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Sample records for activation ferritic alloys

  1. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  2. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  3. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  4. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370 degrees C to 15 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370 degrees C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf

  5. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  6. Effects of alloying elements and heat treatments on mechanical properties of Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Y. B.; Kang, S. H.; Noh, S.; Kim, T. K.; Lee, D. W.; Cho, S.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an alloy development program for Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel, a total of 37 program alloys were designed and their mechanical properties were evaluated with special attention being paid to the effects of alloying elements and heat treatments. A reduction of the normalizing temperature from 1050 °C to 980 °C was found to have a positive effect on the impact resistance, resulting in a decrease in ductile-brittle transition-temperature (DBTT) of the program alloys by an average of 30 °C. The yield strength and creep rupture time are affected strongly by the tempering time at 760 °C but at the expense of ductility. Regarding the effects of the alloying elements, the addition of trace amounts of Zr enhances both the creep and impact resistance: the lowest DBTT was observed for the alloys containing 0.005 wt.% Zr, whereas the addition of 0.01 wt.% Zr extends the creep rupture-time under an accelerated condition. The enhanced impact resistance owing to the normalizing at lower temperature is attributed to a more refined grain structure, which provides more barriers to the propagation of cleavage cracks. Solution softening by Zr addition is suggested as a possible mechanism for enhanced resistance to both impact and creep of the program alloys.

  7. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  8. High hardness of alloyed ferrite after nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed layer-by layer structure and phase analyses of the diffusion layer of nitrided binary alloys of iron with aluminium, chromium, vanadium and titanium have been carried out by means of a complex technique. Transition d-metals (chromium, vanadium and titanium) raise to a greater degree the solubility of nitrogen in the α solid solution, sharply increases the hardness of ferrite and decrease the depth of the layer. Nitrided binary alloys of iron with chromium, vanadium and titanium are strengthened through precipitation from the nitrogen-saturated α-solid solution of nitrides of alloying elements TiN, VN and CrN of a structure B1. A maximum hardness of ferrite alloyed by chromium, vanadium and titanium is observed after nitriding at 550 deg C when the precipitated special nitrides are fully coherent with the α matrix

  9. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel

  10. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  11. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  12. The properties of silicon alloyed ferritic ductile irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Glavas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of silicon content of 3,1 to 5,4 wt. % on the tensile properties, hardness and impact energy of ferritic ductile iron was analysed. It was found that silicon strengthens the ferrite, resulting in an increase in yield strength and tensile strength with increasing silicon content up to 4,22 wt. %. Elongation and impact energy decreases and the hardness increases with increasing silicon content. Since ferritic ductile irons alloyed and strengthened by silicon have a higher Rp0,2/Rm ratio and a higher elongation than conventional ferritic, ferritic/pearlitic and pearlitic ductile irons at the same level of tensile strength, we can expect an increased demand for these materials in applications where high resistance to impact load and low temperature impact properties are not required.

  13. The properties of silicon alloyed ferritic ductile irons

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Glavas; A. Strkalj; A. Stojakovic

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the influence of silicon content of 3,1 to 5,4 wt. % on the tensile properties, hardness and impact energy of ferritic ductile iron was analysed. It was found that silicon strengthens the ferrite, resulting in an increase in yield strength and tensile strength with increasing silicon content up to 4,22 wt. %. Elongation and impact energy decreases and the hardness increases with increasing silicon content. Since ferritic ductile irons alloyed and strengthened by silicon have a h...

  14. High-coercivity ferrite magnets prepared by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline hexaferrite (BaFe12O19 or SrFe12O19) and mixed Fe,Co-ferrite ((FexCo1-x)Fe2O4 with x=0-1) materials have been prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing. High coercivities were obtained in these nanocrystalline materials, 6-7 kOe for hexaferrite and ∝3 kOe for Co-ferrite. Hexaferrite powders prepared by mechanical alloying have been used as the starting material for high-coercivity bonded magnets. Hot-pressed anisotropic hexaferrite magnets have been produced with high values of coercivity and remanence. High magnetic performance was also achieved in some mixed Fe,Co-ferrites after magnetic annealing. (orig.)

  15. Ferrite hardening response in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The ferrite hardening response varies with ferrite volume fraction. • A considerable variation in hardness was observed within a specific ferrite grain. • Finer ferrite grains were accompanied by more homogenized carbon content. • Coarser ferrite grains depicted a significant gradient of carbon content. • Ferrite hardness increased along the center to the peripheral regions of a grain. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned to investigate in details the variation of ferrite hardening response in conjunction with carbon partitioning developed within ferrite during austenite to ferrite phase transformation in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP microstructures consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been prepared using step quenching heat treatment processes at isothermal temperature of 600 °C for various holding times. Nanoindentation measurements have been supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray and microprobe wavelength-dispersive spectroscopic analyses to follow the variation of ferrite hardening response and its relation to the carbon concentration of ferrite in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardening response is quite variable depending on the progress of ferrite formation in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. For a specific ferrite grain in a specific ferrite martensite DP microstructure, the location nearer to the ferrite–martensite interfaces has been accompanied with a significant higher carbon concentration and simultaneously higher ferrite hardening response in comparison to that of central regions of ferrite grains. These results are rationalized with a higher concentration of carbon within ferrite developed as a consequence of higher carbon entrapment within defected ferrite area generated at early stage of austenite to ferrite phase transformation

  16. Iron chromium potential to model high-chromium ferritic alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny, Giovanni; Pasianot, Roberto C; Terentyev, Dmitry; Malerba, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we present a Fe-Cr interatomic potential to model high-Cr ferritic steels. The potential is fitted to thermodynamic and point-defect properties obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments. The here developed potential is also benchmarked against other potentials available in literature. It shows particularly good agreement with the DFT obtained mixing enthalpy of the random alloy, the formation energy of intermetallics and exper...

  17. Ferrite hardening response in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fereiduni, E., E-mail: e.fereiduni@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • The ferrite hardening response varies with ferrite volume fraction. • A considerable variation in hardness was observed within a specific ferrite grain. • Finer ferrite grains were accompanied by more homogenized carbon content. • Coarser ferrite grains depicted a significant gradient of carbon content. • Ferrite hardness increased along the center to the peripheral regions of a grain. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned to investigate in details the variation of ferrite hardening response in conjunction with carbon partitioning developed within ferrite during austenite to ferrite phase transformation in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP microstructures consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been prepared using step quenching heat treatment processes at isothermal temperature of 600 °C for various holding times. Nanoindentation measurements have been supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray and microprobe wavelength-dispersive spectroscopic analyses to follow the variation of ferrite hardening response and its relation to the carbon concentration of ferrite in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardening response is quite variable depending on the progress of ferrite formation in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. For a specific ferrite grain in a specific ferrite–martensite DP microstructure, the location nearer to the ferrite–martensite interfaces has been accompanied with a significant higher carbon concentration and simultaneously higher ferrite hardening response in comparison to that of central regions of ferrite grains. These results are rationalized with a higher concentration of carbon within ferrite developed as a consequence of higher carbon entrapment within defected ferrite area generated at early stage of austenite to ferrite phase

  18. Activation analysis for different structural alloys considered for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation calculations have been made for the austentic steel 316SS, the ferritic alloy HT-9, the titanium alloy Ti6A14V, and the vanadium alloy V5Cr5Ti in a liquid metal (Na) design suggested recently for ITER. The calculations show that the vanadium alloy has the minimum short and long-term radioactivity and BHP. It also has the minimum decay heat at all the time. The titanium alloy has less radioactivity than the austenitic and this ferritic alloys. However, the decay heat of this alloy could exceed that of the conventional alloys

  19. Effect of alloy content on microstructure and microchemistry of phases during short term thermal exposure of 9Cr–W–Ta–0.1C reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravikirana; R Mythili; S Raju; S Saroja; G Paneerselvam; T Jayakumar; E Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the microstructural evolution in 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels during short term thermal exposures. Since the microstructure is strongly influenced by the alloying additions, mainly W, Ta and C contents, the effect of varying W and Ta contents on the martensite structure that forms during normalizing treatment and the subsequent changes during tempering of the martensite in the temperature regime of 923–1033 K have been studied. Microstructural changes like subgrain formation and nature of precipitates have been evaluated and correlated to hardness variations. The systematic change in size distribution and microchemistry of M23C6 carbide is studied with variation in W content at different temperatures.

  20. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  1. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Hino; K. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamauchi; Y. Hirohata; K. Tsuzuki; Y.Kusama

    2005-01-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall,vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study,deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus.After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 kev D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316 L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention.Ferritic steel sample was

  2. The properties and weldability of low activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of ferritic steels patterned on the chromium-molybdenum alloys, 2 1/4Cr--1Mo, 9Cr--1MoVNb and 12Cr--1MoVW, were tested for weldability. These steels are being developed as candidates for the first wall and blanket structures of fusion reactors. Use of these materials will minimize the long term radioactive hazards associated with disposal after service. In these low activation alloys, elements which become activated during irradiation with long half lives (Mo and Nb) are replaced. The major changes include the replacement of molybdenum with tungsten, the addition of vanadium in 2 1/4% Cr steels, and the replacement of niobium in the 9% Cr steel with tantalum. These replacement elements radically modify both the mechanical properties and weldability of the alloys. In this study, the effect of the alloy modifications on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the welds are presented. Bainitic steels (2 1/4 Cr%) usually exhibit good weldability, while the martensitic steels (5, 9 and 12 Cr%) are suspectable to embrittlement in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The objective of this study was to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties of these low activation alloys. Autogeneous bead-on-plate welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microstructure, microhardness, weld bend and tensile test results are reported for the base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone of the weld. 46 refs., 36 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Characteristics of 14Cr-ODS ferritic alloy fabricated by mechanically alloying and microwave sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenhua, Yao [State Key Laboratory of Materia Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Weihao, Xiong, E-mail: whxiong@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materia Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Bin, Huang; Qingqing, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Materia Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jiang, Jianjun [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-06-15

    14Cr-ODS ferritic alloys were fabricated by microwave sintering and conventional vacuum sintering. The results showed that the sintering time could be reduced and the sintering temperature could be decreased effectively by adoption of microwave sintering. The tensile strength of the alloy microwave sintered at 1250 °C and the alloy vacuum sintered at 1350 °C were 691.4 MPa and 521.5 MPa respectively. The superior strength of microwave sintered one would be attributed to finer grain size, which was resulted from the shorter sintering time and lower sintering temperature. The elongation of microwave sintered alloy was worse than that of the vacuum sintering one. Nano-oxide precipitates were dispersed homogeneously in the Fe-based matrix, and their size was mostly ranged from several nm to more than 20 nm.

  4. Mapping of 475 oC embrittlement in ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrittlement at 475 oC was mapped in ferritic ternary alloys with a wide composition range of Fe-(10-30)Cr-(0-20)Al (at.%) using a diffusion multiple technique. A large solid solution of Al suppresses the 475 oC embrittlement, while a small solid solution of Al promotes embrittlement. Transmission electron microscopy observations on aged samples suggest that suppression of the embrittlement due to Al addition can be attributed to the suppression of phase separation of the ferrite phase into the two phases Fe-rich ferrite and Cr-rich ferrite.

  5. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Reinhard, D.; Larson, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m-3 and 1.2 × 1024 m-3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti-Y-O- clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  6. Precipitation of Icosahedral Quasicrystalline Phase, R-phase and Laves Phase in Ferritic Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keisuke Yamamoto; Yoshisato Kimura; Yoshinao Mishima

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic heat resistant steels involving precipitation of intermetallic phases have drawn a growing interest for the enhancement of creep strength, while the brittleness of the intermetallic phases may lower the toughness of the alloy.Therefore, it is necessary to optimize the dispersion characteristics of the intermetallics phase through microstructural control to minimize the trade-off between the strength and toughness. The effects of α-Fe matrix substructures on the precipitation sequence, morphology, dispersion characteristics, and the stability of the intermetallic phases are investigated in Fe-Cr-W-Co-Si system. The precipitates of the Si-free Fe-10Cr-1.4W-4.5Co (at%) alloy aged at 873K are the R-phase but those of the Si-added Fe-10Cr-1.4W-4.5Co-0.3Si (at%) alloy are the icosahedral quasicrystalline phase. The precipitates in both the Si-free and Si-added alloys aged at 973K are the Laves phase. Matrix of the alloys is controlled by heat treatments as to provide three types of matrix substructures; ferrite, ferrite/martensite mixture and martensite. The hardening behavior of the alloys depends on the matrix substructures and is independent of the kinds of precipitates. In the alloys with ferrite matrix, the peak of hardness during aging at 873K shifts to longer aging time in comparison with that in the alloys with lath martensite matrix which contain numbers of nucleation sites.

  7. Effects of consolidation temperature, strength and microstructure on fracture toughness of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully consolidated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were prepared by attritor milling pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.3 wt% Y2O3 powders, followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at 1000 oC or 1150 oC at 200 MPa for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed similar bimodal distributions of fine and coarse ferrite grains in both cases. However, as expected, the alloy microhardness decreased with increasing in HIPing temperature. Three point bend tests on single edge notched specimens, with a nominal root radius ρ = 0.15 mm, were used to measure the notch fracture toughness, K ρ, as a function of test temperature. The K ρ curves were found to be similar for both processing conditions. It appears that the coarser ferrite grains control cleavage fracture, in a way that is independent of alloy strength and HIPing temperature

  8. Void and precipitate structure in ion- and electron-irradiated ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Soumei; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Takeyama, Taro

    1984-05-01

    Void formation and precipitation were investigated in Fe10Cr and Fe13Cr base alloys by 200 keV C + ion and 1 MeV electron irradiation. The ferritic alloys exhibited significant resistance to void swelling. In FeCr and FeCr-Si alloys, ion-irradiation produced the precipitates of M 23C 6 type. In the FeCrTi alloy, Ti-rich precipitates were formed with high number density on {100} plane. During electron-irradiation Fe-10Cr alloy, complex dislocation loops were produced with high number density, of which Burgers vector was mostly . EDX analysis showed slightly enrichment of chromium on dislocation loops. These results suggested that the stability of type dislocation structure at high dose is an important factor on good swelling resistance in the ferritic alloys, moreover, titanium addition will intensify the stability of the doslocations through the fine precipitation on dislocations.

  9. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B. [Washington State Univ., WA (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  10. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Rashidi; Abolghasem Ataie

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinylalcohol (PVA) on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF) nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fieldemission ...

  11. Substrate integrated ferrite phase shifters and active frequency selective surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, B M

    2002-01-01

    There are two distinct parts to this thesis; the first investigates the use of ferrite tiles in the construction of printed phase shifting transmission lines, culminating in the design of two compact electromagnetic controlled beam steered patch and slot antenna arrays. The second part investigates the use of active frequency selective surfaces (AFSS), which are later used to cover a uPVC constructed enclosure. Field intensity measurements are taken from within the enclosure to determine the dynamic screening effectiveness. Trans Tech G-350 Ferrite is investigated to determine its application in printed microstrip and stripline phase shifting transmission lines. 50-Ohm transmission lines are constructed using the ferrite tile and interfaced to Rogers RT Duroid 5870 substrate. Scattering parameter measurements are made under the application of variable magnetic fields to the ferrite. Later, two types of planar microwave beam steering antennas are constructed. The first uses the ferrites integrated into the Dur...

  12. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  13. Characterization of microstructural and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-09-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜823 K to about 923 K. Temperatures above 973 K in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitate the use of Reduced Activation Ferritic (RAF)-ODS-steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. The development concentrates on the ferritic ODS-steel Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3. The microstructures of a mechanically alloyed powder particle are observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ageing experiments for 1000 h and 3000 h at 1123.5 K and 1223.5 K of compacted Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 were executed. The impact especially on the oxide particles in terms of segregation and decomposition effects were monitored by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Long term vacuum creep experiments have been performed with rolled Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 at 923.5 K and 1023.5 K, which will be compared to reference alloys.

  14. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  15. FERRITE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF LOW ALLOY DUPLEX STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoel, R.H.; Thomas, G.

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this communication is threefold. 1) To confirm the presence of and to characterize the precipitates in the ferrite phase of the base + Nb and base + Mo steels, 2) to study any possible variation in precipitate density as the martensitic volume fraction is changed and 3) to determine the level of precipitation strengthening.

  16. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  17. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, G M; Stoica, A D; Miller, M K; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation. PMID:25300893

  18. SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite additional material

    OpenAIRE

    Klimpel, A; T. Kik; J. Górka; A. Czupryński; P. Sitarz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: of these researches was to investigate influence of heat input in SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite filler material on quality of deposits.Design/methodology/approach: the quality of single and multilayer, stringer beads was assessed by metallographic examinations, stresses measurements and hardness tests.Findings: due to the fact that it was used at automated surfacing stand, the analysis of properties of the deposits was performed for single and multilayer, str...

  19. The welding of austenitic-ferritic Mo-alloyed Cr-Ni-Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides general information and guidance on the welding of austenitic-ferritic Mo-alloyed Cr-Ni stainless steel. Information is given on the various chemical compositions and on resistance to corrosion and on the mechanical and physical properties of commercially available steels. The effect of welding on the base metal and the selection of welding processes and welding consumables are described

  20. Void swelling of an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy in a high voltage electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snykers, M.

    1980-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy with nominal composition Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-1.5Mo-2TiO 2 and a cast alloy with a composition close to that of the matrix of the oxide dispersion strengthened alloy are irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope in the temperature range 380-550°C. The alloys are doped with 0-30 ppm helium. For alloys containing 10 ppm He a peak swelling temperature at 450°C is found. A maximum swelling of 1.1% is found at an irradiation dose of 20 dpa. In the absence of He no swelling is found in the temperature range 430-470°C. The swelling rate is highest at the onset of swelling. The results obtained here are quite similar to those for some ferritic steels such as FV607, EM 12 and HT9, except for the influence of He and for the dose dependence.

  1. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  2. Development of ferritic steels for reduced activation: the US program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels are candidates for the structural components of fusion reactors. Irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes, which lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by using steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). The US Department of Energy has a program to develop steels to meet the criteria for shallow land burial as opposed to deep geologic storage. A review of the alloy development programs indicates that ferritic steels that meet these criteria can be developed

  3. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K., E-mail: millermk@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6139 (United States); Reinhard, D., E-mail: David.Reinhard@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Larson, D.J., E-mail: David.Larson@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simulated APT data indicate that solute clusters can be resolved at 80% detection efficiency. • Solute clusters containing 2–9 atoms were detected in a prototype ∼80% detection efficiency LEAP. • High densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, of solute clusters were detected in as-milled flakes of 14YWT. • Lower densities, 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, were detected in the stir zone of a FSW. • Vacancies stabilize the clusters, which retard diffusion and confers excellent stability. - Abstract: A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3} and 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  4. Computational thermodynamics aided design of novel ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Tianyi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-30

    With the aid of computational thermodynamics, Ni was identified to suppress the liquidus temperature of Fe2Zr and four Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys were designed to study the Ni effect on the phase stability of Fe2Zr laves_phase. These alloys were fabricated through traditional arc-metling, followed by annealing at 1000 C for 336 hours and 700 C for 1275 hours. The microstructure were examined and characterized by SEM BSE image, EDS compositional mapping and point scan, XRD and TEM analysis. The major results were summarized below: 1)For investigated alloys with 12wt% Cr, 3~6wt% Zr and 3~9 wt%Ni, the phases in equilibrium with the BCC phase are C15_Laves phase, Fe23Zr6 phase. The volume fraction of intermetallic phases increases with Ni and Zr contents. 2)Instead of (Fe,Cr)2Zr C14_Laves phase, Ni stabilizes the C15_Laves structure in Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys by substituting Fe and Cr atoms with Ni atoms in the first sublattice. 3)Fe23Zr6, that is metastable in the Fe-Cr-Zr ternary, is also stabilized by Ni addition. 4)Ni7Zr2 phase was observed in samples with high Ni/Zr ratio. Extensive solubility of Fe was identified in the phase. The microstructural and composition results obtained from this study will be incorportated into the the Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr database. The current samples will be subjected to ion irradiaition to be compared with those results for Fe-Cr-Zr alloys. Additional alloys will be designed to form (Fe,Cr,Ni)2Zr nanoprecipitates for further studies.

  5. Computational thermodynamics aided design of novel ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [ORNL; Tan, Lizhen [ORNL

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of computational thermodynamics, Ni was identified to suppress the liquidus temperature of Fe2Zr and four Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys were designed to study the Ni effect on the phase stability of Fe2Zr laves_phase. These alloys were fabricated through traditional arc-metling, followed by annealing at 1000 C for 336 hours and 700 C for 1275 hours. The microstructure were examined and characterized by SEM BSE image, EDS compositional mapping and point scan, XRD and TEM analysis. The major results were summarized below: 1)For investigated alloys with 12wt% Cr, 3~6wt% Zr and 3~9 wt%Ni, the phases in equilibrium with the BCC phase are C15_Laves phase, Fe23Zr6 phase. The volume fraction of intermetallic phases increases with Ni and Zr contents. 2)Instead of (Fe,Cr)2Zr C14_Laves phase, Ni stabilizes the C15_Laves structure in Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys by substituting Fe and Cr atoms with Ni atoms in the first sublattice. 3)Fe23Zr6, that is metastable in the Fe-Cr-Zr ternary, is also stabilized by Ni addition. 4)Ni7Zr2 phase was observed in samples with high Ni/Zr ratio. Extensive solubility of Fe was identified in the phase. The microstructural and composition results obtained from this study will be incorportated into the the Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr database. The current samples will be subjected to ion irradiaition to be compared with those results for Fe-Cr-Zr alloys. Additional alloys will be designed to form (Fe,Cr,Ni)2Zr nanoprecipitates for further studies.

  6. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  7. Bismuth Ferrite for Active Control of Surface Plasmon Polariton Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose and investigate several layouts of m etal-insulator-metal waveguide with active core which can be utilized for dynamic switching in photonic integrated circuits. The active material, bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), is sandwiched between metal plates and changes i ts refractive index through...

  8. The microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a 9Cr oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with additional corrosion resistant element Al was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot pressing (HP) to explore the impact of Al on the microstructure and mechanical property of a 9Cr ODS alloy. It is found that the Al completely dissolved into the Fe–Cr matrix after milling for 30 h. The minor phases in the Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy were investigated by a high-energy X-ray, and were identified to be orthorhombic-YAlO3 (YAP), bcc-Y3Al5O12 (YAG), monoclinic-Al2Y4O9 (YAM), and hexagonal-YAlO3 (YAH). These phases were further confirmed by selected area diffraction pattern (SADP), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In addition, their volume fractions were also calculated from the integrated intensities. According to the analysis of the particles and their formation sequences, the larger particles (greater than 100 nm) are identified as mainly YAG and Al2O3 particles, while the particles with small size (less than 30 nm) are likely primarily YAM, YAH, and YAP particles. The yielding strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at RT are 563 MPa and 744 MPa, respectively, while the YS and UTS at 700 °C are 245 MPa and 276 MPa, respectively. Although the addition Al in ODS alloys decreases the strength at RT, the values at high temperature are similar to those obtained for 9Cr ODS alloys strengthened by fine Y–Ti–O particles. - Graphical abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction line profile of the 9CrAl ODS alloy; (Ferrite matrix phases, along with minor phases, orthorhombic YAlO3 (yttrium aluminum perovskite, YAP), bcc Y3Al5O12 (yttrium aluminum garnet, YAG), monoclinic Al2Y4O9 (yttrium aluminum monoclinic, YAM), and hexagonal YAlO3 (yttium aluminum hexagonal, YAH) were recognized.). - Highlights: • The Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy was firstly fabricated by MA and HP. • The precipitates were

  9. The microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wang, Pinghuai [Fusion Reactor & Materials Division, Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Miao, Yinbin [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Shaofu; Wang, Man [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiang [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Gong, Mengqiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-11-05

    In this study, a 9Cr oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with additional corrosion resistant element Al was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot pressing (HP) to explore the impact of Al on the microstructure and mechanical property of a 9Cr ODS alloy. It is found that the Al completely dissolved into the Fe–Cr matrix after milling for 30 h. The minor phases in the Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy were investigated by a high-energy X-ray, and were identified to be orthorhombic-YAlO{sub 3} (YAP), bcc-Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), monoclinic-Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (YAM), and hexagonal-YAlO{sub 3} (YAH). These phases were further confirmed by selected area diffraction pattern (SADP), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In addition, their volume fractions were also calculated from the integrated intensities. According to the analysis of the particles and their formation sequences, the larger particles (greater than 100 nm) are identified as mainly YAG and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, while the particles with small size (less than 30 nm) are likely primarily YAM, YAH, and YAP particles. The yielding strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at RT are 563 MPa and 744 MPa, respectively, while the YS and UTS at 700 °C are 245 MPa and 276 MPa, respectively. Although the addition Al in ODS alloys decreases the strength at RT, the values at high temperature are similar to those obtained for 9Cr ODS alloys strengthened by fine Y–Ti–O particles. - Graphical abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction line profile of the 9CrAl ODS alloy; (Ferrite matrix phases, along with minor phases, orthorhombic YAlO{sub 3} (yttrium aluminum perovskite, YAP), bcc Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (yttrium aluminum garnet, YAG), monoclinic Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (yttrium aluminum monoclinic, YAM), and hexagonal YAlO{sub 3} (yttium aluminum hexagonal, YAH) were recognized.). - Highlights: • The

  10. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kalin, B. A.; Binyukova, S. Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 10 20 m -2 at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content ( NC>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  11. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, I.I. E-mail: chernov@phm.mephi.ru; Kalashnikov, A.N.; Kalin, B.A.; Binyukova, S.Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2} at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content (N{sub C}>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  12. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  13. Reduced activation ferritic steel R and D in US/Japan collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material performance of reduced activation ferritic steels (RAFS) and their response to neutron irradiation, which have been investigated by utilizing fission reactors under the US/Japan collaborative research program (JUPITER), are summarized. Rather high resistance to neutron irradiation and helium was recognized for 9Cr-2W RAFS; irradiation hardening and helium embrittlement of RAFS were evaluated to be much less than for other candidate materials. Alloy design of high-temperature steels and the development of oxide dispersion-strengthened steels have been progressing. (author)

  14. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  15. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H2) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  16. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  17. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  18. SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite additional material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klimpel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of these researches was to investigate influence of heat input in SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite filler material on quality of deposits.Design/methodology/approach: the quality of single and multilayer, stringer beads was assessed by metallographic examinations, stresses measurements and hardness tests.Findings: due to the fact that it was used at automated surfacing stand, the analysis of properties of the deposits was performed for single and multilayer, stringer beads.Research limitations/implications: for complete information about tested deposits it is needed to compare deposits properties with other technologies of super-ferrite deposits surfacing.Practical implications: results of this paper is an optimal range of parameters for surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer beads of super-ferrite layers.Originality/value: the researches (macro- and micro-observations, hardness tests, stresses distribution tests were provided for surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer beads, and the results were compared. The influence of heat input on layers properties and theirs structure was defined.

  19. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, G.L. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  20. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys

  1. Substrate integrated ferrite phase shifters and active frequency selective surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two distinct parts to this thesis; the first investigates the use of ferrite tiles in the construction of printed phase shifting transmission lines, culminating in the design of two compact electromagnetic controlled beam steered patch and slot antenna arrays. The second part investigates the use of active frequency selective surfaces (AFSS), which are later used to cover a uPVC constructed enclosure. Field intensity measurements are taken from within the enclosure to determine the dynamic screening effectiveness. Trans Tech G-350 Ferrite is investigated to determine its application in printed microstrip and stripline phase shifting transmission lines. 50-Ohm transmission lines are constructed using the ferrite tile and interfaced to Rogers RT Duroid 5870 substrate. Scattering parameter measurements are made under the application of variable magnetic fields to the ferrite. Later, two types of planar microwave beam steering antennas are constructed. The first uses the ferrites integrated into the Duroid as microstrip lines with 3 patch antennas as the radiating elements. The second uses stripline transmission lines, with slot antennas as the radiating sources etched into the ground plane of the triplate. Beam steering is achieved by the application of an external electromagnet. An AFSS is constructed by the interposition of PIN diodes into a dipole FSS array. Transmission response measurements are then made for various angles of electromagnetic wave incidence. Two states of operation exist: when a current is passed through the diodes and when the diodes are switched off. These two states form a high pass and band stop space filter respectively. An enclosure covered with the AFSS is constructed and externally illuminated in the range 2.0 - 2.8GHz. A probe antenna inside the enclosure positioned at various locations through out the volume is used to establish the effective screening action of the AFSS in 3 dimensional space. (author)

  2. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  3. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  4. Microstructure modelling of ferritic alloys under high flux 1 MeV electron irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardouin Duparc, A.; Moingeon, C.; Smetniansky-de-Grande, N.; Barbu, A. E-mail: alain.barbu@poly.polytechnique.fr

    2002-04-01

    The point-defect clustering is an important component of the hardening of low copper content pressure vessel steels. This study reports the first steps of a project devoted to the modelling of the nucleation and growth of point-defect clusters in ferritic alloys under irradiation at large fluence. A cluster-dynamics modelling based on rate equations giving the evolution of the population of interstitial loops up to some 0.1 {mu}m and of vacancy clusters is developed. It is applied to two alloys FeCu (0.13 wt%) and FeMn(1.5 wt%)Ni(0.8 wt%)Cu(0.13 wt%)P(0.01 wt%) the composition of which is close to the one of pressure vessel steels and to non-alloyed Fe for comparison. The model was calibrated by carrying out 1 MeV irradiations in a high voltage microscope on these three materials and by using the results of experiments and atomic simulations reported in the literature. It is shown that the presence of copper in iron stabilises the interstitial clusters and more important that the parameters relative to the interstitials in the complex alloys are totally different from those for iron: the migration energy must be increased from 0.3 to 1 eV and the binding energy of di-interstitials must be decrease from 0.9 to 0.2 eV.

  5. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K., E-mail: millermk@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Parish, C.M.; Bei, H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. The result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  6. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-12-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  7. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  8. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y2O3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  9. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-Y2O3-Dispersed Ferritic Alloy Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Consolidated by High-Pressure Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Swapan Kumar; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Witczak, Zbigniew; Lojkowski, Witold; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Manna, Indranil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to synthesize 1.0 wt pct nano-Y2O3-dispersed ferritic alloys with nominal compositions: 83.0 Fe-13.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy A), 79.0 Fe-17.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy B), 75.0 Fe-21.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy C), and 71.0 Fe-25.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy D) steels (all in wt pct) by solid-state mechanical alloying route and consolidation the milled powder by high-pressure sintering at 873 K, 1073 K, and 1273 K (600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C) using 8 GPa uniaxial pressure for 3 minutes. Subsequently, an extensive effort has been undertaken to characterize the microstructural and phase evolution by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Mechanical properties including hardness, compressive strength, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were determined using micro/nano-indentation unit and universal testing machine. The present ferritic alloys record extraordinary levels of compressive strength (from 1150 to 2550 MPa), Young's modulus (from 200 to 240 GPa), indentation fracture toughness (from 3.6 to 15.4 MPa√m), and hardness (from13.5 to 18.5 GPa) and measure up to 1.5 through 2 times greater strength but with a lower density (~7.4 Mg/m3) than other oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels (ferritic matrix useful for grain boundary pinning and creep resistance.

  11. Interaction of carbon-vacancy complex with minor alloying elements of ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; He, X.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial carbon, dissolved in bcc matrix of ferritic steels, plays an important role in the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure since it exhibits strong interaction with vacancies. Frequent formation and break-up of carbon-vacancy pairs, occurring in the course of irradiation, affect both kinetics of the accumulation of point defect clusters and carbon spatial distribution. The interaction of typical alloying elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Si, Cr and P) in ferritic steels used as structural materials in nuclear reactors with a carbon-vacancy complex is analyzed using ab initio techniques. It is found that all the considered solutes form stable triple clusters resulting in the increase of the total binding energy by 0.2-0.3 eV. As a result of the formation of energetically favourable solute-carbon-vacancy triplets, the dissociation energy for vacancy/carbon emission is also increased by ∼0.2-0.3 eV, suggesting that the solutes enhance thermal stability of carbon-vacancy complex. Association of carbon-vacancy pairs with multiple solute clusters is found to be favorable for Ni, Cu and P. The energetic stability of solute(s)-carbon-vacancy complexes was rationalized on the basis of pairwise interaction data and by analyzing the variation of local magnetic moments on atoms constituting the clusters.

  12. Interaction of carbon–vacancy complex with minor alloying elements of ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakaev, A., E-mail: abakaev@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol B2400 (Belgium); Center for Molecular Modeling, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Terentyev, D. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol B2400 (Belgium); He, X. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-51, 102413 Beijing (China); Zhurkin, E.E. [Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Van Neck, D. [Center for Molecular Modeling, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial carbon, dissolved in bcc matrix of ferritic steels, plays an important role in the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure since it exhibits strong interaction with vacancies. Frequent formation and break-up of carbon–vacancy pairs, occurring in the course of irradiation, affect both kinetics of the accumulation of point defect clusters and carbon spatial distribution. The interaction of typical alloying elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Si, Cr and P) in ferritic steels used as structural materials in nuclear reactors with a carbon–vacancy complex is analyzed using ab initio techniques. It is found that all the considered solutes form stable triple clusters resulting in the increase of the total binding energy by 0.2–0.3 eV. As a result of the formation of energetically favourable solute–carbon–vacancy triplets, the dissociation energy for vacancy/carbon emission is also increased by ∼0.2–0.3 eV, suggesting that the solutes enhance thermal stability of carbon–vacancy complex. Association of carbon–vacancy pairs with multiple solute clusters is found to be favorable for Ni, Cu and P. The energetic stability of solute(s)–carbon–vacancy complexes was rationalized on the basis of pairwise interaction data and by analyzing the variation of local magnetic moments on atoms constituting the clusters.

  13. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  14. The effect of ageing temperature and time on the mechanical properties of Fe-NiCrMo alloys with different contents of δ ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory cast alloys with 2-27% of δ ferrite were aged for up to 17,520 h in the temperature range 290-350 deg. C. Tensile and Charpy tests were performed at 22 and 290 deg. C on specimens aged for different times, and the microhardnesses of both constituents of the microstructure were determined for the alloy with 27% of δ ferrite. The effects of the content of δ ferrite, the ageing and testing temperature, and the ageing time on mechanical properties and notch toughness are presented and discussed

  15. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  16. Electronic Structures and Alloying Behaviors of Ferrite Phases in High Co-Ni Secondary Hardened Martensitic Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The electronic structure of ferrite (tempered martensite phase) in high Co-Ni secondary hardened martensitic steel has been investigated. The local density of states (LDOS) of alloying elements in the steel displays the relationship between solid solubility and the shape of the LDOS. The bond order integral (BOI) between atoms in the steel shows that the directional bonding of the p orbital of Si or C leads to the brittleness of the steel. At last, ∑BOI between atoms demonstrate that C, Co, Mn, Cr, Mo, Si strengthen the alloyed steel through solid-solution effects.

  17. Activating Flux Design for Laser Welding of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立; 胡绳荪; 胡宝; 申俊琦; 王勇慧

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of YAG laser welding process of ferritic stainless steel with activating fluxes were investi-gated in this study. Some conventional oxides, halides and carbonates were applied in laser welding. The results showed that the effect of oxides on the penetration depth was more remarkable. Most activating fluxes improved the penetration more effectively at low power than that at high power. The uniform design was adopted to arrange the formula of multicomponent activating fluxes, showing that the optimal formula can make the penetration depth up to 2.23 times as large as that without flux, including 50%ZrO2, 12.09%CaCO3, 10.43%CaO and 27.48%MgO. Through the high-speed photographs of welding process, CaF2 can minimize the plasma volume but slightly improve the pene-tration capability.

  18. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  19. Effects of austenite grain size and cooling rate on Widmanstaetten ferrite formation in low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnar, R.L.; Hansen, S.S. (Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States). Hot Rolled Products Div.)

    1994-04-01

    Deformation dilatometry is used to simulate the hot rolling of 0.20 pct C-1.10 pct Mn steels over a product thickness range of 6 to 170 mm. In addition to a base steel, steels with additions of 0.02 pct Ti, 0.06 pct V, or 0.02 pct Nb are included in the study. The transformation behavior of each steel is explored for three different austenite grain sizes, nominally 30, 55, and 100 [mu]m. In general, the volume fraction of Widmanstaetten ferrite increases in all four steels with increasing austenite grain size and cooling rate, with austenite grain size having the more significant effect. The Nb steel has the lowest transformation temperature range and the greatest propensity for Widmanstaetten ferrite formation, while the amount of Widmanstaetten ferrite is minimized in the Ti steel (as a result of intragranular nucleation of polygonal ferrite on coarse TiN particles). The data emphasize the importance of a refined austenite grain size in minimizing the formation of a coarse Widmanstaetten structure. With a sufficiently fine prior austenite grain size (e.g., [le]30 [mu]m), significant amounts of Widmanstaetten structure can be avoided, even in a Nb-alloyed steel.

  20. Thermal stability of nanoscale helium bubbles in a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, P.D., E-mail: philip.edmondson@materials.ox.ac.uk; Parish, C.M.; Li, Q.; Miller, M.K.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • 14YWT NFA irradiated with 335keV He{sup +} to 6.75x10{sup 20} He m{sup -2} at 400 °C then thermally treated at 750 °C for up to 100 hr. • As-irradiated material displayed poly-disperse bubble size distribution that became more inhomogeneous with thermal treatment. • The bubbles were observed to coarsen following thermal treatment. • Coarsening behaviour exhibits characteristics of self-interstitial and dislocation loop punching, Brownian motion and coalescence and Ostwald ripening. - Abstract: A 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy has been irradiated with 335 keV He{sup +} to a total fluence of 6.75 × 10{sup 20} He m{sup −2} at a temperature of 400 °C and subsequently thermally treated at 750 °C for up to 100 h. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize the size and distribution of the resultant helium bubbles. The results indicate that the bubbles generally increase in size and the distribution becomes more inhomogeneous during the thermal treatment. The results are discussed in terms of the helium supply and vacancy supersaturation, Brownian motion and coalescence, and Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  1. Effects of alloying elements on sticking occurring during hot rolling of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, effects of alloying elements on the sticking occurring during hot rolling of five kinds of ferritic STS430J1L stainless steels were investigated by analyzing high-temperature hardness and oxidation behavior of the rolled steels. Hot-rolling simulation tests were conducted by a high-temperature wear tester which could simulate actual hot rolling. The simulation test results revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation. Since the hardness continuously decreased as the test temperature increased, whereas the formation of Fe-Cr oxides in the rolled steel surface region increased, the sticking of five stainless steels was evaluated by considering both the high-temperature hardness and oxidation effects. The addition of Zr, Cu, or Si had a beneficial effect on the sticking resistance, while the Ni addition did not show any difference in the sticking. Particularly in the case of the Si addition, Si oxides formed first in the initial stage of high-temperature oxidation, worked as initiation sites for Fe-Cr oxides, accelerated the formation of Fe-Cr oxides, and thus raised the sticking resistance by about 10 times in comparison with the steel without Si content

  2. Dual-beam irradiation of friction stir spot welding of nanostructured ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Liang, E-mail: chunliang@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 840, Taiwan (China); Richter, Asta [Department of Engineering, Technical University of Applied Sciences, Wildau, Bahnhofstrasse 1, 15745 Wildau (Germany); Koegler, Reinhard [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Wu, Lung-Tien [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSSW has been successfully applied to join two sheets of ODS material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization occurs in the thermo mechanically affected zone, resulting in a decrease in hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After irradiation, a clear maximum is visible in all depth dependent hardness charts, which is caused by defects generated during ion bombardment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material changes during FSSW are larger than the radiation induced hardness increase. - Abstract: Nanostructured ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys usually contain a high density of Y-Al-O and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles, high dislocation densities and fine grains. Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a very promising technique for the joining of ODS materials without oxide particle agglomeration and loss in mechanical properties in the weld zone. Heating and severe plastic deformation can significantly alter the originally as-received material. The local microstructure determines the weld mechanical properties, which are analyzed by nanoindentation. The FSSW region consists of three different zones: the base material, the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the heat affected zone. Irradiation of the FSSW area was performed with a Fe{sup +}/He{sup +} dual ion beam. Hardness changes within the welding zones and variation with irradiation damage are discussed.

  3. Incidence of mechanical alloying contamination on oxides and carbides formation in ODS ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferritic ODS steels containing 14 or 18 wt.% Cr are produced by mechanical alloying (MA), hot consolidation and cold working. This study focuses on the evolution of interstitials such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon at each stage of the fabrication route by comparing two MA methods: attrition milling or ball milling. The milling time required to obtain a homogenous distribution of yttrium at the micron scale in the ground powders is relatively short by using an attritor. But, in this case the carbon and nitrogen contamination is more pronounced considering powders which have reached a similar metastable stationary state. The presence of oxygen in excess results in the formation of large micron-sized oxides after extrusion. Most of them are identified as titanium-based or silicon oxides by EDS analysis. For attrition milling, a high density of aligned Ti(C,N) compounds and some FeCrW carbides (M23C6 type) mainly distributed at the grain boundaries are identified, correlated with the higher carbon contamination

  4. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  5. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100–500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials’ excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer-to micrometer-scale materials analysis. Modern high-brightness, high-X-ray collection STEM instruments are capable of enabling advanced experiments, such as simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging at nm to sub-nm resolution, that are now well-established for the study of nuclear materials. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis

  6. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer-to micrometer-scale materials analysis. Modern high-brightness, high-X-ray collection STEM instruments are capable of enabling advanced experiments, such as simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging at nm to sub-nm resolution, that are now well-established for the study of nuclear materials. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  7. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1- x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1- x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  8. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  9. Characterization and corrosion resistance of organically modified silicate-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline hybrid coatings on aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.H. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: khwu@ccit.edu.tw; Chao, C.M. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.H. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China); Chang, T.C. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China)

    2007-07-15

    Hybrid coatings based on organically modified silicate (Ormosil)-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline (10-30 wt.%) were synthesized through a sol-gel technique. Tetraethylenepentamine, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, tetraethoxysilane and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/polyaniline were used as precursors for the hybrid coatings. These hybrid films were deposited via spin coating onto an aluminum alloy to improve the corrosion protection. The effects induced by the NiZn ferrite/polyaniline content on the chain dynamics, ferromagnetic behavior and corrosion performances of the coated samples were investigated. The rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and scale of the spin-diffusion path length indicated that the configuration of the hybrid films was highly cross-linked, dense and adhered to the aluminum alloy substrates. The magnetic properties of the resulting hybrids showed super-paramagnetic behavior, such as zero coercive force (coercivity 0 G) and a low blocking temperatures (45 K). Potentio-dynamic and salt-spray analysis revealed that the hybrid films provided an exceptional barrier and corrosion protection in comparison with untreated aluminum alloy substrates.

  10. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  11. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  12. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them. PMID:18503676

  13. Simulation of Ferrite Formation in Fe-C Alloys Based on a Three-Dimensional Mixed-Mode Transformation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bohemen, S. M. C.; Bos, C.; Sietsma, J.

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional mixed-mode (MM) transformation model accounting for both soft impingement and hard impingement was developed that calculates the growth kinetics of ferrite grains in an austenite matrix. The simulations are compared to the kinetics of ferrite formation in high-purity Fe-C alloys for which phase-transformation kinetics were measured isothermally by dilatometry at several temperatures in the range of 973 K to 1043 K (700 °C to 770 °C). The interface mobility is obtained from the best fit of the data at 1023 K (750 °C) for which the nucleus density N is estimated from the final microstructure. Subsequently, the experimental ferrite kinetics in Fe-0.36C at the other temperatures are simulated. The values of N extracted from the fits can be described with a nucleation model. The significance of the MM calculations is rationalized by comparing the results for Fe-0.17C with simulations assuming purely diffusion-controlled (DC) and purely interface-controlled (IC) growth. Comparison of simulated fraction curves for Fe-0.57C with the three models demonstrates that the transformation in high-carbon steels is essentially DC.

  14. A wear and corrosion resistant α-ferrite toughened Fe9Cr9Si2 ternary intermetallic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical moving components working under corrosion or elevated temperature aggressive service conditions demand tribological materials having excellent combinations of wear and corrosion resistance. Most conventional high-performance wear resistant materials such as high Cr cast irons lack adequate corrosion resistance, while most corrosion resistant materials such as stainless steels are poor in resisting wear. In this paper, a novel α-ferrite toughened Fe9Cr9Si2 wear and corrosion resistant ternary intermetallic alloy was developed with a microstructure consisting of small amount of dispersive α particles well distributed in the continuous matrix of Fe9Cr9Si2 (referred as α/Fe9Cr9Si2 alloy). Corrosion properties were evaluated using the anodic polarization methods in H2SO4 and NaCl water solutions. Wear resistance was tested under room-temperature block-on-wheel dry sliding wear test conditions. Due to the unique chemical composition of both the Cr and Si highly alloyed α and the σ-phase Fe9Cr9Si2, the α/Fe9Cr9Si2 alloy exhibited outstanding corrosion resistance. Due to the excellent combination of high hardness and the strong covalent-dominant atomic bonds of σ-Fe9Cr9Si2, the excellent toughness and ductility of α and the unique chemical composition induced oxidation wear, the α-toughened Fe9Cr9Si2 σ-based alloy exhibited outstanding dry sliding wear resistance

  15. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time. These reduced-activation or fast induced-radioactivity decay ferritic steels are being developed to be analogous to the Cr-Mo steels presently in the fusion program, but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten. In this paper, steels with 2-1/4% Cr will be discussed. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium on these steels, heats were produced with 2% W, with 0.25% V, with 1% W and 0.25% V, and with 2% W and 0.25% V. Tempering and microstructural studies were made and tensile and impact tests were conducted. Preliminary results indicate that it should be possible to develop a low-chromium Cr-W steel without molybdenum or niobium. Such steels should have properties as good as or better than the three Cr-Mo steels presently being considered as candidates for fusion-reactor applications. 22 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Propertiesof a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced ActivationFerritic/Martensitic Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; SHA, WEI; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-01-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic micro...

  17. Fe-Cr-V ternary alloy-based ferritic steels for high- and low-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase stability of alloys and steels developed for application in nuclear fission and fusion technology is one of the decisive factors determining the potential range of operating temperatures and radiation conditions that the core elements of a power plant can tolerate. In the case of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, the choice of the chemical composition is dictated by the phase diagram for binary FeCr alloys where in the 0-9% range of Cr composition the alloy remains in the solid solution phase at and below the room temperature. For Cr concentrations exceeding 9% the steels operating at relatively low temperatures are therefore expected to exhibit the formation of α' Cr-rich precipitates. These precipitates form obstacles for the propagation of dislocations, impeding plastic deformation and embrittling the material. This sets the low temperature limit for the use of of high (14% to 20%) Cr steels, which for the 20% Cr steels is at approximately 600 deg. C. On the other hand, steels containing 12% or less Cr cannot be used at temperatures exceeding ∼600 deg. C due to the occurrence of the α-γ transition (912 deg. C in pure iron and 830 deg. C in 7% Cr alloy), which weakens the steel in the high temperature limit. In this study, we investigate the physical properties of a concentrated ternary alloy system that attracted relatively little attention so far. The phase diagram of ternary Fe-Cr-V alloy shows no phase boundaries within a certain broad range of Cr and V concentrations. This makes the alloy sufficiently resistant to corrosion and suggests that steels and dispersion strengthened materials based on this alloy composition may have better strength and stability at high temperatures. Experimental heats were produced on a laboratory scale by arc melting the material components to pellets, then by melting the pellets in an induction furnace and casting the melt into copper moulds. The compositions in weight percent (iron base) are 10Cr5V, 10Cr

  18. Helium Retention and Desorption Behaviour of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martenstic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pinghuai; Nobuta, Yuji; Hino, Tomoaki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Chen, Jiming; Xu, Zengyu; Li, Xiongwei; Liu, Shi

    2009-04-01

    The reduced activation ferritic/martenstic steel CLF-1 prepared by the Southwestern Institute of Physics in China was irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV at room temperature using an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion irradiation apparatus. After the irradiation, the helium retention and desorption were investigated using a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The experiment was conducted with both the normal and welded samples. Blisters were observed after the helium ion irradiation, and the surface density of blisters in the welded samples was lower than that in the non-welded samples. Three desorption peaks were observed in both the non-welded and welded samples. These desorption peaks corresponded to those of blister ruptures and the helium release from the inner bubbles and the defects. The amount of helium retained in the welded samples was approximately the same as that in the non-welded samples, which was much less than other reduced activation materials, such as vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composites.

  19. Helium Retention and Desorption Behaviour of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martenstic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pinghuai; NOBUTA Yuji; HINO Tomoaki; YAMAUCHI Yuji; CHEN Zilning; XU Zengyu; LI Xiongwei; LIU Shi

    2009-01-01

    The reduced activation ferritic/martenstic steel CLF-1 prepared by the Southwest-ern Institute of Physics in China was irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV at room temperature using an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion irradiation apparatus. After the irradiation, the helium retention and desorption were investigated using a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The experiment was conducted with both the normal and welded samples. Blisters were observed after the helium ion irradiation, and the surface density of blisters in the welded samples was lower than that in the non-welded samples. Three desorption peaks were observed in both the non-welded and welded samples. These desorption peaks corresponded to those of blister ruptures and the helium release from the inner bubbles and the defects. The amount of helium retained in the welded samples was approximately the same as that in the non-welded samples, which was much less than other reduced activation materials, such as vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composites.

  20. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  1. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700-950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  2. Alloying design of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel for long life FBRs core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, S.; Harada, M.; Okada, H.; Inoue, M.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Asabe, K.; Nishida, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    1993-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with excellent swelling resistance and superior high temperature strength are prospective cladding materials for advanced fast breeder reactors. The addition of Ti in 13Cr-3W ODS ferritic steels improved the high temperature strength remarkably by the formation of uniformly distributed ultra-fine oxide particles. ODS ferritic steels have a bamboo-like grain structure and a strong deformation texture. The decrease of creep rupture strength in the bi-axial direction compared to the uni-axial direction is attributed mainly to this unique bamboo grain structure. Nearly equivalent creep rupture strength for both bi-axial and uni-axial direction was successfully attained by introducing the α to γ transformation in ODS martensitic steel.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties in stainless alloy ferritic with 5 % molybdenum; Avaliacao das propriedades mecanicas em ligas inoxidaveis ferriticas com 5% de molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, V.X.; Gomes, F.H.F.; Guimaraes, R.F.; Saboia, F.H.C.; Abreu, H.F.G. de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE). Campus Maracanau, CE (Brazil)], e-mail: venceslau@ifce.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The deterioration of equipment in the oil industry is caused by high aggressiveness in processing the same. One solution to this problem would increase the content of molybdenum (Mo) alloys, since this improves the corrosion resistance. As the increase of Mo content causes changes in mechanical properties, we sought to evaluate the mechanical properties of alloys with 5% Mo and different levels of chromium (Cr). Were performed metallography and hardness measurement of the alloys in the annealed condition. Subsequent tests were performed tensile and Charpy-V, both at room temperature. The results showed that 2% difference in the content of Cr did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of alloys. The alloys studied had higher values in measured properties when compared to commercial ferritic alloys with similar percentages of Cr. The high content of Mo resulted in a brittle at room temperature but ductile at temperatures above 70 degree C. (author)

  4. Transmutation of alloys in MFE facilities as calculated by REAC (a computer code system for activation and transmutation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code system for fast calculation of activation and transmutation has been developed. The system consists of a driver code, cross-section libraries, flux libraries, a material library, and a decay library. The code is used to predict transmutations in a Ti-modified 316 stainless steel, a commercial ferritic alloy (HT9), and a V-15%Cr-5%Ti alloy in various magnetic fusion energy (MFE) test facilities and conceptual reactors

  5. Influence of scandium addition on the high-temperature grain size stabilization of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lulu, E-mail: lli18@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2015-06-11

    The influence of 1–4 at% Sc addition on the thermal stability of mechanically alloyed ODS ferritic alloy was studied in this work. Sc addition was found to significantly stabilize grain size and microhardness at high temperatures. Grain sizes of samples with 1 and 4 at% Sc was found maintained in the nanoscale range at temperatures up to 1000 °C with hardness maintained at 5.6 and 6.7 GPa, respectively. The detailed microstructure was also investigated from EDS elemental mapping, where nanofeatures [ScTiO] were observed, while nanosized [YTiO] particles were rarely seen. This is probably due to the concentration difference between Sc and Y, leading to the formation of [ScTiO] favoring that of [YTiO]. Precipitation was considered as the major source for the observed high temperature stabilization. In addition, 14YT–Sc alloys without large second phases such as Ti-oxide can exhibit better performance compared to conventional ODS materials.

  6. Ultra-fine ferrite grain refinement by static re-crystallization of hot rolled vanadium micro-alloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of ultrafine-grain refinement of ferrite during transformational grain refinement (TGR) followed by static re-crystallization of vanadium micro-alloyed steels was studied. A substantial grain refinement (2.8 mu m) was attained during TGR process by rolling at 900 deg. C. Cold rolling with 70% of reduction introduced strain, utilized for re-crystallization during annealing at different temperatures. Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique was employed to quantify the low angle grain boundaries (LAGB) and high angle grain boundaries (HAGB) spacings and results were correlated with hardness drops during annealing process. At higher annealing times and temperatures the vanadium precipitates restricted the process of grain growth probably due to effective dispersion strengthening. The abnormal grain growth during annealing, predicted previously for niobium steels, found absent in the present vanadium microalloyed steels. (author)

  7. Numerical evaluation of the weldability of the low alloy ferritic steels T/P23 and T/P24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A model based on transport equations was numerically implemented by the finite volume method (FVM in a computational code in order to simulate the influence of the heat input, base metal thickness and preheating temperature on the thermal evolution and the cooling rate during the welding of the low alloy ferritic steels T/P23 and T/P24. As a consequence, it was possible to evaluate qualitatively the microstructure at the heat affected zone (HAZ of these steels when a single weld bead was deposited on their surface and calculate the maximum hardness reached at this region. Goldakfs double-ellipsoid heat source model for power density distribution was utilized in order to obtain a good estimate of the cooling rate and dimensions of the fusion zone (FZ. The results are discussed in light of previous work and good agreement between experimental and simulated results was verified.

  8. The influence of fabrication procedure on the void swelling of an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy in a HVEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snykers, M.; Biermans, F.; Cornelis, J.

    The influence of changes in the fabrication procedure of ferritic alloys with compositions Fe-13Cr-Ti-Mo-TiO 2 on the swelling behaviour are investigated. The fabrication procedures are: casting, powder metallurgy 3- milling in air and powder metallurgy 3- milling in argon. No difference is found for the results obtained for the materials fabricated by casting and by powder metallurgy 3- milling in air. Slightly different results are obtained for the material fabricated by powder metallurgy 3- milling in argon. This material contains argon in solution in the matrix, which causes a small shift of the peak swelling temperature and of the peak swelling helium concentration for tests carried out at 450°C. The overall swelling of this material is the lowest due to the small grain size and to the high density of inclusions.

  9. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Pawel, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  10. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300-325 °C.

  11. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  12. Outgassing characteristics of F82H ferritic steel as a low activation material for fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odaka, Kenji; Satou, Osamu [Hitachi Ltd., Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan). Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.; Ootsuka, Michio; Abe, Tetsuya; Hara, Shigemitsu; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Enoeda, Mikio

    1997-09-01

    Outgassing characteristics of F82H ferritic steel as a low activation material for the blanket of fusion device were investigated. A test chamber was constructed by welding F82H ferritic steel plates. The inner surface of the chamber was buffed and electropolished. The test chamber was degassed by the prebaking at temperature of 350degC for 20 h in vacuum. Then outgassing rates of the test chamber were measured by the throughput method as a function of pumping time for the cases that the test chamber was baked and not baked. The typical outgassing rate after baking at 250degC for 24 h was 3 x 10{sup -9} Pa{center_dot}ms{sup -1} and it seems that this value is sufficiently small to produce pressures at least as low as 10{sup -9} Pa in the vacuum chamber made of F82H ferritic steel. In the pump-down of the test chamber without baking after exposure to air, the outgassing rate decreases with pumping time and reached 1 x 10{sup -7} Pa{center_dot}ms{sup -1} at t = 10{sup 5} s. The activation energy of hydrogen in bulk diffusion in the F82H ferritic steel was measured and found to be 7 kcal/mol. (author)

  13. (Ni, Zn, Sn) Ru and (Ni, Sn) Sn substituted barium ferrite prepared by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NiRu, ZnRu, SnRu and SnSn mixtures considerably improved the saturation magnetization, Ms with low substitution values; diminishing quickly at the same times the coercivity, Hci to suitable values for high-density magnetic recording applications. On the other hand, the NiSn mixture also decreased the coercivity rapidly however without enhancing the saturation magnetization. The shown differences on magnetic properties were mainly due both to magnetic nature of divalent ion and to secondary phase apparitions. The mixtures with Sn2+ as partner ion diminished markedly to Tc. The tetravalent Ru4+ ion has a special effect on magnetic properties of hexagonal ferrites (increases Ms and diminishes fast Hci with low substitutions).

  14. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  15. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  16. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  17. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during the hot rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Yagi, Akira; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite (γ) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hotrolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometers in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain rowth which occurred during reheating at around 930 °C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  18. Ab Initio Investigation of He Bubbles at the Y2Ti2O7-Fe Interface in Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Thomas; Tea, Eric; Hin, Celine

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are promising materials candidates for the next generation of nuclear reactors due to their ability to withstand high temperatures, high pressures, high neutron flux and especially, the presence of high concentrations of transmutation product helium. As helium diffuses through the matrix, large number densities of complex oxide nanoclusters, namely Y2Ti2O7, Y2O3 and Y2TiO5, act as trapping sites for individual helium atoms and helium clusters. Consequently, there is a significant decrease in the amount of helium that reaches grain boundaries, mitigating the threat of pressurized bubble formation and embrittlement. In order to understand the helium trapping mechanisms of the oxides at a fundamental level, the interface between the nanoclusters and the iron matrix must be modeled. We present results obtained using density functional theory on the Y2Ti2O7-Fe interface where the structure has been modeled based on experimental observations. Helium has been added along the interface in order to investigate the influence of helium on the structure and to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of helium along the interface.

  19. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  20. Large zinc cation occupancy of octahedral sites in mechanically activated zinc ferrite powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cation site occupancy of a mechanically activated nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powder was determined as (Zn0.552+Fe0.183+)tet[Zr0.452+Fe1.823+]octO4 through analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, showing a large redistribution of cations between sites compared to normal zinc ferrite samples. The overpopulation of cations in the octahedral sites was attributed to the ascendance in importance of the ionic radii over the crystal energy and bonding coordination in determining which interstitial sites are occupied in this structurally disordered powder. Slight changes are observed in the local atomic environment about the zinc cations, but not the iron cations, with respect to the spinel structure. The presence of Fe3+ on both sites is consistent with the measured room temperature magnetic properties. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  2. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  3. The effect of Alloying elements on pitting resistance of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels in terms of pitting resistance equivalents (PRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloying elements, such as Cr, Mo, and N of stainless steels play important roles in their resistances to pitting corrosion. The pitting resistances of stainless steels ha e long been characterized in terms of electrochemical parameters such as pitting potentials. however, in order to better understand the resistances to pitting of stainless steels, Pit Propagation Rate (PPR) and Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) tests were carried out in deaerated 0.1N H2SO4 + 0.1N NaCl solution. The effect of Cr, Mo, and N alloying elements on the pitting corrosion resistances of both ferritic Fe-Cr, Fe-Cr-Mo stainless steels and austenitic stainless steels was examined by performing polarization, PPR, and CPT tests. The comparison between test results was made in terms of the Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE). Results showed that PRE values are the good parameters representing the extents of pitting corrosion resistance on a single scale regardless of both kinds of alloying elements and types of ferritic or austenitic stainless steels

  4. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  5. Study of the formation of solute clusters under irradiation in model ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron irradiation results in the formation of a high number density (1023 to 1024 m-3) of ultrafine (2 nm in diameter) solute clusters in reactor vessel steels. These clusters contain a supersaturated element (copper), and some others solutes (Mn, Ni, Si and P) soluble at the temperature of irradiation (300 C). The aim of the work described in this report is to understand what are the basic processes at the origin of the formation of these clusters, and to obtain information about the effect of the different solutes. The microstructure of model alloys, after different irradiation experiments is characterised by atom probe. The comparison between experimental results and results obtained by mean field modelling (evolution of point defects under irradiation) suggests that the precipitation of the solute clusters is heterogeneous, on point defects clusters. Precipitation kinetic is slowed down by solutes other than copper. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Cytotoxicity Activities of Copper Ferrite (CuFe2O4 and Zinc Ferrite (ZnFe2O4 Nanoparticles Synthesized by Sol-Gel Self-Combustion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samikannu Kanagesan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinel copper ferrite (CuFe2O4 and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a sol-gel self-combustion technique. The structural, functional, morphological and magnetic properties of the samples were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. XRD patterns conform to the copper ferrite and zinc ferrite formation, and the average particle sizes were calculated by using a transmission electron microscope, the measured particle sizes being 56 nm for CuFe2O4 and 68 nm for ZnFe2O4. Both spinel ferrite nanoparticles exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization of 31 emug−1 for copper ferrite (50.63 Am2/Kg and 28.8 Am2/Kg for zinc ferrite. Both synthesized ferrite nanoparticles were equally effective in scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH free radicals. ZnFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 nanoparticles showed 30.57% ± 1.0% and 28.69% ± 1.14% scavenging activity at 125 µg/mL concentrations. In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed higher concentrations (>125 µg/mL of ZnFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 with increased toxicity against MCF-7 cells, but were found to be non-toxic at lower concentrations suggesting their biocompatibility.

  7. Analysis of ferrite grain growth mechanisms during {gamma}-{alpha} transformation in a niobium alloyed steel using EBSD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novillo, E. [CEIT and TECNUN, P Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Hernandez, D. [CEIT and TECNUN, P Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Gutierrez, I. [CEIT and TECNUN, P Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain)]. E-mail: igutierrez@ceit.es; Lopez, B. [CEIT and TECNUN, P Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain)

    2004-11-15

    The austenite to ferrite phase transformation was studied in a C-Mn-Nb steel after different hot deformation schedules, leading to deformed and recrystallized austenite. The mechanisms of nucleation and growth of ferrite grains were investigated by means of the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The ferrite microstructures were characterised in terms of the misorientation angles between ferrite grains and the deviations from an ideal Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship with the austenite. The results show that the grain refinement produced by the accumulation of the deformation in the austenite is limited to a certain extent by the ferrite grain coarsening taking place behind the transformation front. Both coalescence and normal grain growth have been observed to contribute to this coarsening. Coalescence is enhanced as a result of the variant selection taking place in transformation from a recrystallized austenite. The accumulation of the deformation in the austenite results in ferrite-ferrite boundaries of higher misorientation, causing coalescence in this case to be less favoured, as compared with normal grain growth.

  8. Corrosion characteristics of low activation ferritic steel, JLF-1, in liquid lithium in static and thermal convection conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compatibility of JLF-1(Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C), a reduced activation ferritec/martensitic (RAFM) steel with static and flowing lithium (Li) was investigated. The corrosion characteristics were studied by means of measurement of weight losses and scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis on the surfaces and cross-sections of the specimens. The weight losses of JLF-1 specimens showed saturation at the temperature of 500 deg. C and 600 deg. C. This is possibly due to the saturation of Fe, Cr in bulk Li or formation of saturated layer of dissolved elements in liquid Li near the specimen surface. In the corrosion test in a thermal convection loop, the corrosion rate at 500 deg. C for 250 h was significantly larger than that obtained in the static test in an identical condition. After Li exposure, the phase transformation from martensite to ferrite was found on the specimens. The chemical analysis results and the loss of carbides suggested that the phase change was caused by the depletion of carbon. At the same time, selective depletion of alloy elements, such as Cr and W was detected by EDS on the surface. The result of Vickers hardness test showed that obvious softening occurred on the surface of the specimens after Li exposure and the depth of the softened region was consistent with that of the phase transformation. The flowing Li enhanced the weight loss, phase change and hardness reduction due to the mass transfer

  9. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K. [Vista Metals, Inc., McKeesport, PA (United States); Froes, F.H. [Univ. of Idaho, ID (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  10. Compatibility of graphite with a martensitic-ferritic steel, an austenitic stainless steel and a Ni-base alloy up to 1250 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the chemical interactions between graphite and a martensitic-ferritic steel (1.4914), an austenitic stainless steel (1.4919; AISI 316), and a Ni-base alloy (Hastelloy X) isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range between 900 and 1250 C. At higher temperatures a rapid and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions. The chemical interactions are diffusion-controlled processes and can be described by parabolic rate laws. The reaction behavior of the two steels is very similar. The chemical interactions of the steels with graphite are much faster above 1100 C than those for the Ni-base alloy. Below 1000 C the effect is opposite. (orig.)

  11. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  12. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Hot-rolling can induce a coarser ferrite grain in 8CrODS ferritic steel. •HR specimen consists of martensite, residual ferrite and transformed ferrite. •The coarsening of the transformed ferrite was analyzed by EBSD. •Hot-rolling can improve the strength of 8CrODS ferritic steel at 700 °C. -- Abstract: The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above Ar3 of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite

  13. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaochao, E-mail: chaoxiaowu_008@163.com [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ukai, Shigeharu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Leng, Bin [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Hot-rolling can induce a coarser ferrite grain in 8CrODS ferritic steel. •HR specimen consists of martensite, residual ferrite and transformed ferrite. •The coarsening of the transformed ferrite was analyzed by EBSD. •Hot-rolling can improve the strength of 8CrODS ferritic steel at 700 °C. -- Abstract: The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above A{sub r3} of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite.

  14. Report of IEA workshop on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    IEA Workshop on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels under implementing agreement for program of research and development on fusion materials was held at Tokyo Yayoi Kaikan and JAERI headquarter on November 2-3, 2000. The objective of this workshop was a review of the fusion material development programs, the progress of the collaboration and the irradiation effects studies on RAF/M steels in the collaborating parties (Europe, Russia the United States, and Japan). Moreover, the development of plans for future collaboration was discussed. The present report contains viewgraphs presented at the workshop. (author)

  15. High-temperature creep rupture of low alloy ferritic steel butt-welded pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and end loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili-Tahami, F; Hayhurst, D R; Wong, M T

    2005-11-15

    Constitutive equations are reviewed and presented for low alloy ferritic steels which undergo creep deformation and damage at high temperatures; and, a thermodynamic framework is provided for the deformation rate potentials used in the equations. Finite element continuum damage mechanics studies have been carried out using these constitutive equations on butt-welded low alloy ferritic steel pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and axial loads at 590 and 620 degrees C. Two dominant modes of failure have been identified: firstly, fusion boundary failure at high stresses; and, secondly, Type IV failure at low stresses. The stress level at which the switch in failure mechanism takes place has been found to be associated with the relative creep resistance and lifetimes, over a wide range of uniaxial stresses, for parent, heat affected zone, Type IV and weld materials. The equi-biaxial stress loading condition (mean diameter stress equal to the axial stress) has been confirmed to be the worst loading condition. For this condition, simple design formulae are proposed for both 590 and 620 degrees C. PMID:16243708

  16. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaze, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content.Las fundiciones con grafito esferoidal de matriz totalmente ferrítica tienen gran interés debido a su homogeneidad estructural, alargamiento destacable y su buena respuesta frente a las operaciones de mecanizado. Por otro lado, la extensa variedad de materias primas disponibles en las plantas de fundición supone un problema a la hora de controlar de forma efectiva la composición química de las aleaciones preparadas. En este trabajo se ha realizado un estudio estadístico sobre la influencia de los diferentes contenidos de carbono, silicio, níquel y de otros elementos minoritarios sobre las características estructurales y las propiedades mecánicas de un grupo de fundiciones con grafito esferoidal y matriz ferrítica. Finalmente, se han obtenido un número de ecuaciones que permiten predecir las propiedades mecánicas a temperatura ambiente de estas fundiciones en función de su composición química y su contenido de perlita en la matriz metálica.

  17. Comparative study of the activity of nickel ferrites for solar hydrogen production by two-step thermochemical cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresno, Fernando [Solar Concentrating Systems, CIEMAT-PSA. Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yoshida, Tomoaki; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Kodama, Tatsuya [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Center for Transdisciplinary Research, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Fernandez-Saavedra, Rocio [Chemistry Division, CIEMAT. Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    In this work, we compare the activity of unsupported and monoclinic zirconia - supported nickel ferrites, calcined at two different temperatures, for solar hydrogen production by two-step water-splitting thermochemical cycles at low thermal reduction temperature. Commercial nickel ferrite, both as-received and calcined in the laboratory, as well as laboratory made supported NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, are employed for this purpose. The samples leading to higher hydrogen yields, averaged over three cycles, are those calcined at 700 C in each group (supported and unsupported) of materials. The comparison of the two groups shows that higher chemical yields are obtained with the supported ferrites due to better utilisation of the active material. Therefore, the highest activity is obtained with ZrO{sub 2}-supported NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} calcined at 700 C. (author)

  18. Interaction of minor alloying elements of high-Cr ferritic steels with lattice defects: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakaev, A. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol B2400 (Belgium); Center for Molecular Modeling, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Terentyev, D., E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol B2400 (Belgium); Bonny, G. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol B2400 (Belgium); Klaver, T.P.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of 3mE, TU Delft, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Olsson, P. [Department of Neutron Research, Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 525, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Van Neck, D. [Center for Molecular Modeling, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • The interaction of Mo, W, Nb, Ta, V, Mn, Si with point and extended defects is characterized. • Mn and Si exhibit peculiar interaction with both point and extended lattice defects. • The results for substitutional atoms of the refractory metals well follow one specific trend. -- Abstract: Basic properties of minor alloying elements, namely Mo, W, Nb, Ta, V, Mn, Si entering the conventional and reduced-activation structural Fe–(9–12)Cr steels have been analyzed using ab initio calculations. The electronic structure calculations were applied to study the interaction of minor alloying elements with a number of important and well defined lattice structures, such as point defects, the 1/2〈1 1 1〉 screw dislocation core, high angle symmetric grain boundaries and free surfaces. The studied elements were classified according to their similarities and discrepancies regarding the interaction with the above mentioned defects. The refractory alloying elements are found to follow the same trend whereas Mn and Si exhibit peculiar behavior with respect to the interaction with both point and extended lattice defects. The obtained results are discussed and compared with previously published ab initio and available experimental data.

  19. Manufacturing development of low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomics is developing manufacturing methods for vanadium alloys as part of a program to encourage the development of low activation alloys for fusion use. The culmination of the program is the fabrication and installation of a vanadium alloy structure in the DIII-D tokamak as part of the Radiative Divertor modification. Water-cooled vanadium alloy components will comprise a portion of the new upper divertor structure. The first step, procuring the material for this program has been completed. The largest heat of vanadium alloy made to date, 1200 kg of V-4Cr-4Ti, has been produced and is being converted into various product forms. Results of many tests on the material during the manufacturing process are reported. Research into potential fabrication methods has been and continues to be performed along with the assessment of manufacturing processes particularly in the area of joining. Joining of vanadium alloys has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for their use in the Radiative Divertor Program. Joining processes under evaluation include resistance seam, electrodischarge (stud), friction and electron beam welding. Results of welding tests are reported. Metallography and mechanical tests are used to evaluate the weld samples. The need for a protective atmosphere during different welding processes is also being determined. General Atomics has also designed, manufactured, and will be testing a helium-cooled, high heat flux component to assess the use of helium cooled vanadium alloy components for advanced tokamak systems. The component is made from vanadium alloy tubing, machined to enhance the heat transfer characteristics, and joined to end flanges to allow connection to the helium supply. Results are reported

  20. Underwater explosive welding of tungsten to reduced-activation ferritic steel F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Daichi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morizono, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hokamoto, Kazuyuki [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The underwater explosive welding was successfully applied in the joining of tungsten to F82H reduced activation ferritic steel. • Microstructure of the interface showed the formation of a wave-like interface with a thin mixed layer of tungsten and F82H. • Nanoindentation hardness results exhibited a gradual change away from the welded interface without hardened layer. • Small punch tests on the welded specimens resulted in the cracking at a center of tungsten followed by the interfacial cracking. - Abstract: The present study reports the underwater explosive welding of commercially pure tungsten onto the surface of a reduced-activation ferritic steel F82H plate. Cross-sectional observation revealed the formation of a wave-like interface, consisting of a thin mixed layer of W and F82H. The results of nanoindentation hardness testing identified a gradual progressive change in the interface, with no hardened or brittle layer being observed. Small punch tests on the welded specimens resulted in cracking at the center of the tungsten, followed by crack propagation toward both the tungsten surface and the tungsten/steel interface.

  1. Diffusion bonding beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic steel: Development of processes and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.M., E-mail: hunt52@llnl.gov [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA, 44-128 Engineering IV, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90025-1597 (United States); Goods, S.H., E-mail: shgoods@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Ying, A., E-mail: ying@fusion.ucla.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA, 44-128 Engineering IV, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90025-1597 (United States); Dorn, C.K., E-mail: christopher.dorn@materion.com [Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites (United States); Abdou, M., E-mail: abdou@fusion.ucla.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA, 44-128 Engineering IV, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90025-1597 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We diffusion bonded Be to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin copper and titanium interlayers improved the bond's shear strength to 168 MPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A slow cooling scheme and intermediate hold step greatly increased bond strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Failure occurred in Be-Ti and Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds. - Abstract: Beryllium was successfully bonded to a Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel with a maximum strength of 150 MPa in tension and 168 MPa in shear. These strengths were achieved using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), at temperatures between 700 Degree-Sign C and 750 Degree-Sign C for 2 h and under a pressure of 103 MPa. To obtain these strengths, 10 {mu}m of titanium and 20 {mu}m of copper were deposited on the beryllium substrate prior to HIP bonding. The copper film acted a bonding aid to the RAFM steel, while the titanium acted as a diffusion barrier between the copper and the beryllium, suppressing the formation of brittle intermetallics that are known to compromise mechanical performance. Slow cooling from the peak HIP temperature along with an imposed hold time at 450 Degree-Sign C further enhanced the final mechanical strength of the bond.

  2. Nitriding treatment of reduced activation ferritic steel as functional layer for liquid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of functional layers such as a tritium permeation barrier and an anti-corrosion layer is the essential technology for the development of a molten salt type self cooled fusion blanket. In the present study, the characteristics of a nitriding treatment on a reduced activation ferritic steel, JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C) as the functional layer were investigated. The steel surface was nitrided by an ion nitriding treatment or a radical nitriding treatment. The nitridation characteristic of the steel surface was made clear based on the thermodynamic stability. The thermal diffusivity, the hydrogen permeability and the chemical stability in the molten salt Flinak were investigated. The results indicated that the nitriding treatment can improve the compatibility in the Flinak without the decrease of the thermal diffusivity, though there was little improvement as the hydrogen permeation barrier. (author)

  3. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T., E-mail: tjk@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  4. Thermo-mechanical fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermo-mechanical cycling fatigue (TMCF) behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels is examined. The test rig consists of a stiff load frame, which is directly heated by the digitally controlled ohmic heating device. Cylindrical specimens are used with a wall thickness of 0.4 mm. Variable strain rates are applied at TMCF test mode, due to the constant heating rate of 5.8 K/s and variable temperature changes. TMCF results of as received EUROFER 97 in the temperature range between 100 and 500-600 deg. C show a reduction in life time (a factor of 2) compared to F82H mod. and OPTIFER IV. TMCF-experiments with hold times of 100 and 1000 s show dramatic reduction in life time for all three materials

  5. Magnetic properties and adsorptive performance of manganese–zinc ferrites/activated carbon nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the unique microstructure and high specific surface area, activated carbon (AC) could act as an excellent adsorbent for wastewater treatment and good carrier for functional materials. In this paper, manganese–zinc ferrites (Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4: MZF) were anchored into AC by hydrothermal method, resulting in the excellent magnetic response for AC nanocomposites in wastewater treatment. All results demonstrated the magnetic nanoparticles presented a spinel phase structure and existed in the pores of AC. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of MZF/AC nanocomposites increased with the ferrites content, while the pore volume and specific surface area declined. The Sample-5 possessed the specific surface area of 1129 m2 g−1 (close to 1243 m2 g−1 of AC) and Ms of 3.96 emu g−1. Furthermore, the adsorptive performance for organic dyes was studied and 99% methylene blue was adsorbed in 30 min. The magnetic AC nanocomposites could be separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique. - Graphical abstract: The Sample-5 presented both good magnetic response and high BET surface area up to 1129 m2 g−1 (close to AC of 1243 m2 g−1), which could be separated completely for about 60 s. MZF/AC nanocomposites (Sample-3, 4, 5) in our work could be used as the magnetic absorbents, which could be separated easily by an outer magnet after the MB adsorption. - Highlights: • Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 (MZF) as few as possible was implanted into activated carbon (AC) for the higher surface area. • Sample-5 possessed the high specific surface area (1129 m2 g−1) and the suitable Ms (3.96 emu g−1). • Methylene blue was adsorbed almost completely by MZF/AC nanocomposites in 30 min. • MZF/AC nanocomposites were separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique

  6. TEM Study of the Orientation Relationship Between Cementite and Ferrite in a Bainitic Low Carbon High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Illescas Fernandez, Silvia; Brown, A P; He, K.; Fernández, Javier; Guilemany Casadamon, Josep Maria

    2005-01-01

    Two different bainitic structures are observed in a steel depending on the sample heat treatment. The different types of bainitic structures exhibit different orientation relationships between cementite and the ferrite matrix. Upper bainite presents a Pitsch orientation relationship and lower bainite presents a Bagaryatski orientation relationship. Different heat treatments of low carbon HSLA steel samples have been studied using TEM in order to find the orientation relationshi...

  7. Effect of water depth on the underwater wet welding of ferritic steels using austenitic Ni-based alloy electrodes.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheakley, Brian J.

    2000-01-01

    Underwater welding using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) on US naval Vessels is very attractive because of the ability to effect repairs without costly dry dock expenses. In the past the primary problems with underwater wet weldments on steels utilizing SMAW with ferritic electrodes, were underbead cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ), slag inclusions, oxide inclusions, and porosity. To avoid underbead cracking three weld samples were made using an austenitic nickel weld metal with an O...

  8. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  9. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  10. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    The broad objective of this NEUP was to further develop a class of 12-15Cr ferritic alloys that are dispersion strengthened and made radiation tolerant by an ultrahigh density of Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in the size range of less than 5 nm. We call these potentially transformable materials nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). NFAs are typically processed by ball milling pre-alloyed rapidly solidified powders and yttria (Y2O3) powders. Proper milling effectively dissolves the Ti, Y and O solutes that precipitate as NFs during hot consolidation. The tasks in the present study included examining alternative processing paths, characterizing and optimizing the NFs and investigating solid state joining. Alternative processing paths involved rapid solidification by gas atomization of Fe, 14% Cr, 3% W, and 0.4% Ti powders that are also pre-alloyed with 0.2% Y (14YWT), where the compositions are in wt.%. The focus is on exploring the possibility of minimizing, or even eliminating, the milling time, as well as producing alloys with more homogeneous distributions of NFs and a more uniform, fine grain size. Three atomization environments were explored: Ar, Ar plus O (Ar/O) and He. The characterization of powders and alloys occurred through each processing step: powder production by gas atomization; powder milling; and powder annealing or hot consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) or hot extrusion. The characterization studies of the materials described here include various combinations of: a) bulk chemistry; b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); c) atom probe tomography (APT); d) small angle neutron scattering (SANS); e) various types of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM); and f) microhardness testing. The bulk chemistry measurements show that preliminary batches of gas-atomized powders could be produced within specified composition ranges. However, EPMA and TEM showed that the Y is heterogeneously distributed and phase separated, but

  11. Deposition of La0.8Sr0.2Cr0.97V0.03O3 and MnCr2O4 thin films on ferritic alloy for solid oxide fuel cell application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2007-01-01

    Single layer dense films of La0.8Sr0.2Cr0.97V0.03O3 (LSC) and MnCr2O4 with a thickness of 500 nm were deposited on a commercially available ferritic alloy (Crofer 22APU) by large-area Pulsed Laser Deposition. The deposited samples were subsequently oxidized at 1173 K for 500 h in humidified air...

  12. Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically activated mixtures of barium carbonate and goethite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Temuujin; M Aoyama; M Senna; T Masuko; C Ando; H Kishi; A Minjigmaa

    2006-10-01

    -type hexagonal ferrite precursor was prepared by a soft mechanochemical treatment of BaCO3 and -FeOOH mixtures. The effect of milling on its structure and thermal behaviour was examined by XRD, SEM and FTIR. Well crystallized -type hexagonal ferrite was formed from just 1 h milled precursors at 800°C. The beneficial effect of milling was explained in terms of increased homogeneity with simultaneous hetero bridging bond formation between powder constituents.

  13. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  14. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  15. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK-CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, Anne, E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie-Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK-CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 Degree-Sign C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4}) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 Degree-Sign C, solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 Degree-Sign C, final annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, straightening and final aging at 800 Degree-Sign C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO{sub 2} were loaded in Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial

  16. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  17. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  18. Catalysis by Oxidic Spinel Ferrites

    OpenAIRE

    Darshane, V.; Lokegaonkar, S.; Oak, S.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed metal oxides viz. ferrites, ferrochromites and chromites have been studied with a view to investigating a correlation between bulk physical properties and catalytic performance over decomposition of alcohols. We could observe a satisfactory relationship between lattice parameter, electronic activation energy, nature and mobility of charge carriers and Curie temperature with reference to catalytic activity of various spinel ferrites.

  19. Weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel under ultra power density fiber laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems as it has been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. As one of RAFMS, F82H, which has been developed and studied in Japan, is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the collaboration of IEA fusion materials development. Although F82H is the well perceived RAFM as ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) structural material, the weldability was proved though TIG, EB and YAG laser weld tests using only 15 and 25 mm thickness plate. In order to reduce the welding distortion, the residual stress and the area of the heat affected zone, it is necessary to decrease the total heat input under the welding. Recently, as a result of R and D efforts about the sources of laser beam, a high-power fiber laser beam has been developed as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. Since the power density of the fiber laser beam is very large, it is possible to increase the welding speed more than 10 m/min. So, in this study, the weldability of 1.5 mm thickness F82H plate and pipe was examined by using a ultra power density fiber laser, in order to reveal the excellent weldability of F82H. As a basic study of the butt welding between 1.5 mm plate and 1.5 mm thickness pipe with 11 mm outer diameter, the focus position, the beam position and the laser power were varied using 25 mm square plate and 25 mm length pipe. Then, by using the fiber laser with 1.1 MW/mm2 peak power density under the appropriate welding condition obtained from the basic study, a full penetrated weld bead with narrow width was formed in the butt welding

  20. Radiological assessment of the limits and potential of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu, E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp; Someya, Yoji; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Hirose, Takanori; Ochiai, Kentaro

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Ni is the major contamination element that should be removed to reduce the activation levels. • The amount of 14C transmuted from N must be reduced to achieve the shallow land burial limit. • About 100 ppm N will remain in the EAF melted steel, and Ni contamination occurs during the melting process. • Using Al for deoxidation of the RAFM steel has no significant impact on the activation levels. • The impact of the minor elements such as Ag is negligible compared to that of Ni and N. - Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed as the structural material for the fusion demonstration reactor, DEMO. These steels contain elements that produce radioactive isotopes and decay to low levels in timeframe required by the waste management scenario. Developments within the past quarter-century suggest a practical limit to the removal of undesired impurities such as Co, Cu, Ni, Mo and Nb. The concentrations of elements essential for the mechanical properties of RAFM steels, such as Al and N, required a compromise between the waste disposal scenario and performance demand. The limits and potential of RAFM steel pertaining to reducing the activation levels after service are discussed based on the actual achievements of F82H, Japanese RAFM steel, and numerical analyses of the activity. It was found that in order to achieve the shallow land burial limits 100 years after a reactor shutdown, Ni is the most significant impurity that must be removed (Mo in the case of the first wall). Limiting N below concentrations of 100 ppm will not be possible for a large scale melt, but concentrations of Al up to the maximum amount that has been achieved present no problems.

  1. Influence of smelting processes on precipitation behaviors and mechanical properties of low activation ferrite steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Creep properties could be improved dramatically by control of smelting process. → VIM + ESR smelting process could improve the W macrosegregation. → W could accelerate the transition of M7C3 to M23C6 in RAFM steel. → The synergetic effect of carbides and tungsten depletion of solid solution lead to the decrease in creep resistance. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of smelting processes on precipitation behaviors and mechanical properties of CLF-1 (China low activation ferrite) steel was investigated. Mechanical properties of CLF-1 steels melted by vacuum induction melting (VIM, CS25 steel) and vacuum induction melting followed by consumable electrode remelting (VIM + ESR, CS350 steel) had been studied. The results indicated that the steels showed similar values of hardness and tensile strength, however, creep properties of CLF-1 steel were obviously improved by VIM + ESR process. M23C6 and M7C3 Carbides were precipitated in the CS25 steel, and M23C6 carbides were precipitated in CS350 steel after high-temperature tempering at 1013 K for 90 min. Creep properties of CS25 steel were shown to be dramatically deteriorated by the existence of rod M7C3 precipitates, which was due to W macrosegregation in the CS25 steel melted by VIM. M7C3 was replaced by M23C6 after ageing at 823 K for 5000 h.

  2. Effect of silicon on the microstructure and mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shenghu; Rong, Lijian

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Si in the range of 0.05-0.77 wt.% on the microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels has been investigated. An increase in Si content affected the prior austenite grain size resulting in an increase in the tensile strength at room temperature. The tensile strength of steels tested above 773 K did not change significantly with the addition of Si, which was due to the diminished carbide hardening effect and boundary strengthening effect. Detailed fractographic analysis revealed that tear fractures occurred in the samples tensile tested at room temperature, while cup and cone fractures were found in samples tensile tested at temperatures above 773 K, which were induced by the easing of dislocation pile-ups. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) decreased when the Si content increased to 0.22 wt.%. However, the DBTT increased when the Si content reached 0.77 wt.% and this was due to the precipitation of Laves phase. The RAFM steel with approximately 0.22 wt.% Si content was found to possess an optimized combination of microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness.

  3. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  4. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  5. Optimization of production and properties of the nanoscaled ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y2O3-0,3TiH2 and characterization of structure and property correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion power reactors next to renewable energy sources shall form an important basis for a future energy scenario avoiding damaging emissions due to the lack of fossil primary energy carriers. An efficient operation of such reactors necessitate temperatures >700 C, which require new kinds of structural materials. Today only reduced activated oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS-) materials based on iron, which have high strengths at elevated temperatures, offer the possibility to meet those criterias, which are developed in internationally coordinated programs. Therefore a nearly industrial production process based on the powdermetallurgical route is iteratively and systematically optimized to produce the ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y2O3-0,3TiH2. Through TEM elemental analyses of mechanically alloyed steel powder it is confirmed, that the additives Y2O3 and TiH2 dissolve completely in the powder and form the ODS-particles during the HIP-cycle. Detailed studies of powder contamination during mechanical alloying reveal correlations between the contamination behaviour of certain elements and the milling parameters. A specially designed procedure of powder encapsulation and sealing leads to a successful powder compaction to the ODS-material 13Cr-1W-0,3Y2O3-0,3TiH2. Detailed TEM studies show a bimodal grain size distribution within the material at first. The alloy's recrystallization behaviour is the main reason for this phenomenon and is therefore discussed in detail. A high dispersion of ODS-particles as the decisive material's component with particle sizes von 3-5nm within grains and 12-36nm at the grain boundaries is successfully reached and verified by numerous TEM-Elemental Mappings. By applying hot rolling as an additional step during production a more even grain structure by equally maintaining the fine nanoskaled particle dispersion is set up. The microstructure is highly stable, since no grain- or ODS-particle coarsening occurs during short term heat

  6. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  7. Research and Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel CLF-1 in SWIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Because of the good industrial bases and the superior resistance for irradiation, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel is recognized as the primary structural material for ITER test blanket modules (TBM) and a DEMOnstration reactor. In China, one of the basic options of the blanket module concept to be tested in ITER is helium cooled solid breeder (HCSB) with the RAFM steel as the reference structural material. To provide material and property database for the design and fabrication of the ITER HCSB TBM, a new type of RAFM steel CLF-1 was developed and characterized by South Western Institute of Physics in China. In this paper, recent progress in SWIP research on RAFM steel CLF-1 R and D is reviewed with a focus on ITER-TBM design and fabrication. A new heat of 350 kg of CLF-1 steel was produced recently and different product forms (plates, rods and welding wires) were manufactured. Recent advances in the fields of steel development, mainly on the melting and processing techniques, composition optimization and thermo-mechanical treatment were addressed. The properties database and technical information required for blanket design and fabrication were derived. From the tensile and creep properties test, the design allowable stresses are derived. From the Charpy impact test, ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) are evaluated. From the physical properties databases, density, modulus of elasticity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, linear expansion coefficients are derived. The effect of thermal ageing on the microstructure and properties was investigated to study the stability under high temperature for long periods of time. In addition, the efforts to characterize the weldability of CLF-1 using tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) method for the fabrication of TBM were also introduced. (author)

  8. Cryomilling effect on the mechanical alloying behaviour of ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened powder with Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Significant particle/grain size refinement of both Y2O3 and Fe-alloy powders by cryomilling. •Mechanisms of fragmentation/dissolution of Y2O3 during cryomilling were suggested. •The effect of cryomilling on residual microstrain was found. •Increased interstitial elements contamination during cryomilling was found. -- Abstract: Cryogenic cooling effect on mechanical alloying of the mixture of Fe–14Cr–3W–0.1Ti and Y2O3 powders was investigated. The powder mixtures were ball milled for 40 h at room-temperature and −150 °C. Cryomilling produced much finer particle/grain size than conventional room-temperature milling. XRD diffraction peak intensity was much lower under cryomilling conditions due to formation of nano-size grains and increased residual microstrain. Absorption amounts of interstitial elements were considerably higher under cryomilling conditions

  9. The effect of chelating/combustion agent on catalytic activity and magnetic properties of Dy doped Ni-Zn ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoila, P.; Slatineanu, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Postolache, P. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Iordan, A.R. [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Palamaru, M.N., E-mail: palamaru@uaic.ro [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania)

    2012-09-14

    The spinel ferrite Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 1.98}Dy{sub 0.02}O{sub 4} was prepared by sol-gel low temperature autocombustion method using four different chelating/combustion agents: citric acid, tartaric acid, urea and cellulose. Infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area measurement, the catalytic H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition and the magnetic behavior were employed to investigate the influence of the combustion agents on structural characteristics, catalytic activity and magnetic properties. Spinel-type phase in the nano-scale domain was accomplished during sol-gel synthesis and was confirmed by XRD and IR. The best catalytic activity is belonging to the sample obtained using urea, which shows the smallest grain size (SEM), the highest specific surface area (BET measurements) and DyFeO{sub 3} phase (XRD), while ferrimagnetic behavior prevails for all the samples independently of fuel agent. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Zn ferrite doped with Dy as catalyst and magnetic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four chelating/combustion agents were used in sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid and cellulose allowed spinel monophase formation confirmed by XRD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of ferrite samples is affected by synthesis conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behavior is not changed significantly as a function of fuel agent.

  10. Impedance spectroscopy of the oxide films formed during high temperature oxidation of a cobalt-plated ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velraj, S.; Zhu, J. H.; Painter, A. S.; Du, S. W.; Li, Y. T.

    2014-02-01

    Impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate the oxide films formed on cobalt-coated Crofer 22 APU ferritic stainless steel after thermal oxidation at 800 °C in air for different times (i.e. 2, 50, 100 and 500 h). Impedance spectra of the oxide films exhibited two or three semicircles depending on the oxidation time, which correspond to the presence of two or three individual oxide layers. Coupled with scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the individual oxide layer corresponding to each semicircle was determined unambiguously. Impedance spectrum analysis of the oxide films formed on the sample after thermal exposure at 800 °C in air for 2 h led to the identification of the low-frequency and high-frequency semicircles as being from Cr2O3 and Co3O4, respectively. SEM/EDS and XRD analysis of the 500-h sample clearly revealed the presence of three oxide layers, analyzed to be Co3-xCrxO4, CoCr2O4, and Cr2O3. Although the SEM images of the 50-h and 100-h samples did not clearly show the CoCr2O4 layer, impedance plots implied their presence. The oxide scales were assigned to their respective semicircles and the electrical properties of Co3-xCrxO4, CoCr2O4 and Cr2O3 were determined from the impedance data.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of furosemide-functionalized ferrite on the sedimentation behavior of starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanikumar, S.; Meenarathi, B.; Kannammal, L.; Anbarasan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Furosemide-functionalized nanoferrite was synthesized and characterized by various analytical techniques. The furosemide-functionalized ferrite was used to settle down the starch particles under three different pH. Thus, obtained starch/Fe3O4 nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The sedimentation velocity of starch in the presence of furosemide-functionalized Fe3O4 was critically compared with the available literature value and the results are discussed in detail. The high sedimentation velocity of starch under the influence of gravitational force and the external magnetic force is studied. The starch-coated ferrites exhibited the lower vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) value. This novel research work will bring out a new methodology in the field of starch materials.

  12. Effects of Grit Blasting and Annealing on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Austenitic and Ferritic Fe-Cr Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. V.; Otero, E.; Bouchaud, B.; Pedraza, F.

    2014-08-01

    Grit blasting (corundum) of an austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel (18Cr-8Ni) and of a low-alloy SA213 T22 ferritic steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) followed by annealing in argon resulted in enhanced outward diffusion of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Whereas 3 bar of blasting pressure allowed to grow more Cr2O3 and Mn x Cr3- x O4 spinel-rich scales, higher pressures gave rise to Fe2O3-enriched layers and were therefore disregarded. The effect of annealing pre-oxidation treatment on the isothermal oxidation resistance was subsequently evaluated for 48 h for both steels and the results were compared with their polished counterparts. The change of oxidation kinetics of the pre-oxidized 18Cr-8Ni samples at 850 °C was ascribed to the growth of a duplex Cr2O3/Mn x Cr3- x O4 scale that remained adherent to the substrate. Such a positive effect was less marked when considering the oxidation kinetics of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel but a more compact and thinner Fe x Cr3- x O4 subscale grew at 650 °C compared to that of the polished samples. It appeared that the beneficial effect is very sensitive to the experimental blasting conditions. The input of Raman micro-spectroscopy was shown to be of ground importance in the precise identification of multiple oxide phases grown under the different conditions investigated in this study.

  13. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  14. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  15. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs

  16. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Gu; Han, Heung Nam

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  17. Influence of Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on thermal stability and improved hardness in mechanically alloyed Fe base ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotan, Hasan, E-mail: hkotan@konya.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Necmettin Erbakan University, Dere Aşıklar Mah. Demet Sokak, Meram, Konya 42140 (Turkey); Darling, Kris A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NC State University, 911 Partners Way, Room 3078, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    The motivation of this work was driven to improve the thermal stability in systems where polymorphic transformations can result in an additional driving force, upsetting the expected thermodynamic stability. In this study, Fe{sub 92}Ni{sub 8} alloys with Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions were produced by ball milling and then annealed at high temperatures. Emphasis was placed on understanding the effects of dispersed nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle additions and their effect on microstructural stability at and above the bcc-to-fcc transformation occurring at 700 °C in Fe–Ni systems. Results reveal that microstructural stability and hardness can be promoted by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions, that being mostly effective for stability before and after phase transition, respectively. The mechanical strength of these alloys is achieved by a unique microstructure comprised a ultra-fine grain Fe base matrix, which contains dispersions of both nano-scale in-situ formed Zr base intermetallics and ex-situ added Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} secondary oxide phases. Both of these were found to be essential for a combination of high thermal stability and high mechanical strength properties. - Highlights: • Polymorphic transformations can limit the processing of nanostructured powders. • It causes a rapid grain growth and impairs the improved mechanical properties. • We aim to improve the hardness and thermal stability above the phase transformation. • Thermal stability is achieved by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions. • Hardness is promoted by in-situ formed and ex-situ added secondary nano phases.

  18. Recent activities on the compatibility of the ferritic steel wall with the plasma in the JFT-2M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Sato, M.; Kawashima, H.; Isei, N.; Kimura, H.; Ogawa, H.; Miyachi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Shibata, T.

    2002-12-01

    The compatibility of the low activation ferritic steel with a fusion plasma has been investigated in the JFT-2M tokamak. The program consists of three stages. In the first stage, the reduction of fast ion losses was well demonstrated by ferritic steel plates (FPs) outside the vacuum vessel (VV). In the second stage, 20% of the inner surface of the VV was covered by the FPs. The plasma control, stability, and impurity release were preliminary investigated. No deteriorative effect on the plasma was observed at least in the following conditions: partial covering of 20% and the normalized beta value less than 2.8. First boronization was applied to JFT-2M leading to a remarkable decrease of the oxygen impurity. After the boronization, plasmas with the highest normalized beta in JFT-2M were obtained. Thus encouraging results were gained for this stage. In the third stage, the VV was fully covered by FPs, where the ripple reduction and the plasma stability will be investigated as a full scale testing.

  19. Experimental evidence and thermodynamics analysis of high magnetic field effects on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature in Fe-C-Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-isothermal decomposition of austenite into ferrite and pearlite in Fe-xC-1.5 wt.% Mn steels with x = 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 wt.% C is investigated by in situ dilatometry and microstructure characterization in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The global shift towards higher temperatures of the respective austenite, ferrite + austenite and ferrite + pearlite stability regions is experimentally quantified. A systematic increase in the ferrite area fraction and proportional reduction of the Vickers hardness values with the magnetic field intensity are also reported. Moreover, the steels' magnetizations, measured up to 3.5 T and 1100 K, are used to calculate the magnetic contribution to the free energy of the transformation and to account thermodynamically for the field dependence of the transformation temperature. The impact of magnetic field is found to be greater with increasing carbon content in the steels.

  20. Experimental evidence and thermodynamics analysis of high magnetic field effects on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature in Fe-C-Mn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, T., E-mail: thomas.garcin@grenoble.cnrs.fr [CNRS/CRETA, 25 rue des martyrs BP166, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Rivoirard, S. [CNRS/CRETA, 25 rue des martyrs BP166, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Elgoyhen, C. [CRM Gent, Technologiepark 903c, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Beaugnon, E. [CNRS/CRETA, 25 rue des martyrs BP166, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2010-04-15

    The non-isothermal decomposition of austenite into ferrite and pearlite in Fe-xC-1.5 wt.% Mn steels with x = 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 wt.% C is investigated by in situ dilatometry and microstructure characterization in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The global shift towards higher temperatures of the respective austenite, ferrite + austenite and ferrite + pearlite stability regions is experimentally quantified. A systematic increase in the ferrite area fraction and proportional reduction of the Vickers hardness values with the magnetic field intensity are also reported. Moreover, the steels' magnetizations, measured up to 3.5 T and 1100 K, are used to calculate the magnetic contribution to the free energy of the transformation and to account thermodynamically for the field dependence of the transformation temperature. The impact of magnetic field is found to be greater with increasing carbon content in the steels.

  1. Microstructure and toughness of Cr-W and Cr-V ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain an optimum alloy composition of reduced-activation Cr-W-V ferritic steels, the microstructural evolution during thermal aging at 823-973 K and its effect on the toughness were investigated for simple Cr-W and Cr-V steels by means of transmission electron microscopy and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural evolution of the Cr-W steels was similar to that of the conventional Cr-Mo steels. Carbides precipitated in the martensite and the intermetallic compound Fe2W precipitated in the δ-ferrite of the Cr-W steels. On the other hand, only carbides precipitated in both the martensite and the δ-ferrite of the Cr-V steels. The effect of Cr, W and V on the thermal embrittlement is discussed by taking account of the precipitation behavior. (orig.)

  2. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  3. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  4. Fe-Ni合金/Ni铁氧体复合纳米纤维的制备、表征与磁性能研究%Preparation, Characterization and Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni Alloy/Ni-Ferrite Composite Nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向军; 张雄辉; 褚艳秋; 沈湘黔

    2012-01-01

    A series of Fe-Ni alloy/Ni-ferrite composite nanofibers with average diameters of 60~70 nm were successfully fabricated using electrospinning combined with the hydrogen-thermal reduction method.The thermal decomposition behavior of electrospun precursor nanofibers and crystal structures,phase compositions,morphologies and magnetic properties of the resultant products were characterized by means of thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis,X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy,selected area electron diffraction,and vibrating sample magnetometer.It is found that both the preparation temperature of the pristine Ni-ferrite nanofibers and the reduction temperature have considerable influences on the phase compositions and magnetic properties of the corresponding reduction products.With increasing reduction temperature from 270 to 400 ℃ for the Ni-ferrite nanofibers prepared at 550 ℃,the content of Fe-Ni alloy in the reduction products increases gradually,the saturation magnetizations,remanences and coercivities increase initially,respectively reaching a maximum value of 203.0 emu g-1,54.9 emu g-1 and 42.7 kA m-1 for the composite obtained after reduction at 320 ℃,with a mass fraction of about 82% for Fe-Ni alloy,and then decrease with a further increase in reduction temperature.As the preparation temperature of the pristine Ni-ferrite nanofibers decreases from 700 to 400 ℃,the saturation magnetizations of the corresponding products obtained at the same reduction condition(i.e.,reduction at 300 ℃ for 1h) increase gradually,while their remanences and coercivities show a trend of first increase and then decrease,and the reduction product of Ni-ferrite nanofibers synthesized at 500 ℃ has a maximum remanence and coercivity of 62.2 emu g-1 and 47.8 kA m-1,respectively.Compared to the pristine Ni-ferrite nanofibers,the prepared Fe-Ni alloy/Ni-ferrite composite nanofibers exhibit more excellent soft magnetic

  5. Experimental study on activating welding for aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yong; Fan Ding

    2005-01-01

    TIG welding and EB welding for aluminum alloy 3003 were carried out to study the effects of activating flux on weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys. SiO2 was used as the activating flux. It is found that, SiO2 can increase the weld penetration and decrease the weld width of FBTIG when the flux gap is small. For A-TIG welding and EB welding with focused mode, the weld penetrations and the weld widths increase simultaneously. SiO2 has little effect on the weld penetration and weld width of EB welding with defocused mode. It is believed that, change of surface tension temperature gradient is not the main mechanism of SiO2 improving weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys.

  6. On crystallochemical mechanism of small alloying addition effect on dissolution process of corrosion-resistant steels in active state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regularities of component dissolution and the changes of the surface layer composition of the Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Mo steels are studied. The investigations have been carried out taking as an example high-purity ferrite steels of the FeCr18 and FeCr26 type with Mo content from O to 1.7 and from 0 to 1.2 at. % in 1n H2SO4 respectively at room temperature. The notions of dissolution character of energetically heterogeneous alloy surface are developed. A conclusion is made on the mechanism of inhibitting effect of molybdenum on the anode process of steel dissolution in the active state and on the mechanism of its effect on steel passivation capacity

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  9. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  10. Rapid solidification of candidate ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo steels were rapidly solidified by the liquid dynamic compaction process and 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel was prepared by the ultrasonic gas atomization process. The consolidation was performed in the ferritic temperature range in order to minimize segregation. These alloys will be tested at ORNL using 1/3 CVN test specimens and the results will be compared with those for conventially processed alloys

  11. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  12. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroja, S., E-mail: saroja@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Bhanu Sankara Rao, K. [School of Engineering Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad (India); Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures (A{sub c1}, A{sub c3} and M{sub s}) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  13. Application of thermoelectricity to NDE of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steels and neutron irradiated ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoelectric power (TEP) of an alloy depends mainly on its temperature, its chemical composition and its atomic arrangement. The TEP measurement technique is used in order to study and follow two degradation phenomena affecting some components of the primary loop of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The first degradation phenomenon is the thermal aging of cast duplex stainless steel components. The de-mixing of the ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni slid solution is responsible for the decreasing of the mechanical characteristics. Laboratory studies have shown the sensitivity of TEP to the de-mixing phenomenon. TEP increases linearly with the ferrite content and with and Arrhenius-type aging parameter depending on time, temperature and activation energy. TEP is also correlated to mechanic characteristics. The second degradation phenomenon is the aging of ferritic steels due to neutron irradiation at about 290 deg C. In this case, the degradation mechanism is the formation of clusters of solute atoms and/or copper rich precipitates that causes the hardening of the material. As a first approach, a study of binary Fe-Cu alloys irradiated by electrons at 288 deg C has revealed the possibility of following the copper depletion of the ferritic matrix. Moreover, the recovery of the mechanical properties of the alloy by annealing can be monitored. Finally, a correlation between Vickers hardness and TEP has been established. (author)

  14. One-step pickling-activation before magnesium alloy plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-juan; YU Gang; OUYANG Yue-jun; HE Xiao-mei; ZHANG Jun; YE Li-yuan

    2009-01-01

    A one-step pickling-activation process was proposed as an environmental friendly pretreatment method in phosphate-permanganate solution before electroplating on magnesium alloys. The effects of pickling-activation on qualities of coating were assessed by adhesion and porosity testing of copper plating. The interfacial reactions between specimen and solution were analyzed with SEM, EDX and XRD. The results show that the developed process of pickling-activation can equalize the potentials on substrate surface. The compacted zinc film can be obtained by zinc immersion after treating magnesium alloy in the pH 4-6 phosphate-permanganate solution for 3-5 min. The adhesion and corrosion resistance of copper plating are enhanced. The one-step pickling-activation can replace the existing two-step process of acid pickling and activation which contains a great deal of chromium and fluorine. The procedure of surface pretreatment is simplified and the production environment is improved.

  15. Application of Mechanochemistry in Ferrite Materials Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarek, W.; Ninham, B.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of progress and implications of recent technological advances in mechanochemical processing of ferrites is presented. We discuss the potential for applications of mechanical activation by induced phase transformations and chemical reactions in soft and hard ferrite materials through enhancement of structural and magnetic properties.

  16. Control of substrate oxidation in MOD ceramic coating on low-activation ferritic steel with reduced-pressure atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Teruya, E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp; Muroga, Takeo

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was produced on a ferritic steel substrate with a reduced-pressure. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer prevents further substrate oxidation in following coating process. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer has a function as a hydrogen permeation barrier. • A smooth MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was successfully made on the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by dip coating. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would enhance flexibility in MOD coating process and performances. - Abstract: An Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coating fabricated using the metal–organic decomposition (MOD) method on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered low-activation ferritic steel JLF-1 substrate was examined to improve hydrogen permeation barrier performance of the coating. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was obtained before coating by heat treating the substrate at 700 °C under reduced pressures of <5 × 10{sup −3} Pa and 5 Pa. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was significantly stable even with heat treatment at 700 °C in air. This layer prevented further production of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which has been considered to degrade coating performance. An MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating with a smooth surface was successfully obtained on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered JLF-1 substrate by dip coating followed by drying and baking. Preprocessing to obtain a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would provide flexibility in the coating process for blanket components and ducts. Moreover, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer suppressed hydrogen permeation through the JLF-1 substrate. While further optimization of the coating fabrication process is required, it would be possible to suppress hydrogen permeation significantly by multilayers of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MOD oxide ceramic.

  17. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition

  18. Dynamic Strain Aging and Oxidation Effects on the Thermomechanical Fatigue Deformation of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagesha, A.; Kannan, R.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Sandhya, R.; Choudhary, B. K.; Laha, K.

    2016-03-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated under in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) conditions under different mechanical strain amplitudes and temperature regimes. OP TMF was generally observed to result in the lowest cyclic lives compared to both IP TMF and isothermal low cycle fatigue (IF) at the maximum temperature ( T max). The stress-strain hysteresis loops under TMF were marked by extensive serrations associated with dynamic strain aging (DSA) at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct. The serrations were noticed during the downward ramp of temperature that resulted in IP and OP TMF exhibiting jerky flow in the compressive and tensile portions, respectively. However, no evidence of serrated flow was seen under IF cycling at any of the temperatures within the TMF cycle. The stress response during IP TMF was marked by a near-saturation regime over 65 to 70 pct of life in contrast to continuous cyclic softening in the case of OP TMF. The marked life reduction observed under OP cycling at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct was attributed to the deleterious influence associated with oxidation, DSA, and tensile mean stress. The findings assume importance in the context of elevated temperature fatigue design, considering the fact that the IF data at T max are deemed adequately conservative in traditional design approaches.

  19. Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhuitong@126.com [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Gansu Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Cai, Xiaodong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Qianping [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Gansu Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. Solid spinel Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods for comparison. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be magnetically separated easily for reuse and no obvious loss of activity was observed when reused in six consecutive runs. - Highlights: • Uniform spinel ferrite hollow spheres were prepared by a simple method. • The catalyst has been proved much more efficient for styrene oxidation than the reported analogues. • The catalyst can be easily separated by external magnetic field and has exhibited excellent reusability. • The catalytic system is environmentally friendly. - Abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. For comparison, solid Mg–Cu ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods. All the samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} physisorption. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed, and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be

  20. Ferrites and ceramic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Jotania, Rajshree B

    2013-01-01

    The Ferrite term is used to refer to all magnetic oxides containing iron as major metallic component. Ferrites are very attractive materials because they simultaneously show high resistivity and high saturation magnetization, and attract now considerable attention, because of the interesting physics involved. Typical ferrite material possesses excellent chemical stability, high corrosion resistivity, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-striction, and magneto-optical properties. Ferrites belong to the group of ferrimagnetic oxides, and include rare-earth garnets and ortho-ferrites. Several

  1. Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraliya, Jagdish D., E-mail: jdbaraliya@yahoo.co.in; Joshi, Hiren H., E-mail: jdbaraliya@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Saurashtra University, Rajkot - 360 005, Gujarat (India)

    2014-04-24

    We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria.

  2. Development of HIP bonding procedure and mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints for reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural materials of blanket components in fusion DEMO reactors will receive a neutron wall load more than 3-5MW/m2 as well as exposed by surface heat flux more than 0.5MW/m2. A reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H has been developed by JAERI in collaboration with NKK from viewpoints of resistance for high temperature and neutron loads and lower radioactivity. This study intends to obtain basic performance of F-82H to establish the fabrication procedure of the first wall and blanket box by using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonding. Before HIP bonding tests, effects of heat treatment temperature and surface roughness on mechanical properties of joints were investigated in the heat treatment tests and diffusion bonding tests, respectively. From these results, the optimum HIP bonding conditions and the post heat treatment were selected. Using these conditions, the HIP bonding tests were carried out to evaluate HIP bondability and to obtain mechanical properties of the joints. Sufficient HIP bonding performance was obtained under the temperature of 1040degC, the compressive stress of 150MPa, the holding time of 2h, and the surface roughness ∼μ m. Mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints with these conditions were similar to those of as-received base metal. An oxide formation on the surface to be bonded would need to be avoided for sufficient bonding. The bonding ratio, Charpy impact value and fatigue performance of the joints strongly depended on the HIP conditions, especially temperature, while micro-structure, Vickers hardness and tensile properties had little dependence on the HIP temperature. The surface roughness strongly affected the bonding ratio and would be required to be in the level of a few μ m. In the HIP bonding test of the welded material, the once-melted surface could be jointed by the HIP bonding under the above-mentioned procedure. (J.P.N.)

  3. Ultra-fine ferrite grains obtained in the TSDR process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Wangyue Yang; Chunxia Xue; Zuqing Sun

    2008-01-01

    By careful design of rolling schedule, ultra-fine (~2 μm) ferrite grains in a low carbon high niobium (0.09wt%Nb) micro-alloying steel with average austenite grain sizes above 800 μm can be achieved in the simulated thin slab direct rolling process. The 5-pass deformation was divided into two stages: the refinement of austenite through complete recrystallization and the refinement of ferrite through dynamic strain-induced transformation. The effects of Nb in solution and strain-induced NbCN precipitates on the fer-rite transformation were also extensively discussed.

  4. Precipitation of Nb in Ferrite After Austenite Conditioning. Part II: Strengthening Contribution in High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, M. A.; Iza-Mendia, Amaia; Gutiérrez, I.

    2012-12-01

    Often, Nb contributes to the strength of a microalloyed steel beyond the expected level because of the grain size strengthening resulting from thermomechanical processing. Two different mechanisms are behind this phenomenon, and both of them have to do with the amount of Nb remaining in solution after hot rolling. The first of them is the increase of the hardenability of the steel as a result of Nb, and the second one is the fine precipitation of NbC in ferrite. Three Nb microalloyed steels were thermomechanically processed in the laboratory and coiled at different temperatures to investigate the effect of Nb content on the tensile properties. The extra strength was linearly related to the Nb remaining in solution after the hot working. The maximum contribution from Nb was reached for a coiling temperature of 873 K (600 °C).

  5. Study of the precipitation and of the hardening microscopic mechanisms under irradiation in dilute ferritic alloys; Etude de la precipitation et des mecanismes microscopiques de durcissement sous irradiation dans des alliages ferritiques dilues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H

    1995-07-01

    The copper precipitation plays a significant role in the embrittlement process of reactor vessel steels under neutron irradiation at 300 deg C. In order to understand the copper precipitation mechanisms, we have studied model ferritic binary FeCu and ternary alloys FeCuX (X=Mn,Ni, Cr, P). These materials have been either Irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons In the 175-360 deg C temperature range or thermal aged at 500 deg C. The evolution of materials has been followed by resistivity measurements under irradiation, by small angle neutron scattering and by Vickers microhardness measurements. We have shown the similarity of copper precipitation under thermally ageing at 500 deg C and electron Irradiation at 300 deg C, in FeCu{sub 1,34%}. This result confirms that the main effect of electronic irradiation is to accelerate precipitation. Nevertheless, we have observed that irradiation induces an additional contribution to hardening attributed to point defect clusters. Concerning the ternary alloys, we observed that at 300 deg C the addition of a third element has no significant effect on the copper precipitation kinetic under irradiation but that at lower temperature manganese slows down precipitation kinetic. In order to reproduce the experimental results obtained on FeCu{sub 1,34%} by using a cluster kinetics model, we have to suppose that the precipitation is heterogeneous and controlled by interface reactions for the small size clusters. In addition, neutron or electron irradiated industrial steels have been studied by small angle neutron scattering. The results revealed the presence of nano-metric solute clusters which contain few copper atoms and which are not linked to the formation of displacement cascades. (author)

  6. Tensile and charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on eight reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on the steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 365{degrees}C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15-17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 365{degrees}C. Thermal aging had little effect on the tensile behavior or the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in the upper-shelf energy (USE). After {approx}7 dpa, the strength of the steels increased and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (i.e., the strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness, as measured by an increase in DBTT and a decrease in the USE, remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels were the most irradiation resistant.

  7. Ultra-Pure Ferritic Stainless Steels-Grade, Refining Operation, and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Xiang-mi; JIANG Zhou-hua; LI Hua-bing

    2007-01-01

    The grades of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels, especially the grades used in automobile exhaust system, were reviewed. The dependence of properties on alloying elements, the refining facilities, and the mechanism of the reactions in steel melts were described in detail. Vacuum, strong stirring, and powder injection proved to be effective technologies in the melting of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels. The application of the ferritic grades was also briefly introduced.

  8. Chromium Activity Measurements in Nickel Based Alloys for Very High Temperature Reactors: Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are potential candidates for the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) of (very) high temperature reactors ((V)-HTRs). The behavior under corrosion of these alloys by the (V)-HTR coolant (impure helium) is an important selection criterion because it defines the service life of these components. At high temperature, the Haynes 230 is likely to develop a chromium oxide on the surface. This layer protects from the exchanges with the surrounding medium and thus confers certain passivity on metal. At very high temperature, the initial microstructure made up of austenitic grains and coarse intra- and intergranular M6C carbide grains rich in W will evolve. The M6C carbides remain and some M23C6 richer in Cr appear. Then, carbon can reduce the protective oxide layer. The alloy loses its protective coating and can corrode quickly. Experimental investigations were performed on these nickel based alloys under an impure helium flow (Rouillard, F., 2007, 'Mecanismes de formation et de destruction de la couche d'oxyde sur un alliage chrominoformeur en milieu HTR, Ph.D. thesis, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, France). To predict the surface reactivity of chromium under impure helium, it is necessary to determine its chemical activity in a temperature range close to the operating conditions of the heat exchangers (T approximate to 1273 K). For that, high temperature mass spectrometry measurements coupled to multiple effusion Knudsen cells are carried out on several samples: Haynes 230, Inconel 617, and model alloys 1178, 1181, and 1201. This coupling makes it possible for the thermodynamic equilibrium to be obtained between the vapor phase and the condensed phase of the sample. The measurement of the chromium ionic intensity (I) of the molecular beam resulting from a cell containing an alloy provides the values of partial pressure according to the temperature. This value is compared with that of the pure substance (Cr) at the same temperature

  9. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  10. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  11. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João ARG; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  12. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João Arg; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  13. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João ARG; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity.

  14. Surface-Activated Amorphous Alloy Fuel Electrodes for Methanol Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Asahi; Hashimoto, Koji

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous alloy electrodes for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and its derivatives were obtained by the surface activation treatment consisting of electrodeposition of zinc on as-quenched amorphous alloy substrates, heating at 200-300℃ for 30 min, and subsequently leaching of zinc in an alkaline solution. The surface activation treatment provided a new method for the preparation of a large surface area on the amorphous alloys. The best result for oxidation of methanol, sodium formate an...

  15. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties; Alliages ferritiques 14/20% de chrome renforces par dispersion d`oxydes. Effets des procedes de mise en forme sur les textures de deformation, la recristallisation et les proprietes de traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regle, H.

    1994-12-31

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidi, Sheida

    2014-01-01

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. Implementation of RAFM steel and PbLi in blanket applications still requires material compatibility studies as many questions related to physical/chemical interactions in the RAFM...

  17. Impaired bacterial attachment to light activated Ni-Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Valappil, Sabeel P. [UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, 256 Gray' s In Road, WC1X 8LD, London (United Kingdom); Dunnill, Charles W. [University College London, Centre for Materials Chemistry, Chemistry Department, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Abou Neel, Ensanya A. [UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, 256 Gray' s In Road, WC1X 8LD, London (United Kingdom); Lee, Kevin [London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Parkin, Ivan P. [University College London, Centre for Materials Chemistry, Chemistry Department, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Wilson, Michael [UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Division of Microbial Diseases, 256 Gray' s In Road, WC1X 8LD, London (United Kingdom); Armitage, David A. [De Montfort University, Leicester School of Pharmacy, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Knowles, Jonathan C., E-mail: j.knowles@eastman.ucl.ac.uk [UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, 256 Gray' s In Road, WC1X 8LD, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-30

    Ni-Ti alloy due to its unique mechanical properties, is used for many types of implants. Failure of these implants can be attributed to many different factors; however infections are a common problem. In this paper, the attachment of the bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, to the Ni-Ti surface modified by a range of processes with and without of light activation (used to elicit antimicrobial properties of materials) was assessed and related to different surface characteristics. Before the light activation the number of bacterial colony forming units was the greatest for the samples thermally oxidised at 600 deg. C. This sample and the spark oxidised samples showed the highest photocatalytic activity but only the thermally oxidised samples at 600 deg. C showed a significant drop of S. aureus attachment. The findings in this study indicate that light activation and treating samples at 600 deg. C is a promising method for Ni-Ti implant applications with inherent antimicrobial properties. Light activation was shown to be an effective way to trigger photocatalytic reactions on samples covered with relatively thick titanium dioxide via accumulation of photons in the surface and a possible increase in defects which may result in free oxygen. Moreover, light activation caused an increase in the total surface energy.

  18. Abnormal Austenite-Ferrite Transformation Behaviors of Fe-Si:Dilatometric Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-chang; ZHANG Zhe-ping; ZHAO Kai; LI Bao-yin

    2004-01-01

    The isochronal γ→α transformation of Fe-1Si alloy was measured by high-resolution dilatometry. According to the variation of the ferrite formation rate, an abnormal γ→α phase transformation was recognized, while normal reaction,i.e. one peak continuous reaction, was also detected. The occurrence the one or the other type of γ→α transformation strongly depends on the grain size: the transformation type changes from abnormal to normal with decreasing grain size. In the abnormal transformation process the first stage of the transformation corresponds to the first peaks in the transformation rate, which are not thermally activated.

  19. Measurement of Activity of Indium in Liquid Bi-In-Sn Alloys by EMF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. R.; Mohan, S.; Behera, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical technique based on a molten salt electrolyte galvanic cell has been used to measure the activity of indium in liquid Bi-In-Sn alloys in the temperature range of 723 K to 855 K along three ternary sections. The activity of tin in Bi-Sn binary alloys has also been measured by the same technique in the above temperature range. The activity of indium in Bi-In-Sn alloys shows negative deviation from Raoult's law for most of the compositions and slight positive deviations for a few indium-rich compositions. The ternary excess molar free energies have been calculated by Darken's treatment. Isoactivity curves at 813 K in the ternary Bi-In-Sn alloys were derived by combining the activity data of In-Sn and Bi-In alloys. The values of excess molar free energy obtained in this study are compared with those calculated from the Muggianu model at 813 K.

  20. Production and qualification for fusion applications, a steel of low activity ferritic-martensitic ASTURFER; Produccion y cualificacion, para aplicaciones de fusion, de un acero de baja actividad ferritico-martensitico, ASTURFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Belzunce, J.; Artimez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    This article details the work carried out in the design and development pilot plant scale of a steel ferritic-martensitic of reduced activity, Asturfer, with a chemical composition and metallurgical properties similar to steel Eurofer. We describe the different stages of steel production and the results of the characterizations made in the context of an extensive test program.

  1. Research activities of biomedical magnesium alloys in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Gu, Xuenan

    2011-04-01

    The potential application of Mg alloys as bioabsorable/biodegradable implants have attracted much recent attention in China. Advances in the design and biocompatibility evaluation of bio-Mg alloys in China are reviewed in this paper. Bio-Mg alloys have been developed by alloying with the trace elements existing in human body, such as Mg-Ca, Mg-Zn and Mg-Si based systems. Additionally, novel structured Mg alloys such as porous, composited, nanocrystalline and bulk metallic glass alloys were tried. To control the biocorrosion rate of bio-Mg implant to match the self-healing/regeneration rate of the surrounding tissue in vivo, surface modification layers were coated with physical and chemical methods.

  2. The Effect of Interfacial Element Partitioning on Ferrite and Bainite Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2016-05-01

    The formation of bainitic ferrite and that of grain boundary ferrite in low alloy steels have been two of the most important and interesting research topics in the field of solid state ferrous phase transformation for several decades, and various aspects of these two transformations have been discussed extensively in the literature. Recently, a so-called Gibbs energy balance (GEB) model was proposed by the authors to evaluate alloying element effects on the growth of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite. The model predicts a growth mode transition from paraequilibrium, negligible partitioning to partitioning during the isothermal formation of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite. Transformation stasis and bay phenomenon are well explained by the GEB model and both of them are found to be due to alloying element diffusion at the interface. This overview gives a summary of the authors' recent progress in the understanding of the growth of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite, with particular focus on the growth mode transition, the transformation stasis phenomenon and the bay phenomenon.

  3. Radiation resistance and thermal creep of ODS ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels containing 0.38-0.39 wt% Y2O3 have been produced by mechanical alloying. After thermo-mechanical treatment, the structure of ODS steels includes polygonized extended grains and a great number (to ∼1016-1017 cm-3) of ultrafine complex yttrium oxides ∼2-3 nm in diameter. Irradiation by fast neutrons to 4.5x1026 n/m2 (340 K) and 1.5x1022 n/m2 (77 K) leads to strengthening and plasticity decreasing in ODS alloys. The advantages of ODS ferritic steels in creep resistance and strength against ferritic-martensitic steel 12Cr-2Mo-Nb-B-V and austenitic steel 16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Ti-V display obviously when creep rate is approximately 10-2 h-1 and fracture time is longer than 1000 h

  4. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  5. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  6. Modern Ferrite Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Goldman, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Modern Ferrite Technology, 2nd Ed. offers the readers an expert overview of the latest ferrite advances as well as their applications in electronic components. This volume develops the interplay among material properties, component specification and device requirements using ferrites. Throughout, emphasis is placed on practical technological concerns as opposed to mathematical and physical aspects of the subject. The book traces the origin of the magnetic effect in ferrites from the level of the simplest particle and then increases the scope to include larger hierarchies. From the desired magnetic properties, the author deduces the physical and chemical material parameters, taking into consideration major chemistry, impurity levels, ceramic microstructures and grain boundary effects. He then discusses the processing conditions and associated conditions required for implementation. In addition to conventional ceramic techniques, he describes non-conventional methods such as co-precipitation, co-spray roasting ...

  7. Investigation on different oxides as candidates for nano-sized ODS particles in reduced-activation ferritic (RAF) steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; Rieth, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Klimenkov, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Sandim, Hugo Ricardo Zschommler

    2013-11-01

    Future generation reactor concepts are based on materials that can stand higher temperatures and higher neutron doses in corrosive environments. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels with chromium contents ranging from 9 to 14 wt.% - produced by mechanical alloying - are typical candidate materials for future structural materials in fission and fusion power plants.

  8. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel for Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel were explored. The samples for HAZs were prepared using a Gleeble simulator at different heat inputs. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and carbides through quenching and tempering treatment, whereas the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite, and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size, lath width of martensite, and δ-ferrite fraction in the HAZs increased with increase in the heat input. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and Charpy V-notch impact test. The Vickers hardness in the HAZs was higher than that in the base steel but did not change noticeably with increase in the heat input. The HAZs showed poor impact property due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared to the base steel. In addition, the impact property of the HAZs deteriorated more with the increase in the heat input. Post weld heat treatment contributed to improve the impact property of the HAZs through the formation of tempered martensite, but the impact property of the HAZs remained lower than that of base steel.

  9. Investigation on low activated materials on the base of V-Ti-Cr alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Low activated materials on the base of vanadium are among the key materials for future fusion reactors. In the Russian Federation the long term National Program on the development of such vanadium alloys is under the way.

  10. Investigation on low activated materials on the base of V-Ti-Cr alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Potapenko; M.; Shikov; A.; Chernov; V.; Drobishev; V.; Gubkin; I.

    2005-01-01

    Low activated materials on the base of vanadium are among the key materials for future fusion reactors. In the Russian Federation the long term National Program on the development of such vanadium alloys is under the way.……

  11. Activities of liquid Fe-As and Fe-Sb alloys saturated with carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leandro Voisin; Kimio Itagaki

    2006-01-01

    A solid iron base alloy of the so-called furnace residue is often formed as a by-product in reduction smelting of lead sinter and scraps with high contents of arsenic and antimony. The use of phase separation into a liquid iron-rich alloy and a liquid lead-rich alloy in lead-iron-arsenic and lead-iron-antimony systems saturated with carbon at relatively low temperatures of about 1200℃ was proposed in a new process for treating the furnace residue to recover valuable elements into the lead-rich alloy and fix toxic arsenic into the iron-rich alloy. As a fundamental study for the proposed process, the activity coefficients and interaction parameters of the Fe-As and Fe-Sb systems saturated with carbon at 1200℃ were derived in this study, based on the determined phase relations in the Fe-Pb-As and Fe-Pb-Sb systems saturated with carbon.

  12. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  13. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  14. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  15. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, S. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Sinha, M. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Meikap, A.K., E-mail: meikapnitd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Pradhan, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  16. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  17. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  18. Fracture toughness behaviour of ferritic ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The static rate fracture toughness of a series of eight heats of ductile cast iron has been measured. Samples from each heat were tested in a heat treated condition which produced a fully ferritic matrix. The chemical composition and the microstructural feature size has also been measured directly from each specimen tested. A multiple linear regression method was used to establish a simple mathematical relationship between fracture toughness and the composition and microstructure. Fracture toughness was found to be strongly associated with the spacing (or size) of the graphite nodules in these fully ferritic ductile cast irons. Other features, including the composition, the ferrite grain size, or the amount of graphite (over the ranges examined), did not strongly influence the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness also did not correlate with tensile properties (i.e. strength or ductility) in these alloys. (author)

  19. PWSCC Preventive Maintenance Activities for Alloy 600 in Japanese PWR Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because many nuclear plants have been in operation for ages, the importance of preventive maintenance technologies is getting higher. One conspicuous problem found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) observed in Alloy 600 (a kind of high nickel based alloy) parts. Alloy 600 was used for butt welds between low alloy steel and stainless steel of nozzles of Reactor Vessel (RV), Steam Generator (SG), and Pressurizer (Pz). As PWSCC occurred at these parts may cause Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), preventive maintenance is necessary. PWSCC is considered to be caused by a mixture of three elements: high residual tensile stress on surface, material (Alloy 600) and environment. PWSCC can be prevented by improving one of the elements. MHI has been developing stress improvement methods, for example, Water Jet Peening (WJP), Shot Peening by Ultrasonic vibration (USP), and Laser Stress Improvement Process (L-SIP). According to the situation, appropriate method is applied for each part. WJP has been applied for RV nozzles of a lot of plants in Japan. However PWSCC was observed in RV nozzles during the inspection before WJP in recent years, MHI developed the Advanced INLAY system to improve the material from Alloy 600 to Alloy 690. Alloy 600 on the inner surface of the nozzles is removed and welding with Alloy 690 is performed. In addition, heat treatments for the nozzles are difficult for its structural situation, so ambient temperature temper bead welding technique for RV nozzles was developed to make the heat treatments unnecessary. This paper describes countermeasures against PWSCC and introduces the maintenance activities performed in Japan. (author)

  20. Corrosion characteristics of reduced activation ferritic steel, JLF-1 (8.92Cr-2W) in molten salts Flibe and Flinak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Masatoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan)], E-mail: kondo.masatoshi@nifs.ac.jp; Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Xu Qi [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Noda, Nobuaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Ninomiya, Daisuke; Nagura, Masaru; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Fujii, Naoki [Biko Chemical Company, Koube (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Static corrosion tests were performed in molten salts, LiF-BeF{sub 2} (Flibe) and LiF-NaF-KF (Flinak), at 500 deg. C and 600 deg. C for 1000 h. The purpose is to investigate the corrosion characteristics of reduced activation ferritic steels, JLF-1 (8.92Cr-2W) in the fluids. The concentration of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in the fluids was measured by slurry pH titration method before and after the exposure. The HF concentration determined the fluoridation potential. The corrosion was mainly caused by dissolution of Fe and Cr into the fluids due to fluoridation and/or electrochemical corrosion. Carbon on the surface might be dissolved into the fluids due to the corrosion, and this resulted to the decrease of carbide on the surface. The corrosion depth of the JLF-1 specimen, which was obtained from the weight losses, was 0.637 {mu}m in Flibe at 600 deg. C and 6.73 {mu}m in Flinak at 600 deg. C.

  1. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M23 C6 and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T03 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23 . In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs

  2. Microstructural characterization of a diffusion-bonded joint for 9Cr-ODS and JLF-1 reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, H.Y., E-mail: haigirl1983@gmail.com [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagasaka, T.; Muroga, T. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Chen, J.M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610225 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Bonding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels to non-ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels is essential to their application to blanket systems. In the present study, a diffusion-bonded joint of the candidate 9Cr-ODS steel and JLF-1 RAFM steel was fabricated using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The effect of post-bond heat treatments (PBHTs) was studied by hardness measurement and microstructural analysis. The results indicated that, after normalization and tempering (N and T), the hardness and microstructures of 9Cr-ODS and JLF-1 base metals recovered to levels similar to those before HIP. However, a soft region was observed across the bonding interfaces for all specimens containing the as-HIPed condition and those after PBHTs. This was due to coarser micro-carbides (M{sub 3}C in as-HIPed condition and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in N and T conditions) near the interfaces than in the base metals for both 9Cr-ODS and JLF-1. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirmed that carbon, tungsten, and chromium in the matrix near the interfaces are transferred to the micro-carbides, making them coarser there. Ti diffused from the 9Cr-ODS side to the JLF-1 side forming Ti-rich carbides after tempering, especially at high temperature to 1073 K.

  3. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  4. Optimization of production and properties of the nanoscaled ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2} and characterization of structure and property correlations; Eigenschaftsoptimierung der nanoskaligen ferritischen ODS-Legierung 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}, metallkundliche Charakterisierung und Bestimmung von Struktur-Eigenschaftskorrelationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiselt, Charles Christopher

    2010-01-15

    Fusion power reactors next to renewable energy sources shall form an important basis for a future energy scenario avoiding damaging emissions due to the lack of fossil primary energy carriers. An efficient operation of such reactors necessitate temperatures >700 C, which require new kinds of structural materials. Today only reduced activated oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS-) materials based on iron, which have high strengths at elevated temperatures, offer the possibility to meet those criterias, which are developed in internationally coordinated programs. Therefore a nearly industrial production process based on the powdermetallurgical route is iteratively and systematically optimized to produce the ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Through TEM elemental analyses of mechanically alloyed steel powder it is confirmed, that the additives Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiH{sub 2} dissolve completely in the powder and form the ODS-particles during the HIP-cycle. Detailed studies of powder contamination during mechanical alloying reveal correlations between the contamination behaviour of certain elements and the milling parameters. A specially designed procedure of powder encapsulation and sealing leads to a successful powder compaction to the ODS-material 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Detailed TEM studies show a bimodal grain size distribution within the material at first. The alloy's recrystallization behaviour is the main reason for this phenomenon and is therefore discussed in detail. A high dispersion of ODS-particles as the decisive material's component with particle sizes von 3-5nm within grains and 12-36nm at the grain boundaries is successfully reached and verified by numerous TEM-Elemental Mappings. By applying hot rolling as an additional step during production a more even grain structure by equally maintaining the fine nanoskaled particle dispersion is set up. The microstructure is highly stable, since no grain- or

  5. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels; Etude a la sonde atomique de l`evolution microstructurale sous irradiation d`alliages ferritiques Fe-Cu et d`aciers de cuve REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareige, P.

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends.

  6. Activity measurement of solid Cu-In alloys by EMF method with solid electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayama I.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic activity of indium in the solid Cu-In alloys was obtained from the EMF measurement of cell: In,In2O3, ZrO2(+11mol%CaO, Cu-In,In2O3 for 16 alloys in the temperature range 773 to 900K. Activity changes with composition at 823K are very large in the and - phase regions. Activity and free energies of formation are derived and compared with the published data.

  7. Effect of manganese and chromium on microstructure and toughness of Fe-Cr-Mn alloys resulting from solid-solution treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is aimed at making clear the effect of Mn and Cr on the microstructure and toughness of an Fe-Cr-Mn alloy which is considered as one of the candidate alloys for reduced activation materials for the first wall application of the fusion reactor. The microstructures of Fe-12% Cr-(5∼30)% Mn(mass%) alloys after solution treatment at 1373 K for 3.6 ks are markedly varied with Mn contents; α'(martensite) + δ(ferrite) in 5% Mn alloy, α' + δ + ε(martensite) + γ(austenite) in the 10% Mn alloy, α' + ε + γ in 15% Mn alloy, ε + γ in the 20% Mn alloy, and ε + γ +δ in the 25% Mn alloy, and γ + δ in the 30% Mn alloy. It is to be noted that the δ phase increases with increasing Mn content when the Fe-12% Cr alloy contains more than 25% Mn, which suggests that Mn plays the role of a ferrite former. In Fe-15% Mn-Cr alloy, the δ phase is not observed in the range of Cr contents up to 12%, whereas it is markedly increased with the addition of 16% Cr. C, N and Ni are very helpful in forming the γ phase in these alloys as generally known in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. The toughness evaluated by the Charpy impact test at 273 K and room temperature is very low in the 5% Mn alloy which consists of the α' and δ phases. It is, however, significantly improved by a small amount of the γ phase and increases with increase of γ phase stability. (author)

  8. Low activation R-tokamak with aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aluminum alloy system is considered as an alternative of the first phase design of the R-tokamak. The 1-D calculation showed that the radiation level outside the vacuum vessel could be reduced by a factor of 30 about half a month after a D-T shot, when the aluminum alloy system is adopted instead of a stainless steel system. The aluminum system has weak mechanical strength, is highly conductive, and shows overaging effect at a certain low temperature. Accordingly, it is necessary to overcome these points. The highly conductive aluminum case leads to considerable increase in power consumption. Various problems on the toroidal coils, the vacuum system, and the limiter were studied. The optimization of the device parameters was investigated. (Kato, T.)

  9. Preparation and characterization of rice husk/ferrite composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel ferrite composite using rice husk as substrate has been prepared via high temperature treatment under nitrogen atmosphere.The rice husk substrate consists of porous activated carbon and silica,where spinel ferrite particles with average diameter of 59 nm are distributed.The surface area of the composite is greater than 170 m~2 g~(-1) and the bulk density is less than 0.6 g cm~(-3).Inert atmosphere is indispensable for the synthesis of pure ferrite composites,while different preparation temperatur...

  10. Lattice-parameter change induced by accommodation of precipitate/matrix misfit; misfitting nitrides in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon nitriding of iron-based alloys, development of misfitting coherent nitride precipitates in a ferrite matrix induces an overall expansion of the ferrite lattice. This lattice expansion was quantitatively determined by X-ray diffraction from the change of the lattice parameter of ferrite of homogenously nitrided Fe−Cr and Fe−V alloys. Adopting the experimentally verified (by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy) notion that the misfitting precipitates diffract coherently with the matrix, the extent of this hydrostatic lattice-strain component could be calculated, in general, as function of the precipitate/matrix misfit, the volume fraction of precipitates and the elastic properties of the matrix and precipitates. The experimentally observed and the predicted dependencies of lattice dilatation agree very well for both nitrided Fe−Cr and Fe−V alloys. This is the first time that this type of lattice expansion was experimentally identified and quantitatively explained

  11. Microstructural changes and effect of variation of lattice strain on positron annihilation lifetime parameters of zinc ferrite nanocomposites prepared by high enegy ball-milling

    OpenAIRE

    Abhijit Banerjee; Srinjoy Bid; Hema Dutta; Sandeep Chaudhuri; Dipankar Das; Swapan Kumar Pradhan

    2012-01-01

    Zn-ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature by mechanical alloying the stoichiometric (1:1 mol%) mixture of ZnO and α-Fe2O3 powder under open air. Formation of both normal and inverse spinel ferrite phases was noticed after 30 minutes and 2.5 hours ball milling respectively and the content of inverse spinel phase increased with increasing milling time. The phase transformation kinetics towards formation of ferrite phases and microstructure characterization of ball mille...

  12. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  13. Mn-Zn soft magnetic ferrite nanoparticles synthesized from spent alkaline Zn-Mn batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → This manuscript reports for the first time to prepare Mn-Zn soft magnetic ferrite nanoparticles using spent alkaline Zn-Mn batteries as raw material by multi-step processes including acid leaching, chemical treatment of battery iron shells and citrate-nitrate precursor auto-combustion. → Synthesized Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles have pure ferrite phase, larger saturation magnetization and lower coercivity compared with the same composition ferrites prepared by other techniques due to better crystallinity. → Auto-combustion Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles synthesis method presents a viable alternative for alkaline Zn-Mn batteries recycling due to its target product is not a single metal or its oxide. → It is original and not currently submitted for review to any other journal and their intent is to publish the article in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds. - Abstract: Using spent alkaline Zn-Mn batteries as raw material, Mn-Zn soft magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are prepared by multi-step processes including acid leaching, chemical treatment of battery iron shells and citrate-nitrate precursor auto-combustion. Acid leaching and chemical treatment mechanisms are investigated. Dried gels thermal decomposition process, auto-combustion, phase composition, morphological and magnetic properties of as-prepared Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles are characterized by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Synthesized Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles (Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) have pure ferrite phase, larger saturation magnetization (Ms = 60.62 emu g-1) and lower coercivity (Hc = 30 Oe) compared with the same composition ferrites prepared by other techniques due to better crystallinity. Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles synthesis method presents a viable alternative for alkaline Zn-Mn batteries recycling.

  14. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    In this thesis I present our work on theoretical modelling of platinum alloys as catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). The losses associated with the kinetics of the ORR is the main bottleneck in low-temperature fuel cells for transport applications, and more active catalysts...... are essential for wide-spread use of this technology. platinum alloys have shown great promise as more active catalysts, which are still stable under reaction conditions. We have investigated these systems on multiple scales, using either Density Functional Theory (DFT) or Effective Medium Theory (EMT...

  15. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Abarrategui C

    2016-08-01

    studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus. Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5 from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. Keywords: nanoparticles, conjugation, antifungal, Cm-p5 peptide

  16. Electrocatalytic activity and electrochemical hydrogen storage of Ni-La alloy prepared by electrodeposition from aqueous electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫祥; 成旦红; 刘淑兰; 郭鹤桐

    2002-01-01

    Ni-La alloy coating was prepared by electrodeposition.The effect of cathodic current density on the La content of the alloy coatings was discussed.It is found that the content of La in the alloy increases with increasing the cathodic current density.The microstructures and codeposition mechanism of Ni-La alloy coatings were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry (CV).The results demonstrate that the Ni-La alloy is FCC and codeposited by the induced mechanism.The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on the electrodeposited Ni-La alloy electrodes in alkaline solution was evaluated by Tafel polarization curves.It is found that La-Ni alloy coating exhibites much higher exchange current density for HER than pure Ni electrode,and that the exchange current density increases with increasing the La content of alloys.The good electrocatalytic activity for HER of this Ni-La alloy is attributed to the synergism of the electronic structure of La and Ni.The electrodeposited La-Ni alloys have a certain electrochemical hydrogen storage capacity of 34~143 mAh/g,which increases with increasing the La content of alloys.

  17. Determination of trace impurities of chlorine in zirconium-alloy matrices using neutron activation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, H.; Nathaniel, T. Newton [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Sant, V.L. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.; Suryanarayana, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Nuclear Physics Div.; Prajapati, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Reactor Physics Design Div.

    2011-07-01

    Trace impurities of chlorine in the zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5% Nb alloy matrix have been determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and off-line {gamma}-ray spectrometric technique. The results have been compared with the values obtained from pyrohydrolysis-IC and spark source mass spectrometric method. The limit of internal precision error from the neutron activation technique is 6.7% for zircaloy-2 and 9% for Zr-2.5% Nb alloy, which are lower than that of pyrohydrolysis-IC and spark source mass spectrometric measurements respectively. For both alloys the results from present work based on NAA technique are slightly higher than the results based on the other two methods but are comparable within the uncertainty. Read More: http://www.oldenbourg-link.com/doi/abs/10.1524/ract.2011.1863 (orig.)

  18. Long term creep properties and microstructural evolution of ferritic and austenitic grades for USC power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminada, S.; Cumino, G. [Tenaris, Dalmine (BG) (Italy); Cipolla, L.; Di Gianfrancesco, A. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali SpA, Material and Product Directorate, Rome (Italy); Minami, Y.; Ono, T. [TenarisNKKt, R and D, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The steam parameters in the new high efficiency fossil fuel power plants are continuously increasing, requiring new advanced materials with enhanced creep strength able to operate on the most severe temperature and pressure conditions. Tenaris focused on the development of ferritic-martensitic and austenitic grades for tubes and pipes applications. The product development in TenarisDalmine for the ferritic-martensitic grades has been focused on: low alloyed ASTM Grade 23 as substitute of Grade 22 for components operating at relatively low temperatures, containing 1.5% W and with quite good weldability and creep properties up to 580 C and a competitive cost; high alloyed ASTM Grade 92, an improved version of the well known Grade 91 for the superheaters, headers and other parts of the boiler operating at temperatures up to 620 C: its tempered martensitic structure offers very high creep strength and long term stability. The product development in TenarisNKKt R and D on austenitic grades has been focused on: TEMPALOY AA-1 as improved version of 18Cr8NiNbTi with the 3%Cu, showing high creep and corrosion properties, TEMPALOY A-3: a 20Cr-15Ni-Nb-N showing good creep behaviour and corrosion properties better than AA-1 due to the higher Cr content. This paper describes the Tenaris products, the process routes and the main characteristics of these steels, including the effect of shot blasting on steam oxidation properties of the austenitic grades, as well as, the R and D activities in the field of alloy design, creep tests, data assessment, microstructural analysis and damage modelling, conducted with the support of the Centro Sviluppo Materiali. (orig.)

  19. Fracture mechanics of pseudoelastic NiTi alloys: review of the research activities carried out at University of Calabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sgambitterra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a brief review of the research activities on fracture mechanics of nickel-titanium based shape memory alloys carried out at University of Calabria. In fact, this class of metallic alloys show a unusual fracture response due to the reversible stress-induced and thermally phase transition mechanisms occurring in the crack tip region as a consequence of the highly localized stresses. The paper illustrates the main results concerning numerical, analytical and experimental research activities carried out by using commercial NiTi based pseudoelastic alloys. Furthermore, the effect of several thermo-mechanical loading conditions on the fracture properties of NiTi alloys are illustrated.

  20. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  1. Response of Phase Transformation Inducing Heat Treatments on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels of Varying Tungsten Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravathi, K. S.; Laha, Kinkar; Sasmal, C. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Tailor, H. M.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-09-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of 9Cr-W-0.06Ta Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steels having various tungsten contents ranging from 1 to 2 wt pct have been investigated on subjecting the steels to isothermal heat treatments for 5 minutes at temperatures ranging from 973 K to 1473 K (700 °C to 1200 °C) (below Ac1 to above Ac3) followed by oil quenching and tempering at 1033 K (760 °C) for 60 minutes. The steels possessed tempered martensite structure at all the heat-treated conditions. Prior-austenitic grain size of the steels was found to decrease on heating in the intercritical temperature range (between Ac1 and Ac3) and at temperatures just above the Ac3 followed by increase at higher heating temperatures. All the steels suffered significant reduction in hardness, tensile, and creep strength on heating in the intercritical temperature range, and the reduction was less for steel having higher tungsten content. Strength of the steels increased on heating above Ac3 and was higher for higher tungsten content. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of the steels revealed coarsening of martensitic substructure and precipitates on heating in the intercritical temperature range, and the coarsening was relatively less for higher tungsten content steel, resulting in less reduction in tensile and creep strength on intercritical heating. Tensile and creep strengths of the steels at different microstructural conditions have been rationalized based on the estimated inter-barrier spacing to dislocation motion. The study revealed the uniqueness of inter-barrier spacing to dislocation motion in determining the strength of tempered martensitic steels subjected to different heat treatments.

  2. Conditions, mechanism of formation and morphology of ferrite supersaturated with carbon (chernovite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made into the mechanism of formation and structure of a specific alpha-phase (chernovite) in a number of carbon and low alloy steels. It is shown that the chernovite constitutes a ferrite supersaturated with carbon and is formed directly from austenite in a subcritical temperature range in the form of plates or equiaxial grains. The isothermal tempering results in chernovite transformation into equilibrium ferrite and dispersed carbides and in a hardness decrease. Alloying elements promote an increase of hardness and decelerate chernovite tempering. The quantity of chernovite in the steel depends on the temperature of phase transition and carbon concentration. 10 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Dislocation Climb Sources Activated by 1 MeV Electron Irradiation of Copper-Nickel Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, P.; Leffers, Torben

    1977-01-01

    irradiation temperatures corresponding to the highest source densities is approximately 350°–500°C. The climb sources are not related to any pre-existing dislocations resolved in the microscope. The sources emit three types of loop: ‘rectangular’ loops with a100 Burgers vector and {100} habit plane, normal...... prismatic loops with Burgers vector a/2110, and Frank loops. There is no significant difference between the apparent activation energy for growth of the three types of loops. The source points are suggested to be submicroscopic nickel precipitates-with reference to the existing evidence that......Climb sources emitting dislocation loops are observed in Cu-Ni alloys during irradiation with 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. High source densities are found in alloys containing 5, 10 and 20% Ni, but sources are also observed in alloys containing 1 and 2% Ni. The range of...

  4. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  5. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  6. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results

  7. Calculation of activity coefficients for components in ternary Ti alloys and intermetallics as matrix of composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱艳; 杨延清; 孙军

    2004-01-01

    Based on Kohler's ternary solution model and Miedema's model for calculating the formation heat of binary solution, the integral equation was established for calculating the activity coefficients in ternary alloys and intermetallics. The activity coefficients for components in alloy Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, Ti-6Al-4V and intermetallics TiAl, Ti3 Al and Ti2 AlNb were calculated with the equations. The calculated data coincide well with the experimental ones found in literatures. According to the calculated activity coefficients and activities, it can be predicted that the interfacial reaction in SiC/Ti3 Al composite is more severe than that in composites SiC/Ti2 AlNb and SiC/TiAl.

  8. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for iron-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-02-01

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels. The Cr-Si ferrite layers have proven to be very resistant to high temperature cyclic oxidation and to pitting in aqueous solutions. The process has been patented, and is being transferred for industrial application, e.g. for water walls of utility boilers, etc. In the proposed extension of this project, the use of mixed pure metal powders in the pack will be extended to achieve similar ferrite Fe-Cr-Al coatings with excellent oxidation resistance, with the eventual transfer of the technology to industry. In other recent studies, Ni-base alloy rods were aluminized by the halide-activated pack cementation process to bring their average composition to that for the ORNL-developed Ni{sub 3}Al, for use as a welding rod. A similar effort to develop a welding rod for the ORNL Fe{sub 3}Al alloy did not yield reproducible coating compositions or growth kinetics. The continued effort to produce Duriron-type (Fe-18Si-5Cr) coatings on steels was not successful. Literature for the intrinsic diffusion coefficients suggests that this task cannot be achieved.

  9. Creep lifetime assessements of ferritic pipeline welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low alloy ferritic steam pipework in Advanced Gas Cooled reactor (AGR) power stations operates at temperatures in the creep range. An inspection strategy for continued operation of the pipework has been developed based on estimation of the creep rupture life of pipework weldments and fracture mechanics for demonstrating acceptance of defects. This strategy is described in outline. The estimation of creep rupture life is described in more detail. Validation for the approach is illustrated by comparison with pressure vessel tests and with metallographic examination of components removed from service. The fracture mechanics methods are also described. It is shown that the amount of creep crack growth is dependent on the life fraction at which the assessment is made; crack growth being rapid as the creep rupture life is approached. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Mesoporous zinc ferrite: Synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic activity with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Minhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); He, Chun, E-mail: hechun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Sharma, Virender K. [Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, FL 32901 (United States); Abou Asi, Mudar; Xia, Dehua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Xiang-zhong [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Deng, Huiqi; Xiong, Ya [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) played a significant role in synthesizing mesoporous ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}via hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-visible light system had a higher photocatalytic activity to degrade AOII than either ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-visible light system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {center_dot}OH was the reactive species for degrading AOII in ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-visible light system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocurrent-time profiles showed the production of electron in ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-visible light system that caused the generation of {center_dot}OH through reaction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Abstract: Mesoporous ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (meso-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was synthesized by a hydrothermal process in which cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) participates in the reaction to produce nanocrystals. Synthesized ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The meso-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was resulted from the agglomeration of nanoparticles with size of 5-10 nm. The photocatalytic activity of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under visible light ({lambda} > 400 nm) was evaluated by the degradation of Acid Orange II (AOII) at different sintering temperatures, the amount of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The photocatalytic degradation of AOII was almost complete within 2 h in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/visible light system. The high efficiency for AOII degradation was attributed to the strong absorption of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in visible-light region and the generation of reactive {center_dot}OH by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the system. The involvement of {center_dot}OH in

  11. Grain boundary diffusion of Fe in ultrafine-grained nanocluster-strengthened ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grain boundary diffusion of Fe in nanocluster-strengthened ferritic steel (Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 in wt.%) has been investigated. The steel was produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot extrusion. The final grain size was ∼200 nm. The diffusivity of Fe was measured within the temperature range 423-820 K. The grain boundary penetration at lower temperatures revealed a specific time dependence, which indicates a residual interconnected porosity in the ferritic steel. In order to quantify the percolating porosity, conventional radiotracer (59Fe) diffusion measurements were combined with a study of room temperature penetration of liquid 110mAg solution to distinguish between solid-state diffusion along boundaries and penetration along the surface of interconnected cavities. The presence of porosity affected the diffusion process, introducing a hierarchy of internal interfaces. The grain boundary diffusion coefficient and the diffusivity along internal surfaces were determined in the so-called type C-C, C-B and B-B kinetic regimes of interface diffusion in a hierarchical microstructure. Using the residual activity method and a 65Zn tracer, the volume fraction of the percolating porosity was estimated to be 0.6%.

  12. Studies on the preparation of active oxygen-deficient copper ferrite and its application for hydrogen production through thermal chemical water splitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Bo; ZHANG Ping; ZHANG Lei; CHEN Jing; XU JingMing

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through thermal chemical water splitting technology has recently received in-creasingly international interest in the nuclear hydrogen production field. Besides the main known sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle developed by the General Atomics Company and the UT3 cycle (iron, calcium, and bromine) developed at the University of Tokyo, the thermal cycle based on metal oxide two-step water splitting methods is also receiving research and development attention worldwide. In this work, copper ferrite was prepared by the co-precipitation method and oxygen-deficient copper ferrite was synthesized through first and second calcination steps for the application of hydrogen production by a two-step water splitting process. The crystal structure, properties, chemical composition and δwere investigated in detail by utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV), gas chro-matography (GC), and so on. The experimental two-step thermal chemical cycle reactor for hydrogen generation was designed and developed in this lab. The hydrogen generation process of water splitting through CuFe2O4-δ and the cycle performance of copper ferrite regeneration were firstly studied and discussed.

  13. Studies on the preparation of active oxygen-deficient copper ferrite and its application for hydrogen production through thermal chemical water splitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through thermal chemical water splitting technology has recently received in- creasingly international interest in the nuclear hydrogen production field. Besides the main known sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle developed by the General Atomics Company and the UT3 cycle (iron, calcium, and bromine) developed at the University of Tokyo, the thermal cycle based on metal oxide two-step water splitting methods is also receiving research and development attention worldwide. In this work, copper ferrite was prepared by the co-precipitation method and oxygen-deficient copper ferrite was synthesized through first and second calcination steps for the application of hydrogen production by a two-step water splitting process. The crystal structure, properties, chemical composition and δ were investigated in detail by utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV), gas chro- matography (GC), and so on. The experimental two-step thermal chemical cycle reactor for hydrogen generation was designed and developed in this lab. The hydrogen generation process of water splitting through CuFe2O4-δ and the cycle performance of copper ferrite regeneration were firstly studied and discussed.

  14. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  15. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  16. Chromium activity measurements in nickel based alloys for very high temperature reactors: Inconel 617, haynes 230 and model alloys - HTR2008-58147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are potential candidates for the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) of (V)-HTR reactors. The behaviour under corrosion of these alloys by the (V)-HTR coolant (impure helium) is an important selection criterion because it defines the service life of these components. At high temperature, the Haynes 230 is likely to develop a chromium oxide on the surface. This layer protects from the exchanges with the surrounding medium and thus confers certain passivity on metal. At very high temperature, the initial microstructure made up of austenitic grains and coarse intra and intergranular M6C carbide grains rich in W will evolve. The M6C carbides remain and some M23C6 richer in Cr appear. Then, carbon can reduce the protective oxide layer Then, the alloy loses its protective coating and can corrode quickly. Experimental investigations were performed on these nickel based alloys under an impure helium flow [1]. To predict the surface reactivity of chromium under impure helium, it is necessary to determine its chemical activity in a temperature range close to the operating conditions of the heat exchangers (T∼1273 K). For that, high temperature mass spectrometry measurements coupled to multiple effusion Knudsen cells are carried out on several samples: Haynes 230, Inconel 617 and model alloys 1178, 1181, 1201. This coupling makes it possible thermodynamic equilibrium to be obtained between the vapour phase and the condensed phase of the sample. The measurement of the chromium ionic intensity (/) of the molecular beam resulting from a cell containing an alloy provides the values of partial pressure according to the temperature. This value is compared to that of the pure substance (Cr) at the same temperature. These calculations provide thermodynamic data characteristic of the chromium behaviour in these alloys. These activity results call into question those previously measured by Hilpert [2], largely used in the literature. (authors)

  17. Ferritic Steel Interconnectors and Their Interactions with Ni Base Anodes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    OpenAIRE

    Froitzheim, J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years high Cr ferritic steels such as Crofer 22 APU became the most widespread construction materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects mainly due to low cost and the ease of fabrication compared to ceramic materials. It was shown that optimum properties with respect to oxide scale growth and adherence could only be obtained by very low, carefully controlled concentrations of minor alloying additions such as Al and Si. This required sophisticated alloy manufacturing met...

  18. Interaction of precipitates and dislocations in low activation V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Wu, J.; Zheng, P. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chinese Physical Society of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics, P.O.Box 432, 610041 Chengdu Sichuan (China); Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science - NIFS, 322-6 Oroshi, 509-5292 Toki, Gifu (Japan); Li, C.; Qiu, S. [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: V-4Cr-4Ti is the leading candidate structural material in V-Li blanket of a fusion reactor for its low activation feature and good high temperature mechanical performance. Though some critical issues still remained to be solved, much effort was made to increase the strength of this alloy in recent years. There is strong precipitation hardening of the alloy when aging at 600 deg. C though the hardening is thermally unstable above 500 deg. C. To enhance the stability, strengthening by both precipitation and cold work (CW) hardening was studied. The studies showed the interactions between precipitates and dislocations, which stabilize microstructure and increase not only the high temperature tensile strength but the improvement of thermal creep property as well. The hardening curves on aging temperature and time were established at 600-700 deg.C. Based on the curves the activation energy was obtained, which showed the controlling process of the precipitate growth. The precipitation-hardening alloy was further cold rolled at room temperature with a 20% reduction in thickness. This increased the strength significantly even measured at elevated temperature. But the strain hardening capability lost much. Microstructural observation by TEM showed the stabilization of the precipitates due to the presence of dislocations. In another case, the alloy in SA state was cold rolled at first, aged at 600 deg. C then. As expected, the aging does hardened the alloy additionally, but the hardening was not as significant as the one directly following the SA treatment. Therefore, the cold rolling could not only stabilize the precipitates, but also resist their formation. (authors)

  19. Antimicrobial activity of different copper alloy surfaces against copper resistant and sensitive Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Libin; Elguindi, Jutta; Rensing, Christopher; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-05-01

    Copper has shown antibacterial effects against foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of copper surfaces on copper resistant and sensitive strains of Salmonella enterica. Six different copper alloy coupons (60-99.9% copper) were tested along with stainless steel as the control. The coupons were surface inoculated with either S. Enteritidis or one of the 3 copper resistant strains, S. Typhimurium S9, S19 and S20; stored under various incubation conditions at room temperature; and sampled at various times up to 2 h. The results showed that under dry incubation conditions, Salmonella only survived 10-15 min on high copper content alloys. Salmonella on low copper content alloys showed 3-4 log reductions. Under moist incubation conditions, no survivors were detected after 30 min-2 h on high copper content alloys, while the cell counts decreased 2-4 logs on low copper content coupons. Although the copper resistant strains survived better than S. Enteritidis, they were either completely inactivated or survival was decreased. Copper coupons showed better antimicrobial efficacy in the absence of organic compounds. These results clearly show the antibacterial effects of copper and its potential as an alternative to stainless steel for selected food contact surfaces.

  20. A Model for Ferrite/Pearlite Band Formation and Prevention in Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Diaz-Del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Sietsma, J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2004-01-01

    A model for predicting the conditions under which ferrite/pearlite band formation occurs, and therefore the conditions in which it can be avoided in steels, has been developed. The model requires as input the alloy composition and microchemical segregation wavelength, and provides in turn the homoge

  1. Microwave applications of soft ferrites

    CERN Document Server

    Pardavi-Horvath, M P

    2000-01-01

    Signal processing requires broadband, low-loss, low-cost microwave devices (circulators, isolators, phase shifters, absorbers). Soft ferrites (garnets, spinels, hexaferrites), applied in planar microwave devices, are reviewed from the point of view of device requirements. Magnetic properties, specific to operation in high-frequency electromagnetic fields, are discussed. Recent developments in thick film ferrite technology and device design are reviewed. Magnetic losses related to planar shape and inhomogeneous internal fields are analyzed.

  2. Assessment of air pollutants produced by industrial activity from an aluminium alloys foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cirtina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The industrial activity in non-ferrous alloys foundries leads to the elimination of the pollutants in the atmosphere that may have adverse effects on the environment and human health. This paper presents an evaluation of the pollutantemissions resulting from an aluminium foundry starting from data on concentrations and pollutant massflow rates estimated for each phase of the technological process and on measured ambient levels for the area of influence of the objective to study.

  3. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles activate IL-1b, NFKB1, CCL21 and NOS2 signaling to induce mitochondrial dependent intrinsic apoptotic pathway in WISH cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Shams T. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chair for DNA Research, Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Chair for DNA Research, Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, U.P. (India)

    2013-12-01

    The present study has demonstrated the translocation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs) into the cytoplasm of human amnion epithelial (WISH) cells, and the ensuing cytotoxicity and genetic damage. The results suggested that in situ NPs induced oxidative stress, alterations in cellular membrane and DNA strand breaks. The [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) cytotoxicity assays indicated 64.48 ± 1.6% and 50.73 ± 2.1% reduction in cell viability with 100 μg/ml of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exposure. The treated WISH cells exhibited 1.2-fold higher ROS level with 0.9-fold decline in membrane potential (ΔΨm) and 7.4-fold higher DNA damage after 48 h of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs treatment. Real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of p53, CASP 3 (caspase-3), and bax genes revealed 5.3, 1.6, and 14.9-fold upregulation, and 0.18-fold down regulation of bcl 2 gene vis-à-vis untreated control. RT{sup 2} Profiler™ PCR array data elucidated differential up-regulation of mRNA transcripts of IL-1b, NFKB1, NOS2 and CCL21 genes in the range of 1.5 to 3.7-folds. The flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis suggested the transfer of 15.2 ± 2.1% (p < 0.01) population of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs (100 μg/ml) treated cells into apoptotic phase through intrinsic pathway. Over all, the data revealed the potential of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs to induce cellular and genetic toxicity in cells of placental origin. Thus, the significant ROS production, reduction in ΔΨm, DNA damage, and activation of genes linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, proliferation, DNA damage and repair could serve as the predictive toxicity and stress markers for ecotoxicological assessment of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs induced cellular and genetic damage. - Highlights: • First report on the molecular toxicity of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs in cells of placental origin • WISH cells treated with ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exhibited cytoplasmic

  4. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, S. A.; Saleh, T. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Romero, T. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Li, S.; Cole, J. I.; Fielding, R.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress-strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress-strain constitutive σ(ɛ) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ɛ) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ɛ) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ɛ) in the range of 0-10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are also analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. Notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  5. Investigation of corrosion of alloys using neutron activation and gamma-ray spectrometry. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple procedure is proposed for studying differential (selective) corrosion of alloys using the radioactive tracer technique. This procedure is based on the neutron activation of samples, and the measurement of the γ-ray spectra of irradiated samples and their corrosion products. The reliability of the given method has been demonstrated by application to conventional and spheroidal dental amalgams. The method can produce useful results for studying the various factors affecting the properties of dental amalgams as well as other alloys. A week after end of irradiation of dental amalgam only the isotopes 65Zn, sup(110m)Ag, 113Sn and 203Hg are excepted to have significant activites. Samples were irradiated in the Egyptian Reactor (RR-I) at Inshas for 5 hours. The neutron flux was approximately 1x1013n cm-2s-1. (F.G.)

  6. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production; Caracterizacion mecanica de un acero ferritico/martenitico de activacion reducida de produccion espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  7. Understanding the effect of steps, strain, poisons, and alloying: Methane activation on Ni surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that a single parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a transition metal surface, the d-band center (epsilon(d)), can be used to provide a unified description of a range of phenomena in heterogeneous catalysis. Using methane activation on Ni surfaces as an example, we show...... that variations in epsilon(d) can be used to quantitatively describe variations in the activation energy when the surface structure is changed, when the coverage of carbon is changed, when the surface is strained, when the surface is alloyed, and when the surface is poisoned by sulfur. The d-band center is...

  8. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Shozo Inoue; Takahiro Miki; Takafumi Tsurui; Hiroyuki Nagasawa; Mamoru Komatsubara; Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spi...

  9. Studies on separation and purification of fission 99Mo from neutron activated uranium aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed for separation and purification of fission 99Mo from neutron activated uranium–aluminum alloy. Alkali dissolution of the irradiated target (100 mg) results in aluminum along with 99Mo and a few fission products passing into solution, while most of the fission products, activation products and uranium remain undissolved. Subsequent purification steps involve precipitation of aluminum as Al(OH)3, iodine as AgI/AgIO3 and molybdenum as Mo-α-benzoin oxime. Ruthenium is separated by volatilization as RuO4 and final purification of 99Mo was carried out using anion exchange method. The radiochemical yield of fission 99Mo was found to be >80% and the purity of the product was in conformity with the international pharmacopoeia standards. - Highlights: • 99Mo separation, purification method developed from neutron activation of 100 g U–Al alloy. • Uranium, fission, activation product decontamination by alkali dissolution of activated target. • Purification by Al(OH)3, AgI/AgIO3, Mo-α-benzoin oxime precipitation and anion exchange. • Very high decontamination factors for alpha activity obtained. • Final 99Mo product (recovery >80%) complied with international pharmacopoeia standards

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt{111} surface alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Ye, Jin-Yu; Morgan, David; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-07-21

    PtM overlayers (where M=Fe, Co or Ni) supported on Pt{111} are prepared via thermal annealing in either a nitrogen/water or hydrogen ambient of dilute aqueous droplets containing M(Z+) cations directly attached to the electrode. Two different PtM phases are detected depending on the nature of the post-annealing cooling environment. The first of these consists of small (hydroxides. The second type of PtM phase is prepared by cooling in a stream of hydrogen gas. Although this second phase also consists of numerous microcrystals covering the Pt{111} electrode surface, these are both flatter than before and moreover are entirely metallic in character. A positive shift in the onset of PtM oxide formation correlates with increased activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which we ascribe to the greater availability of platinum metallic sites under ORR conditions. PMID:24986646

  11. PdM (M = Pt, Au) bimetallic alloy nanowires with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for electro-oxidation of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Guo, Shaojun; Dong, Shaojun [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin, 130022 (China)

    2012-05-02

    A facile and general method has been developed to synthesize well-defined PdPt and PdAu alloy nanowires, which exhibit significantly enhanced activity towards small molecules, such as ethanol, methanol, and glucose electro-oxidation in an alkaline medium. Considering the important role of one-dimensional alloy nanowires in electrocatalytic systems, the present Pd-based alloy nanostructures could offer a promising new class of advanced electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells and electrochemical sensors. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Catalysts prepared from copper-nickel ferrites for the steam reforming of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Tsai, An-Pang; Kameoka, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Fe3O4-supported Cu and Ni catalysts are prepared through reduction of Cu-Ni (Ni1-xCuxFe2O4) ferrites. The Cu-Ni ferrites, synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, are reduced at temperatures from 240 °C to 500 °C in a H2 atmosphere. All ferrites are characterized with granular morphology and a smooth particle surface before reduction. For the CuFe2O4, Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 and NiFe2O4 ferrites reduced at 240, 300, and 400 °C, respectively, nanosized Cu and/or Ni particles (5-32 nm) and mesopores (5-30 nm) are distributed and adhered on the surfaces of Fe3O4 supports. After increasing the reduction temperature of NiFe2O4 ferrite to 500 °C, the Ni particles and mesopores disappear from the Fe3O4 surfaces, which is due to the formation of a Fe-Ni alloy covering on the Fe3O4 surfaces. The CuFe2O4 ferrite after H2 reduction at 240 °C exhibits the highest H2 production rate of 149 ml STP/min g-cat at 360 °C. The existence of Ni content in the Cu-Ni ferrites enhances the reverse water gas shift reaction, and raises the CO selectivity while reducing the CO2 selectivity. Formation of a Fe-Ni alloy exaggerates the trend and poisons the H2 production rate.

  13. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  14. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tyburska-Puschel, Beata [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  15. Hollow raspberry-like PdAg alloy nanospheres: High electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Hu, Yongli; Liu, Mingrui; Zheng, Yixiong

    2015-03-01

    Palladium-silver (PdAg) alloy nanospheres with unique structure were prepared using a one-pot procedure based on the galvanic replacement reaction. Their electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media was evaluated. The morphology and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) measurements were used to analyze the electrochemical performance of the PdAg alloy nanospheres. The SEM and TEM images showed that the PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit a hierarchical nanostructure with hollow interiors and porous walls. Compared to the commercial Pd/C catalyst, the as-prepared PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity and stability towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline media, showing its potential as a new non-Pt electro-catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).

  16. Grain boundary premelting and activated sintering in binary refractory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaomeng

    Quasi-liquid intergranular film (IGF) which has been widely observed in ceramic systems can persist into sub-solidus region whereby an analogy to Grain boundary (GB) premelting can be made. In this work, a grain boundary (GB) premelting/prewetting model in a metallic system was firstly built based on the Benedictus' model and computational thermodynamics, predicting that GB disordering can start at 60-85% of the bulk solidus temperatures in selected systems. This model quantitatively explains the long-standing mystery of subsolidus activated sintering in W-Pd, W-Ni, W-Co, W-Fe and W-Cu, and it has broad applications for understanding GB-controlled transport kinetics and physical properties. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the necessity of developing GB phase diagrams as a tool for materials design. Subsequently, Grain boundary (GB) wetting and prewetting in Ni-doped Mo are systematically evaluated via characterizing well-quenched specimens and thermodynamic modeling. In contrast to prior reports, the delta-NiMo phase does not wet Mo GBs in the solid state. In the solid-liquid two-phase region, the Ni-rich liquid wets Mo GBs completely. Furthermore, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that nanometer-thick quasi-liquid IGFs persist at GBs into the single-phase region where the bulk liquid phase is no longer stable; this is interpreted as a case of GB prewetting. An analytical thermodynamic model is developed and validated, and this model can be extended to other systems. Furthermore, the analytical model was refined based upon Beneditus' model with correction in determining interaction contribution of interfacial energy. A calculation-based GB phase diagram for Ni-Mo binary system was created and validated by comparing with GB diffusivities determined through a series of controlled sintering experiments. The dependence of GB diffusivity on doping level and temperature was examined and compared with model-predicted GB phase diagram. The

  17. Magnetic resonance in superparamagnetic zinc ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitendra Pal Singh; Gagan Dixit; R C Srivastava; Hemant Kumar; H M Agrawal; Prem Chand

    2013-08-01

    In the present work, we have synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticles by nitrate method. Presence of almost zero value of coercivity and remanence in the hysteresis of these samples shows the superparamagnetic nature at room temperature. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on these samples in the temperature range 120–300 K indicates the systematic variation of the line-shapes of the spectra with temperature. Both gvalue and peak-to-peak linewidth decrease with increase in temperature. The variation of g-values and peak-topeak linewidth with temperature has been fitted with existing models and we observed different values of activation energies of the spins for both the samples.

  18. Interfacial Microstructure of Diffusion Bonded Inconel 738 and Ferritic Stainless Steel Couple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bulent Kurt; Mustafa Ulutan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, Inconel 738 alloy was diffusion bonded to a ferritic stainless steel. The effect of bonding temperature on the microstructural development across the joint region was investigated. Following the diffusion bonding, conventional characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and microhardness were used to examine the interfacial microstructure. It was seen that bonding temperature was effective on the diffusion of Ni from Inconel 738 to ferritic stainless steel that affected the microstructure of the interface. Austenite phase was formed at the interface as a result of Ni diffusion from the Inconel 738 to the interface.

  19. Nature of anisotropy of impact toughness of structural steels with ferrite-pearlite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goritskii, V. M.; Shneyderov, G. R.; Lushkin, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    The anisotropy of the impact toughness of low-alloy steels of various compositions and purities with a ferrite-pearlite structure has been investigated using samples of type 11 according to the Russian Standard GOST 9454-78. It has been established that the anisotropy coefficient of the impact toughness depends on the anisotropy coefficient of the work of crack propagation and is independent of the degree of striation of the ferrite-pearlite structure and the work for nucleation of the ductile crack.

  20. Effects of alloying elements and heat treatments on mechanical properties of Korean reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Y.B., E-mail: borobang@gmail.com [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S.H.; Noh, S.; Kim, T.K. [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.W. [Nuclear Fusion Engineering Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Y.H. [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    As part of an alloy development program for Korean reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steel, a total of 37 program alloys were designed and their mechanical properties were evaluated with special attention being paid to the effects of alloying elements and heat treatments. A reduction of the normalizing temperature from 1050 °C to 980 °C was found to have a positive effect on the impact resistance, resulting in a decrease in ductile–brittle transition-temperature (DBTT) of the program alloys by an average of 30 °C. The yield strength and creep rupture time are affected strongly by the tempering time at 760 °C but at the expense of ductility. Regarding the effects of the alloying elements, the addition of trace amounts of Zr enhances both the creep and impact resistance: the lowest DBTT was observed for the alloys containing 0.005 wt.% Zr, whereas the addition of 0.01 wt.% Zr extends the creep rupture-time under an accelerated condition. The enhanced impact resistance owing to the normalizing at lower temperature is attributed to a more refined grain structure, which provides more barriers to the propagation of cleavage cracks. Solution softening by Zr addition is suggested as a possible mechanism for enhanced resistance to both impact and creep of the program alloys.

  1. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Banerjee, M., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Basu, S., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur-713209 (India); Pal, M. [CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur-713209 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  2. Fast photoresponse of zinc ferrite nanotube arrays fabricated by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nano-sized zinc ferrite materials exhibit excellent visible light activity, their photoresponse characteristics as photodetectors have rarely been investigated. In this paper, zinc ferrite nanotube arrays were fabricated using electrodeposition with the aid of zinc oxide nanowire arrays as a template. These nanotube arrays showed tens of milliseconds-response photocurrents under the irradiation of a 532 nm solid-state laser, and the magnitudes of the photocurrents were linearly increased with increasing laser power. These features of ZnFe2O4 nanotube arrays revealed their potential applications in high-frequency or high-speed photodevices. (paper)

  3. Precipitation hardening of biodegradable Fe-Mn-Pd alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszner, F. [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sologubenko, A.S. [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schinhammer, M. [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lerchbacher, C. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Haenzi, A.C. [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Leitner, H. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Uggowitzer, P.J. [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Loeffler, J.F., E-mail: joerg.loeffler@mat.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Metal Physics and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    This work presents a phenomenological description of the precipitation controlled hardening of a new biodegradable Fe-based alloy developed to fulfill the requirements of temporary implant applications. Pronounced strengthening of the solution-treated martensitic Fe-10Mn-1Pd (in wt.%) alloy upon isothermal aging at temperatures within the ferrite-austenite phase field is observed and attributed to the thermally activated formation of coherent plate-like Pd-rich precipitates on {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} planes of the matrix. The onset and the early stages of alloy decomposition were studied using two complementary techniques: transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe analysis. Three distinct regions of the hardening kinetics are recognized and closely correlated to the evolution of the alloy microstructure. Upon aging, clustering of Pd atoms within the Fe-Mn solid solution occurs. The very small clusters grow, coarsen and adopt a plate-like shape, rearranging mutually to reduce the overall elastic strain energy. The elastic interaction of the dislocation substructure with Pd-rich precipitates of evolving morphology affects the dislocation mobility and is responsible for the hardness evolution of the alloy. A study of the hardening kinetics shows that the process exhibits all the features characteristic of maraging steels.

  4. Swelling and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    Vanadium-base alloys are candidates for use as structural material in magnetic fusion reactors. In comparison to other candidate structural materials (e.g., Type 316 stainless and HT-9 ferritic steels), vanadium-base alloys such as V-15Cr-5Ti and V-20Ti have intrinsically lower long-term neutron activation, neutron irradiation after-heat, biological hazard potential, and neutron-induced helium and hydrogen transmutation rates. Moreover, vanadium-base alloys can withstand a higher surface-heat, flux than steels because of their lower thermal stress factor. In addition to having these favorable neutronic and physical properties, a candidate alloy for use as structural material in a fusion reactor must have dimensional stability, i.e., swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement during the reactor lifetime at a level of structural strength commensurate with the reactor operating temperature and structural loads. In this paper, we present experimental results on the swelling and tensile properties of several vanadium-base alloys after irradiation at 420, 520, and 600{degree}C to neutron fluences ranging from 0.3 to 1.9 {times} 10{sup 27} neutrons/m{sup 2} (17 to 114 atom displacements per atom (dpa)).

  5. Precipitation hardening of biodegradable Fe-Mn-Pd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a phenomenological description of the precipitation controlled hardening of a new biodegradable Fe-based alloy developed to fulfill the requirements of temporary implant applications. Pronounced strengthening of the solution-treated martensitic Fe-10Mn-1Pd (in wt.%) alloy upon isothermal aging at temperatures within the ferrite-austenite phase field is observed and attributed to the thermally activated formation of coherent plate-like Pd-rich precipitates on {1 0 0} planes of the matrix. The onset and the early stages of alloy decomposition were studied using two complementary techniques: transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe analysis. Three distinct regions of the hardening kinetics are recognized and closely correlated to the evolution of the alloy microstructure. Upon aging, clustering of Pd atoms within the Fe-Mn solid solution occurs. The very small clusters grow, coarsen and adopt a plate-like shape, rearranging mutually to reduce the overall elastic strain energy. The elastic interaction of the dislocation substructure with Pd-rich precipitates of evolving morphology affects the dislocation mobility and is responsible for the hardness evolution of the alloy. A study of the hardening kinetics shows that the process exhibits all the features characteristic of maraging steels.

  6. Activation energies for oxygen reduction on platinum alloys: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alfred B; Roques, Jérôme; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Murthi, Vivek S; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2005-01-27

    A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the electrode potential dependencies of activation energies is presented for the first step in oxygen reduction over platinum and platinum alloy catalysts in both polycrystalline and carbon supported form. Tafel data for several of the catalysts are used to predict potential-dependent activation energies for oxygen reduction over the 0.6-0.9 V range in strong and weak acid. Comparisons with the theoretical curve show good agreement above 0.8 V, suggesting a fairly constant preexponential factor. Arrhenius determinations of activation energies over the 0.7-0.9 V range yield little trend for weak acid, possibly because of the larger uncertainties in the Arrhenius fits, but the strong acid results have smaller uncertainties and for them the measured activation energies trend up with potential. PMID:16851081

  7. The use of ferrites at microwave frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Thourel, Léo

    1964-01-01

    The Use of Ferrites at Microwave Frequencies describes the applications of ferrites at microwave frequencies and the apparatus involved. Topics covered range from the properties of ferrites to gyromagnetic and non-reciprocal effects, ferrite isolators, circulators, and modulators. The use of ferrites in variable frequency filter cavities is also discussed. Mathematical explanations are reduced to the strict minimum and only the results of calculations are indicated. This book consists of seven chapters and opens with a review of the theory of magnetism, touching on subjects such as the BOHR m

  8. Surface structure and catalytic activity of electrodeposited Ni-Fe-Co-Mo alloy electrode by partially leaching Mo and Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Bei-ping; GONG Zhu-qing; REN Bi-ye; YANG Yu-fang; CHEN Meng-jun

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Fe-Mo-Co alloy electrode was prepared in a citrate solution by electrodeposition, and then Mo and Fe were partially leached out from the electrode in 30% KOH solution. The unique surface micromorphology of a hive-like structure was obtained with an average pore size of about 50 nm. The electrode has a very large real surface area and a stable structure. The effects of sodium molybdate concentration on the composition, surface morphology, and structure of electrodes were analyzed by EDS, SEM and XRD. The polarization curves of the different electrodes show that the catalytic activity of electrodes is strongly correlated with the mole fraction of alloy elements (Ni, Fe, Mo, Co), and the addition of cobalt element to Ni-Fe-Mo alloy improves the catalytic activity. The Ni35.63Fe24.67Mo23.52Co16.18 electrode has the best activity for hydrogen evolution reaction(HER), with an over-potential of 66.2 mV, in 30% KOH at 80 ℃ and 200 mA/cm2. The alloy maintains its good catalytic activity for HER during continuous or intermittent electrolysis. Its electrochemical activity and catalytic stability are much higher than the other iron-group with Mo alloy electrodes.

  9. A method to determine the active particle nucleation undercooling distribution in a refined alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method to determine the active particle distribution of nucleation undercooling in a refined alloy. The experimental data used in this work are inferred from solidification experiments on a refined Al-3.5 wt% Ni alloy performed with X-ray radiography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. These in situ and real time observations allow the accurate and direct determination of the grain origin (heterogeneous nucleation on particles or fragmentation), of the density and of the equiaxed front growth rate. The LGK classical dendrite growth model is used to evaluate the front undercooling (ΔTC) corresponding to the measured equiaxed front growth rate. Then, the corresponding cumulative distribution of active refining particles is determined. From this cumulative distribution, we derive the corresponding Gaussian and log-normal laws to obtain the nucleation undercooling distribution of active particles. Results are discussed and compared to available measurements in the literature. The standard particle distribution parameters (density of nuclei, mean nucleation undercooling and standard deviation) are determined. We plan to use the determined nucleation undercooling particle distribution in a stochastic CAFE model for the grain structure without preliminary adjustment of the nucleation undercooling.

  10. THERMODYNAMICS OF BINARY ALLOYS OF PHARMACEUTICAL ACTIVE IMIDAZOLE WITH O- PHENYLENEDIAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar H.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the investigation of eutectic and non-eutectic alloys of imidazole (IM with o - Phenylenediamine (OPD. the solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE data determined by thaw melt method in the form of melting temperature with their corresponding composition construct the solid-liquid equilibrium phase diagram which suggests simple eutectic behaviour is followed by the binary system. The activity co-efficient model based on enthalpy of fusion was employed to calculate the excess partial and integral thermodynamic functions such as gE, hE and sE. These values help to predict the nature of molecular interaction, ordering and stability between the components. The spontaneity of mixing of eutectic and non eutectic alloys was discussed by the partial and integral mixing quantities ∆GM, ∆HM and ∆SM. Using Gibbs-Duhem equation the solution of partial molar heat of mixing, activity and activity coefficient of the component in the binary mix have been resolved.

  11. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of some cast stainless steels and high alloy white irons in scrubber solutions of flue gas desulfurization plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight loss and electrochemical measurements have been used to determine the ranges of applicability of cast austenitic stainless steel Werkstoff No. 1.4408, of two special cast ferritic-austenitic stainless steels NORIDUR 9.4460 and NORICLOR NC 246 and of two high alloy Cr and CrMo white irons in scrubber solutions of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants. Whereas the Werkstoff No. 1.4408 cannot be used due to its insufficient resistance to general and localized corrosion, NORIDUR 9.4460 can be used in scrubber solutions with pH > 2.5 and chloride concentrations up to 80 g/l, NORICLOR NC 246 with 5% Mo even in liquids with pH > 1.5 and chlorides up to 100 g/l. At lower pH-values both duplex stainless steels show active corrosion of either the austenite or the ferrite depending on the contents of hydrochloric acid in the solution. At higher chloride concentrations pitting occurs on the passive materials. The CrMo white iron NORILOY NL 252 with 25% Cr and 2% Mo can be used in scrubber liquids with pH > 3.5. As the ferritic matrix is cathodically protected by the precipitated carbides, there is no sensitivity of this alloy to chlorides. In liquids with pH < 3.5 there is selective corrosion of the ferritic matrix. For practical application of all these cast alloys the limits for purely corrosive attack have to be modified to assure resistance to a superposition of corrosion, erosion/abrasion and cavitation on parts exposed to real flow conditions in FGD scrubbers. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steel via a Sol-Gel Route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙钦星; 张涛; 王先平; 方前锋; 胡菁; 刘长松

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel powders with nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.3Ti-0.4Y2O3 are synthesized using sol-gel method and hy- drogen reduction. At low reduction temperature the impurity phase of CrO is detected. At higher reduction temperature the impurity phase is Cr2O3 which eventually disappears with increasing reduction time. A pure ODS ferritic steel phase is obtained after reducing the sol-gel resultant products at 1200℃ for 3 h. The HRTEM and EDS mapping indicate that the Y2O3 particles with a size of about 15 nm are homogenously dispersed in the alloy matrix. The bulk ODS ferritic steel samples prepared from such powders exhibit good mechanical performance with an ultimate tensile stress of 960 MPa.

  14. Evaluation of the transformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of ferrite: martensite microalloyed steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovri Henry

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of starting point microstructures on the transformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of a micro alloyed steel after annealing in the alpha + gamma region have been investigated. Three different microstructures: austenite, pearlite in a ferrite matrix and martensite were used as starting point microstructures for the production of dual (alpha + phase structures in the test steel. Photomicrographs obtained from metallographic examination of the heat treated samples were used as criteria for the assessment of results obtained from impact toughness and hardness testing. The results obtained showed that the transformation mechanisms and hence the morphology of ferrite - martensite microalloyed steels are strongly influenced by their initial microstructural details. Ferrite - martensite structures produced via the intercritical quench (IQ treatment, with martensite as the starting point microstructure, have the best combination of hardness and impact energy.

  15. Rupture character of steels with ferrite-pearlite structure under influence of liquid metallic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of liquid metal environment (gallium base alloy with melting point of 5 deg C) on mechanical properties and fracture mode was studied for ferritic-pearlitic steels with 0.03-0.8 % C under static and cyclic loading. Liquid metal medium was found to assist plastic deformation in a surface layer and to change fracture mode. It was revealed that the liquid of metal deteriorated steel properties in case of static loads but this effect weakened when passing from ferrite to pearlite. In ferritic steel under cycling loading the liquid metal affected so that shifted cracking resistance value to the region of lower stress intensity factors and promoted transition from intragranular fracture to intergranular one. Pearlitic steels behaved alike under cyclic loading both in liquid metal and in the air

  16. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steel alloys in molten (Na,K)NO{sub 3} eutectic mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, A.A. [Zagazik Univ. (Egypt). Chem. Dept.; Ali, A.-H.; Masri, A.N.A.; Baraka, A.M. [High Technological Inst., Ramadan Tenth City (Egypt)

    1999-09-01

    In the present article it is aimed to study the corrosion (oxidation) behaviour of two types of stainless steel alloys, ferritic (15.03% Cr) and austenitic (20.45% Cr, 8.37% Ni), in molten (Na, K)NO{sub 3} mixture at different temperatures ranging from 400-600 C. In this investigation the technique of potential-time and current-time under the open-circuit conditions is employed. The variation of potential with time at different temperatures was explained in terms of propagation and thickening of oxide film with a rate which depends on the temperature. It is assumed that the oxide film thickens according to a solid state mechanism under high field strength. The activation energy of the corrosion process was estimated using Arrhenius plots. The calculated values are found to be 21.36 KJ/mol for the ferritic stainless steel alloy and 23.3 KJ/mol for the austenitic one. The low value of activation energy signifies diffusion controlled process occurring in the oxide matrix. The corrosion products formed on the surface of stainless steel alloys are identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. Also the melt is chemically analysed to detect the amount of Fe, Cr and Ni in the melt after the completion of experiment. (orig.)

  17. Fe-rich border and activation energy of phase decomposition in a Fe–Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubiel, S.M., E-mail: Stanislaw.Dubiel@fis.agh.edu.pl; Żukrowski, J.

    2013-08-15

    Concentration of Cr in the Fe-rich α-phase, x, resulted from a phase decomposition caused by an isothermal annealing at T = 415 and 450 °C of a non-irradiated (NR) Fe–Cr14 EFDA sample and that of a He-ions irradiated one (IR) annealed at 415 °C was determined with Mossbauer spectroscopy. The x-value in the latter was by ∼3 at% higher than the one in the NR-counterpart. The activation energy for the phase decomposition in the NR-sample was 122 kJ mol{sup −1}. In the IR-sample its value was by 12 kJ mol{sup −1} lower. Avrami exponents for the NR-samples were close to 0.5, and that the IR-sample had a value of about 1. - Highlights: • Fe-rich border of miscibility gap in Fe–Cr alloys at 415 and 450 °C was determined. • In the He-ion irradiated alloy the miscibility gap at 415 °C was narrower by 3 at%. • Activation energy for the phase separation in non-irradiated samples was 122 kJ mol{sup −1}. • Avrami exponent was 0.5 and 1.0 for non-irradiated and irradiated samples, respectively.

  18. A novel active fire protection approach for structural steel members using NiTi shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel active fire protection approach, based on integrating a shape memory alloy, NiTi, with a steel structure, was proposed to satisfy the fire resistance requirements in structural design. To demonstrate the principles of this approach, a simple structure in the form of a simply supported steel beam was used. The internal action of the beam due to a transverse applied load was reduced by utilizing the shape memory effect in the NiTi alloy at rising temperatures. As a result, the net internal action from the load design was kept below the deteriorated load capacity of the beam during the fire scenario for period of time that was longer than that of the original beam without the NiTi alloy. By integrating the NiTi alloy into the beam system, the structure remained stable even though the steel temperature exceeded the critical temperature which may have caused the original beam structure to collapse. Prior to testing the composite NiTi–steel beam under simulated fire conditions, the NiTi alloy specimens were characterized at high temperatures. At 300 °C, the stiffness of the specimens increased by three times and its strength by four times over that at room temperature. The results obtained from the high-temperature characterization highlighted the great potential of the alloy being used in fire engineering applications. (paper)

  19. Ferrites – what is new?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Ranganathan; Anindita Ray

    2002-05-01

    Ferrites, combining insulating and ferrimagnetic properties, have long been used in technology. The aim of this paper is to focus on new features in these materials. In the classical theory of ferrimagnets, Neel had predicted the unusual thermal variation of the spontaneous magnetization, such as, the disappearance of the magnetization at a temperature which was not the Curie temperature but at a point where there was compensation of the spontaneous magnetization of the two sublattices. We show experimentally that temperature (K) in spinel oxide is different under the ZFC and FC magnetization method. To our knowledge, only limited attempt has been made to study K as very few systems exhibit such behavior. In general, some of the ferrites have specific semiconducting properties, e.g., a very low carrier mobility. We discuss the anomalies of the magneto-resistance in ferrites that occur at order–disorder and order–order magnetic phase transition along with our ac and dc conductivity data near the spin compensation temperature. Another notable feature of the ferrites is that, upon irradiation of heavy ions, one can tune the magnetic ordering on bulk sample without destructive effects, i.e., irradiation-induced magnetization. It is interesting to note that spinel ferrite (nano) particle is an ideal small particle magnetic system as the crystal chemistry issue can be controlled, unlike pure metal particle systems where the crystal chemistry issues are basically fixed. In relevance to this, we will also discuss the future prospects, namely, the effect of irradiation on small particle magnetism, as, so far, only a limited attempt has been made in this field.

  20. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  1. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature...

  2. Precipitation of K phase in austenitic alloys of Fe-Mn-Al system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of austenite decomposition in a fully austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-Si-C alloy aged for up to 400 hours at 500, 550, 600 and 6500C was investigated. Mettalographic studies using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microprobe analysis and X-ray diffraction showed the presence only of the K-phase in the aged samples. Ferrite and other phases such as β-Mn were not detected at the aging temperatures employed. The activation energy for the K phase precipitation was evaluated by means of the evaluation of hardness peaks associated to the early stages of precipitation. (author)

  3. Characterization of ferritic G. M. A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel for cryogenic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahin, K.W.

    1980-04-01

    Low temperature containment vessels of 9% Ni are normally fabricated using the shielded metal arc (S.M.A.W.) or the gas metal arc (G.M.A.W.) welding processes. Available filler metals compatible with these processes are highly alloyed austenitics, whose strength levels undermatch those of the base plate. A more efficient weld joint would be a low alloy ferritic deposit. Although acceptable matching ferritic gas tungsten arc weld (G.T.A.W.) wires have been developed, similar progress has not been made in the area of ferritic G.M.A. weld wires. Most of the prior work in this area has focused on correlating composition with mechanical properties, without a corresponding evaluation of resultant microstructure. The study presented focused on establishing correlations between chemistry, microstructure and mechanical properties for four different ferritic G.M.A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel, with the purpose of developing a better understanding of the factors controlling the 77K (-196/sup 0/C) toughness behavior of these weld metals. Microstructural characterization was carried out using standard optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as a variety of advanced analytical techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.), scanning T.E.M., Moessbauer spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  4. High coercivity in mechanically alloyed BaFe10Al2O19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-substituted Ba-ferrite in the form of BaFe10Al2O19 was prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent heat treatment. Their structure and magnetic properties were investigated in comparison with Ba-ferrite without Al substitution. After annealing at 1100 deg. C, a coercivity as high as 9.3 kOe was measured, while the coercivity values of the Ba-ferrite samples without Al substitution with a similar particle size were observed in the range of 5-6 kOe. A significant reduction of saturation magnetization was observed as compared to pure barium ferrite

  5. Thermal activation approaches to deformation mechanisms for high Nb containing TiAl base alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘自成; 王艳丽; 林均品; 张卫军; 陈国良

    2002-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 1200K were investigated by thermal activation approach. Using observed instantaneous stress response to the strain rate jump (Δσtr), the activation volume Va, then the activation enthalpy ΔH, activation free enthalpy ΔG and activation entropy ΔS were calculated. The apparent activation energy of high temperature deformation is estimated to be 3.66eV, which is larger than the self-diffusion coefficient of binary TiAl (3.01eV). The dislocations at 1173K are generally curved or bowed, even helical-shaped dislocations. The climb of ordinary dislocations as well as twinning has greatly contributed to the plastic deformation. The CRSS at 1173K is estimated to be 180MPa. The higher resisting stress at both room temperature and elevated temperature might relate to the high Nb content of the alloy.

  6. Versatility of electrospinning in the fabrication of fibrous mat and mesh nanostructures of bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) and their magnetic and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathkumar, S; Sakar, M; K, Rohith Vinod; Balakumar, S

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates the fabrication of electrospun bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) fiber mat and fibrous mesh nanostructures consisting of aligned and random fibers respectively. The formation of these one dimensional (1D) nanostructures was mediated by the drum and plate collectors in the electrospinning process that yielded aligned and random nanofibers of BFO respectively. The single phase and rhombohedral crystal structure of the fabricated 1D BFO nanostructures are confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies indicated that the fabricated fibers are stoichiometric BFO with native oxidation states +3. The surface texture and morphology are analyzed using the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The average size of fibers in mat and mesh nanostructures is found to be 200 nm and 150 nm respectively. The band gap energy of BFO mat and mesh deduced from their UV diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-DRS) was found to be 2.44 eV and 2.39 eV, respectively, which evidenced the improved visible light receptivity of BFO mesh compared to that of the mat. Magnetization studies using a super conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer revealed the weak ferromagnetic properties of BFO mesh and mat nanostructures that could emerge due to the dimension induced suppression of cycloidal spin structures. The photocatalytic degradation properties of the fibrous mesh are found to be enhanced compared to that of the mat. This could be attributed to the reduced band gap energy and an improved semiconductor band-bending phenomenon in the mesh that favoured the transportation of excited charge carriers to the photocatalyst-dye interfaces and the production of more number of reactive species that lead to the effective degradation of the dye molecules.

  7. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer’s formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  8. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  9. Applicability of Shape Memory Alloy Wire for an Active, Soft Orthotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Leia; Yu, Chih-Han; Miller, Jason; Hawkes, Elliot; Wood, Robert; Goldfield, Eugene; Nagpal, Radhika

    2011-07-01

    Current treatments for gait pathologies associated with neuromuscular disorders may employ a passive, rigid brace. While these provide certain benefits, they can also cause muscle atrophy. In this study, we examined NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wires that were annealed into springs to develop an active, soft orthotic (ASO) for the knee. Actively controlled SMA springs may provide variable assistances depending on factors such as when, during the gait cycle, the springs are activated; ongoing muscle activity level; and needs of the wearer. Unlike a passive brace, an active orthotic may provide individualized control, assisting the muscles so that they may be used more appropriately, and possibly leading to a re-education of the neuro-motor system and eventual independence from the orthotic system. A prototype was tested on a suspended, robotic leg to simulate the swing phase of a typical gait. The total deflection generated by the orthotic depended on the knee angle and the total number of actuators triggered, with a max deflection of 35°. While SMA wires have a high energy density, they require a significant amount of power. Furthermore, the loaded SMA spring response times were much longer than the natural frequency of an average gait for the power conditions tested. While the SMA wires are not appropriate for correction of gait pathologies as currently implemented, the ability to have a soft, actuated material could be appropriate for slower timescale applications.

  10. Activation Energy Measurement of Oxygen Ordering in a Nb-Ti Alloy by Anelastic Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemeyer T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals with bcc structure are able to dissolve large amounts of interstitial element atoms in the form of oxygen. These atoms diffuse through the lattice by jumping into octahedral sites with equivalent symmetry, causing strong alterations in the anelastic behavior. This paper reports on a study of Snoek relaxation in Nb-Ti alloys with oxygen in solid solution, based on internal friction as a function of temperature. The internal friction measurements were taken in a torsion pendulum operating at temperatures in the range of 350 to 650 K, with frequencies varying from 6 to 36 Hz. The results show relaxation spectra in which thermally activated relaxation peaks produced by the stress-induced ordering of oxygen atoms around niobium atoms of the metallic matrix were identified.

  11. Ferritic stainless steel composite slabs : Experimental study of longitudinal shear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer Ballester, Miquel; Marimón Carvajal, Federico; Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Mirambell Arrizabalaga, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out the procedure described in Eurocode 4 to evaluate the longitudinal shear transfer capability of conventional steel sheeting open-rib profile with embossments, usually rolled in conventional galvanized steel, being rolled now in ferritic stainless steel 1.4003 alloy. Finally, the results of both composite floor slabs are compared. Two methodologies have been used to evaluate the longitudinal shear resistance in composite slabs, the m-k method and t...

  12. Precipitation of niobium carbonitrides in ferrite: chemical composition measurements and thermodynamic modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Michel; Courtois, E.; Acevedo, D.; T. Epicier; Maugis, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy have been used to characterize the structure and chemical composition of niobium carbonitrides in the ferrite of a Fe–Nb–C–N model alloy at different precipitation stages. Experiments seem to indicate the coexistence of two types of precipitates: pure niobium nitrides and mixed substoichiometric niobium carbonitrides. In order to understand the chemical composition of these precipitates, a thermodynamic for...

  13. Evaluation of the transformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of ferrite: martensite microalloyed steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ovri Henry; Kamma Celestine Monde

    2008-01-01

    The influence of starting point microstructures on the transformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of a micro alloyed steel after annealing in the alpha + gamma region have been investigated. Three different microstructures: austenite, pearlite in a ferrite matrix and martensite were used as starting point microstructures for the production of dual (alpha + ) phase structures in the test steel. Photomicrographs obtained from metallographic examination of the heat treated samples were ...

  14. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohsen Kazeminezhad

    2012-06-01

    In this research, an algorithm based on the -state Potts model is presented for modeling the austenite to ferrite transformation. In the algorithm, it is possible to exactly track boundary migration of the phase formed during transformation. In the algorithm, effects of changes in chemical free energy, strain free energy and interfacial energies of austenite–austenite, ferrite–ferrite and austenite–ferrite during transformation are considered. From the algorithm, the kinetics of transformation and mean ferrite grain size for different cooling rates are calculated. It is found that there is a good agreement between the calculated and experimental results.

  15. Sonochemical Synthesis of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha P. Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite being a hard magnetic material with high coercivity and moderate magnetization has found wide-spread applications. In this paper, we have reported the sonochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles using metal acetate precursors. The ferrite synthesis occurs in three steps (hydrolysis of acetates, oxidation of hydroxides, and in situ microcalcination of metal oxides that are facilitated by physical and chemical effects of cavitation bubbles. The physical and magnetic properties of the ferrite nano-particles thus synthesized have been found to be comparable with those reported in the literature using other synthesis techniques.

  16. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Jacob; M Abdul Khadar; Anil Lonappan; K T Mathew

    2008-11-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite samples of three different average grain sizes and those of two sintered samples were studied. The parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and heating coefficient of the nanoparticles samples are studied in the frequency range from 2.4 to 4 GHz. The values of these parameters are compared with those of sintered pellets of the same samples. All these parameters show size dependent variations.

  17. Direct dyes removal using modified magnetic ferrite nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Abdi, Jafar; Bastani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic adsorbent nanoparticle was modified using cationic surface active agent. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide were used as an adsorbent and a surface active agent, respectively. Dye removal ability of the surface modified nanoparticle as an adsorbent was investigated. Direct Green 6 (DG6), Direct Red 31 (DR31) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) were used. The characteristics of the adsorbent were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron mi...

  18. Neutron activation studies of the in-body corrosion of hip-joint prostheses made of Co-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) the trace element composition of 18 elements was investigated in human tissues (articular capsule and fascia lata) of 36 persons after removal of hip-joint prostheses made of Co-Cr alloys. Normal trace element concentrations were determined studying a group of 26 patients before receiving their first artificial hip-joint. The tissues of patients with metal implants exhibited a heavy burdening by corrosion products (Co, Cr, Ni) from the prostheses as well as by Zr, Hf and Ba from the bone cements. Moreover, changes in the distribution of trace elements not contained in the steel were also observed. A comparison of the analytical results with those of model experiments of the corrosion of Co-Cr alloy in Ringer's solution demonstrates that the distribution pattern of corrosion products in the tissues are influenced by both, the biochemical properties as well as by selective dissolution of the alloy constituents. (author)

  19. Friction stir joining of dissimilar ferritic ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Noh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Application of the latest developments in materials technology may greatly aid in the successful pursuit of next generation reactor and transmutation technologies. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are expected to be used as a long life cladding in the future advanced fast reactor. Comparing to the other steels, ODS steels have excellent resistance to creep and swelling as well as superior mechanical strength. Applications of ODS steels grow faster in nuclear engineering society; however, not so many studies have been made for improving weld properties. In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano oxide depressed act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for joining traditionally difficult to join materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology, first developed in 1991, has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process for ferritic ODS steels, solid state microstructure modification is performed. During the FSW, dynamic recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and micro texture of the material near the stir zone was found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The response of material for different process variables have been discussed in terms of plastic deformation amount and heat input.

  20. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  1. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  2. Biodegradable Mg-Cu alloy implants with antibacterial activity for the treatment of osteomyelitis: In vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Liu, Lina; Wan, Peng; Zhai, Zanjing; Mao, Zhenyang; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Yu, Degang; Sun, Qi; Tan, Lili; Ren, Ling; Zhu, Zhenan; Hao, Yongqiang; Qu, Xinhua; Yang, Ke; Dai, Kerong

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of chronic osteomyelitis (bone infection) remains a clinical challenge; in particular, it requires an implantable material with improved antibacterial activity. Here, we prepared biodegradable magnesium (Mg)-copper (Cu) alloys with different Cu contents (0.05, 0.1, and 0.25 wt%) and assessed their potential for treating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced osteomyelitis. We evaluated the microstructures, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and ion release of the alloys in vitro, and their biocompatibility and antibacterial activity in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial activity of the Mg-Cu alloys in vitro was demonstrated by microbiological counting assays, bacterial viability assays, biofilm formation observations, and the expression of biofilm, virulence, and antibiotic-resistance associated genes. The antibacterial activity of Mg-Cu alloys in vivo was confirmed by imaging examination, microbiological cultures, and histopathology. The biocompatibility of Mg-Cu alloys was confirmed by cell proliferation, vitality, and morphology assays in vitro and Cu(2+) or Mg(2+) ion assays, blood biochemical tests, and histological evaluation in vivo. The alloy containing 0.25 wt% Cu exhibited the highest antibacterial activity among the tested alloys, with favorable biocompatibility. Collectively, our results indicate the potential utility of Mg-Cu alloy implants with 0.25 wt% Cu in treating orthopedic infections. PMID:27573133

  3. Corrosion resistance of modern austenitic-ferritic (duplex) stainless steel. Corrosion of special types. (Review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent data on resistance of modern corrosion-resistant austenitic-ferritic steels to different types of corrosion are generalized. It is shown that these steels are characterized by high resistance to general corrosion in acid, alkali, chloride and other solutions, are not inclined to intercrystalline, pitting and crevice corrosion and are noted for high resistance to corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. All this is combined with technological and economical effectiveness. It is advisible to use these steels instead of highly-alloyed and expensive steels and alloys in chemical, power and other industries. 59 refs.; 2 tabs

  4. Preparation, characterization and application of nanosized copper ferrite photocatalysts for dye degradation under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaharieva, Katerina, E-mail: zaharieva@ic.bas.bg [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Rives, Vicente, E-mail: vrives@usal.es [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Tsvetkov, Martin, E-mail: mptsvetkov@gmail.com [Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, 1 J. Bourchier Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Cherkezova-Zheleva, Zara, E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kunev, Boris, E-mail: bkunev@ic.bas.bg [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Trujillano, Raquel, E-mail: rakel@usal.es [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Mitov, Ivan, E-mail: mitov@ic.bas.bg [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Milanova, Maria, E-mail: nhmm@wmail.chem.uni-sofia.bg [Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, 1 J. Bourchier Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-06-15

    Nanosized copper ferrite-type materials (Cu{sub x}Fe{sub 3–x}O{sub 4}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) have been prepared by combination of co-precipitation and mechanochemical activation and/or thermal treatment. The crystalline structure and morphology of the obtained ferrite nanopowders have been characterized by different instrumental methods, such as Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, specific surface area and porosity measurements, thermal analyses (Differential Thermal Analysis and Thermogravimetric Analysis) and Temperature-Programmed Reduction. The average crystallite size of copper ferrites ranged between 7.8 and 14.7 nm and show a superparamagnetic and collective magnetic excitations nature. The photocatalytic decolorization of Malachite green oxalate under different UV illumination intervals was examined using these copper ferrites as photocatalysts. The results indicate that the prepared nanostructured copper ferrites showed enhanced photocatalytic activity and amount adsorbed Malachite Green dye. The co-precipitated nanosized copper ferrite powder with a low content of copper metal ions in a magnetite host structure (Cu{sub 0.25}Fe{sub 2.75}O{sub 4}) showed an apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant 15.4 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1} and an amount adsorbed Malachite Green as model organic dye pollutant per 1 g catalyst of 33.4 ppm/g after the dark period. The results confirm that the copper ferrites can be suitable for photocatalytic treatment of wastewaters containing organic dyes. The new aspect of presented investigations is to study the influence of different degree of incorporation of copper ions into the magnetite host structure and preparation methods on the photocatalytic properties of nanosized copper ferrite materials and obtaining of potential photocatalyst (Cu{sub 0.25}Fe{sub 2.75}O{sub 4}) with higher photocatalytic activity (15.4 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1}) than that of the standard referent Degussa P25 (12 × 10

  5. Effect of niobium on corrosion resistance to sulfuric acid of 430 ferritic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Alonso-Falleiros

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of niobium on corrosion resistance to 0.5M H2SO4 of 17% Cr ferritic stainless steels, to which it was added in amounts larger than that necessary to stabilize the interstitial elements, was investigated. Their performance was compared to that of other two Fe-17%Cr alloys, one without additions and another containing 0.93% molybdenum. Through weight and electrochemical measurements and through morphologic examination of corroded surface it was found that the corrosion of these alloys, with the exception of that containing molybdenum, proceeds in two different steps. In the first step (up to about 60 min the corrosion rate practically does not change with time, the lower rates being displayed by alloys containing larger amounts of Nb. In the second stage the corrosion rate increases with time. The corrosion rate of Mo containing alloy is constant for all times.

  6. Calorimetry studies on U-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calorimetric study of Uranium-Chromium system is of interest on both basic and applied fronts. With the advent of U-Pu-Zr alloy as the fuel, in combination with ferritic-martensitic steel as the cladding material, the metal fuelled fast reactors constitute the second major step in Indian nuclear power program. In such a context, a fundamental investigation on the high temperature phase stability of U-Cr alloys is of particular relevance in getting further insight in to the complex issue of the metallurgical compatibility of ferritic steels with metallic Uranium-Zirconium fuel. It may be added that following U-Fe, and U-Zr binaries, the U-Cr constitutes one of the important subsystems of the complex U-Zr-Pu-Fe- Cr-Mn-Si-V-Nb-C-N multinary system. In the current study, the results of calorimetry investigations on U, U-2, 3, 7, 15wt. % Cr alloys are presented

  7. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling of actively cooled thermal protection systems with nickel alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinzhi; He Yurong; Zheng Yan; Ma Junju; H. Inaki Schlaberg

    2014-01-01

    Actively cooled thermal protection system has great influence on the engine of a hyper-sonic vehicle, and it is significant to obtain the thermal and stress distribution in the system. So an analytic estimation and numerical modeling are performed in this paper to investigate the behavior of an actively cooled thermal protection system. The analytic estimation is based on the electric analogy method and finite element analysis (FEA) is applied to the numerical simulation. Temper-ature and stress distributions are obtained for the actively cooled channel walls with three kinds of nickel alloys with or with no thermal barrier coating (TBC). The temperature of the channel wall with coating has no obvious difference from the one with no coating, but the stress with coating on the channel wall is much smaller than that with no coating. Inconel X-750 has the best charac-teristics among the three Ni-based materials due to its higher thermal conductivity, lower elasticity module and greater allowable stress. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling results are com-pared with each other and a reasonable agreement is obtained.

  8. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spiral wirings for realization of various flexure motions of catheter tip using Ti-Ni SMA actuators. The size of the catheter is 3.5 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length of the sum of transducer and actuator sections. Ti-Ni SMA springs were fabricated from a Ti-50.9at.%Ni sheet by electrochemical etching with a mixed solution of ethanol and lithium chloride. The catheter was assembled by hand under a stereomicroscope. The tip of the produced catheter was able to move in parallel toward at least eight directions by controlling an applied current to Ti-Ni SMA springs. We have confirmed that the active catheter was able to observe an object settled in the front.

  9. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling of actively cooled thermal protection systems with nickel alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinzhi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Actively cooled thermal protection system has great influence on the engine of a hypersonic vehicle, and it is significant to obtain the thermal and stress distribution in the system. So an analytic estimation and numerical modeling are performed in this paper to investigate the behavior of an actively cooled thermal protection system. The analytic estimation is based on the electric analogy method and finite element analysis (FEA is applied to the numerical simulation. Temperature and stress distributions are obtained for the actively cooled channel walls with three kinds of nickel alloys with or with no thermal barrier coating (TBC. The temperature of the channel wall with coating has no obvious difference from the one with no coating, but the stress with coating on the channel wall is much smaller than that with no coating. Inconel X-750 has the best characteristics among the three Ni-based materials due to its higher thermal conductivity, lower elasticity module and greater allowable stress. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling results are compared with each other and a reasonable agreement is obtained.

  10. The recent development of fabrication of ODS ferritic steels for supercritical water-cooled reactors core application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Li, M.; Liao, L.; Liu, X.; He, P.; Xu, Y.; Chen, W.; Ge, C. [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    Development of cladding materials which can work at high temperature is crucial to realize highly efficient and high-burnup operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is one of the most promising cladding materials for advanced nuclear reactors, such as supercritical water-cooled reactor. ODS ferritic steels with Cr content of 12, 14 and 18% were designed and fabricated in China through the mechanical alloying (MA) route. The process parameters were discussed and optimized. Mechanical properties were measured at room temperature and high temperature. (author)

  11. In vivo degradation behavior and biological activity of some new Mg-Ca alloys with concentration's gradient of Si for bone grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Fântânariu, Mircea; Solcan, Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Burtan, Liviu; Acatrinei, Dumitru Mihai; Stanciu, Sergiu; Istrate, Bogdan; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium based alloys, especially Mg-Ca alloys, are biocompatible substrates with mechanical properties similar to those of bones. The biodegradable alloys of Mg-Ca provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers and also they avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. The main issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy is the fast degradation in the aggressive physiological environment of the body. The alloy's corrosion is proportional with the dissolution of the Mg in the body: the reaction with the water generates magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen. The accelerated corrosion will lead to early loss of the alloy's mechanical integrity. The degradation rate of an alloy can be improved mainly through tailoring the composition and by carrying out surface treatments. This research focuses on the ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys by an original method and studies the biological activity of the resulted specimens. A new Mg-Ca alloy, with a Si gradient concentration from the surface to the interior of the material, was obtained. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (VegaTescan LMH II, SE detector, 30 kV), X-ray diffraction (X'Pert equipment) and energy dispersive X-ray (Bruker EDS equipment). In vivo degradation behavior, biological compatibility and activity of Mg-Ca alloys with/without Si gradient concentration were studied with an implant model (subcutaneous and bony) in rats. The organism response to implants was characterized by using radiological (plain X-rays and computed tomography), biochemical and histological methods of investigation. The results sustained that Si gradient concentration can be used to control the rate of degradation of the Mg-Ca alloys for enhancing their biologic activity in order to facilitate bone tissue repair.

  12. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  13. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  14. Study of surface modification of alloys by photoelectron spectroscopy and neutron activation analysis: application to the study of a gold-copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion erosion etching is generally used to prepare surfaces for electron spectroscopy (ESCA and AES). During etching, selective interactions occur between ions and various elements from which the solid is constituted. The surface studied therefore undergoes modifications. Modifications of this type in the surface of a gold-copper alloy have been studied. The characteristics of an ion beam generated by a commercial gun without sweeping have been determined for low energy ions (beam shape, ion density distribution). These characteristics are then related to the effects observed (crater shape, etching rate). Neutron activation analysis has been used to determine the quantity of sputtered matter and subsequently the sputtering rate. Finally, a sequential analysis of sputtered matter (activation analysis) and studies of the characteristics of the eroded surface have confirmed the existence of a transient regime and enabled a correlation to be etablished between the composition of the surface layer for a stationary regime and the model used to describe the sputtering

  15. Microstructure of polymer composite with barium ferrite powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nowosielski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is the microstructure characterization of commercial BaFe12O19 powder and its composite material in polymer matrix; XRD (X-Ray Diffraction and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy methods were applied.Design/methodology/approach: The Rietveld method appeared to be very useful in the verification of the qualitative phase composition and in the determination of phase abundance. Hill and Howard procedure was applied for quantitative phase analysis. The parameters of the individual diffraction line profiles were determined by PRO-FIT Toraya procedure. The morphology of barium ferrite powders and a fracture surface of the examined composite material was analyzed using the scanning electron microscope.Findings: The X-ray diffraction analysis enabled the identification of BaFe12O19 and Fe2O3 phases in examined material. Basing on Rietveld and Toraya methods the determination of lattice parameters, crystallite size and the lattice distortion was performed. Distribution of powders of barium ferrite in polymer matrix is irregular and powder particles are of irregular shapes and different sizes.Research limitations/implications: Maked researches are limited only to characterization the microstructure of commercial material, because obtained results will be helpful to prepare barium ferrite powders by mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing in the future. As prepared BaFe12O19 powders will be used as the starting material for magnets bonded with polymer material.Originality/value: The obtained results of investigations by different methods of structure analysis confirm their useful in the microstructure analysis of powder materials.

  16. Cation distribution in ferrites and its effects on the chemical dissolution behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrites are formed on the steel surfaces as a protective corrosion oxide film on the heat transport surfaces in the water cooled nuclear reactors. These oxides film acts as a host to many neutron activated corrosion products (ACPs) leading to man-rem problem during the service maintenance. Understanding of chemical dissolution kinetics of these ferrites is important aspect in the development of decontamination process with aim of good decontamination factors. Ferrite shows a cation distribution as a function of parameter like metal ion substitution, crystallite size and temperature. Change in the cation distribution in ferrite can effect its dissolution process. The following three ferrites namely CoFe2O4/ZnFe2O4/MgFe2O4 were studied for its chemical dissolution behaviour as a function of the cation distribution. CoFe2O4, MgFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 shows an inversion parameters of 0.95, 0.46 and 0.06 respectively. The above ferrites with different cation distribution were achieved by the thermal treatment. The variation of cation distribution in ferrite was monitored/characterised by the Raman spectroscopy. Chemical dissolution of these ferrites were carried out in NAC formulation. Dissolution process was monitored by the metal ion dissolution in the solution. Dissolution data was fitted to the following two models 'Shrinking sphere model' and 'Factual chain mechanism model' to elucidate the kinetic parameter. We tried to establish correlation between the cation distribution in the ferrite and the dissolution kinetics of ferrites. ZnFe2O4 ('δ'= ∼ 0.06) showed k80obs(Fe) = 1.250 x 10-3 min-1and ZnFe2O4 ('δ' = ∼ 0.30) showed k80obs(Fe) =2.295 x 10-3min-1, indicating ZnFe2O4 with high inversion parameter showed higher dissolution rate. Activation energy for the ZnFe2O4 ('δ'= ∼ 0.30) and ZnFe2O4 ('δ'= ∼ 0.06) in NAC formulation was 58.4 and 61.5 kJ mol-1 respectively. CoFe2O4 and MgFe2O4 also showed the

  17. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  18. Bonding of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy using an active cement, Ag-Cu eutectic and Cu interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhao; Xiaohong, Li; Jinbao, Hou; Qiang, Sun; Fuli, Zhang

    2012-10-01

    The interfacial microstructures and mechanical properties of the joints formed by active cement added brazing in vacuum of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy, using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and pure copper foil as braze alloy and interlayer respectively, were investigated. CuTi, Cu4Ti3, Fe2Ti and the reaction layer of TiC and Si were the predominant components at the joint interface. The maximum shear strength of the joint was 77 MPa for brazing at 850 °C for 15 min. The results show that active cement added brazing in vacuum using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and Cu interlayer can be used successfully for joining Cf/SiC composites to Invar alloy.

  19. Effect of thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying of a pre-alloyed, gas atomised powder with yttria nano-particles, followed by hot isostatic pressing and thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). Two kinds of TMT were applied: (i) hot pressing, or (ii) hot rolling, both followed by annealing in vacuum at 850 deg. C. The use of a thermo-mechanical treatment was found to yield strong improvement in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the ODS RAF steel. In particular, hot pressing leads to microstructure refinement, equiaxed grains without texture, and an improvement in Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the upper shelf energy (about 4.5 J). Hot rolling leads to elongated grains in the rolling direction, with a grain size ratio of 6:1, higher tensile strength and reasonable ductility up to 750 deg. C, and better Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (about 55 deg. C).

  20. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  1. Long-term high temperature oxidation behavior of ODS ferritics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, B.A. E-mail: pintba@ornl.gov; Wright, I.G

    2002-12-01

    Four oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-(13-14 at.%) Cr ferritic compositions were exposed in air and air with 10 vol.% water vapor for up to 10 000 h at 700-1100 deg. C. At 700-800 deg. C in air, the reaction rates were very low for all of the alloys compared to stainless steels. At 900 deg. C, a dispersion of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, compared to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, showed a distinct benefit in improving the oxidation resistance, due to a reactive element effect. However, failure occurred after 7000 h at 900 deg. C when only 13% Cr was present. The absence of Ti and W in one alloy appeared to result in a thinner reaction product after oxidation at 800 deg. C. One composition was exposed in 10 vol.% water vapor at 800 and 900 deg. C and in air at 1000 and 1100 deg. C. Under both of these conditions, there was a significant increase in the rates of oxidation. With the relatively low Cr contents in these alloys, their corrosion-limited operating temperature in air is near 900 deg. C.

  2. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Weng Lan Lee [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  3. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values

  4. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G., E-mail: gcao@wisc.edu; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Sridharan, K.; Anderson, M.H.; Allen, T.R.

    2013-10-15

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values.

  5. Thermomechanical testing of FeNiCoTi shape memory alloy for active confinement of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Andrawes, Bassem; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2014-05-01

    The thermomechanical properties of a new type of shape memory alloy (SMA), FeNiCoTi, are explored in this paper with the aim of examining the feasibility of using this new material as transverse reinforcement for concrete structures subjected to earthquake loading. One advantage of using FeNiCoTi alloy is its cost effectiveness compared to commonly studied NiTi alloy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests are conducted to investigate the transformation temperatures of FeNiCoTi alloy under different heat treatment methods and prestrain schemes. First, a heat treatment method is established to produce FeNiCoTi alloy with wide thermal hysteresis that is pertinent to civil structural applications. Next, recovery stress tests are conducted to explore the effect of parameters including heating method, heating temperature, heating rate, heating protocol and prestrain level on the recovery stress. An optimum prestrain level is determined based on the recovery stress results. Moreover, cyclic tests are carried out to examine the cyclic response of FeNiCoTi alloy after stress recovery. Thermal cyclic tests are also carried out on the FeNiCoTi alloy to better understand the effect of temperature variation on the recovery stress. In addition, reheating of the FeNiCoTi alloy after deformation is conducted to examine the reusability of the material after being subjected to excessive deformation. Test results of the FeNiCoTi alloy indicate that this cost-effective SMA can potentially be a promising new material for civil structural applications.

  6. Mechanical and Electrochemical Behavior of a High Strength Low Alloy Steel of Different Grain Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, K. S.; Mondal, D. K.

    2013-08-01

    Various heat treatments applied to a fine-grained high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel resulted in producing different grain sizes. Optical and scanning electron microstructures of the different alloy states exhibited varying ferrite grains which have increased with the increase of annealing time and decrease of cooling rates. TEM structures of the as-received HSLA steel displayed characteristics microstructural features, distribution, and morphology of microalloy precipitates. Hardness and tensile strength values have decreased with the increase of grain sizes. Potentiodynamic electrochemical polarization of the different alloy states in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution showed typical active metal/alloy behavior. Tensile specimens of the as-received and heat-treated alloy cathodically charged with hydrogen, followed by tensile testing, did not indicate any noticeable loss of ductility. FESEM fractographs of hydrogen-charged samples showed a few chain of voids in the presence of cup and cone ductile fracture features in tensile-tested samples without hydrogen charging as well.

  7. Kinetics of Acicular Ferrite Transformation in Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acicular Ferrite (AF) is beneficial in welds because it providesa tough and strong microstructure. Therefore, much works have been done in the study of the effect of alloying elements and welding conditions aimed at obtaining more AF in the weld metal. However, the knowledge about the nature of AF is limited due to the lack of kinetics researches. In this paper, the kinetic curves of AF transformation in an X65 weld metal were established by means of welding thermal simulation test. The results showed that AF transformation is a typical diffusion process of nucleation and growth with incubation period. AF transformation in weld metal obeys the relationship described by JMA Equation. The effect of welding heat input was also studied.

  8. Decomposition Kinetics of Ferrite in Isothermally Aged SAF 2507-Type Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecz, Tibor; Fazakas, Éva; Mészáros, István; Sajó, István

    2015-12-01

    Decomposition of the ferritic phase is studied in isothermally aged SAF 2507 superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) by means of different examination methods. The ferritic phase ( δ) undergoes an eutectoid transformation into secondary austenite ( γ 2) and σ-phase between 650 and 1000 °C. Samples were treated at 900 °C because the incubation time of this transformation is the shortest at this temperature. In order to follow the microstructural changes, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), applied magnetic investigation [vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM)], micro-hardness tests, and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used. The results of XRD and EBSD methods for phase quantification showed nearly the same amounts for all three phases. The results of applied magnetic investigation for the fraction of ferritic phase were also in good agreement with the corresponding results of XRD and EBSD methods. Decomposition of ferrite is similarly well-traceable on EBSD phase maps where the coherent ferritic areas gradually broke into pieces with increasing time of heat treatment. According to the EBSD measurements the σ-phase grains appeared and started to grow after 2 min aging time in the ferritic-austenitic matrix, usually on the boundaries of ferritic and austenitic grains. After 15 min treating time, the microstructure consisted of mainly σ- and austenitic (primary and secondary) phases with negligible amount of ferrite. Chemical composition of the σ-phase was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) at different aging times. Activation energies of σ-phase precipitation and α'-phase formation were determined by the Kissinger plot, through DTA measurements; they are 243 and 261 kJ/mol, respectively. Using the results of phase quantifications, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was fitted.

  9. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  10. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Rapid and facile preparation of zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) oxide by microwave-solvothermal technique and its catalytic activity in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) oxide was rapidly and easily prepared by microwave-solvothermal route and its catalytic property in photo-Fenton reaction was evaluated. The effects of microwave heating time and power on the properties of produced particles were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms were the techniques used for characterizing the solid products. The synthesized material was tested as a catalyst in the degradation of the textile dye molecule by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. Characterization results showed that the microwave heating time and power have significant influences on the formation of the phase spinel as well as on its physical properties. The reaction results showed that the ZnFe2O4 oxide has good photocatalytic activity, which can be attributed to high surface area and pore volume, and large pore size. The ZnFe2O4 oxide produced by the microwave irradiation exhibited promising photocatalytic activity for the removal of textile dye, reaching nearly 100% of decolorization at 40 min and 60% of mineralization at 240 min. Therefore, ZnFe2O4 particles rapidly prepared by the microwave route have the potential for use in treatment of textile wastewater by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. - Highlights: • ZnFe2O4 was synthesized by microwave-solvothermal method. • ZnFe2O4 was prepared by different microwave heating times and powers. • ZnFe2O4 was used as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst. • Degradation of Procion red dye using heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. • ZnFe2O4 was highly efficient to degrade textile dye under visible light

  12. Rapid and facile preparation of zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) oxide by microwave-solvothermal technique and its catalytic activity in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchieta, Chayene G.; Severo, Eric C.; Rigo, Caroline; Mazutti, Marcio A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Kuhn, Raquel C., E-mail: raquelckuhn@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Muller, Edson I.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Moreira, Regina F.P.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-970, Florianópolis (Brazil); Foletto, Edson L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    In this work zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) oxide was rapidly and easily prepared by microwave-solvothermal route and its catalytic property in photo-Fenton reaction was evaluated. The effects of microwave heating time and power on the properties of produced particles were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms were the techniques used for characterizing the solid products. The synthesized material was tested as a catalyst in the degradation of the textile dye molecule by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. Characterization results showed that the microwave heating time and power have significant influences on the formation of the phase spinel as well as on its physical properties. The reaction results showed that the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide has good photocatalytic activity, which can be attributed to high surface area and pore volume, and large pore size. The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide produced by the microwave irradiation exhibited promising photocatalytic activity for the removal of textile dye, reaching nearly 100% of decolorization at 40 min and 60% of mineralization at 240 min. Therefore, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles rapidly prepared by the microwave route have the potential for use in treatment of textile wastewater by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. - Highlights: • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by microwave-solvothermal method. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by different microwave heating times and powers. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was used as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst. • Degradation of Procion red dye using heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was highly efficient to degrade textile dye under visible light.

  13. Constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of high strength ferritic steels for static and dynamic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Farid H.

    2010-11-01

    A constitutive relation is presented in this paper to describe the plastic behavior of ferritic steel over a broad range of temperatures and strain rates. The thermo-mechanical behavior of high strength low alloy (HSLA-65) and DH-63 naval structural steels is considered in this study at strains over 40%. The temperatures and strain rates are considered in the range where dynamic strain aging is not effective. The concept of thermal activation analysis as well as the dislocation interaction mechanism is used in developing the flow model for both the isothermal and adiabatic viscoplastic deformation. The flow stresses of the two steels are very sensitive to temperature and strain rate, the yield stresses increase with decreasing temperatures and increasing strain rates. That is, the thermal flow stress is mainly captured by the yield stresses while the hardening stresses are totally pertained to the athermal component of the flow stress. The proposed constitutive model predicts results that compare very well with the measured ones at initial temperature range of 77 K to 1000 K and strain rates between 0.001 s-1 and 8500 s-1 for both steels.

  14. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe–Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7–9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe–8%Cr–2%W–TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe–9%Cr–1%W–TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx

  15. Ferritic/martensitic steels - overview of recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Odette, G. R.; van der Schaaf, B.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable research work has been conducted on the ferritic/martensitic steels since the last International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials in 1999. Since only a limited amount of that work can be reviewed in this paper, four areas will be emphasized: (1) the international collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to address potential problems with ferritic/martensitic steels and to prove their feasibility for fusion, (2) the major uncertainty that remains concerning the effect of transmutation helium on mechanical properties of the steels when irradiated in a fusion neutron environment, (3) development of new reduced-activation steels beyond the F82H and JLF-1 steels studied in the IEA collaboration, and (4) work directed at developing oxide dispersion-strengthened steels for operation above 650 °C.

  16. Impact property of low-activation vanadium alloy after laser welding and heavy neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Watanabe, Hideo [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Miyazawa, Takeshi [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Shinozaki, Kenji [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Weld specimens of the reference low activation vanadium alloy, NIFS-HEAT-2, were irradiated up to a neutron fluence of 1.5 × 10{sup 25} n m{sup −2} (E > 0.1 MeV) (1.2 dpa) at 670 K and 1.3 × 10{sup 26} n m{sup −2} (5.3 dpa) at 720 K in the JOYO reactor in Japan. The base metal exhibited superior irradiation resistance with the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) much lower than room temperature (RT) for both irradiation conditions. The weld metal kept the DBTT below RT after the 1.2 dpa irradiation; however, it showed enhanced irradiation embrittlement with much higher DBTT than RT after the 5.3 dpa irradiation. The high DBTT for the weld metal was effectively recovered by a post-irradiation annealing at 873 K for 1 h. Mechanisms of the irradiation embrittlement and its recovery are discussed, based on characterization of the radiation defects and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  17. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  18. ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPLIANT CORROSION-ACTIVATED INHIBITOR SYSTEM FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    The federal government is estimated to spend $1 billion on painting/repainting aircraft annually. Aircraft have surfaces composed of aluminum alloys that are highly susceptible to corrosion and must be protected with corrosion-preventative treatments that typically conta...

  19. One-step synthesis of PtPdAu ternary alloy nanoparticles on graphene with superior methanol electrooxidation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuzhen; Gu Yonge; Lin Shaoxiong; Wei Jinping; Wang Zaihua [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Chunming, E-mail: wangcm@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du Yongling; Ye Weichun [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > PtPdAu nanoparticles were synthesized on graphene sheets via chemical reduction method. > The prepared PtPdAu nanoparticles were ternary alloy with fcc structure. > The catalyst exhibited superior catalytic activity and stability for MOR in alkaline. - Abstract: Well-dispersed PtPdAu ternary alloy nanoparticles were synthesized on graphene sheets via a simple one-step chemical reduction method in ethylene glycol (EG) and water system, in which EG served as both reductive and dispersing agent. The electrocatalytic activity of PtPdAu/G was tested by methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The catalyst was further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that the as-synthesized PtPdAu nanoparticles with alloy structures were successfully dispersed on the graphene sheets. Electrocatalytic properties of the catalyst for MOR in alkaline have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and Tafel curves. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of PtPdAu/G were superior to PtPd/G, PtAu/G and Pt/G. In addition, the anodic peak current on PtPdAu/G catalyst was proportional to the concentration of methanol in the range of 0.05-1.00 M. This study implies that the prepared catalyst have great potential applications in fuel cells.

  20. Effects of Hard Surface Grinding and Activation on Electroless-Nickel Plating on Cast Aluminium Alloy Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Olarewaju Ajibola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examined effects of hard surface polishing grits and activation on electroless-nickel (EN plating on cast aluminium alloy substrates in sodium hypophosphite baths. As-received aluminium alloy sample sourced from automobile hydraulic brake master cylinder piston was melted in electric furnace and sand cast into rod. The cast samples were polished using different grits (60 μm–1200 μm before plating. The effects on adhesion, appearance, and quantity of EN deposits on substrates were studied. Observation shows that the quantity of EN deposit is partly dependent on the alloy type and roughness of the surface of the substrates, whereas the adhesion and brightness are not solely controlled by the degree of surface polishing. The best yield in terms of adhesion and appearance was obtained from the activation in zincate and palladium chloride solutions. Higher plating rates (g/mm2/min of 3.01E-05, 2.41E-05, and 2.90E-05 were obtained from chromate, zincate, and chloride than 8.49E-06, 8.86E-06, and 1.69E-05 as obtained from HCl etched, NaOH, and H2O activated surfaces, respectively.

  1. The effect of dissolved stainless steel alloy elements on the activity and growth of SRB

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Lopes; Morin, P.; Oliveira, Rosário; Melo, L. F.

    2000-01-01

    Sulphate reducing bacteria have an important role in the sulphur cycle, and therefore in wastewater treatment systems. They are able to form biofilms on metallic surfaces, leading to fouling and corrosion problems. These bacteria are among the micro-organisms most frequently implicated in microbial corrosion of iron and ferrous alloys. Alloying elements added to steels for the improvement of their corrosion resistance such as molybdenum and nickel can be dissolved in bulk liqui...

  2. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous platinum-copper alloy networks with enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Zhang, Zong-Wen; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Porous Pt-Cu alloy networks are synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal process, with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and the block copolymer Pluronic F127 as structure-directing agent. The structure, porosity and surface chemical state of as-prepared Pt-Cu alloy with different composition are characterized. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is investigated by time sequential experiments. The obtained Pt53Cu47 alloy possesses a unique 3D hierarchical porous network structure assembled by interconnected nanodendrites as building blocks. Because of the high surface area, concave surface topology and open porous structure, the Pt53Cu47 alloy catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation in comparison with commercial Pt black and the Pt73Cu27 alloy synthesized following the same process as Pt53Cu47.

  3. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    during the industrial treatments. The thermodynamic boundary conditions for the kinetic model were assessed with respect to paraequilibrium. The potential interaction between the alloying atoms and the moving ferrite-austenite interface, referred to as solute drag effect, was accounted for rigorously in the model. To quantify the solute drag pressure the Purdy-Brechet approach was modified prior to its implementation into the model. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures

  5. Tailoring magnetic and dielectric properties of rubber ferrite composites containing mixed ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Anantharaman; K A Malini; S Sindhu; E M Mohammed; S K Date; S D Kulkarni; P A Joy; Philip Kurian

    2001-12-01

    Rubber ferrite composites containing various mixed ferrites were prepared for different compositions and various loadings. The magnetic and dielectric properties of the fillers as well as the ferrite filled matrixes were evaluated separately. The results are correlated. Simple equations are proposed to predetermine the magnetic and dielectric properties. The validity of these equations is verified and they are found to be in good agreement. These equations are useful in tailoring the magnetic and dielectric properties of these composites with predetermined properties.

  6. Microstructure feature of friction stir butt-welded ferritic ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Defect-free ferritic ductile iron joints is fabricated by FSW. • The welding nugget is composed of graphite, martensite, and recrystallized ferrite. • The graphite displays a striped pattern in the surface and advancing side. • The ferritic matrix transforms into martensite structure during welding. • High degree of plastic deformation is found on the advancing side. - Abstract: This study conducted friction stir welding (FSW) by using the butt welding process to join ferritic ductile iron plates and investigated the variations of microsturcture in the joined region formed after welding. No defects appeared in the resulting experimental weld, which was formed using a 3-mm thick ductile iron plate and tungsten carbide alloy stir rod to conduct FSW at a rotational speed of 982 rpm and traveling speed of 72 mm/min. The welding region was composed of deformed graphite, martensite phase, and dynamically recrystallized ferrite structures. In the surface region and on the advancing side (AS), the graphite displayed a striped configuration and the ferritic matrix transformed into martensite. On the retreating side (RS), the graphite surrounded by martensite remained as individual granules and the matrix primarily comprised dynamically recrystallized ferrite. After welding, diffusion increased the carbon content of the austenite around the deformed graphite nodules, which transformed into martensite during the subsequent cooling process. A micro Vickers hardness test showed that the maximum hardness value of the martensite structures in the weld was approximately 800 HV. An analysis using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA) indicated that its carbon content was approximately 0.7–1.4%. The peak temperature on the RS, 8 mm from the center of the weld, measured 630 °C by the thermocouple. Overall, increased severity of plastic deformation and process temperature near the upper stir zone (SZ) resulted in distinct phase transformation

  7. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  8. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  9. “Colossal” interstitial supersaturation in delta ferrite in stainless steels—I. Low-temperature carburization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature carburization has been successfully used to surface harden 17-7 precipitation-hardening (PH) and 2205 duplex stainless steels. After carburization, the delta ferrite grains in both alloys near the free surface show a uniform weak contrast under conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Spatially resolved compositional analysis shows that these delta ferrite grains possess enormous carbon contents (as high as 18 at.%) in solid solution, but structurally there is no detectable tetragonality (<5%) or evidence of carbide formation. Near the interface between the interstitially hardened layer and bulk material, weak-contrast plates with significant carbon concentrations were observed in ferrite grains in 17-7 PH stainless steel. A carbon-induced spinodal-like decomposition of delta ferrite to the nanometer-scale Cr-rich and Fe-rich alpha ferrite phases is observed. Carbon is enriched in Cr-rich ferrite due to the high affinity between C and Cr, which introduces lattice mismatch between the Cr-rich and Fe-rich regions. The weak contrast is believed to be the result of overlapping strain fields of these Cr-rich and Fe-rich phases. As the binding energies of carbon interstitials to dislocations in body-centered cubic Fe-based alloys are greater than the binding energy of C to Fe in possible carbides, segregation to dislocation cores is expected. The extremely high dislocation density we observe in high-resolution scanning TEM is consistent with the hypothesis that carbon segregation to dislocation cores effectively delays carbide precipitation and makes possible the “colossal” carbon supersaturation

  10. Preparation of AZ91D magnesium alloy semi-solid billet by new strain induced melt activated method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ju-fu; LUO Shou-jing; ZOU Jing-xiang

    2006-01-01

    New strain induced melt activated (new SIMA) method for preparing AZ91D magnesium alloy semi-solid billet is introduced by applying equal channel angular extrusion into strain induced step in SIMA method, by which semi-solid billet with fine spheroidal grains and average grain size of 18 μm can be prepared. Furthermore, average grain size of semi-solid billet is reduced with increasing extrusion pass of AZ91D magnesium alloy obtained in ECAE process. By using semi-solid billet prepared by new SIMA, thixoforged magazine plates component with high mechanical properties such as yield strength of 201.4 MPa, ultimate tensile strength of 321.8 MPa and elongation of 15.3%, can be obtained.

  11. Study of fluidized-bed desulfurization with zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindley, T

    1991-01-01

    Previous work established the technical feasibility of desulfurizing the hot product gases of coal gasification with fixed beds of a regenerable zinc ferrite sorbent. This process, intended for integration with coal gasifiers and gas turbines, has been tested and studied in considerable detail in a process development unit. Though possessing the advantages of high-sulfur absorption at low-sulfur breakthrough and the lack of sorbent attrition characteristic of a stationary bed, fixed beds also have inherent disadvantages: susceptibility to plugging by particles and a large diluent requirement during regeneration to control the reaction zone temperature. Therefore, METC conducted a scoping laboratory test program to determine the desulfurizing capability of fluid beds of zinc ferrite. Results from this program are presented. The results generally demonstrated that fluid beds of zinc ferrite have the potential to lower the H{sub 2}S level in hot gas from 10,000 to 10 ppmv. To achieve this at a high-sorbent sulfur loading would require two fluid-bed stages. Sorbent attrition appears to be acceptably low. Planned future activities include tests at high pressure with both simulated gas and in a gasifier sidestream.

  12. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil—Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis L. Liakos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose acetate (CA nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs, with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  13. Nanocrystalline spinel ferrites by solid state reaction route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundu; S Mishra

    2008-06-01

    Nanostructured NiFe2O4, MnFe2O4 and (NiZn)Fe2O4 were synthesized by aliovalent ion doping using conventional solid-state reaction route. With the doping of Nb2O5, the size of NiFe2O4 is reduced down to 33 nm. Similarly, nanostructured manganese ferrites (MnFe2O4) with diameters in the range of 45–30 nm were synthesized by Ti4+ ion doping. Particle diameters in all the specimens are found to decrease with increasing dopant content. The substitution of Nb5+ or Ti3+ ions essentially breaks up the ferrimagnetically active oxygen polyhedra. This created nanoscale regions of ferrites. Saturation magnetization and coercive field show a strong dependence on the size of the ferrite grains. Superparamagnetic behaviour is observed from the Mössbauer spectra of nanostructured NiFe2O4, if the particle size is reduced to 30 nm. Zero field cooled and field cooled curves from 30 nm sized MnFe2O4 particles showed a peak at B (∼ 125 K), typical of superparamagnetic blocking temperature. These results are explained in terms of core/shell structure of the materials. The d.c. resistivity of the doped specimens decreases by atleast five orders of magnitude compared to pure sample. This is ascribed to the presence of an interfacial amorphous phase between the sites.

  14. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  15. Effects of Ni content on the microstructures, mechanical properties and thermal aging embrittlement behaviors of Fe–20Cr–xNi alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shilei [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Steel Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Yanli, E-mail: wangyl@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xitao [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Steel Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-07-15

    The effects of Ni content on the microstructures, mechanical properties and thermal aging embrittlement behaviors of Fe–20Cr–xNi alloys were investigated in the model alloys of Fe–20Cr, Fe–20Cr–5Ni and Fe–20Cr–10Ni, corresponding to ferritic stainless steel, duplex stainless steel and weld of austenitic stainless steel, respectively. Addition of Ni element will significantly change the solidification process and the microstructures of model alloys. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 3000 h leads to different degrees of hardening in ferrite of alloys, and a ductile–brittle transition in Fe–20Cr–5Ni alloy. It is well-known that Ni will accelerate the decomposition kinetics of ferrite. The thermodynamic calculation for Fe–Cr–Ni alloy indicates that addition of Ni will reduce the fraction of Cr-rich phase in the equilibrium phase diagram.

  16. Activity and Stability of Rare Earth-Based Hydride Alloys as Catalysts of Hydrogen Absorption-Oxidation Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Taokai(应桃开); Gao Xueping(高学平); Hu Weikang(胡伟康); Noréus Dag

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth-based AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys as catalysts of hydrogen-diffusion electrodes for hydrogen absorption and oxidation reactions in alkaline fuel cells were investigated. It is demonstrated that the meta-hydride hydrogen-diffusion electrodes could be charged by hydrogen gas and electrochemically discharged at the same time to retain a stable oxidation potential for a long period. The catalytic activities and stability are almost comparable with a Pt catalyst on the active carbon. Further improvement of performances is expected via reduction of catalyst size into nanometers.

  17. The origin of transformation textures in steel weld metals containing acicular ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluken, A. O.; Grong, Ø.; Hjelen, J.

    1991-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with basic studies of the development of transformation textures in steel weld metals, using the electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) technique. It is shown that the acicular ferrite (AF) plates exhibit an orientation relationship with both the austenite and the prior delta ferrite columnar grains in which they grow. The observed orientation relationship lies within the Bain orientation region and can be described by three texture components, i.e., a component and two complementary components. Each of these texture components is orientated approximately parallel with the original cell/dendrite growth direction. Measurements of the spatial misorientation between neighboring plates confirm that the morphology of AF in low-alloy steel weld metals bears a close resemblance to upper bainite.

  18. Void formation and microstructural development in oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels during electron-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, J.; Suda, T.; Yamashita, S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Akasaka, N.; Nishida, M.; Ukai, S.

    1998-10-01

    ODS ferritic steels (13Cr-0.5Ti-0.2Y 2O 3) were prepared by the mechanical alloying method followed by the hot extrusion and several heat treatments including recrystallization. ODS steels with different heat treatment and a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel for the reference were irradiated to 12 dpa at 670-770 K in HVEM. After recrystallization, the dislocation density decreased with increasing grain size, however, the oxide particles did not show any obvious change in the size and the number density. During the electron-irradiation the microstructure was relatively stable, i.e. oxide particles showed good stability and the dislocation density remained almost constant. A limited void formation was observed in the specimens, and the suppressive effect due to dislocations with high number density was confirmed. From these results, the behavior of microstructure and the limited void formation in ODS steels have been discussed.

  19. High-temperature thermodynamic activities of zirconium in platinum alloys determined by nitrogen-nitride equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-temperature nitrogen-nitride equilibrium apparatus is constructed for the study of alloy thermodynamics to 23000C. Zirconium-platinum alloys are studied by means of the reaction 9ZrN + 11Pt → Zr9Pt11 + 9/2 N2. Carful attention is paid to the problems of diffusion-limited reaction and ternary phase formation. The results of this study are and a/sub Zr//sup 19850C/ = 2.4 x 10-4 in Zr9Pt11 ΔG/sub f 19850C/0 Zr9Pt11 less than or equal to -16.6 kcal/g atom. These results are in full accord with the valence bond theory developed by Engel and Brewer; this confirms their prediction of an unusual interaction of these alloys

  20. The activation/depassivation of nickel–chromium–molybdenum alloys in bicarbonate solution: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical and surface analytical techniques (X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopies) were used to characterize the influence of potential on the properties of the oxide film formed on the Hybrid BC-1 (a Ni–Cr–Mo) alloy in chloride solutions containing bicarbonate. In the passive region the film possesses the expected bilayer structure with a Cr(III)-dominated barrier layer containing mixed oxidation states of Mo and an outer dominantly-hydroxide layer. At more positive potentials the Cr/Mo content of the film decreases when bicarbonate is present and the alloy becomes covered by a thick (>100 nm), and only partially protective, Ni(OH)2 layer

  1. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M K

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, part...

  2. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  3. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for a SFR Fuel Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-chromium(9-12 wt.%) ferritic/martensitic steels are currently being considered as candidate materials for cladding and duct applications in a Gen-IV SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor) nuclear system because of their higher thermal conductivities and lower expansion coefficients as well as excellent irradiation resistance to void swelling when compared to austenite stainless steels. Since the operation condition in the design of Gen-IV SFR would be envisioned to be harsh from the viewpoints of temperature (≥600 .deg. C) and irradiation dose (≥200 dpa), the primary emphasis is on the fuel cladding materials, i.e. high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The ferritic/martensitic steels for the fuel cladding are commonly used in a 'normalized and tempered' condition. This heat treatment involves a solutionizing treatment (austenitizing) that produces austenite and dissolves the M23C6 carbides and MX carbonitrides, followed by an air cooling that transforms the austenite to martensite. Precipitation sequence during a long-term creep exposure is strongly influenced by the distribution of those in the as heat treated condition of the steels. Their creep strength has been improved by their martensitic lath structure, the precipitation strengthening effects of M23C6 carbides and MX carbonitrides and the solid solution strengthening effects of Mo and W in the matrix. Especially, the precipitation strengthening effect of MX is important because its coarsening rate is small and a fine particle size is maintained for a long-term creep exposure. Z-phase formation from MX-type precipitates has been proposed as a degradation mechanism for a long-term creep regime. The ferritic/martensitic steels should need to improve their performance to be utilized in the high burn-up fuel cladding. For this purpose, KAERI has been developing advanced ferritic/martensitic steels since 2007. This study includes some performance evaluation results of the mechanical and microstructural

  4. Influence of Boron on transformation behavior during continuous cooling of low alloyed steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzic, A., E-mail: Adnan.Terzic@imf.tu-freiberg.de [Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Metal Forming, Bernhard-von-Cotta-Str. 4, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Calcagnotto, M. [Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung GmbH, Eisenhüttenstr. 99, 38239 Salzgitter (Germany); Guk, S. [Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Metal Forming, Bernhard-von-Cotta-Str. 4, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Schulz, T. [Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung GmbH, Eisenhüttenstr. 99, 38239 Salzgitter (Germany); Kawalla, R. [Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Metal Forming, Bernhard-von-Cotta-Str. 4, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Abstracts: The phase transformation behavior during continuous cooling of low-carbon (LC) Boron-treated steels was studied. Furthermore, the influence of combining Boron with Nb or Ti or V on transformation kinetics was investigated. Additions of Boron to LC steels have a strong influence on the ferrite transformation. By adding 30 ppm Boron to a Boron-free reference alloy the suppressing effect on the ferrite transformation is most pronounced, whereas 10 ppm Boron has almost no effect and 50 ppm Boron the same effect as 30 ppm Boron. Thereby the critical Boron concentration for transformation kinetics in this alloying concept is 30 ppm. The combination of Boron with Ti shifts the phase fields to shorter times and increase the ferrite start temperature, whereas the combination of B+V and B+Nb only affects the ferrite start temperature. Hardness values are mostly influenced by the presence of Boron and strongly depend on the cooling rate.

  5. Joining of CBN abrasive grains to medium carbon steel with Ag-Cu/Ti powder mixture as active brazing alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, W.F. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)]. E-mail: dingwf2000@vip.163.com; Xu, J.H. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Shen, M. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Su, H.H. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Fu, Y.C. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Xiao, B. [College of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2006-08-25

    In order to develop new generation brazed CBN grinding wheels, the joining experiments of CBN abrasive grains and medium carbon steel using the powder mixture of Ag-Cu alloy and pure Ti as active brazing alloy are carried out at elevated temperature under high vacuum condition. The relevant characteristics of the special powder mixture, the microstructure of the interfacial region, which are both the key factors for determining the joining behavior among the CBN grains, the filler layer and the steel substrate, are investigated extensively by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS), as well X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The results show that, similar to Ag-Cu-Ti filler alloy, Ag-Cu/Ti powder mixture exhibits good soakage capability to CBN grains during brazing. Moreover, Ti in the powder mixture concentrates preferentially on the surface of the grains to form a layer of needlelike Ti-N and Ti-B compounds by chemical metallurgic interaction between Ti, N and B at high temperature. Additionally, based on the experimental results, the brazing and joining mechanism is deeply discussed in a view of thermodynamic criterion and phase diagram of Ti-B-N ternary system.

  6. Hybrid LCA of a design for disassembly technology: active disassembling fasteners of hydrogen storage alloys for home appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Yamasue, Eiji

    2010-06-15

    In the current recycling system of end-of-life (EoL) appliances, which is based on shredding, alloying elements tend to end up in the scrap of base metals. The uncontrolled mixing of alloying elements contaminates secondary metals and calls for dilution with primary metals. Active disassembling fastener (ADF) is a design for disassembly (DfD) technology that is expected to solve this problem by significantly reducing the extent of mixing. This paper deals with a life cycle assessment (LCA) based on the waste input-output (WIO) model of an ADF developed using hydrogen storage alloys. Special attention is paid to the issue of dilution of mixed iron scrap using pig iron in an electric arc furnace (EAF). The results for Japanese electrical and electronic appliances indicate superiority of the recycling system based on the ADF over the current system in terms of reduced emissions of CO(2). The superiority of ADF was found to increase with an increase in the requirement for dilution of scrap.

  7. Composition adjustment of low activation materials for shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three representative low activation materials for a fusion reactor are ferritic steel, V-alloy and SiC/SiC composite. The adjustment of the material composition of these materials to increase the fraction of shallow land burial in Japan was considered. In Japan, the fission waste having any single radionuclide exceeding the limiting concentration value, causing 100 μSv year-1 individual dose, determined by the Nuclear Safety Commission will not qualify as a low level waste (LLW), which could be disposed by shallow land burial. The limiting concentration values of radionuclides produced in fusion reactor were derived based on the methodology of the Nuclear Safety Commission. Radionuclide concentrations of the radwastes generated from the fusion power reactors using the three low activation materials based on the composition of existing materials were evaluated. Radwastes are classified into LLW and medium level waste (MLW), which is defined as the waste which does not qualify for LLW because one or more of the radionuclides exceeds the derived limiting concentration value. The weight fraction of MLW among the sum of LLW and MLW is found to be 10% for ferritic steel, 54% for V-alloy and 43% for SiC/SiC. The possibility of decreasing the MLW fraction by the material composition adjustment is considered. It is found that if Nb impurity content in V-alloy and N impurity content in SiC/SiC composite could be reduced, the MLW fraction can be significantly decreased. On the other hand, the content of the alloy component material (W), needs to be reduced to further decrease the MLW fraction in case of the ferritic steel F82H

  8. Sodium citrate assisted facile synthesis of AuPd alloy networks for ethanol electrooxidation with high activity and durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanling; Zhu, Zhijun; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhou, H. Susan

    2016-10-01

    The direct ethanol fuel cell is an emerging energy conversion device for which palladium is considered as the one of the most effective components for anode catalyst, however, its widespread application has been still limited by the activity and durability of the anode catalyst. In this work, AuPd alloy networks (NWs) are synthesized using H2PdCl4 and HAuCl4 as precursors reduced by NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate (SC). The results reveal that SC plays significant role in network structure, resulting in the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. This self-supported AuPd NWs catalyst exhibits much higher electrochemical catalytic activity than commercial Pd/C catalyst toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. Significantly, AuPd NWs catalyst shows extremely high durability at the beginning of the chronoamperometry test, and as high as 49% of the mass current density (1.41 A/mgPd) remains after 4000 s current-time test at -0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in N2-saturated KOH-ethanol solution. This strategy provides a facile method for the preparation of alloy networks with high electrochemical activity, and can be potentially expanded to a variety of electrochemical applications.

  9. Improving the Ethanol Oxidation Activity of Pt-Mn Alloys through the Use of Additives during Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Zamanzad Ghavidel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, sodium citrate (SC was used as an additive to control the particle size and dispersion of Pt-Mn alloy nanoparticles deposited on a carbon support. SC was chosen, since it was the only additive tested that did not prevent Mn from co-depositing with Pt. The influence of solution pH during deposition and post-deposition heat treatment on the physical and electrochemical properties of the Pt-Mn alloy was examined. It was determined that careful control over pH is required, since above a pH of four, metal deposition was suppressed. Below pH 4, the presence of sodium citrate reduced the particle size and improved the particle dispersion. This also resulted in larger electrochemically-active surface areas and greater activity towards the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR. Heat treatment of catalysts prepared using the SC additive led to a significant enhancement in EOR activity, eclipsing the highest activity of our best Pt-Mn/C prepared in the absence of SC. XRD studies verified the formation of the Pt-Mn intermetallic phase upon heat treatment. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that catalysts prepared using the SC additive were more resistant to particle size growth during heat treatment.

  10. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  11. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  12. Deformation at ambient and high temperature of in situ Laves phases-ferrite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical behavior of a Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy has been studied at ambient and high temperature. This Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy, whoose microstructure is formed by alternate lamellae of Laves phase and ferrite, constitutes a very simple example of an in situ CMA phase composite. The role of the Laves phase type was investigated in a previous study while the present work focuses on the influence of the microstructure length scale owing to a series of alloys cast at different cooling rates that display microstructures with Laves phase lamellae width ranging from ∼50 nm to ∼150 nm. Room temperature compression tests have revealed a very high strength (up to 2 GPa) combined with a very high ductility (up to 35%). Both strength and ductility increase with reduction of the lamella width. High temperature compression tests have shown that a high strength (900 MPa) is maintained up to 873 K. Microstructural study of the deformed samples suggests that the confinement of dislocations in the ferrite lamellae is responsible for strengthening at both ambient and high temperature. The microstructure scale in addition to CMA phase structural features stands then as a key parameter for optimization of mechanical properties of CMA in situ composites. (papers)

  13. Elastic anomalies in Fe-Cr alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Guisheng; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Hertzman, Staffan; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2013-05-15

    Using ab initio alloy theory, we determine the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic Fe(1-c)Cr(c) (0 ≤ c ≤ 1) alloys in the body centered cubic crystallographic phase. Comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli. The predicted single-crystal elastic constants follow complex anomalous trends, which are shown to originate from the interplay between magnetic and chemical effects. The nonmonotonic composition dependence of the elastic parameters has marked implications on the micro-mechanical properties of ferrite stainless steels. PMID:23604218

  14. Thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance of ferritic stainless steels under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Five ferritic stainless steels with dissimilar composition included. • Thermal oxide films and performance under exhaust gas condensate conditions studied. • Oxide films grown at 300 and 600 °C show differences in structure and properties. • Performance of alloys with >11.5 wt.% Cr is related to elements Ti, Si, Nb and Mo. • Compositional optimization requires knowledge on several linked processes. - Abstract: Five ferritic stainless steels are characterized in terms of thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions. Oxide films developed at 300 °C show only little variation in microstructure and properties between the alloys, whereas those evolved at 600 °C exhibit clear differences. Especially in alloys with >11.5 wt.% chromium, the presence and distribution of such alloying elements as titanium, silicon, niobium and molybdenum are crucial for the film properties and the overall corrosion performance. The results may be exploited in the compositional optimization of the alloys for the cold-end components of automotive exhaust system

  15. Mechanisms of short crack propagation in austenitic–ferritic duplex steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharnweber, Michael, E-mail: michael.scharnweber@mailbox.tu-dresden.de; Tirschler, Wolfgang; Oertel, Carl-Georg; Skrotzki, Werner

    2014-02-10

    For applications requiring both high strength and high corrosion resistance, austenitic–ferritic duplex steels are often the material of choice. In this study, cyclic deformation experiments were performed on the austenitic–ferritic duplex stainless steel 1.4462. By measuring the crack opening and crack sliding displacement in situ in a scanning electron microscope, the characteristics of the different crack propagation mechanisms in the two phases are determined. In the ferritic phase, two different appearances of short cracks can be observed, one exhibiting a very smooth and the other one a rather rough surface crack path. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements on the crack-containing grains in addition with high resolution imaging of the topography of the crack flanks reveal that contrary to common assumptions in the literature, short cracks in ferrite do not propagate via single slip. Instead, two different slip systems with an identical slip direction, but different slip planes, are activated. In this context, the specific appearance of different crack paths can be explained with the orientation of the respective grains. Furthermore, a model for discontinuous crack propagation especially of rough cracks in ferrite is developed. Finally, a correlation between the crack propagation rate and the plastic deformation of the crack tip is revealed and the possibility of determining the barrier effect of grain and phase boundaries via the measurement of the plastic deformation of the crack tip is investigated.

  16. Magnetic Polymer-Ferrite Nanocomposites: Structure, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Merijs-Meri, R; Kalniņš, M; Kaļķis, V; Šutka, A; S. Strode

    2009-01-01

    This research is devoted to the investigation of the ferrite modified polymer matrix nanocomposites. Auto-combustion route has been utilized for the manufacturing of the ferrite nanoparticles. The effect of initial chemical composition and most important processing parameters on the fineness of the ferrite nanopowder have been cleared out. Obtained ferrite nanoparticles have been introduced in a polycarbonate matrix by melt mixing. Most important technological parameters of the melt processin...

  17. Computer Simulation of Ferrite Transformation during Hot Working of Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunbo XU; Yongmei YU; Xianghua LIU; Guodong WANG

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of transformation kinetics and thermodynamics, the austenite-ferrite transformation start temperature during deformation was predicted for several grades of low-carbon steels under different processing conditions. Results indicate that Ar3d temperature mostly depended on alloying composition and processing parameters. Ar3d increased as strain rate or strain increased for the same steel grade. In view of enhancement of deformation on transformation,the basic kinetics model was established to simulate deformation induced transformation behavior, using which the influence of the deformation stored energy and effective deformation ledge on the nucleation and growth can be considered. The simulated results are in good agreement with experiment results.

  18. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  19. Effect of niobium on corrosion resistance to sulfuric acid of 430 ferritic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Alonso-Falleiros; Stephan Wolynec

    1998-01-01

    The influence of niobium on corrosion resistance to 0.5M H2SO4 of 17% Cr ferritic stainless steels, to which it was added in amounts larger than that necessary to stabilize the interstitial elements, was investigated. Their performance was compared to that of other two Fe-17%Cr alloys, one without additions and another containing 0.93% molybdenum. Through weight and electrochemical measurements and through morphologic examination of corroded surface it was found that the corrosion of these al...

  20. The origins of acicular ferrite in gas metal arc and submerged arc welds

    OpenAIRE

    Brothers, Daniel G.

    1994-01-01

    The nature of weld metal inclusions in relation to the formation of acicular ferrite was investigated. Gas-metal arc welds (GMAW) on High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) plate with varying amounts of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide added to the argon cover gas and submerged arc welds (SAW) on HY-100 plate with five different fluxes were analyzed. This analysis determined the effect of weld metal composition on non-metallic inclusion composition and the ultimate effects on the formation of acicular fer...

  1. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  2. MICROWAVE ASSISTED, NICKELCOBALT FERRITE CATALYSED ONEPOT MULTICOMPONENT SYNTHESIS OF β- ACETAMIDO KETONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAUL DOUGLAS SANASI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An efficient microwave assisted one pot synthesis of β-acetamido ketones from aromatic aldehydes, acetophenone, acetonitrile and acetyl chloride using nano Ni0.5Co0.5Fe2O4 ferrites as a catalyst is described, compared to mannich reaction the new method has advantage of good yield and short reaction time by simple phase separation. nano Ni0.5Co0.5Fe2O4 ferrites could be recycled several times without distinct loss of activity.

  3. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe2O4) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods

  4. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Wei, Gaoling; Chen, Tianhu; Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H2 temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200-600°C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300-600°C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400°C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn(4+) species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites. PMID:26774985

  5. Gibbs Free Energy and Activation Energy of ZrTiAlNiCuSn Bulk Glass Forming Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfei SUN; Jun SHEN; Zhenye ZHU; Gang WANG; Dawei XING; Yulai GAO; Bide ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy differences between the supercooled liquid and the crystalline mixture for the (Zr52.5Ti5Al10- Ni14.6Cu17.9)(100-x)/100Snx ·(x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) glass forming alloys are estimated by introducing the equation proposed by Thompson, Spaepen and Turnbull. It can be seen that the Gibbs free energy differences decrease first as the increases of Sn addition smaller than 3, then followed by a decrease due to the successive addition of Sn larger than 3, indicating that the thermal stabilities of these glass forming alloys increase first and then followed by a decrease owing to the excessive addition of Sn. Furthermore, the activation energy of Zr52.5Ti5Al10Ni14.6Cu17.9 and (Zr5 2.5Ti5 Al10 Ni14.6 Cu 17.9)0.97Sn3 was evaluated by Kissinger equation. It is noted that the Sn addition increases the activation energies for glass transition and crystallization, implying that the higher thermal stability can be obtained by appropriate addition of Sn.

  6. Micromagnetic simulations of spinel ferrite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Christine C., E-mail: ccdantas@iae.cta.b [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Gama, Adriana M., E-mail: adriana-gama@uol.com.b [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the magnetization field ac response (at 2-12 GHz) of various submicron ferrite particles (cylindrical dots). The ferrites in the present simulations have the spinel structure, expressed here by M{sub 1}-{sub n}Zn{sub n}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where M stands for a divalent metal), and the parameters chosen were the following: (a) for n=0: M={l_brace}Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg, Cu {r_brace}; (b) for n=0.1: M = {l_brace}Fe, Mg{r_brace} (mixed ferrites). These runs represent full 3D micromagnetic (one-particle) ferrite simulations. We find evidences of confined spin waves in all simulations, as well as a complex behavior nearby the main resonance peak in the case of the M = {l_brace}Mg, Cu{r_brace} ferrites. A comparison of the n=0 and n=0.1 cases for fixed M reveals a significant change in the spectra in M = Mg ferrites, but only a minor change in the M=Fe case. An additional larger scale simulation of a 3 by 3 particle array was performed using similar conditions of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite; n=0, M = Fe) one-particle simulation. We find that the main resonance peak of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} one-particle simulation is disfigured in the corresponding 3 by 3 particle simulation, indicating the extent to which dipolar interactions are able to affect the main resonance peak in that magnetic compound.

  7. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  8. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-16

    In summary, Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  9. Surface microstructure and antibacterial property of an active-screen plasma alloyed austenitic stainless steel surface with Cu and N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Li, X; Bell, T; Sammons, R; Dong, H

    2010-10-01

    Antibacterial modification of medical materials has already been developed as a potentially effective method for preventing device-associated infections. However, the thin layer generated, often less than 1 µm, cannot ensure durability for metal devices in constant use. A novel stainless steel surface with both a quick bacterial killing rate and durability has been developed by synthesizing Cu and a supersaturated phase (S-phase) using a new active screen plasma alloying technology. This paper investigated the microstructure of a multilayer (using EDS/WDS, SEM, TEM and XRD) and the viability of bacteria attached to biofunctional surfaces (using the spread plate method). The experimental results demonstrate that the plasma alloyed multilayered surface case consists of three sublayers: a nano-crystalline (Fe, Cr, Ni)3N deposition layer (∼200 nm), a unique Cu-containing face-centred cubic (f.c.c.) γ'-M4N (M=Fe, Cr, Ni, Cu) layer and a Cu/N S-phase layer. The thicknesses of the total treated case and the Cu-containing layers are 15 and 8 µm, respectively. Copper exists as substitutional atoms in the γ'-M4N (with a constant concentration of about 5 at%) and in the S-phase lattice (reduces from 5 to 0 at%). The crystal constant of the Cu/N S-phase layer ranged from 0.386 to 0.375 nm, which is expanded by γ from 4.4% to 7.5%. An effective reduction of 99% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 3 h was achieved by contact with the homogeneous Cu alloyed surface. No viable E. coli was found after 6 h (100% killed). PMID:20876967

  10. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  11. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  12. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  13. TEM observation of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    Sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites were studied using transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure morphology and its correlation with the magnetic properties. The present study shows that the microstructure of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites is an important parameter in determining their magnetic properties. The microstructure morphology in low-performance ferrite magnet is obviously different from high-performance one. Themagnetic properties of sintered permanent strontium ferrite depend strongly on the orientation degree of strong magnetic crystals. The presence of ferric oxidephase in ferrite magnet can deteriorate the magnetic properties. Moreover, proper quantities of crystal defects are beneficial to high coercive force due to the fixing of magnetic domain.

  14. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  15. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1) and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p500pg/mL). Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the unique nature of Cobalt alloy particle bioreactivity is strong enough to illicit danger signaling that secondarily activate concomitant TLR activation, and may in part explain Cobalt particulate associated inflammatory and toxicity-like reactions of specific orthopedic implants.

  16. Surface and electrochemical characterization of nano zinc ferrite coating on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural materials in nuclear power reactors are mainly iron and nickel based alloys. Operation of these nuclear reactors at high temperatures and high pressures for a longer duration leads to the formation of various oxides due to the corrosion of the structural materials and the nature of these oxides depend on the chemical environment prevailed. Since the corrosion process is electrochemical in nature, the interface formed between the alloys and oxides play a crucial role in deciding the overall corrosion resistance of the structural materials. Therefore, modifying these oxides to nano size would improve the adherence and protectiveness of the interfacial film. In this context, the chemical synthesis of zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) was carried out by precipitation method using zinc sulphate and iron ammonium sulphate. The synthesized ferrite powder was confirmed by Raman Spectroscopy. X-Ray Diffraction studies showed that the intensity and the ‘d’ values of the observed diffraction peaks perfectly match with the single-crystalline cubic spinel form of zinc ferrite having lattice constant a=8.436 Å. The 10 mm diameter ferrite targets were prepared using synthesized ZnFe2O4 powder by sintering at 1000°C for 24 hours. Thin film of ZnFe2O4 was deposited on Carbon Steel specimens using pulsed laser deposition technique. Characterization of this deposited ferrite was carried out by Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Secondary Electron Microscopy. Raman data of coated ZnFe2O4 matched with the standard ZnFe2O4 oxide. X-ray diffraction pattern indicated that the sample was in single phase with an average grain size 30 nm. XPS data indicated the formation of ZnFe2O4. Scanning electron microscopy technique was used to analyze the surface film morphology. The mechanism of corrosion resistance/improvement in the deposited layer was studied by electrochemical techniques and the results are presented in detail in this paper

  17. Sigma-phase formation in high chromium ferritic steels at 650 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewolak, L., E-mail: l.niewolak@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEF-2, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; Meier, G.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Quadakkers, W.J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEF-2, 52428 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • Formation of σ-FeCr phase at 650 °C in alloys Fe–30%Cr–2%(Mn,Mo,W) was investigated. • Formation of σ-FeCr phase was accelerated by interdiffusion with Ni-coating. • Mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation of σ-FeCr at BCC/FCC interface was discussed. • Mechanisms of homogenous and heterogeneous nucleation were discussed. • Improvement of isothermal section of Fe–Cr–Ni phase diagram at 650 °C was proposed. - Abstract: A binary Fe–30 wt.%Cr alloy and corresponding ternary alloys containing manganese, molybdenum or tungsten were studied with respect to σ-phase formation at 650 °C. Although even after 3000 h exposure complete equilibration was not attained, the presence of tungsten and especially molybdenum was found to promote σ-phase formation. More extensive σ-phase formation was observed in the tungsten and especially in the molybdenum-containing alloys than in the binary and manganese-containing alloy. Apparently the bulk free energy decrease driving the nucleation of σ-phase is substantially larger when tungsten or molybdenum are present in the alloy. The presence of a nickel layer, to simulate the contact between ferritic steel interconnects and nickel mesh in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) results in the formation of an austenitic zone and in accelerated formation of a σ-phase rich layer at the ferrite/austenite interface, due to interdiffusion processes. This interface acts as a highly efficient heterogeneity for the nucleation of σ-phase. The nucleation is enhanced by an increased Cr/Fe-ratio at that interface. Several possible modes for the growth of the σ layer were identified but the available experimental data were not sufficient to distinguish among these. The σ-rich layer, which appears to act as an interdiffusion barrier, is thicker in the case of the binary Fe–Cr and the Fe–Cr–Mn alloy than for the molybdenum- or tungsten-rich alloys. The results show that the stability range of σ-phase is larger

  18. Optimisation of a Nanostructured ODS Ferritic Steel Fabrication towards Improvement of its Plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In order to increase the operation temperature of the high-chromium reduced activation steels foreseen in applications of fusion reactors, ferritic steels containing 12 to 14% Cr in weight and reinforced with a dispersion of nano-oxides are being under development. The nano-oxides are incorporated into the matrix by adding Y2O3 or Fe-Y intermetallic particles to the initial steel powder, and by performing an intensive ball milling. In order to produce an ODS-steel with better mechanical properties, two specific actions of the production route were considered in this work to minimize the air contamination and porosity. The first one consists in using a higher purity pre-alloyed steel powder instead of mixture of elemental powders. The second one is to perform an additional densification after the hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) by hot cross rolling (HCR) the consolidated HIPed ingot. The steel powders batches were produced by ball milling of either elemental or pre-alloyed powders with Y2O3 or Fe2Y reinforcement particles in attritor, applying a hydrogen milling atmosphere at a controlled pressure and subsequent hot isostatic pressing. The influence of the type of substrate powders on the mechanical properties was studied for the ODS steels after HIP and after a thermal-mechanical treatment. HCR were applied at a temperature of 800 deg C. Optical microscope observations revealed a refinement of the microstructure with smaller porosity. Transmission electron microscope observations of the HCR ODS steel samples microstructures showed mainly recovered grains but also a slight coarsening of the finest oxides particles compared with the steel after HIP. Grains elongation in the rolling plane or in the normal plane was not observed. Hot cross-rolling resulted in an increase of ultimate tensile strength and a significant decrease of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). While a lower DBTT has been found for the ODS steels on which HCR was applied

  19. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  20. Semi-solid process of 2024 wrought aluminum alloy by strain induced melt activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surachai Numsarapatnuk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a production process of a fine globular structure feedstock of the 2024 aluminumalloy suitable for subsequent semi-solid forming. The 2024 wrought aluminum alloy was first annealed to reduce the effect ofwork hardening. Then, strain was induced in the alloy by cold compression. After that the microstructural evolution duringpartial melting was investigated. The samples were subjected to full annealing at 415°C for 3 hrs prior to cold compression of40% reduction of area (RA with 3 mm/min strain rate. After that samples were partially melted at 620°C with varying holdingtime from 0 to 60 min followed by water quenching. The grain size and the average grain diameter of solid grains weremeasured using the linear intercept method. The globularization was interpreted in terms of shape factor. Liquid fraction andthe distribution of the eutectic liquid was also investigated. It was found that during partial melting, the globular morphologywas formed by the liquid wetting and fragmentation of high angle boundaries of recrystallized grains. The suitable semi-solidmicrostructure was obtained from a condition of full annealing, 40% cold working and partial melting at 620°C for 6 minholding time. The near globular grains obtained in the range of 0-60 min consisted of uniform spheroid grains with an averagegrain diameter ranged from 73 to 121 m, quenched liquid fraction was approximately 13–27% and the shape factor was greaterthan 0.6. At a holding time of less than 6 min, grain coarsening was dominant by the immigration of high-angle grainboundaries. At a longer holding time, liquid fraction increased and Ostwald ripening was dominant. The coarsening rateconstant for the 2024 Al alloy was 400.36 mm3.s-1. At a soaking time of 60 min, it was found that a minimum diameter differencewas 1.06% with coarsening index n=3 in a power law equation. The non-dendritic slug of 2024 alloy was rapid compressedinto a disc with 90%RA

  1. Intermetallic Alloys as CO Electroreduction Catalysts-Role of Isolated Active Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamad, Mohammadreza; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges associated with the electrochemical CO or CO2 reduction is poor selectivity toward energetically rich products. In order to promote selectivity toward hydrocarbons and alcohols, most notably, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) should be suppressed. To achieve this goal...... potentially selective intermetallic surfaces on which CO can be reduced to methanol at potentials comparable to or even slightly positive than those for CO/CO2 reduction to methane on Cu. Common features shared by most of the selective alloys are single TM sites. The role of single sites is to block parasitic...

  2. Characterization and Modeling of Grain Boundary Chemistry Evolution in Ferritic Steels under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, Emmanuelle [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels such as HT-9, T-91 and NF12 with chromium concentrations in the range of 9-12 at.% Cr and high Cr ferritic steels (oxide dispersion strengthened steels with 12-18% Cr) are receiving increasing attention for advanced nuclear applications, e.g. cladding and duct materials for sodium fast reactors, pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors and first wall structures in fusion reactors, thanks to their advantages over austenitic alloys. Predicting the behavior of these alloys under radiation is an essential step towards the use of these alloys. Several radiation-induced phenomena need to be taken into account, including phase separation, solute clustering, and radiation-induced segregation or depletion (RIS) to point defect sinks. RIS at grain boundaries has raised significant interest because of its role in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and corrosion of structural materials. Numerous observations of RIS have been reported on austenitic stainless steels where it is generally found that Cr depletes at grain boundaries, consistently with Cr atoms being oversized in the fcc Fe matrix. While FM and ferritic steels are also subject to RIS at grain boundaries, unlike austenitic steels, the behavior of Cr is less clear with significant scatter and no clear dependency on irradiation condition or alloy type. In addition to the lack of conclusive experimental evidence regarding RIS in F-M alloys, there have been relatively few efforts at modeling RIS behavior in these alloys. The need for predictability of materials behavior and mitigation routes for IASCC requires elucidating the origin of the variable Cr behavior. A systematic detailed high-resolution structural and chemical characterization approach was applied to ion-implanted and neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr alloys containing from 3 to 18 at.% Cr. Atom probe tomography analyses of the microstructures revealed slight Cr clustering and segregation to dislocations and

  3. Stress-Strain Rate Relations in Ultra High Carbon Steels Deformed in the Ferrite Range of Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syn, C K; Lesuer, D R; Sherby, O D; Taleff, E M

    2003-02-20

    The stress-strain rate relations in ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been analyzed at high temperatures in the ferrite range where dislocation slip is the principal deformation mechanism. Specifically, the present investigation centers on the factors influencing the strength of UHCS in the ferrite range of 500 to 700 C and in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. These steels contain iron carbide as a second phase either in the form of spheroidite or pearlite and vary in the grain size according to the processing history. The new variables that need to be taken into account are the effect of ferromagnetism and its change with temperature on the creep strength of the ferritic UHCSs. Recent studies have shown that ferromagnetism strongly influences the lattice and dislocation pipe diffusion coefficient and the elastic modulus of iron in the ferrite range of temperature. These variables are shown to influence the creep strength of ferrite-base steels and explain the high activation energies that are observed in many of the ferritic UHCSs.

  4. Dielectric properties of nanocrystalline Co-Mg ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jyoti, E-mail: jyotijoshi.phy2008@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India); Sharma, Neha [Department of Physics, VEC Lakhanpur, Sarguja University, Ambikapur (C.G.) (India); Parashar, Jyoti; Saxena, V.K.; Bhatnagar, D. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India); Sharma, K.B. [Department of Physics, S. S. Jain Subodh P. G. College, Jaipur (India)

    2015-11-15

    Nanocrystalline powder samples with chemical formula Co{sub x}Mg{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) have been synthesized by sol–gel auto combustion method using citric acid as fuel agent. The rietveld refinement study of x-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the spinel single phase formation for all samples. Dielectric constant (ε′), dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) and AC conductivity of Co{sub x}Mg{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles have been measured at room temperature in the frequency range from 1000 Hz to 120 MHz. The dielectric dispersion observed at lower frequency region is attributed to Maxwell–Wagner two layer model, which is in agreement with Koops phenomenological theory. The observed results have been explained by polarization which is attributed to the electron exchange between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The temperature variation of ε′ and tanδ for some particular frequencies were studied. The rapid increase in ε′ and tan δ has been explained using thermally activated electron exchange between Fe{sup 2+} ↔ Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ↔ Co{sup 3+} ions at adjacent octahedral sites. The role of interfacial polarization has been focused to explain the high dispersion in ε′ and tanδ with temperature observed at low frequencies. - Graphical abstract: (a) TEM image of Co{sub 0.4}Mg{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} shows the nano size of the synthesized ferrite particles and (b) Dielectric constant behavior with frequency of Co{sub x}Mg{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite.

  5. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Choi, P; Goto, S; Borchers, C; Raabe, D; Kirchheim, R

    2013-09-01

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite. PMID:23237772

  6. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  7. Nanostructured/ultrafine multiphase steel with enhanced ductility obtained by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nanostructured/ultrafine steel with a complex microstructure comprising bainitic ferrite, austenite and martensite was obtained by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering of powders. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed to investigate the microstructural morphologies and the nature of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite formed during sintering process. The presence of a complex microstructure with elongated ferritic lamellae separated by thin layers of retained austenite was revealed. Some ferritic equiaxed grains are also present. The steel displays a large uniform plastic deformation, thanks to its work hardenability provided by the microstructural characteristics: the bimodal distribution of ferrite, the multiphase microstructure and the TRIP phenomenon provided by austenite.

  8. Superparamagnetic response of zinc ferrite incrusted nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Maldonado, K.L., E-mail: liliana.lopez.maldonado@gmail.com [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. Del Charro 450 norte, 32310 Ciudad Juárez (Mexico); Presa, P. de la, E-mail: pmpresa@ucm.es [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC), PO Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Dpto. Física de Materiales, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Betancourt, I., E-mail: israelb@unam.mx [Departamento de Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Farias Mancilla, J.R., E-mail: rurik.farias@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. Del Charro 450 norte, 32310 Ciudad Juárez (Mexico); Matutes Aquino, J.A., E-mail: jose.matutes@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Hernando, A., E-mail: antonio.hernando@externos.adif.es [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC), PO Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Dpto. Física de Materiales, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Incrusted nanoparticles are found at the surface of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} microparticles. • Magnetic contribution of nano and microparticles are analyzed by different models. • Langevin model is used to calculate the nanoparticles-superparamagnetic diameter. • Susceptibility and Langevin analysis and calculations agree with experimental data. - Abstract: Zinc ferrite is synthesized via mechano-activation, followed by thermal treatment. Spinel ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} single phase is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. SEM micrographs show large particles with average particle size 〈D{sub part}〉 = 1 μm, with particles in intimate contact. However, TEM micrographs show incrusted nanocrystallites at the particles surface, with average nanocrystallite size calculated as 〈D{sub inc}〉 ≈ 5 nm. The blocking temperature at 118 K in the ZFC–FC curves indicates the presence of a superparamagnetic response which is attributable to the incrusted nanocrystallites. Moreover, the hysteresis loops show the coexistence of superpara- and paramagnetic responses. The former is observable at the low field region; meanwhile, the second one is responsible of the lack of saturation at high field region. This last behavior is related to a paramagnetic contribution coming from well-ordered crystalline microdomains. The hysteresis loops are analyzed by means of two different models. The first one is the susceptibility model used to examine separately the para- and superparamagnetic contributions. The fittings with the theoretical model confirm the presence of the above mentioned magnetic contributions. Finally, using the Langevin-based model, the average superparamagnetic diameter 〈D{sub SPM}〉 is calculated. The obtained value 〈D{sub SPM}〉 = 4.7 nm (∼5 nm) is consistent with the average nanocrystallite size observed by TEM.

  9. Preparation of Pt Ag alloy nanoisland/graphene hybrid composites and its high stability and catalytic activity in methanol electro-oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, PtAg alloy nanoislands/graphene hybrid composites were prepared based on the self-organization of Au@PtAg nanorods on graphene sheets. Graphite oxides (GO were prepared and separated to individual sheets using Hummer's method. Graphene nano-sheets were prepared by chemical reduction with hydrazine. The prepared PtAg alloy nanomaterial and the hybrid composites with graphene were characterized by SEM, TEM, and zeta potential measurements. It is confirmed that the prepared Au@PtAg alloy nanorods/graphene hybrid composites own good catalytic function for methanol electro-oxidation by cyclic voltammograms measurements, and exhibited higher catalytic activity and more stability than pure Au@Pt nanorods and Au@AgPt alloy nanorods. In conclusion, the prepared PtAg alloy nanoislands/graphene hybrid composites own high stability and catalytic activity in methanol electro-oxidation, so that it is one kind of high-performance catalyst, and has great potential in applications such as methanol fuel cells in near future.

  10. Synthesis of lithium ferrites from polymetallic carboxylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANIA STOLERIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite was prepared by the thermal decomposition of three polynuclear complex compounds containing as ligands the anions of malic, tartaric and gluconic acid: (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O53(OH4(H2O2]×4H2O (I, (NH46[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O63(OH8]×2H2O (II and (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C6H11O73(OH7] (III. The polynuclear complex precursors were characterized by chemical analysis, IR and UV–Vis spectra, magnetic measurements and thermal analysis. The obtained lithium ferrites were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, IR spectra and magnetic measurements. The single α-Li0.5Fe2.5O4 phase was obtained by thermal decomposition of the tartarate complex annealed at 700 °C for 1 h. The magnetization value ≈ 50 emu g-1 is lower than that obtained for the bulk lithium ferrite due to the nanostructural character of the ferrite. The particle size was smaller than 100 nm.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.S.; Yang, X.L.; Gao, L.;

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powders with a partially inverted spinel structure were synthesized by high-energy ball milling in a closed container at ambient temperature from a mixture of alpha-Fe2O3 and ZnO crystalline powders in equimolar ratio. From low-temperature and in-field Mossbauer...

  12. low temperature irradiation effects in iron-alloys and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam irradiation at 77K and neutron irradiation at 20K were carried out on Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and ZnO and graphite system ceramics, and by measuring positron annihilation lifetime, the micro-information about irradiation-introduced defects was obtained. The temperature of the movement of atomic vacancies in pure iron is about 200K, but it was clarified that by the addition of Cr, it was not much affected. However, in the case of high concentration Cr alloys, the number of atomic vacancies which take part in the formation of micro-voids decreased as compared with the case of pure iron. It is considered that among the irradiation defects of ZnO, O-vac. restored below 300degC. It is considered that in the samples without irradiation, the stage of restoration exists around 550degC, which copes with structural defects. By the measurement of graphite without irradiation, the positron annihilation lifetime corresponding with the interface of matrix and crystal grains, grain boundaries and internal surfaces was almost determined. The materials taken up most actively in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials are austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, and their irradiation defects have been studied. (K.I.)

  13. Active vortex generator deployed on demand by size independent actuation of shape memory alloy wires integrated in fiber reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübler, M.; Nissle, S.; Gurka, M.; Wassenaar, J.

    2016-04-01

    Static vortex generators (VGs) are installed on different aircraft types. They generate vortices and interfuse the slow boundary layer with the fast moving air above. Due to this energizing, a flow separation of the boundary layer can be suppressed at high angles of attack. However the VGs cause a permanently increased drag over the whole flight cycle reducing the cruise efficiency. This drawback is currently limiting the use of VGs. New active VGs, deployed only on demand at low speed, can help to overcome this contradiction. Active hybrid structures, combining the actuation of shape memory alloys (SMA) with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) on the materials level, provide an actuation principle with high lightweight potential and minimum space requirements. Being one of the first applications of active hybrid structures from SMA and FRP, these active vortex generators help to demonstrate the advantages of this new technology. A new design approach and experimental results of active VGs are presented based on the application of unique design tools and advanced manufacturing approaches for these active hybrid structures. The experimental investigation of the actuation focuses on the deflection potential and the dynamic response. Benchmark performance data such as a weight of 1.5g and a maximum thickness of only 1.8mm per vortex generator finally ensure a simple integration in the wing structure.

  14. EELS study of niobium carbo-nitride nano-precipitates in ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, E; Epicier, T; Scott, C

    2006-01-01

    Micro-alloying steels allow higher strength to be achieved, with lower carbon contents, without a loss in toughness, weldability or formability through the generation of a fine ferrite grain size with additional strengthening being provided by the fine scale precipitation of complex carbo-nitride particles. Niobium is reported to be the most efficient micro-alloying element to achieve refinement of the final grain structure. A detailed microscopic investigation is one of the keys for understanding the first stages of the precipitation sequence, thus transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required. Model Fe-(Nb,C) and Fe-(Nb,C,N) ferritic alloys have been studied after annealing under isothermal conditions. However the nanometre scale dimensions of the particles makes their detection, structural and chemical characterization delicate. Various imaging techniques have then been employed. Conventional TEM (CTEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) were used to characterise the morphology, nature and repartition of precipitates. Volume fractions and a statistical approach to particle size distributions of precipitates have been investigated by energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging. Great attention was paid to the chemical analysis of precipitates; their composition has been quantified by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), on the basis of calibrated 'jump-ratios' of C-K and N-K edges over the Nb-M edge, using standards of well-defined compositions. It is shown that a significant addition of nitrogen in the alloy leads to a complex precipitation sequence, with the co-existence of two populations of particles: pure nitrides and homogeneous carbo-nitrides respectively. PMID:16500107

  15. A Study on the Microstructures and Toughness of Fe-B Cast Alloy Containing Rare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dawei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Fu, Hanguang; Yang, Chengyan; Ma, Shengqiang; Li, Yefei

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of cerium on the microstructures, mechanical properties of medium carbon Fe-B cast alloy. The as-cast microstructure of Fe-B cast alloy consists of the eutectic boride, pearlite, and ferrite. Compared with the coarse eutectic borides in the unmodified alloy, the eutectic boride structures in the modified alloy are greatly refined. Cerium promotes the formation of Ce2O3 phase. Ce2O3 can act as effective heterogeneous nuclei of primary austenite, and refine austenite and boride. After heat treatment, the impact toughness of the modified alloy is higher than that of the unmodified alloy because there are more broken borides in the modified alloy. Meanwhile, the fracture mechanism of medium carbon Fe-B alloy is depicted and analyzed by using fractography.

  16. The structure and mechanical properties of pearlitic-ferritic vermicular cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of magnesium alloy in modern Tundish + Cored Wire injection method for production of vermicular graphite cast irons were described. The injection of Mg Cored Wire length is a treatment method which can be used to process iron melted in an electric induction furnace. This paper describes the results of using a high-magnesium ferrosilicon alloy in cored wire for the production of vermicular graphite cast irons at the; Tundish + Cored Wire to be injected methods (PE for pearlitic-ferritic matrix GJV with about 25 %ferrite content. The results of calculations and experiments have indicated the length of the Cored Wire to be injected basing on the initial sulfur content and weight of the treated melt. The paper presents a microstructure matrix and vermicular graphite in standard sample and different walled castings. The results of numerous trials have shown that the magnesium Tundish + PE Method process can produce high quality vermicular graphite irons under the specific industrial conditions of the above mentioned foundries.

  17. Processing of a new high strength high toughness steel with duplex microstructure (Ferrite + Austenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This new steel has exceptional combination of high strength and fracture toughness. ► Austempering treatment resulted in a very fine scale bainitic ferrite microstructure. ► As the austempering temperature increases yield strength and toughness decreases. ► Maximum fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m is obtained after austempering at 371 °C. ► A relationship between fracture toughness and the parameter σy(XγCγ)1/2 was observed. - Abstract: In this investigation a new third generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) has been developed. This steel was synthesized by austempering of a low carbon and low alloy steel with high silicon content. The influence of austempering temperature on the microstructure and the mechanical properties including the fracture toughness of this steel was also examined. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from a low carbon low alloy steel and were initially austenitized at 927 °C for 2 h and then austempered in the temperature range between 371 °C and 399 °C to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. Test results show that the austempering heat treatment has resulted in a microstructure consisting of very fine scale bainitic ferrite and austenite. A combination of very high tensile strength of 1388 MPa and fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m was obtained after austempering at 371 °C

  18. Design and Development of bcc-Copper- and B2 Nickel-Aluminium-Precipitation-Strengthened Ferritic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Monica

    A series of high-strength low-carbon bcc-Cu- & B2-NiAl-precipitation-strengthened ferritic steels with Mn, Cu, Ni and Al were studied. The yield strength of these alloys increases with the amount of alloying elements. A maximum strength of 1600 MPa, with 12.40 at. % elements, is achieved which is about 30 % higher than the strength of previously reports NUCu (Northwestern Copper) alloys. All the alloys studied attain a maximum hardness within 1--2 h of aging at 500°C--550°C. Aging at a lower temperature and solution treating at a higher temperature can increase the hardness of all the alloys. The lower aging temperature is limited to 500°C by the slow precipitation kinetics observed at 400°C. The higher solution treatment temperature is limited to 1050°C by the adverse impact on toughness in dilute alloys. The primary strengthening contribution is due to combined precipitation of bcc Cu and NiAl-type intermetallic precipitates. The composition, structure and morphology evolution of the precipitates from the 1600 MPa alloy was studied using atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy, as a function of aging time at 550°C. Near the peak hardness, the equiaxed bcc Cu-alloyed precipitates have substantial amounts of Fe and are coherent with the Fe matrix. On subsequent aging, the Cu-alloyed precipitates are progressively enriched with Cu and elongate to transform to the 9R phase. The number density of the Cu-alloyed and NiAl-type precipitate is similar near peak hardness indicating that NiAl-type precipitates nucleate on Cu-alloyed precipitates. Almost all Cu-alloyed precipitates are enveloped on one side by ordered NiAl-type precipitates after aging from 2 h to 100 h. Cu-alloyed precipitates coarsen slower than NiAl-type precipitates because of three possible reasons: interfacial energy differences between the two types of precipitates, slower diffusion kinetics of Cu through the ordered B2 NiAl envelope around the bcc Cu-alloyed precipitate

  19. Modeling of electric resistance of shape memory alloys: self-sensing for temperature and actuation control of active hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissle, Sebastian; Hübler, Moritz; Gurka, Martin

    2016-04-01

    For actuation purposes active hybrid structures made of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) and shape memory alloys (SMA) enable substantial savings concerning weight, space and cost. Such structures allow realizing new functions which are more or less impossible with commonly used systems consisting of the structure and the actuator as separated elements, e.g. morphing winglets in aeronautics. But there are also some challenges that still need to be addressed. For the successful application of SMA FRP composites a precise control of temperature is essential, as this is the activating quantity to reach the required deformation of the structure without overloading the active material. However, a direct measurement of the temperature is difficult due to the complete integration of SMA in the hybrid structure. Also the deformation of the structure which depends on the temperature, the stiffness of the hybrid structure and external loads is hard to determine. An opportunity for controlling the activation is provided by the special behavior of the electrical resistance of SMA. During the phase transformation of the SMA - also causing the actuation travel - the resistance drops with rising temperature. This behavior can be exploited for control purposes, especially as the electrical resistance can be easily measured during the activation done by Joule heating. As shown in this contribution, theoretical modelling and experimental tests provide a load-independent self-sensing control-concept of SMA-FRP-hybrid-structures.

  20. Effect of copper content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of multipass MMA, low alloy steel weld metal deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of copper content in the range of 0.14-0.94 wt.% on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Cr-Ni-Cu low alloy steel weld metal deposits was investigated. All welds were prepared by manual metal arc welding technique in flat position. Microstructure of the welds was examined by optical and scanning electron microscopes. The results showed increase in acicular ferrite and microphases formed at the expense of primary ferrite and ferrite with second phase with steady refinement of microstructure. According to these microstructural changes, hardness, yield and ultimate tensile stresses increased while Charpy V-notch impact toughness and percent elongation reduced.

  1. PREPARATION AND ACTIVATION OF RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED Ni-Zr-Al AMORPHOUS ALLOY FOR CATALYTIC PURPOSE%快速凝固Ni-Zr-Al非晶态催化合金的制备与活化处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国胜; 张海峰; 沈宁福

    1999-01-01

    @@ As new catalytic materials, amorphous alloys have attracted much attention since 1980s. Rapid solidification is one of the main techniques to prepare amorphous alloys.However, as-cast rapidly solidified alloys usually can not be directly used as the catalyst for their poor surface area, oxide film on their surface, etc. Therefore, activation pretreatment must be carried out. Recently, leaching aluminum has been attempted to activate rapidly solidified amorphous catalytic alloys containing aluminum. In order to carry out such an activation pretreatment, the Al-rich amorphous precursor alloys must be obtained first, in which the content of active component must be sufficiently high so that the catalytic activity of the activated catalyst can be attained. On the other hand, the chemical composition of the precursor must approach eutectic point or contribute to the range of low liquidus temperature so that the glass transition can be easily achieved according to the solidification theory[1]. So far Al-based alloys which meet the dual confinement have not been found yet. For Ni-Al and Cu-Al systems,only the microcrystalline alloys can be obtained through rapid solidification[2,3].In the present study, glass formation was achieved by introducing promotion elements in Ni-Al system precursor alloys.

  2. Investigation of photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide coating deposited on aluminium alloy substrate by plasma technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daviðsdóttir, Svava; Soyama, Juliano; Dirscherl, Kai;

    2011-01-01

    . Literature consists of large number of publications on titanium dioxide coating for self-cleaning applications, with glass as the main substrate. Only little work is available on TiO2 coating of metallic alloys used for engineering applications. Engineering materials, such as light-weight aluminium and steel...... have wide spread technological applications, where a combination of self-cleaning properties has a huge business potential. The results presented in this paper demonstrate superior photocatalytic properties of TiO2 coated aluminium compared to nano-scale TiO2 coating on glass substrate. The thickness...... of the crystals. Furthermore, it manifested that the surface area of the coating increased linearly with crystal size. The optical measurements demonstrated that the ability of the coating to absorb light was depended on the thickness of the coating. As the coating became thicker, the absorption increased up...

  3. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the Ms value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO3. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings

  4. Design and development of a shape memory alloy activated heat pipe-based thermal switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, O.; Notardonato, W. U.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-10-01

    This work reports on the design, fabrication and testing of a thermal switch wherein the open and closed states were actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) elements while heat was transferred by a two-phase heat pipe. The motivation for such a switch comes from NASA’s need for thermal management in advanced spaceport applications associated with future lunar and Mars missions. As the temperature can approximately vary between -233 and 127 ° C during lunar day/night cycles, the switch was designed to reject heat from a cryogen tank into space during the night cycle while providing thermal isolation during the day cycle. A Ni47.1Ti49.6Fe3.3 (at.%) alloy that exhibited a reversible phase transformation between a trigonal R-phase and a cubic austenite phase was used as the sensing and actuating elements. Thermomechanical actuation, accomplished through an antagonistic spring system, resulted in strokes up to 7 mm against bias forces of up to 45 N. The actuation system was tested for more than thirty cycles, equivalent to one year of operation. The thermal performance, accomplished via a variable length, closed two-phase heat pipe, was evaluated, resulting in heat transfer rates of 13 W using pentane and 10 W using R-134a as working fluids. Experimental data were also compared to theoretical predictions where possible. Direct comparisons between different design approaches of SMA helical actuators, highlighting the effects of the helix angle, were carried out to give a layout of more accurate design methodologies.

  5. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.J., E-mail: y.li@mpie.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Choi, P. [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Goto, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegata Gakuencho, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Borchers, C. [Institut für Materialphysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Kirchheim, R. [Institut für Materialphysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite. - Highlights: ► Mechanical alloying effect is studied on Mn, Si, and Cr in pearlite. ► Severe cold-drawing forces Mn and Cr into the ferrite. ► Si is only somewhat forced into the cementite. ► Following annealing, Si prefers to segregate at ferrite (sub)grain boundaries. ► Following annealing, Cr and Mn are strongly enriched in cementite.

  6. Adhesion, activation, and aggregation of blood platelets and biofilm formation on the surfaces of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowiak-Przybyło, M; Klimek, L; Okrój, W; Jakubowski, W; Chwiłka, M; Czajka, A; Walkowiak, B

    2012-03-01

    Titanium alloys are still on the top list of fundamental materials intended for dental, orthopedics, neurological, and cardiovascular implantations. Recently, a special attention has been paid to vanadium-free titanium alloy, Ti6Al7Nb, that seems to represent higher biocompatibility than traditional Ti6Al4V alloy. Surprisingly, these data are not thoroughly elaborated in the literature; particularly there is a lack of comparative experiments conducted simultaneously and at the same conditions. Our study fills these shortcomings in the field of blood contact and microbiological colonization. To observe platelets adhesion and biofilm formation on the surfaces of compared titanium alloys, fluorescence microscope Olympus GX71 and scanning electron microscope HITACHI S-3000N were used. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis of platelets aggregation and activation in the whole blood after contact with sample surface, as an essential tool for biomaterial thrombocompatibility assessment, was proposed. As a result of our study it was demonstrated that polished surfaces of Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V alloys after contact with whole citrated blood and E. coli bacterial cells exhibit a considerable difference. Overall, it was established that Ti6Al4V has distinct tendency to higher thrombogenicity, more excessive bacterial biofilm formation and notable cytotoxic properties in comparison to Ti6Al7Nb. However, we suggest these studies should be extended for other types of cells and biological objects.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Cu-Sn-Ti-Based Active Braze Alloy Containing In Situ Formed Nano-Sized TiC Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinenbach, Christian; Transchel, Robert; Gorgievski, Klea; Kuster, Friedrich; Elsener, Hans Rudolf; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-05-01

    A Cu-Sn-Ti-based active brazing filler alloy was in situ reinforced with nanosized TiC particles by adding different amounts of a cellulose nitride-based binder. The TiC particles emanate from a reaction of the Ti within the filler alloy with the carbon from the binder that does not decompose completely during heating. The correlation between the microstructure and mechanical performance was studied. In addition, the effect of different binder amounts on the shear strength and cutting performance of brazed diamond grains was studied in shear tests and single grain cutting tests. The results clearly show that the mechanical performance of the brazed diamond grains can be improved by the formation of TiC particles. This is attributed to particle strengthening of the filler alloy matrix as well as to the decreasing grain size and more homogeneous distribution of the (Cu,Sn)3Ti5 phase with increasing amount of binder.

  8. Conductivity improvement of Li-Co-Yb ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of γ-irradiation on some physical properties of rare earth ferrite of the general formula Li0.5+zCozYbxFe2.5-2z-xO4, (z=0.1, x=0.00, 0.025, 0.050,...,0.200) was discussed. The temperature dependence of the polarization and resistance was studied in the range (300 K≤T≤700 K) at different frequencies (10 kHz ≤ f ≤ 1 MHz). The relaxation time and the activation energy were calculated for γ doses of 1 and 3 Mrad. Also, a comparison was made between the ac resistance, before and after irradiation, for the samples with different Yb concentrations (0.0≤x≤0.2). The results after irradiation with a 1 Mrad dose of γ-rays showed that the resistance at the critical concentration decreases from 800 to 25 kΩ, at room temperature. Furthermore, with increasing temperature the resistance ranged from R approx.130 kΩ at T approx. 310 K to R approx. 0.13 kΩ at T approx. 640 K. Thus, it is possible to improve the conductivity of this type of rare earth ferrite material to be used in technological applications at room temperature as well as at high temperatures. (author)

  9. Simultaneous determination of activation energy of hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of hydrogen and deuterium simultaneously, in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Hydrogen/Deuterium was charged on Zr-2.5% Nb alloy electrolytically by using Zr-2.5% Nb alloy and lead as cathode and anode respectively. 0.4 N H2SO4 in 80% D2O + 20% H2O was taken as an electrolyte. Temperature of electrolyte and current density were maintained at 340 K and 0.2 A/cm2 respectively. After charging of hydrogen/deuterium, alloy samples were vacuum sealed in quartz tube. Charged alloy pieces were annealed at four temperatures in the range of 523-673 K. Hydrogen and Deuterium concentration at different depths of alloy from a charged end was determined employing HVE-QMS

  10. Thermal activation analysis of the structural and phase transformations in the Zr-Cu-Nb amorphous alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedotova N.L.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the procedure of the estimation of the thermal activation parameters from the data of dilatometric measurements and the results of its application to the Zr-Cu-Nb amorphous alloy discussed. The determination of the thermal activation parameters of the processes occurring in materials under known temperature-force conditions can be useful for the identification of the structural mechanisms of phase transformations and the evolution of defect structure. We used the data of dilatometric measurements for evaluating the effective activation energy. This method exhibits some advantages over the conventional one due to the design features of dilatometers. First, it ensures the precise measurement of strains; second, the assigned temperature regime is very precisely maintained both at the stage of heating and upon isothermal holding; third, it ensures a high-speed continuous record of the experimental data. The developed method of evaluating the effective activation energy from the results of dilatometric experiments provides statistically reliable results. The data of the photometric analysis of structure images are in accordance with the results of dilatometric experiments

  11. Hot working of high purity Fe-C alloys in the {alpha}-range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montheillet, F; Le Coze, J, E-mail: montheil@emse.f [Ecole des Mines (SMS), CNRS UMR 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The influence of carbon in solid solution on the stress-strain curves of {alpha}-iron was investigated using model alloys prepared from high purity iron. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out within the ferritic domain at temperatures between 700 and 880 {sup 0}C. Oscillating stress-strain curves observed at high temperatures and low strain rates indicate that discontinuous dynamic recrystallization takes place. The macroscopic strain rate sensitivities m and apparent activation energies Q associated with the flow stress are not significantly modified by carbon additions. By contrast, the 'mesoscopic' parameters h and r associated with strain hardening and dynamic recovery, respectively, are strongly dependent on the carbon content. Finally, an estimation of the grain boundary mobilities during dynamic recrystallization was carried out from the above rheological data.

  12. Magneto-optical Kerr spectra and magnetic properties of Co-substituted M-type strontium ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiansong, E-mail: xiansongliu@ahu.edu.cn [Engineering Technology Research Center of Magnetic Materials, Anhui Province, School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Fernandez-Garcia, Lucia [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo UO - Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain); Hu Feng; Zhu Deru [Engineering Technology Research Center of Magnetic Materials, Anhui Province, School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Suarez, Marta; Menendez, Jose Luis [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo UO - Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prepare single phase ferrites by substituted with Co{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties were remarkably modified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A very noticeable Kerr activity was obtained for the Co-substituted ferrites. - Abstract: M-type strontium ferrites SrFe{sub 12-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) were prepared by the conventional ceramic technology. The structure, magnetic properties and magneto-optical Kerr activity of the samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and magneto-optical ellipsometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that all the samples were single phase ferrites. The magnetic properties, especially the coercive field, were remarkably modified due to the substitution of cobalt. Most importantly, a noticeable Kerr activity was demonstrated in the Co-substituted M-type strontium ferrites with x = 0.20.

  13. Microstructure of pre-sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and characteristics of pre-sintered strontium ferrite powderwere investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The present study shows that the pre-sintered strontium ferrite powder is provided with a certain particle size distribution, which results in high-density magnets. The strontium ferrite particle has a laminar hexagonal structure with a size similar to ferrite single domain. Ferric oxidephase due to an incomplete solid phase reaction in the first sintering is discovered, which will deteriorate the magnetic properties of ferrite magnet. In addition, the waste ferrite magnets with needle shape arranging along C axis in good order into the powders are found, which have no negative effects on finished product quality.

  14. Ferritization treatment of copper in soil by electrokinetic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomoyuki; Takase, Ken-Ichi; Terui, Norifumi; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2007-05-17

    The usefulness of the combined use of the electrokinetic (EK) remediation and a ferrite treatment zone (FTZ) was demonstrated for a treatment of the contaminated soil with heavy metal ions. Copper ions in contaminated soil were transferred into the FTZ by the EK technology and were ferritized in this system. The distribution of copper in a migration chamber after EK treatment with FTZ for 48h showed the large difference in the total and eluted concentration of copper. This indicated that copper ions transferred by EK into the FTZ were ferritized there with ferrite reagent in soil alkalified by EK process. The copper-ferrite compound, which was not dissolved with diluted acid, was retained in the FTZ and accumulated there. The ratio of the ferritized amount of copper against total copper was 92% in the EK process with FTZ after 48 h. PMID:17374444

  15. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hankin, G.L. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  16. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Potassium- Incorporated Titanium Oxide Nanostructures Produced by the Wet Corrosion Process Using Various Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured potassium-incorporated Ti-based oxides have attracted much attention because the incorporated potassium can influence their structural and physico-chemical properties. With the aim of tuning the structural and physical properties, we have demonstrated the wet corrosion process (WCP as a simple method for nanostructure fabrication using various Ti-based materials, namely Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TAV, Ti–Ni (TN alloy and pure Ti, which have 90%, 50% and 100% initial Ti content, respectively. We have systematically investigated the relationship between the Ti content in the initial metal and the precise condition of WCP to control the structural and physical properties of the resulting nanostructures. The WCP treatment involved various concentrations of KOH solutions. The precise conditions for producing K-incorporated nanostructured titanium oxide films (nTOFs were strongly dependent on the Ti content of the initial metal. Ti and TAV yielded one-dimensional nanowires of K-incorporated nTOFs after treatment with 10 mol/L-KOH solution, whereas TN required a higher concentration (20 mol/L-KOH solution to produce comparable nanostructures. The obtained nanostructures revealed a blue-shift in UV absorption spectra due to the quantum confinement effects. A significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed via the chromomeric change and the intermediate formation of methylene blue molecules under UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the WCP as a simple, versatile and scalable method for the production of nanostructured K-incorporated nTOFs to be used as high-performance photocatalysts for environmental and energy applications.

  17. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Y. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  18. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  19. Annealing-induced Grain Refinement in a Nanostructured Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limin Wang; Zhenbo Wangt; Sheng Guo; Ke Lu

    2012-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer with a mean ferrite grain size of -8 nm was produced on a Fe-gCr steel by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment. Upon annealing, ferrite grains coarsen with increasing temperature and their sizes increase to -40 nm at 973 K. Further increasing annealing temperature leads to an obvious reduction of ferrite grain sizes, to -14 nm at 1173 K. The annealing-induced grain refinement is analyzed in terms of phase transformations in the nanostructured steel.

  20. Buckling response of ferritic stainless steel columns at elevated temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Afshan, S; Gardner, L; Baddoo, NR

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the buckling behaviour of ferritic stainless steel columns in fire. Finite element models were developed and validated against existing test results to predict the elevated temperature non-linear response of ferritic stainless steel columns. A total of nine austenitic and three ferritic stainless steel column tests were replicated using the finite element analysis package ABAQUS. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the effects of variation...

  1. Magnetic induction of polymer composites filled with ferrite powders

    OpenAIRE

    Ł. Suchoń; M. Szczepanik; J. Pluszyński; A. Dybowska; J. Stabik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to determine influence of amount and type of ferrite fillers on magnetic induction of epoxy composites. Six mixtures that contain different amount of ferrite powder were prepared. Additionally an effect of type and amount of introduced ferrite powder on epoxy resin processing conditions and parameters was searched.Design/methodology/approach: In this research the method of preparing polymeric gradient composites was centrifugal casting. The experimental proc...

  2. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions. PMID:27340099

  3. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd-Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd-Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions. PMID:27340099

  4. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions.

  5. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calculation consistency with the experimental results, the knowledge of the material impurities content is mandatory

  6. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cepraga, D G

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calcul...

  7. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe3O4 and SrFe12O19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic

  8. Spin Reorientation in Substituted Barium Ferrite

    OpenAIRE

    Greneche, J.; Randrianantoandro, N.; Y. Labaye; Boust, F.; Flavin, E.; Pascard, H.

    1997-01-01

    The structural transformation of substituted hexagonal ferrite powders BaFe10CoTiO19 prepared by mechanical milling, was investigated as a function of grinding time by means of Mössbauer spectrometry and static magnetic measurements. A spin reorientation is clearly evidenced from the temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters and of the initial magnetic permeability on the powder mechanically treated for 23h.

  9. Comparison of the effects of sample preparation temperature, milling time, and carbon content on soft ferrite, hard ferrite, and Alnico magnet EM wave absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the effects of sample preparation temperature, milling time, and carbon content on Mn-Zn ferrite (soft ferrite), Ba ferrite and Sr ferrite (hard ferrite), and Alnico magnet EM wave absorbers for preparing superior EM wave absorbers. The reflectivity of the EM wave absorbers depended on the particle size and the particle shape of ferrites. In the manufacturing process of the EM wave absorbers, the preparation temperature played a very important role in deciding the EM wave absorption properties. We confirmed that carbon strongly affects on the reflectivity of hard ferrite and Alnico magnet EM wave absorbers.

  10. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  11. Ferrite Industry in India. Present Scenario and Future Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Sarnot, S.; Mathur, A.; Govila, R.

    1997-01-01

    Present Indian ferrite industry has come long way. Commercial production of ferrites started in 1960's. The production of ferrites in 1990 was about 7000 MT which has grown to about 15000 MT by 1995 indigenously. Indian ferrite industry is now posed for big jump and now getting ready to compete in the world market. The major companies are now proposing for big expansions in their production capacities with a desire to become global player. These plans have got further boost due to new economi...

  12. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  13. Microwave permittivity and permeability of ferrite-polymer thick films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel-zinc ferrite-epoxy composites with different ferrite/epoxy ratios, 50/50, 60/40, 70/30 and 80/20, have been prepared as thick films of thickness 100 μm. Different compositions of nickel-zinc ferrite, Ni1-xZnxFe2O4, where x=0.2,0.4 and 0.5 have been used to prepare the composite films. The complex permittivity (ε'-jε'') and the complex permeability (μ'-jμ'') of the films as well as of the sintered ferrites have been measured at X-band (8-12 GHz) microwave frequencies using the cavity perturbation technique. The dielectric constant and the permeability of the films are found to be different from those of the sintered ferrites. ε' of films is found to increase with increase in the ferrite content of the composites as well as with frequency while the permeability, μ', is observed to decrease with increase in ferrite content as well as frequency. The high permeability losses exhibited by the films at X-band frequencies, shows their potentiality for applications like suppression of electromagnetic interference in microwave circuits. The composites with the ferrite composition x=0.5 are observed to exhibit higher losses compared to the composites with other compositions. Also the ferrite/epoxy ratio 80/20 is observed to give comparatively higher losses

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Xiang; Li Yanxiang

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel has been developed, and its microstructures and mechanical properties at different temperatures were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the boron alloyed high silicon cast steel comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic borides in as-cast condition. The dendritic matrix is made up of pearlite, ferrite, and the interdendritic eutectic boride is with a chemical formula of M2B (...

  15. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  16. Metallurgical and mechanical tests on the low activating martensitic chromium steel OPTIFER-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derived from a martensitic chromium-steel (1.4914) with high strength at elevated temperatures, a new low activating steel OPTIFER-IV, Chg. 986489, had been developed for an application as 'First Wall' - and as structural material for fusion devices. The alloying elements with high activation like Mo, Ni and Nb had been substituted by similar acting, but low activating elements like W and Ta. Some metallurgical and mechanical properties had been tested in order to decide the kind of alloying. The new steel is fully martensitic without δ-ferrite, fine-grained and well hardenable. The tensile properties satisfy the requirements, and the notch impact bending properties are excellent. (orig.)

  17. Study of mechanism of activating flux increasing weld penetration of AC A-TIG welding for aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong; FAN Ding; FAN Qinghua

    2007-01-01

    When multi-component flux AF305 is used as surface activating flux for an aluminum alloy, the weld penetration of activating flux-tungsten inert-gas (A-TIG)welding is over two times more than that of conventional TIG welding. Using A-TIG welding with the modes of alternating current (AC), direct current electrode negative (DCEN) and direct current electrode positive (DCEP), respectively, the flux differently affects weld penetration when the polarity is different. After studied the effect of compelled arc constriction on weld penetration of AC welding, it is believed that the constriction of the whole arc root is not the main mechanism that flux AF305 dramatically improves weld penetration. The penetration has a relationship with the separate distribution of slag on the weld surface. Then, an observation of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an electronic data systems (EDS) analysis of slag were performed respectively. The separate distribution of slag on the weld pool during welding and the great constriction of arc spots were confirmed by TIG welding with helium shielding gas. The relationship between slag distribution and weld penetration was studied by adding aluminum powder into flux AF305 to change the distribution of slag. During welding, the separate distribution of slag on the weld pool results in the great constriction of arc spots, an increase in arc spot force, and an increase in Lorentz force within the arc and weld pool. Finally, the weld penetration is increased.

  18. System-Level Design of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuator for Active Clearance Control in the High-Pressure Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 inches. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 inches in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibits acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  19. An Investigation of the Massive Transformation from Ferrite to Austenite in Laser-Welded Mo-Bearing Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perricone, M. J.; Dupont, J. N.; Anderson, T. D.; Robino, C. V.; Michael, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    A series of 31 Mo-bearing stainless steel compositions with Mo contents ranging from 0 to 10 wt pct and exhibiting primary δ-ferrite solidification were analyzed over a range of laser welding conditions to evaluate the effect of composition and cooling rate on the solid-state transformation to γ-austenite. Alloys exhibiting this microstructural development sequence are of particular interest to the welding community because of their reduced susceptibility to solidification cracking and the potential reduction of microsegregation (which can affect corrosion resistance), all while harnessing the high toughness of γ-austenite. Alloys were created using the arc button melting process, and laser welds were prepared on each alloy at constant power and travel speeds ranging from 4.2 to 42 mm/s. The cooling rates of these processes were estimated to range from 10 K (°C)/s for arc buttons to 105 K (°C)/s for the fastest laser welds. No shift in solidification mode from primary δ-ferrite to primary γ-austenite was observed in the range of compositions or welding conditions studied. Metastable microstructural features were observed in many laser weld fusion zones, as well as a massive transformation from δ-ferrite to γ-austenite. Evidence of epitaxial massive growth without nucleation was also found when intercellular γ-austenite was already present from a solidification reaction. The resulting single-phase γ-austenite in both cases exhibited a homogenous distribution of Mo, Cr, Ni, and Fe at nominal levels.

  20. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic properties of nanometer zinc ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun Guo; Youli Qi; Xien Li; Shengyin Li; Wu Yang; Jinzhang Gao

    2004-01-01

    A combustion synthesis method was adapted for the efficient preparation of pure zinc ferrite particles (ZnFe204). It is based on the exothermic reaction of the corresponding metal nitrates with a reducing agent, to produce extremely fine-grained ashes that readily convert into pure ZnFe2O4 with treating thermally. The composition and microstructure of the so-obtained samples were studied by XRD (X-ray powder diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). These results showed that the range of particle size of ZnFe2O4 is about 15-25 nm. Photocatalytic activities of nanometer ZnFe2O4 were also evaluated by degradation of the curcumin solution.