrological hazard information. The design and implementation of hydrological Web services for conducting various hydrological analysis tasks on the Web using dynamically updating sensor observation data are presented. An application example is provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach over the traditional approach. The results confirm the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed approach in cases of hydrological disaster.

  9. Forest ecosystem monitoring in Tuscany (Italy: past activities, present status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio LEONZIO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1987 the Region of Tuscany has been actively monitoring crown status in its forests, in order to protect them from atmospheric pollution, biotic factors and environmental change. Over this period the Region has performed periodical inventories on crown condition in publicly-owned forests (Level I network and established a network of permanent plots (MON.I.TO., Level II – III to study long-term changes occurring in forest ecosystems. Some of these permanent plots were later included in the national programme CONECOFOR, managed by the Ministry for Policy in Agriculture and Forest. Currently a further development of MON.I.TO. is being implemented, called MONITO III – TOpModel, the aim of which is to broaden the information potential of the monitoring system to include carbon stocks and biodiversity evaluation. This paper provides an up-to-date report on the status of the various surveys and recommends a closer connection between MON.I.TO. and the other regional information systems, especially the Regional Forest Inventory, in order to produce information that may be useful in forest planning and in Sustainable Forest Management.

  10. Comparison of hip and low back worn Axivity AX3 and GT3X+ activity monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønd, Jan Christian; Arvidsson, Daniel; Møller, Niels Christian

    the validity and comparability of the PA measure. Bibliography A 9 subject convenient sample was selected for wearing an Actigraph GT3X+ with an Axivity AX3 glued back to back in an elastic belt at the hip and an Axivity AX3 on the low back using adhesive tape. All monitors were worn during free living for 24...... Hours. The Actigraph GT3X + monitors was initialized to record 30 Hz raw and the Axivity AX3 was initialized to record 100Hz +-8g. The AX3 data was downloaded, resampled and calibrated (1) using the AX3 OMGUI (V1.0.0.28) and further resampled using Matlab into 30 Hz to account for the potential sample...... frequency dependency (4). After manually aligning the 30 Hz raw data it was saved into GT3X+ binary files for PA processing. All AX3 and GT3X+ data were processed into 10 seconds epoch activity counts using Actilife V.6.11.4. Statistical analysis and post data processing was done in Matlab (V8.5.0 R2015a...

  11. Monitoring off-gas O2/CO2 to predict nitrification performance in activated sludge processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Shao-Yuan; Libra, Judy A; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Nitrification/denitrification (NDN) processes are the most widely used technique to remove nitrogenous pollutants from municipal wastewater. The performance of nitrogen removal in the NDN process depends on the metabolism of nitrifying bacteria, and is dependent on adequate oxygen supply. Off-gas testing is a convenient and popular method for measuring oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) under process conditions and can be performed in real-time. Since carbon dioxide is produced by carbonaceous oxidizing organism and not by nitrifiers, it should be possible to use the off-gas carbon dioxide mole fraction to estimate nitrification performance independently of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) or OTE. This paper used off-gas data with a dynamic model to estimate nitrifying efficiency for various activated sludge process conditions. The relationship among nitrification, oxygen transfer, carbon dioxide production, and pH change was investigated. Experimental results of an online off-gas monitoring for a full-scale treatment plant were used to validate the model. The results showed measurable differences in OUR and carbon dioxide transfer rate (CTR) and the simulations successfully predicted the effluent ammonia by using the measured CO(2) and O(2) contents in off-gas as input signal. Carbon dioxide in the off-gas could be a useful technique to control aeration and to monitor nitrification rate.

  12. Rapid monitoring of RNA degradation activity in vivo for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hidenori; Sato, Hiroaki; Torimura, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a rapid fluorescence assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the monitoring of RNA degradation activity in mammalian cells. In this technique, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fluorescent probes are used. The dsRNA fluorescent probes consist of a 5' fluorophore-labeled strand hybridized to a 3' quencher-labeled strand, and the fluorescent dye is quenched by a quencher dye. When the dsRNA is degraded by nascent RNases in cells, the fluorescence emission of the fluorophore is induced following the degradation of the double strands. The degradation rates of the dsRNA are decelerated in response to chemical or environmental toxicity; therefore, in the case of cellular toxicity, the dsRNA is not degraded and remains intact, thus quenching the fluorescence. Unlike in conventional cell-counting assays, this new assay eliminates time-consuming steps, and can be used to simply evaluate the cellular toxicity via a single reaction. Our results demonstrate that this assay can rapidly quantify the RNA degradation rates in vivo within 4 h for three model chemicals. We propose that this assay will be useful for monitoring cellular toxicity in high-throughput applications.

  13. Laser measurement of respiration activity in preterm infants: Monitoring of peculiar events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-09-01

    The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a part of a pediatric hospital dedicated to the care of ill or pre-term patients . NICU's patients are underweight and most of the time they need cardiac and respiratory support therapies; they are placed in incubators or in cribs maintaining target environmental and body temperatures and protecting patients from bacteria and virus. Patients are continuously monitored for long period of time (days or weeks) due to their possible several health conditions. the most common vital signs monitored are: respiration rate, heart rate, body temperature, blood saturation, etc. Most of the devices used for transducing such quantities in electronic signals - like spirometer or electrocardiogram (ECG) - are in direct contact with the patient and results, also in consideration of the specific patient, largely invasive. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement system for non-contact and non-invasive assessment of the respiration activity, with particular reference to the detection of peculiar respiration events of extreme interest in intensive care units, such as: irregular inspiration/expiration acts, hiccups and apneas. The sensing device proposed is the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) which is an non contact, optical measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. In the past it has been demonstrated to be suitable to measure heart rate (HR) and respiration rate (RR) in adult and in preterm infant trough chest-wall displacements. The measurement system is composed by a LDVi system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC, with no direct contact with the patient. Tests have been conducted on 20 NICU patients, for a total of 7219 data sampled. Results show very high correlation (R=0.99) with the reference instrument used for the patient monitoring (mechanical ventilator), with an uncertainty < ±7 ms (k=2). Moreover, during the tests, some peculiar respiration events, have been recorded on 6 of

  14. Energy expenditure prediction via a footwear-based physical activity monitor: Accuracy and comparison to other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannecker, Kathryn

    2011-12-01

    Accurately estimating free-living energy expenditure (EE) is important for monitoring or altering energy balance and quantifying levels of physical activity. The use of accelerometers to monitor physical activity and estimate physical activity EE is common in both research and consumer settings. Recent advances in physical activity monitors include the ability to identify specific activities (e.g. stand vs. walk) which has resulted in improved EE estimation accuracy. Recently, a multi-sensor footwear-based physical activity monitor that is capable of achieving 98% activity identification accuracy has been developed. However, no study has compared the EE estimation accuracy for this monitor and compared this accuracy to other similar devices. Purpose . To determine the accuracy of physical activity EE estimation of a footwear-based physical activity monitor that uses an embedded accelerometer and insole pressure sensors and to compare this accuracy against a variety of research and consumer physical activity monitors. Methods. Nineteen adults (10 male, 9 female), mass: 75.14 (17.1) kg, BMI: 25.07(4.6) kg/m2 (mean (SD)), completed a four hour stay in a room calorimeter. Participants wore a footwear-based physical activity monitor, as well as three physical activity monitoring devices used in research: hip-mounted Actical and Actigraph accelerometers and a multi-accelerometer IDEEA device with sensors secured to the limb and chest. In addition, participants wore two consumer devices: Philips DirectLife and Fitbit. Each individual performed a series of randomly assigned and ordered postures/activities including lying, sitting (quietly and using a computer), standing, walking, stepping, cycling, sweeping, as well as a period of self-selected activities. We developed branched (i.e. activity specific) linear regression models to estimate EE from the footwear-based device, and we used the manufacturer's software to estimate EE for all other devices. Results. The shoe

  15. The roar of Yasur: Handheld audio recorder monitoring of Vanuatu volcanic vent activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Howell, Robert; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2016-08-01

    We describe how near-field audio recording using a pocket digital sound recorder can usefully document volcanic activity, demonstrating the approach at Yasur, Vanuatu in May 2014. Prominent emissions peak at 263 Hz, interpreted as an organ-pipe mode. High-pass filtering was found to usefully discriminate volcano vent noise from wind noise, and autocorrelation of the high pass acoustic power reveals a prominent peak in exhalation intervals of 2.5, 4 and 8 s, with a number of larger explosive events at 200 s intervals. We suggest that this compact and inexpensive audio instrumentation can usefully supplement other field monitoring such as seismic or infrasound. A simple estimate of acoustic power interpreted with a dipole jet noise model yielded vent velocities too low to be compatible with pyroclast emission, suggesting difficulties with this approach at audio frequencies (perhaps due to acoustic absorption by volcanic gases).

  16. Comparison of three generations of ActiGraph activity monitors under free-living conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, May; Hansen, Bjørge Herman; Ried-Larsen, M.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A recent review concludes that the agreement of data across ActiGraph accelerometer models for children and youth still is uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement of three generations of ActiGraph accelerometers in children in a free-living condition. METHODS......: Sixteen 9-year-olds wore the ActiGraph AM7164, GT1M and GT3X+ simultaneously for three consecutive days. We compared mean counts per minute (mcpm) and time spent at different intensities from the three generations of monitors, and the agreement of outputs were evaluated by intra-class correlation.......7%. The inter-generation differences varied in magnitude and direction across intensity levels, with the largest difference found in the highest intensities. CONCLUSION: We found that the ActiGraph model AM7164 yields higher outputs of mean physical activity intensity (mcpm) than the models GT1M and GT3X...

  17. Optoacoustic spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of strongly light-absorbing solutions in applications to analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonova, Tatyana A; Volkov, Dmitry S; Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Pelivanov, Ivan M

    2013-12-01

    An optoacoustic technique for solutions of strongly light-absorbing analytes at 0.1-0.01 mol l(-1) is proposed. The technique is based on the wide-band forward mode detection of temporal profiles of laser-generated ultrasonic pulses (optoacoustic signals). The leading edge of the signal repeats the distribution of the laser fluence in the medium, which makes it possible to determine its optical absorption and investigate its dynamics during a reaction. The range of light-absorption coefficients starts from 1 to 5 and reaches 10(4) to 10(5) cm(-1). The determination of iron(II) as ferroin shows the possibility of probing 0.1 mol l(-1) of iron(II), which was not previously achieved for this reaction by optical spectroscopy. To further prove the concept, kinetic measurements for ferroin decomposition at the level of 0.1 mol l(-1) and at high pHs are performed. The results are compared with spectrophotometry at lower concentrations and show good reproducibility and accuracy of kinetic constants.

  18. [Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-modified activated carbon as the adsorbent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-Jing; Lin, Jian-Wei; Zhan, Yan-Hui; Fang, Qiao; Yang, Meng-Juan; Wang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Surfactant-modified activated carbon (SMAC) was prepared by loading cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) onto activated carbon and used as adsorbents to remove nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC was effective for removing nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC exhibited much higher nitrate adsorption capacity than that of the unmodified activated carbon. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC increased with increasing the CPC loading. The adsorption kinetics of nitrate on SMAC followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption data of nitrate on SMAC could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model. Based on the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC with CPC loading amount of444 mmol per 1 kg activated carbon was determined to be 16.1 mg x g(-1). The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC decreased with the increasing solution pH. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate reduced the nitrate adsorption capacity. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC slightly decreased with the increasing reaction temperature. Almost 95% of nitrate molecules adsorbed on SMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution. The main mechanisms for the adsorption of nitrate on SMAC are anionic exchange and electrostatic attraction. The results of this work indicate that SMAC is a promising adsorbent for removing nitrate from aqueous solution.

  19. Knock-in Luciferase Reporter Mice for In Vivo Monitoring of CREB Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Akhmedov

    Full Text Available The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB is induced during fasting in the liver, where it stimulates transcription of rate-limiting gluconeogenic genes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Adenoviral and transgenic CREB reporters have been used to monitor hepatic CREB activity non-invasively using bioluminescence reporter imaging. However, adenoviral vectors and randomly inserted transgenes have several limitations. To overcome disadvantages of the currently used strategies, we created a ROSA26 knock-in CREB reporter mouse line (ROSA26-CRE-luc. cAMP-inducing ligands stimulate the reporter in primary hepatocytes and myocytes from ROSA26-CRE-luc animals. In vivo, these animals exhibit little hepatic CREB activity in the ad libitum fed state but robust induction after fasting. Strikingly, CREB was markedly stimulated in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, after overnight voluntary wheel-running exercise, uncovering differential regulation of CREB in these tissues under catabolic states. The ROSA26-CRE-luc mouse line is a useful resource to study dynamics of CREB activity longitudinally in vivo and can be used as a source of primary cells for analysis of CREB regulatory pathways ex vivo.

  20. High-power fiber optic cable with integrated active sensors for live process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Ola; Blomqvist, Mats; Bergstrand, Hans; Pålsson, Magnus

    2012-03-01

    In industrial applications using high-brilliance lasers at power levels up to and exceeding 20 kW and similarly direct diode lasers of 10 kW, there is an increasing demand to continuously monitor component status even in passive components such as fiber-optic cables. With fiber-optic cables designed according to the European Automotive Industry fiber standard interface there is room for integrating active sensors inside the connectors. In this paper we present the integrated active sensors in the new Optoskand QD fiber-optic cable designed to handle extreme levels of power losses, and how these sensors can be employed in industrial manufacturing. The sensors include photo diodes for detection of scattered light inside the fiber connector, absolute temperature of the fiber connector, difference in temperature of incoming and outgoing cooling water, and humidity measurement inside the fiber connector. All these sensors are connected to the fiber interlock system, where interlock break enable functions can be activated when measured signals are higher than threshold levels. It is a very fast interlock break system as the control of the signals is integrated in the electronics inside the fiber connector. Also, since all signals can be logged it is possible to evaluate what happened inside the connector before the interlock break instance. The communication to the fiber-optic connectors is via a CAN interface. Thus it is straightforward to develop the existing laser host control to also control the CAN-messages from the QD sensors.