WorldWideScience

Sample records for activation experiment ma-151

  1. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Agocs, Tibor; Challita, Zalpha; Jasko, Attila; Kroes, Gabby; Banyai, Evelin; Miller, Chris; Taylor, William; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a demonstrator freeform active mirror for future astronomical instruments both on Earth and in space. It consists of a system overview and progress in various areas of technology in the building blocks of the mirror: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, an active array, design tools and the metrology and control of the system. The demonstrator aims to investigate the applicability of the technique in high end astronomical systems, also for space and cryogenically.

  2. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  3. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  4. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knox, Hunter Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); James, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Rebekah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  5. Active array design for FAME: Freeform Active Mirror Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskó, Attila; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Agócs, Tibor; Venema, Lars; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Bányai, Evelin

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a status report is given on the development of the FAME (Freeform Active Mirror Experiment) active array. Further information regarding this project can be found in the paper by Venema et al. (this conference). Freeform optics provide the opportunity to drastically reduce the complexity of the future optical instruments. In order to produce these non-axisymmetric freeform optics with up to 1 mm deviation from the best fit sphere, it is necessary to come up with new design and manufacturing methods. The way we would like to create novel freeform optics is by fine tuning a preformed high surface-quality thin mirror using an array which is actively controlled by actuators. In the following we introduce the tools deployed to create and assess the individual designs. The result is an active array having optimal number and lay-out of actuators.

  6. Convoy Active Safety Technologies Warfighter Experiment I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Edward; Theisen, Bernard L.; Animashaun, Asisat; Davis, James, Jr.; Day, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. Warfigher Experiment I, held at A.P. Hill, VA in the fall of 2007, tested the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail the Warfigher Experiment's methodology, analysis, results and conclusions.

  7. Modeling active memory: Experiment, theory and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Daniel J.

    2001-06-01

    Neuro-physiological experiments on cognitively performing primates are described to argue that strong evidence exists for localized, non-ergodic (stimulus specific) attractor dynamics in the cortex. The specific phenomena are delay activity distributions-enhanced spike-rate distributions resulting from training, which we associate with working memory. The anatomy of the relevant cortex region and the physiological characteristics of the participating elements (neural cells) are reviewed to provide a substrate for modeling the observed phenomena. Modeling is based on the properties of the integrate-and-fire neural element in presence of an input current of Gaussian distribution. Theory of stochastic processes provides an expression for the spike emission rate as a function of the mean and the variance of the current distribution. Mean-field theory is then based on the assumption that spike emission processes in different neurons in the network are independent, and hence the input current to a neuron is Gaussian. Consequently, the dynamics of the interacting network is reduced to the computation of the mean and the variance of the current received by a cell of a given population in terms of the constitutive parameters of the network and the emission rates of the neurons in the different populations. Within this logic we analyze the stationary states of an unstructured network, corresponding to spontaneous activity, and show that it can be stable only if locally the net input current of a neuron is inhibitory. This is then tested against simulations and it is found that agreement is excellent down to great detail. A confirmation of the independence hypothesis. On top of stable spontaneous activity, keeping all parameters fixed, training is described by (Hebbian) modification of synapses between neurons responsive to a stimulus and other neurons in the module-synapses are potentiated between two excited neurons and depressed between an excited and a quiescent neuron

  8. p-process nucleosynthesis: Activation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorius, J.; Knörzer, M.; Müller, S.; Pietralla, N.; Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Wälzlein, C.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-04-01

    For the astrophysical p process a complex reaction network has to be solved. In the order of 10,000 theoretically predicted reaction rates are needed for simulations of this network. For reactions involving α particles or protons, the predictions in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach (HF) model were found to deviate from experimental results partially by a factor of 5 or even more. To optimize the predictive power of the applied HF codes, the nuclear physics input has to be improved. For this purpose, the reactions 166ErTm(p,n) as well as the reaction 170Yb(γ,n) have been measured with the activation method at low energies. The data can provide a further test of HF predictions but can also be used to optimize input parameters of the afore mentioned codes. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented and compared to theoretical predictions using the standard settings of the HF codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS.

  9. CAN ACTIVE EXPERIMENTS BE USED IN WOODWORKING PROCESSES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm LAURENZI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiments conducted during scientific research can be very simple or very complex. It is widely known that the classic (passive experiments, consisting of 5 tests at every point of the experiment, are the most precise, but also expensive experiments. In order to reduce the cost of experiments, many researchers use different types of active experiments. These experiments are cheaper than the classical experiments, but no so precise (up to 95%. The number of tests that are necessary can be reduced by designing the experiments (DOE experiments. If we take into account that the structure of wood (depending on its type is non-uniform, it is possible that the results of the experimental research conducted with active experiments are inaccurate. In order to confirm or invalidate these hypothesis, this paper presents a simulation program that allows simulations of a milling process for different types of experiments

  10. Designing Technology for Active Spectator Experiences at Sporting Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; Ludvigsen, Martin

    is not merely an experience of receiving and consuming entertainment. It is also heavily reliant on the active participation of the spectator in creating the atmosphere of the entire event. The BannerBattle experiment provides interactive technology in sport arenas with a form of interaction based on existing...... behaviour in the context. The work presented also argues for a need to overcome the inclination to designing technological systems that imitate or compete with the experience of watching the television broadcast of the game. Experiments such as the presented BannerBattle are cornerstones in our exploratory...... research-through-design approach to designing technologies for social experiences....

  11. Experience API: Flexible, Decentralized and Activity-Centric Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevan, Jonathan M.; Ryan, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    This emerging technology report describes the Experience API (xAPI), a new e-learning specification designed to support the learning community in standardizing and collecting both formal and informal distributed learning activities. Informed by Activity Theory, a framework aligned with constructivism, data is collected in the form of activity…

  12. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Kimerling, Rachel; Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-...

  13. Wind Tunnel Experiments with Active Control of Bridge Section Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section model where movable flaps are integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. This active control flap system is patented by COWIconsult and may be used to increase the...... flutter wind velocity for future ultra-long span suspension bridges. The purpose of the wind tunnel experiments is to investigate the principle to use this active flap control system. The bridge section model used in the experiments is therefore not a model of a specific bridge but it is realistic...... compared with a real bridge. Five flap configurations are investigated during the wind tunnel experiments and depending on the actual flap configuration it is possible to decrease or increase the flutter wind velocity for the model....

  14. EXPERIENCE OF FOREIGN INVESTMENT ACTIVITY OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pikus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of the investment of insurance companies of developed foreign countries. Specific features of state regulation of investment activities of insurance companies are determined, as well as described the main trends shaping the investment portfolio of the insurer under current conditions.

  15. Physical Activity Experiences of Boys with and without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, William J.; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.; Staples, Kerri; Grizenko, Natalie; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity experiences of 12 age-matched boys with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were explored by converging information from Test of Gross Motor Development-2 assessments and semistructured interviews. The knowledge-based approach and the inhibitory model of executive functions, a combined theoretical lens,…

  16. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  17. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  18. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  19. The lived experiences of being physically active when morbidly obese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Bente Skovsby; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    lead to long-term changes in activity level, if facilitators and barriers are approached in a holistic way by professionals. To develop lifestyle interventions, the perspective and experiences of this group of patients are essential for success. The methodology of the systematic review followed......The aim is to identify facilitators and barriers for physical activity (PA) experienced by morbidly obese adults in the Western world. Inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle have become a major challenge for health and well-being, particularly among persons with morbid obesity. Lifestyle changes may...

  20. Experiment R285-06. ILAS 6. Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiment ILAS 6 two different austenitic stainless steel types for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300C up to dpa (displacements per atom) levels of 2.5 dpa. The results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of two types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are given. 1 fig., 1 tab., 8 refs., 3 appendices

  1. Experiment R276-15 (MANIA 15). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiment MANIA 15 austenitic stainless steel for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 325 C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 2.0 dpa. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of the steel sample material are presented. The activities of the streel sample material are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the change in chemical composition of the sample material due to nuclide transmutation, is given in this report. (orig.)

  2. Performing Active Noise Control and Acoustic Experiments Remotely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel and advanced remotely controlled laboratory for conducting Active Noise Control (ANC, acoustic and Digital Signal Processing (DSP experiments. The laboratory facility, recently developed by Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH Sweden, supports remote learning through internet covering beginners level such as simple experimental measurements to advanced users and even researchers such as algorithm development and their performance evaluation on DSP. The required software development for ANC algorithms and equipment control are carried out anywhere in the world remotely from an internet-connected client PC using a standard web browser. The paper describes in detail how ANC, acoustic and DSP experiments can be performed remotely The necessary steps involved in an ANC experiment such as validity of ANC, forward path estimation and active control applied to a broad band random noise [0-200Hz] in a ventilation duct will be described in detail. The limitations and challenges such as the forward path and nonlinearities pertinent to the remote laboratory setup will be described for the guidance of the user. Based on the acoustic properties of the ventilation duct some of the possible acoustic experiments such as mode shapes analysis and standing waves analysis etc. will also be discussed in the paper.

  3. The quality of service experience in outdoor activities programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Astrapellos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In our days the outdoor activities of recreation are new and continuously increasing tendency that has usually entered in the industry of tourism and called Alternative forms of tourism. The aim of this study was to examine the experience of service of individuals after their attendance in various programs of outdoor activities and recreation that offer various private companies of recreation. Another stream of research from the general marketing field has shown that subjective, affective and experiential factors comprise a substantial portion of consumer satisfaction with services. In the research participated 273 men and women of age of 20 – 50 years, which participated in various outdoor activities in Greece that were organised by two private companies of recreation. The results of this research should extend itself in future in a bigger number of companies of recreation so as to become the desirable generalisations but also be used in the frames of processes of marketing.

  4. Experiment R285-08 (ILAS 8). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiment ILAS 8 a number of different stainless steel types for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 2.5 dpa. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of four types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the sample materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation are presented. 8 refs

  5. Business oriented educational experiments enhance active learning by engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nynne Mia; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Simon, Jens

    2012-01-01

    the CIE concept is put into shape as an innovation and information hub for SMEs and start-ups where students, professors and companies can meet, share information, and embark on innovative projects creating practical solutions that are immediately applied in business. Obviously, all parties should harvest......It is generally agreed that one of the keys to recreating industrial growth after the financial crisis is to mobilize universities and engineering schools to be more actively involved in innovation and entrepreneurship activities in cooperation with industrial companies. This active learning...... and the European Social Fund. The project is carried out with other major educational institutions in the Copenhagen area and organized in five themes: 1) world class competences, 2) new interactions between education and business, 3) the experimenting organization, 4) education on demand, and 5) new career paths...

  6. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Julia; Belforte, Stefano; Boehm, Max; Casajus, Adrian; Flix, Josep; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciabà, Andrea; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  7. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; Boehm, M; Casajus, A; Flix, J; Gaidioz, B; Grigoras, C; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Rocha, R; Saiz, P; Santinelli, R; Sidorova, I; Sciabà, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  8. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  9. Network activity of mirror neurons depends on experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Vadim L; Kartashov, Sergey I; Zavyalova, Victoria V; Bezverhiy, Denis D; Posichanyuk, Vladimir I; Terentev, Vasliliy N; Anokhin, Konstantin V

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the investigation of network activity of mirror neurons systems in animal brains depending on experience (existence or absence performance of the shown actions) was carried out. It carried out the research of mirror neurons network in the C57/BL6 line mice in the supervision task of swimming mice-demonstrators in Morris water maze. It showed the presence of mirror neurons systems in the motor cortex M1, M2, cingular cortex, hippocampus in mice groups, having experience of the swimming and without it. The conclusion is drawn about the possibility of the new functional network systems formation by means of mirror neurons systems and the acquisition of new knowledge through supervision by the animals in non-specific tasks.

  10. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  11. Active collimators in experiments with exotic nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active collimator method for experiments with exotic nuclear beams at the energies near Coulomb barrier of nuclear reactions is described. The apparatus consists of two blocks of microchannel plates (MCP) and thin strips of metallic foils (Au, Ag, Al), oriented along X and Y axes. MCPs register electron emission during penetration of exotic nuclei through these foils. It gives possibility to obtain information about particle trajectory and time mark of the event. The proposed technique provides the smallest amount of matter on the particle path (17 cm-2), high efficiency (ε ∼ 90% for every MCP), good time resolution for additional identification of radioactive nuclei using the time-of-flight method

  12. A 12 years brazilian space education activity experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancato, Fernando; Gustavo Catalani Racca, João; Ballarotti, MaurícioG.

    2001-03-01

    A multidisciplinary group of students from the university and latter also from the high school was formed in 1988 with the objective to make them put in practice their knowledge in physics, chemistry and mathematics and engineering fields in experimental rocketry. The group was called "Grupo de Foguetes Experimentais", GFE. Since that time more than 150 students passed throw the group and now many of them are in the space arena. The benefits for students in a space hands-on project are many: More interest in their school subjects is gotten as they see an application for them; Interrelation attitudes are learned as space projects is a team activity; Responsibility is gained as each is responsible for a part of a critical mission project; Multidisciplinary and international experience is gotten as these are space project characteristics; Learn how to work in a high stress environment as use to be a project launch. This paper will cover the educational experiences gotten during these years and how some structured groups work. It is explained the objectives and how the group was formed. The group structure and the different phases that at each year the new team passes are described. It is shown the different activities that the group uses to do from scientific seminars, scientific club and international meetings to technical tours and assistance to rocket activities in regional schools. It is also explained the group outreach activities as some launches were covered by the media in more then 6 articles in newspaper and 7 television news. In 1999 as formed an official group called NATA, Núcleo de Atividades Aerospaciais within the Universidade Estadual de Londrina, UEL, by some GFE members and teachers from university. It is explained the first group project results.

  13. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  14. 129Xe EDM Search Experiment Using Active Nuclear Spin Maser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ohtomo, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Yu; Kojima, Shuichiro; Suzuki, Takahiro; Shirai, Hazuki; Chikamori, Masatoshi; Hikota, Eri; Miyatake, Hirokazu; Nanao, Tsubasa; Suzuki, Kunifumi; Tsuchiya, Masato; Inoue, Takeshi; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Bidinosti, Christopher P.; Ino, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Fukuyama, Takeshi; Asahi, Koichiro

    An active nuclear spin maser, which enables a precision measurement of spin precession frequency, is employed in the experimental search for permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) in the diamagnetic atom 129Xe. In order to eliminate systematic errors which limit the sensitivity of the experiment to an EDM, the following tactics are adopted: (i) 3He comagnetometry for the cancellation of long-term drifts in the external magnetic fields and (ii) double-cell geometry for the mitigation of frequency shifts due to interaction of 129Xe spin with polarized Rb atoms. In the present work, the design for the double-cell has been changed and a magnetic shield-coil system to provide a highly homogeneous magnetic field has been newly introduced. Thanks to increased polarization and longer 3He spin relaxation time, the dual-species maser of 129Xe and 3He in a double-cell geometry operated successfully. Our experiment is now at the stage of assembling these separate technical elements in order to start the measurement of 129Xe EDM in the 10-28 ecm region.

  15. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment: manufacturing process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Venema, Lars; Schnetler, Hermine; Ferrari, Marc; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Extreme freeform mirrors couple a non-axisymmetrical shape and an extreme asphericity, i.e. more than one millimeter of deviation from the best fit sphere. In astronomical instrumentation, such a large asphericity allows compact instruments, using less optical components. However, the lack of freeform mirrors manufacturing facilities is a real issue. We present the concept and development of an innovative manufacturing process based on plasticity forming which allow imprinting permanent deformations on mirrors, following a pre-defined mold. The aim of this activity, pursued in the frame of the OPTICON-FAME (Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment) project, is to demonstrate the suitability of this method for VIS/NIR/MIR applications. The process developed can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. Three study cases have been highlighted by FEA (Finite Element Analysis) and the real tests associated were performed on thin substrates in AISI420b stainless steel with 100 mm optical diameter. A comparison between FEA and tests is performed to study the evolution of the mechanical behaviour and the optical quality. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process to converge toward an innovative and recurrent process.

  16. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  17. Computing Activities for the PANDA Experiment at FAIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, Johan; Gruntorad, J; Lokajicek, M

    2010-01-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future facility FAIR will provide valuable data for our present understanding of the strong interaction. In preparation for the experiments, large-scale simulations for design and feasibility studies are performed exploiting a new software framework, PandaROOT, which is b

  18. Designing Technology for Active Spectator Experiences at Sporting Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Veerasawmy, Rune

    2010-01-01

    behaviour in the context. The work presented also argues for a need to overcome the inclination to designing technological systems that imitate or compete with the experience of watching the television broadcast of the game. Experiments such as the presented BannerBattle are cornerstones in our exploratory...

  19. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already...... the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and creating teacher organised play activities during recess....

  20. Active-Learning Diabetes Simulation in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience to Develop Patient Empathy

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop and integrate an active-learning diabetes simulation into an advanced pharmacy practice experience to improve pharmacy students’ empathy toward patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Antitumor activity of polyacrylates of noble metals in experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Larisa A. Ostrovskaya; David B. Korman; Natalia V. Bluhterova; Margarita M. Fomina; Valentina A. Rikova; Claudia A. Abzaeva; Larisa V. Zhilitskaya; Nina O. Yarosh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research has been the study of the antitumor activity of polymetalacrylate derivatives containing in their structure noble metals. Metallic derivatives of polyacrylic acid were not previously tested as antitumor agents.The antitumor activity of polyacrylates, containing argentum (argacryl), aurum (auracryl) and platinum (platacryl) against experimental models of murine solid tumors (Lewis lung carcinoma and Acatol adenocarcinoma) as well as acute toxicity have been studied. It...

  2. Active Drumming Experience Increases Infants' Sensitivity to Audiovisual Synchrony during Observed Drumming Actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Gerson

    Full Text Available In the current study, we examined the role of active experience on sensitivity to multisensory synchrony in six-month-old infants in a musical context. In the first of two experiments, we trained infants to produce a novel multimodal effect (i.e., a drum beat and assessed the effects of this training, relative to no training, on their later perception of the synchrony between audio and visual presentation of the drumming action. In a second experiment, we then contrasted this active experience with the observation of drumming in order to test whether observation of the audiovisual effect was as effective for sensitivity to multimodal synchrony as active experience. Our results indicated that active experience provided a unique benefit above and beyond observational experience, providing insights on the embodied roots of (early music perception and cognition.

  3. Physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences in patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Lene; Moeller, Marianne K; Vestergaard, Claus H;

    2016-01-01

    : Both physical activity and aerobic fitness were measured. Anomalous bodily experiences were measured by selected items from the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience and The Body Awareness Scale. Psychopathological data comprising negative and positive symptoms and data on psychotropic medication....... AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare physical activity in patients with FES with healthy controls; to investigate changes in physical activity over 1 year of follow-up; and to explore the correlations of physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences reported by patients with FES. METHODS...... anomalous bodily experiences had significantly lower physical activity compared with patients with fewer such experiences (p = 0.030). In linear regression analyses only negative symptoms were significantly correlated with low physical activity (β = -0.88; 95% confidence interval = -1.48 to -0.29; p < 0...

  4. Deutsche Bundespost/FTZ activities in the Olympus experimentation program: Ojectives and experiment set-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugert, M.

    1989-05-01

    The activities of the Telecommunications Engineering Center (FTZ) of the Deutsche Bundespost in the Olympus Experimentation Program are presented. The various communication experiments which are to be carried out in the framework of the GECO (Group of Experimenters of CEPT Administrations for Olympus) are described. These include: TV news gathering/TV distribution, teleseminar experiments, data distribution to microterminal experiments, SMS-TDMA (time division multiple access) experiments, and TDMA frequency diversity experiments. The applied experiment configurations and the layout and design of the transportable 20/30 GHz earth stations to be used in the experiments are described.

  5. Advanced Control of Active Bearings - Modelling, Design and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane

    In all rotating machines relative movements between the stationary parts and the rotating parts imply energy loss and, in many critical cases, vibration problems. This energy loss leads to higher overall energy consumption of the system. Research activities towards the reduction of friction, the ...... in shaft angular velocity, thereby allowing safe operation in and above the regions of the first and second critical speeds.......In all rotating machines relative movements between the stationary parts and the rotating parts imply energy loss and, in many critical cases, vibration problems. This energy loss leads to higher overall energy consumption of the system. Research activities towards the reduction of friction......, the enhancement of damping, the extension of operating range and the minimisation of critical vibrations in machine elements are of fundamental importance. The main component to tackle the energy-loss-related problems is the bearing. The area of design of active bearings, while very promising, is still in its...

  6. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  7. Experiments on active precision isolation with a smart conical adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Li, H. Y.; Chen, Z. B.; Tzou, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    Based on a conical shell adaptor, an active vibration isolator for vibration control of precision payload is designed and tested in this study. Flexible piezoelectric sensors and actuators are bonded on the adaptor surface for active vibration monitoring and control. The mathematical model of a piezoelectric laminated conical shell is derived and then optimal design of the actuators is performed for the first axial vibration mode of the isolation system. A scaled conical adaptor is manufactured with four MFC actuators laminating on its outer surface. Active vibration isolation efficiency is then evaluated on a vibration shaker. The control model is built in Matlab/Simulink and programmed into the dSPACE control board. Experimental results show that, the proposed active isolator is effective in vibration suppression of payloads with the negative velocity feedback control. In contrast, the amplitude responses increase with positive feedback control. Furthermore, the amplitude responses increases when time delay is added into the control signals, and gets the maximum when the delay is close to one quarter of one cycle time.

  8. The Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl: An Active Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl (IEB) as a means of promoting active learning in the realm of marketing ethics. The cases discussed in the competition are based on current ethical issues and require students to provide a coherent analysis of what are generally complex, ambiguous, and highly viewpoint dependent issues. The…

  9. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definit

  10. Formation of social and personal experience of preschoolers in gaming activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydiya Tseeva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors deals with retrospective modern psychological and pedagogical research on the game, sets out the principles and conditions of socio-personal experience of preschool children in the game; revealed relations game and experience that eventually allows to understand the phenomenon of "social experience" more deeply and further outline the path of formation of personality development in gaming activities.

  11. Antitumor activity of polyacrylates of noble metals in experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa A. Ostrovskaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research has been the study of the antitumor activity of polymetalacrylate derivatives containing in their structure noble metals. Metallic derivatives of polyacrylic acid were not previously tested as antitumor agents.The antitumor activity of polyacrylates, containing argentum (argacryl, aurum (auracryl and platinum (platacryl against experimental models of murine solid tumors (Lewis lung carcinoma and Acatol adenocarcinoma as well as acute toxicity have been studied. It is found that the polyacrylates of noble metals are able to inhibit tumor growth up to 50-90% in comparison with the control. Auracryl induced the inhibition of the Lewis lung carcinoma and Acatol adenocarcinoma by 80 and 90% in comparison with the control, results recommending it for further advanced preclinical studies.

  12. Active Learning in Online Courses: An Examination of Students’ Learning Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Floyd; Johnathan Yerby; Terry Smith; Alex Koohang

    2012-01-01

    This study examines students’ perception toward their learning experience in an e-learning environment where active learning through regular and routine graded discussion activities/assignments is expected. Attention was given to the variables of age; gender; increased experience with online courses; and increased proficiency with the course management system. Gender was found to be a significant factor with regard to students’ perception toward their learning experience in online courses. Di...

  13. Calorimetry for Lepton Collider Experiments – CALICE results and activities

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Bilki, B.; Cundiff, T.; De Lurgio, P.; Drake, G.; Francis, K.; Haberichter, B.; Guarino, V.; Kreps, A.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Skrzecz, F.; Smith, J.; Underwood, D.; Wood, K.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, A.; Price, T.; Watson, N.K.; Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dotti, A.; Duarte Ramos, F.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Gerwig, H.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Lam, C.B.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Muennich, A.; Nardulli, J.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Speckmayer, P.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Soumpholphakdy, X.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G.C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Hedin, D.; Lima, J.G.R.; Salcido, R.; Zutshi, V.; Astakhov, V.; Babkin, V.A.; Bazylev, S.N.; Golovatyuk, S.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, N.; Malakhov, A.; Slepnev, S.; Tyapkin, I.; Volgin, S.V.; Zanevski, Y.; Zintchenko, A.; Dzahini, D.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Menu, J.; Rarbi, F-E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Gottlicher, P.; Gunter, C.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Kruger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Ramilli, M.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Oishi, K.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Buscher, V.; Masetti, L.; Schafer, U.; Tapprogge, S.; Wanke, R.; Welker, A.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Andreev, V.; Kirikova, N.; Komar, A.; Kozlov, V.; Negodaev, M.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Terkulov, A.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Smirnov, S.; Baranova, N.; Boos, E.; d; Gladilin, L.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Savin, A.; Voronin, A.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Augustin, J-E.; David, J.; Ghislain, P.; Lacour, D.; Lavergne, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Conforti, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; Guilhem, G.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouene, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Zhang, Z.; Anduze, M.; Belkadhi, K.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cerutti, M.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Decotigny, D.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Jeans, D.; Magniette, F.; Matthieu, A.; Mora, P.; Musat, G.; Roche, N.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Carna, M.; Gallus, P.; Lednicky, D.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Cvach, J.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Gapienko, V.; Semak, A.; Ukhanov, M.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Hamasaki, R.; Ide, H.; Inayoshi, S.; Itoh, S.; Kawakami, Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Kotera, K.; Nishiyama, M.; Obe, S.; Ono, H.; Ogawa, T.; Ohtsuka, N.; Sakuma, T.; Sato, H.; Takeshita, T.; Totsuka, S.; Tsubokawa, T.; Yanagida, K.; Yamaura, W.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Uozumi, S.; Yang, Y.; Fuchi, R.; Ukegawa, F.; Gotze, M.; Hartbrich, O.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2012-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration conducts calorimeter R&D for highly granular calorimeters, mainly for their application in detectors for a future lepton collider at the TeV scale. The activities ranges from generic R&D with small devices up to extensive beam tests with prototypes comprising up to several 100000 calorimeter cells. CALICE has validated the performance of particle flow algorithms with test beam data and delivers the proof of principle that highly granular calorimeters can be built, operated and understood. The successes achieved in the past years allows the step from prototypes to calorimeter systems for particle physics detectors to be addressed.

  14. Experiments on the active control of transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P. A.; Rioual, J.-L.; Fisher, M. J.

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the streamwise position of the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer can be actively controlled. The means of control is through the application of suction through the surface of the plate, a progressive increase in suction rate being capable of producing transition at progressively larger distances downstream from the plate leading edge. A simple digital feedback regulator based on an integral control law is shown to be most effective in regulating the position of transition, an error signal being derived from measurements of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the plate.

  15. Operation experience and research activities at the TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Mainz University is now in operation for 39 years without any longer shut-down period or a failure of the main components. In 1995 a replacement of the heat exchanger took place together with the refurbishment of the cooling and the purification circuits. It can be operated in the steady state mode with thermal powers ranging from 100 kW up to a maximum of 100 MW and in the pulse mode with a maximum peak power of 250 MW. Currently, the core consists of 75 fuel elements with aluminium (Al) or stainless steel (SS) cladding, respectively. So far, more than 14,800 pulses have been performed without any damage of one of the fuel elements. Every 2-3 years the fuel elements are inspected to monitor changes in length (elongation) and shape (bending). The experimental activities cover a wide range from applied investigations, such as neutron activation analysis (NAA) and the production of radioactive isotopes for basic research in nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The reactor is also used for education and training of scientists, students and technicians. A summary of the operation data and the number of irradiations performed in the period 1965-2003 is presented. It is concluded that with 8 fuel elements on stock and taking into account the past and present operation schedule, the TRIGA Mainz can be operated for at least two other decades without purchasing fresh fuel elements, if accepted by the authorities. (nevyjel)

  16. Active Experiment with High-Power Electron Gun in the Polar Region (Plan)

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki,Susumu/Kaneko,Osamu/Kawashima,Nobuki/Yagi,Yasuyuki/Akai,Kazunori/Nakai,Yutaka

    1981-01-01

    A plan of a high-power electron beam experiment in the polar region is discussed. An electron beam is quite useful for studying space plasma phenomena as one of the active experiments. The main objective of the experiment is to study the aurora/airglow and various kinds of waves artificially excited by the electron beam, as compared with natural ones. It can be also used to trace the magnetic field line in the polar region.

  17. Application of the Positive International Experience of Tax Regulation of Investment and Innovation Activity in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Krisovatyy Ihor A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the article is to study the positive international experience in the sphere of tax regulation of investment and innovation activity and a possibility of its use in modern practice. It analyses application of basic instruments of stimulation of investment and innovation activity in foreign countries. Namely: change of the taxation base, tax rate, use of the innovation loan and investment oriented depreciation policy. Using the study of experience of tax regulation in foreign countr...

  18. Engineering support activities for the Apollo 17 Surface Electrical Properties Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the engineering support activities which were required to ensure fulfillment of objectives specified for the Apollo 17 SEP (Surface Electrical Properties) Experiment. Attention is given to procedural steps involving verification of hardware acceptability to the astronauts, computer simulation of the experiment hardware, field trials, receiver antenna pattern measurements, and the qualification test program.

  19. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bühring, S.I.; Ehrenhauss, S.; Kamp, A.; Moodley, L.; Prof. Witte, U.

    2006-01-01

    In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we

  20. Differential hedonic experience and behavioral activation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Ivy F; Grove, Tyler B; Taylor, Stephan F

    2014-11-30

    The Kraepelinian distinction between schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) emphasizes affective and volitional impairment in the former, but data directly comparing the two disorders for hedonic experience are scarce. This study examined whether hedonic experience and behavioral activation may be useful phenotypes distinguishing SZ and BP. Participants were 39 SZ and 24 BP patients without current mood episode matched for demographics and negative affect, along with 36 healthy controls (HC). They completed the Chapman Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales, Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS), and Behavioral Activation Scale (BAS). SZ and BP showed equally elevated levels of self-report negative affect and trait anhedonia compared to HC. However, SZ reported significantly lower pleasure experience (TEPS) and behavioral activation (BAS) than BP, who did not differ from HC. SZ and BP showed differential patterns of relationships between the hedonic experience and behavioral activation measures. Overall, the results suggest that reduced hedonic experience and behavioral activation may be effective phenotypes distinguishing SZ from BP even when affective symptoms are minimal. However, hedonic experience differences between SZ and BP are sensitive to measurement strategy, calling for further research on the nature of anhedonia and its relation to motivation in these disorders. PMID:24999173

  1. Visual cortex activity predicts subjective experience after reading books with colored letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizoli, Olympia; Murre, Jaap M J; Scholte, H Steven; van Es, Daniel M; Knapen, Tomas; Rouw, Romke

    2016-07-29

    One of the most astonishing properties of synesthesia is that the evoked concurrent experiences are perceptual. Is it possible to acquire similar effects after learning cross-modal associations that resemble synesthetic mappings? In this study, we examine whether brain activation in early visual areas can be directly related to letter-color associations acquired by training. Non-synesthetes read specially prepared books with colored letters for several weeks and were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. If the acquired letter-color associations were visual in nature, then brain activation in visual cortex while viewing the trained black letters (compared to untrained black letters) should predict the strength of the associations, the quality of the color experience, or the vividness of visual mental imagery. Results showed that training-related activation of area V4 was correlated with differences in reported subjective color experience. Trainees who were classified as having stronger 'associator' types of color experiences also had more negative activation for trained compared to untrained achromatic letters in area V4. In contrast, the strength of the acquired associations (measured as the Stroop effect) was not reliably reflected in visual cortex activity. The reported vividness of visual mental imagery was related to veridical color activation in early visual cortex, but not to the acquired color associations. We show for the first time that subjective experience related to a synesthesia-training paradigm was reflected in visual brain activation.

  2. Visual cortex activity predicts subjective experience after reading books with colored letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizoli, Olympia; Murre, Jaap M J; Scholte, H Steven; van Es, Daniel M; Knapen, Tomas; Rouw, Romke

    2016-07-29

    One of the most astonishing properties of synesthesia is that the evoked concurrent experiences are perceptual. Is it possible to acquire similar effects after learning cross-modal associations that resemble synesthetic mappings? In this study, we examine whether brain activation in early visual areas can be directly related to letter-color associations acquired by training. Non-synesthetes read specially prepared books with colored letters for several weeks and were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. If the acquired letter-color associations were visual in nature, then brain activation in visual cortex while viewing the trained black letters (compared to untrained black letters) should predict the strength of the associations, the quality of the color experience, or the vividness of visual mental imagery. Results showed that training-related activation of area V4 was correlated with differences in reported subjective color experience. Trainees who were classified as having stronger 'associator' types of color experiences also had more negative activation for trained compared to untrained achromatic letters in area V4. In contrast, the strength of the acquired associations (measured as the Stroop effect) was not reliably reflected in visual cortex activity. The reported vividness of visual mental imagery was related to veridical color activation in early visual cortex, but not to the acquired color associations. We show for the first time that subjective experience related to a synesthesia-training paradigm was reflected in visual brain activation. PMID:26162617

  3. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  4. Knowledge Acquisition Activities, Prior Knowledge and Experience & the Survival of New Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Dencker, J.; Gruber, Marc; Shah, S.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge acquisition activities occurring may be just as critical to firm survival as pre-existing knowledge and experience, because knowledge acquisition activities enable the augmentation of existing knowledge and the exploration and pursuit of new strategic directions. Drawing from organization theory and entrepreneurship theory, we examine two important sets of knowledge acquisition activities: knowledge acquired through planning and knowledge acquired through learning by doing. We exami...

  5. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, H., E-mail: hiroshi.matsumura@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki-ken, 305-0801 (Japan); Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Toyoda, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki-ken, 305-0801 (Japan); Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka-fu, 590-0494 (Japan); Iwase, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki-ken, 305-0801 (Japan); Oishi, K. [Shimizu Corporation, Tokyo, 135-8530 (Japan); Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, IL 60510-5011 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  6. ALTERED HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND AMYGDALAR NEURONAL ACTIVITY IN ADULT MICE WITH REPEATED EXPERIENCE OF AGGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy eSmagin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos positive cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights.

  7. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.; Goodrich, D. C.; Holifield Collins, C.; McKee, L.; Kim, S.; Yueh, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR Watershed provides the infrastructure for the experiment with its extensive soil moisture and soil temperature network. A total of seven aircraft flights are planned for the Passive Active L-Band Scanning instrument (PALS) to provide a high resolution soil moisture map for a variety of soil moisture conditions across the domain. Extensive surface roughness, vegetation and soil rock fraction mapping was conducted to provide a ground truth estimate of the many ancillary datasets used in the SMAP soil moisture algorithms. A review of the methodologies employed in the experiment, as well as initial findings will be discussed.

  8. Sensors for the Senses: Meaning-making via self-active entertainment experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Brooks

    2015-01-01

    In his ACM Computers in Entertainment article, titled "Artist and Audience: Emerging the Nano-entertainment experience", the author posited on how Inhabited Information Spaces, created as core catalyst of research, may be questioned as a multisensory future virtual work of art. This themed Human-Computer Interaction for Entertainment contribution for the EAI INTETAIN 2015 conference builds upon the earlier work by questioning meaning making from such self-active entertainment experiences. Con...

  9. A mobile system for the multifrequency Doppler sounding of the modified ionosphere in active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagno, Iu. D.; Kim, V. Iu.; Namazov, S. A.; Panchenko, V. N.; Khar'kov, I. P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a description of a mobile multichannel Doppler system designed for shipboard studies of the modified ionosphere. The system was used for the diagnostics of the modified ionosphere in active experiments carried out in equatorial and low-latitude regions using the MR-20 geophysical rockets as well as in satellite experiments in the framework of the CRRES project. The data processing method is discussed, and experimental data are presented.

  10. Associations between students' situational interest, mastery experiences, and physical activity levels in an interactive dance game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaoqun; Gao, Zan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous experiences on students' situational interest and physical activity (PA) levels, as well as the relationships between situational interest and PA levels in Dance Dance Revolution (DDR). A total of 135 seventh through ninth graders participated in DDR unit for two weeks, and reported their previous DDR experiences. Students' PA levels were measured by ActiGraph accelerometers for three classes with percentages of time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as the outcome variable. They also responded to the Situational Interest Scale (including novelty, challenge, attention demand, exploration intention, and instant enjoyment) at the end of each class. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) yielded a significant main effect for experience. Follow-up tests revealed that students with DDR experiences scored significantly higher than those without experiences at following dimensions: challenge; exploration intention; instant enjoyment; and attention demand. Regression analysis yielded that novelty emerged as the only significant predictor for MVPA. The findings suggested that four dimensions of situational interest differed between students with and without previous experiences. Novelty emerged as the only predictor for MVPA, suggesting that students would have higher PA when they feel the activity provides new information.

  11. Experiences of physical activity: A phenomenological study of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Rachael; Mercer, Jenny; Mills-Bennett, Rebekah; O'Leary, Catherine; Thirlaway, Kathryn

    2016-02-01

    Although extensive research has investigated the benefits of physical activity in cystic fibrosis, minimal exploration of the experiences for individuals from a qualitative, phenomenological perspective has been carried out. The aim of this study was to explore the subjective experiences of physical activity for individuals with cystic fibrosis. The health-care team, at an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit in the United Kingdom, recruited 12 participants to take part. Interview data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. A central theme of 'self-monitoring' emerged from the accounts and was embedded in the three super-ordinate themes.

  12. Geophysical variables and behavior: XCVIII. Ambient geomagnetic activity and experiences of "memories": interactions with sex and implications for receptive psi experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A

    2002-06-01

    During 96 nonsequential days over a 3-yr. period, a total of 53 men and 86 women were exposed only once for 30 min. to transcerebral, weak complex magnetic fields while they sat alone within a quiet chamber. They were asked to record the frequency of specific experiences after the exposure was completed. There was a significant interaction between sex and global geomagnetic activity for the incidence of experiences attributed to memories. Women reported more experiences attributed to "childhood memories" when geomagnetic activity was less than 20 nT, while men reported more of these experiences when the activity was more than 20 nT. Re-analyses of a database of "paranormal experiences" reported by 395 separate individuals over a 100-yr. period indicated that more men than women reported "precognitive experiences" on days the geomagnetic activity was above 20 nT while women reported such experiences if the geomagnetic activity was below 20 nT. These results suggest that these experiences, be they veridical or illusory, may be influenced by global geomagnetic activity that affect the neuroelectrical or neurochemical processes associated with memory consolidation or the attribution of the serial order of experiences during retrieval. PMID:12186249

  13. Copper sulphate reduces the metabolic activity of Gammarus fossarum in laboratory and field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidlin, Lara, E-mail: lara.schmidlin@unibas.ch; Fumetti, Stefanie von; Nagel, Peter

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Copper-contaminated food significantly reduces the ETS activity of G. fossarum. • The ETS and feeding activity of G. fossarum were significantly higher in the lab. • A combination of test chamber experiments in the laboratory and field is optimal. - Abstract: The specialised fauna of freshwater springs is affected by contamination of the water with xenobiotics from human activities in the surrounding landscape. We assessed the effects of exposure to toxins in laboratory and field experiments by using copper sulphate as a model substance and Gammarus fossarum Koch, 1836, as the model organism. This amphipod is a common representative of the European spring fauna and copper is a widespread contaminant, mainly from agricultural practice. The experiments were conducted in test chambers placed in flow channels and directly in a spring. The gammarids were fed with conditioned beech leaf discs, which had been exposed to a 0.8 mg Cu/L solution for 96 h. The feeding activity of the amphipods was quantified on the level of the organism; and the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) assay was conducted in order to determine changes on the cellular level in the test organisms. The results show that the feeding activity, when the leaf discs were contaminated with copper, was not significantly different from the control. The ETS activity of the gammarids, which had been feeding on the copper contaminated leaf discs was however significantly reduced. The results followed the same pattern for gammarids from both the laboratory and the spring. By conducting the experiments not only in a laboratory but also directly in a spring in the field, we took a crucial step towards a more realistic approach when examining environmental pollutants on an organism. Our findings demonstrate the importance of conducting experiments out in the field, in natural conditions, as well as in the laboratory.

  14. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  15. PERSONIFICATION AS A STRATEGY AND METHOD OF DEVELOPING THE EXPERIENCE IN INTERCULTURAL ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Abdurahmanova ERGAZINA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the essence of personification as a basic method and strategy of developing the experience of intercultural activities of students. The essence of personification of the experience of intercultural activi-ties is in addressing a student‟s personality, careful at-tention to his/her inner world, interests and needs, en-richment of his intercultural potential. Particular features of personification of the experience of intercultural activi-ties of a student are determined by the appeal to the in-ner strength of a personality. The appeal to the own strengths of the brought-up personality acts on the latter not through external influence, but from inside. Thanks to it, the process of personification becomes a powerful factor of forming and developing the experience of inter-cultural activities of students, updating their potential abilities and needs. Purpose of personification is open and set in motion internal reserves of personality and provide professional and personal development of per-sonality.

  16. Learning Active Citizenship: Conflicts between Students' Conceptualisations of Citizenship and Classroom Learning Experiences in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Education for active citizenship continues to be a critical response for social cohesion and reconstruction in conflict-affected areas. Oftentimes, approaches to learning and teaching in such contexts can do as much harm as good. This study qualitatively examines 435 students' reflections of their civics classroom learning experiences and their…

  17. Subjective User Experience and Performance with Active Tangibles on a Tabletop Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van Jan B.F.; Toet, Alexander; Meijer, Koos; Janssen, Joris; Jong, Arnoud

    2015-01-01

    We developed active tangibles (Sensators) that can be used in combination with multitouch tabletops and that can provide multisensory (visual, auditory, and vibrotactile) feedback. For spatial alignment and rotation tasks we measured subjective user experience and objective performance with these Se

  18. An Analysis of Creative Process Learning in Computer Game Activities Through Player Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilawan Inchamnan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the extent to which creative processes can be fostered through computer gaming. It focuses on creative components in games that have been specifically designed for educational purposes: Digital Game Based Learning (DGBL. A behavior analysis for measuring the creative potential of computer game activities and learning outcomes is described. Creative components were measured by examining task motivation and domain-relevant and creativity-relevant skill factors. The research approach applied heuristic checklists in the field of gameplay to analyze the stage of player activities involved in the performance of the task and to examine player experiences with the Player Experience of Need Satisfaction (PENS survey. Player experiences were influenced by competency, autonomy, intuitive controls, relatedness and presence. This study examines the impact of these activities on the player experience for evaluating learning outcomes through school records. The study is designed to better understand the creative potential of people who are engaged in learning knowledge and skills during the course while playing video games. The findings show the creative potential that occurred to yield levels of creative performance within game play activities to support learning. The anticipated outcome is knowledge on how video games foster creative thinking as an overview of the Creative Potential of Learning Model (CPLN. CPLN clearly describes the interrelationships between principles of learning and creative potential, the interpretation of the results is indispensable.

  19. A Survey of Students' Experiences on Collaborative Virtual Learning Activities Based on Five-Stage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, M. Kemal; Özen, Sevil Orhan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to design collaborative virtual learning (CVL) activities by using a five-stage model (FSM) and survey of students' experiences. The study group consisted of 14 voluntary students in the Turkish Teaching Department. In this case study, data were collected through observations, recordings in Second Life (SL) and interviews.…

  20. A Biomedical Application of Activated Carbon Adsorption: An Experiment Using Acetaminophen and N-Acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybolt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates an interesting biomedical application of adsorption from solution and demonstrates some of the factors that influence the in vivo adsorption of drug molecules onto activated charcoal. Uses acetaminophen and N-acetylcysteine for the determination. Suggests several related experiments. (MVL)

  1. Experiences with automatic N and P measurements of an activated sludge process in a research environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Temmink, H.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the advantages of on-line automatic measurement of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate for studying activated sludge systems are pointed out with the help of examples of batch experiments. Sample taking is performed by cross-flow filtration and measurement of all three analytes is performed...

  2. Structures of the fluctuation precursor in an active explosive ionospheric experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from processing the measurement data on low-frequency fluctuations from the North Star active explosive ionospheric experiment. The fluctuation precursor signal was processed by the wavelet analysis method. The structures revealed are identified as ion acoustic envelope solitons

  3. Structures of the fluctuation precursor in an active explosive ionospheric experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, I. Kh.

    2007-05-01

    Results are presented from processing the measurement data on low-frequency fluctuations from the North Star active explosive ionospheric experiment. The fluctuation precursor signal was processed by the wavelet analysis method. The structures revealed are identified as ion acoustic envelope solitons.

  4. A Theoretical Basis for Surges of Electroencephalogram Activity and Vivid Mental Sensation during Near Death Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanad Ray

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Chawla et. al.[1]near-death experiences could be caused by a surge of electrical energy released. We account for this spike using an electromagnetic-physiological theory based on transmission line model plus cortical network activity and using known properties of forward and backward propagating waves proposed earlier[2-5

  5. What are you doing? How active and observational experience shape infants' action understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunnius, S.; Bekkering, H.

    2014-01-01

    From early in life, infants watch other people's actions. How do young infants come to make sense of actions they observe? Here, we review empirical findings on the development of action understanding in infancy. Based on this review, we argue that active action experience is crucial for infants' de

  6. The Alfred Hospital experience of resumption of cardiac activity after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, S A; D'Souza, S; Philpot, S; Pilcher, D V

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of donation after circulatory death programs in Australia and New Zealand, greater knowledge is needed about physiologic variation in haemodynamic activity following withdrawal of cardiorespiratory support. The ANZICS Statement on Death and Organ Donation allows provision for variation in the observation times between two and five minutes after cessation of the circulation prior to declaration of death. We report our experience of two cases, the first where electrical activity and pulse returned after a 102 second pause and the second where electrical activity returned after a three minute pause; both longer than previously reported cases.

  7. The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A Vessel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different subnetworks. Activity increased linearly with observers’ ratings (4-level scale in sensory (occipito-temporal regions. Activity in the striatum also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (4 ratings and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the default mode network previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance.

  8. Experiment R268-06/07/08 (SIWAS 06/07/08). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the title experiments specimens made of different austenitic and martensitic stainless steel types have been irradiated at a temperature of 80C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 2 dpa. The aim of these irradiation series, carried out within the framework of a research programme for advanced nuclear systems, is to study the mechanical behaviour of various materials after irradiation. In this report the results of the activity calculations, valid for different types of specimen materials, are presented. The experiments also contained dummy specimens, made of AIS1316-steel, used for temperature measurements. The activity of this material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the specimen materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert the data to any vertical specimen position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different specimen materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are presented. 6 refs

  9. A Novel Active Grating Monochromator - Active Grating Spectrometer Beamline System for Inelastic Soft-X-ray Scattering Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using two aspherical variable-line-space active gratings and applying the energy compensation principle, we have designed a very efficient active grating monochromator -- active grating spectrometer (AGM-AGS) beamline system for the photon demanding inelastic soft-x-ray scattering experiments. During the energy scan, the defocus and coma aberrations of the AGM can be completely eliminated to make the focal point fixed at the sample position and to maintain high spectral resolution for the entire spectral range. The AGS, which has an optical system identical to that of the AGM, but positioned reversely along the optical path, collects the photons emitted from the sample with a nearly identical energy spread as the AGM and focus them onto a position sensitive detector located at the exit slit position. The ray tracing results show that the efficiency of the AGM-AGS is two orders of magnitudes higher than that of conventional design while maintaining a very high spectral resolution

  10. Antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor in vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, M; Mikashima, H; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The ability of etizolam, 6-(o-chlorophenyl)-8-ethyl-1-methyl-4H-s-triazolo[3,4-c]thieno[2,3-e] [1,4]diazepine (Y-7131), an anti-anxiety drug, to inhibit platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced reactions was investigated in experimental animals in vivo. Etizolam (0.01-0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) dose dependently inhibited PAF (0.3 microgram/kg, i.v.)-induced bronchoconstriction (Konzett and Rössler's method) in guinea pigs, but even at doses as large as 3 mg/kg, i.v., it had no effect on bronchoconstriction induced by histamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, arachidonic acid, bradykinin, angiotensin l or leukotriene D4. Etizolam (0.1-1 mg/kg, i.v.) also dose-dependently reversed PAF (1 microgram/kg, i.v.)-induced hypotension in anesthetized rats. Injection of PAF into the tail veins of mice produced lethal shock within 10-30 min. Etizolam (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v. and 1-10 mg/kg, p.o.) protected against the lethal effect of PAF (75 micrograms/kg, i.v.) in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that etizolam specifically inhibits the action of PAF in vivo. PMID:3682404

  11. Impact of thermostatically controlled loads' demand response activation on aggregated power: A field experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Kosek, Anna Magdalena;

    2015-01-01

    activation. The outcome of this experimental study quantifies the actual flexibility of household TCLs and the consequence for the different parties with respect to power behaviour. Each DR activation method adopts different scenarios to meet the power reduction, and has different impacts on the parameters......This paper describes the impacts of different types of DR (demand response) activation on TCLs' (thermostatically controlled loads) aggregated power. The different parties: power system operators, DR service providers (or aggregators) and consumers, have different objectives in relation to DR....... The experiments are conducted with real domestic refrigerators representing TCL. Activating refrigerators for DR with a delay reduces the ISE (integral square error) in power limitation by 28.46%, overshoot by 7.69%. The delay in refrigerator activation causes reduction in power ramp down rate by 39.90%, ramp up...

  12. Calculating Program for Decommissioning Work Productivity based on Decommissioning Activity Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Seung-Kook; Park, Hee-Seong; Moon, Jei-kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KAERI is performing research to calculate a coefficient for decommissioning work unit productivity to calculate the estimated time decommissioning work and estimated cost based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2. KAERI used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage decommissioning activity experience data through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). In particular, KAERI used to based data for calculating the decommissioning cost with the form of a code work breakdown structure (WBS) based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2.. Defined WBS code used to each system for calculate decommissioning cost. In this paper, we developed a program that can calculate the decommissioning cost using the decommissioning experience of KRR-2, UCP, and other countries through the mapping of a similar target facility between NPP and KRR-2. This paper is organized as follows. Chapter 2 discusses the decommissioning work productivity calculation method, and the mapping method of the decommissioning target facility will be described in the calculating program for decommissioning work productivity. At KAERI, research on various decommissioning methodologies of domestic NPPs will be conducted in the near future. In particular, It is difficult to determine the cost of decommissioning because such as NPP facility have the number of variables, such as the material of the target facility decommissioning, size, radiographic conditions exist.

  13. Expanded activity of schools in Serbia: Legal framework and practical experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognjenović Kosovka Đ.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Expanded activities of schools and activities of student cooperatives are important components of the educational process in schools, which are contributing to the improvement of the quality of education and better social inclusion of students. The main objective of this article is to focus on opportunities enabled by the legal framework that supports the realization of expanded activities and activities of student cooperatives in Serbian schools and to compare relevant experiences in Serbia with the practice in neighbouring countries and the old EU Member States. In particular, in this article it is examined to what extent the adoption of entrepreneurial competences through different entrepreneurship development programs contributes to the probability of implementation of additional activities in Serbian schools. For this purpose, the data of the Survey on practising, types and usefulness of expanded activities and activities of student cooperatives are used. This survey was conducted in 2010 at the samples of public primary and secondary schools that executed some sort of additional activities, as well as of schools that did not practice extended activities.

  14. Basic Research on Selecting ISDC Activity for Decommissioning Costing in KRR-2 Decommissioning Project Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Hee-Seong; Jin, Hyung-Gon; Park, Seung-Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KAERI is performing research for calculation of expected time of a decommissioning work and evaluation of decommissioning cost and this research calculate a decommissioning work unit productivity based on the experience data of decommissioning activity for KRR-2. The KAERI be used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage the experience data from the decommissioning activity through the Decommissioning Information Management System (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), and Decommissioning Work-unit Productivity Calculation System (DEWOCS). In this paper, the methodology was presented how select the ISDC activities in dismantling work procedures of a 'removal of radioactive concrete'. The reason to select the 'removal of radioactive concrete' is main key activity and generates the amount of radioactive waste. This data will take advantage of the cost estimation after the code for the selected items derived ISDC. There are various efforts for decommissioning costing in each country. In particular, OECD/NEA recommends decommissioning cost estimation using the ISDC and IAEA provides for Cost Estimation for Research Reactors in Excel (CERREX) program that anyone is easy to use the cost evaluation from a limited decommissioning experience in domestic. In the future, for the decommissioning cost evaluation, the ISDC will be used more widely in a strong position. This paper has described a method for selecting the ISDC item from the actual dismantling work procedures.

  15. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SGCS, Centre de Marcoule - BP 17171, 302007 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  16. Health physics experience in commissioning and operation of radiation and air activity monitoring system at FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation and Air Activity Monitoring System (RAAMS) at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is meant to monitor and record the radiation and air activity levels at various potentially active areas in FBTR complex. Health Physics Group, FBTR was associated during commissioning of RAAMS in fixing the alarm settings for the monitors, their relocation and in formulating the surveillance procedures. The areas were surveyed to check for any release of activity for confirming the observed readings during operation of the reactor. In such cases, augmentation of shielding was recommended and was promptly implemented by the station management. The details of the long and fruitful experience gained by the Health Physics Group, FBTR are described in this paper. (author)

  17. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  18. Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project : - An Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Katarina; Loelv, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project - An Interview Study   Purpose: To explore the experiences regarding perceived barriers and facilitators for physical activity of three participants with mental disorders who took part in the Norwegian Physical Activity Mentor project. Design and methods: Descriptive qualitative design. Individual semi-structured interviews were used for data collec...

  19. Korean immigrant women's physical activity experience: a situation-specific theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Nguyen, Giang; Stringer, Lynn; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    To develop successful physical activity promotion programs for midlife immigrant women, especially for Korean immigrant midlife women, concrete theoretical bases are needed. However, virtually no theoretical frameworks and/or theories exist that can explain the influences of immigration transition on the physical activity experience of midlife immigrant women in general or Korean immigrant midlife women in specific. The purpose of this article is to present a situation-specific theory on physical activity experience of Korean immigrant midlife women (SPAKIM) with its development process. An integrative approach was used to develop the theory based on the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity (MAPA) theory, the transitions theory, a review of the relevant literature, and two studies on midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity. The proposed theory includes nature of transitions, nonmodifiable and modifiable transition conditions, contexts of daily life, patterns of response, and nursing therapeutics as major concepts, and each major concept includes several related subconcepts. Because several concepts of the theory were developed mainly based on the literature review, the major concepts and related subconcepts need to be further developed and evaluated in future studies.

  20. Subjective experiences of occupational performance of activities of daily living in patients with mild stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Post, A; Poulsen, T.E.;

    2014-01-01

    and risk of accidents. Conclusion: It is important to view the patients with mild stroke as heterogeneous, and consider post-stroke fatigue and emotional reactions when evaluating rehabilitation needs. Therefore, it is important to look further into structured tools, which examine how well the participant......Aim: To investigate the subjective experiences of occupational performance of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with mild stroke. Methodology: Data was generated from January – December 2011 and consisted of 41 individual ADL-I interviews with patients in hospital and another 41...... performs daily activities and how this is perceived, to understand fully the patient’s rehabilitation needs....

  1. Parameter subset selection for the dynamic calibration of activated sludge models (ASMs): experience versus systems analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruano, MV; Ribes, J; de Pauw, DJW;

    2007-01-01

    to describe nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the Haaren WWTP (The Netherlands). The parameter significance ranking shows that the temperature correction coefficients are among the most influential parameters on the model output. This outcome confronts the previous identifiability studies and the experience......). An appropriate combinations of both approaches is proposed which offers a realistic (doable) and sound approach for parameter subset selection in activated sludge modelling....

  2. Active duty female military's experience of fear, embarrassment, and distress during pelvic examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Bakken, April D.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Previous research indicates that among civilians and female veterans, a history of sexual violence is associated with negative experiences with gynecological care. We attempt to extend these findings to active duty female U.S. military officers. We hypothesize that in this population (1) sexual violence history status predicts emotional reactions to the pelvic examination; (2) that this relationship is mediated by military rank; and ...

  3. Active structural control design and experiment for the Mini-Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Horta, Lucas; Sulla, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Control system design and closed-loop test results for the Mini-Mast truss structure located at the NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The simplicity and effectiveness of a classical control approach to the active structural control design are demonstrated by ground experiments. The concepts of robust nonminimum phase compensation and periodic disturbance rejection are also experimentally validated. The practicality of a sensor output decoupling approach is demonstrated for the inherent, multivariable control problem of the Mini-Mast.

  4. A Qualitative Analysis of User Experiences With a Self-Tracker for Activity, Sleep, and Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeongeun

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent increase in chronic diseases and an aging population warrant the necessity of health self-management. As small electronic devices that track one’s activity, sleep, and diet, called self-trackers, are being widely distributed, it is prudent to investigate the user experience and the effectiveness of these devices, and use the information toward engineering better devices that would result in increased efficiency and usability. Objective The aim of this study was to abstra...

  5. The Transliminal Brain at Rest: Baseline EEG, Unusual Experiences, and Access to Unconscious Mental Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Jessica I.; Green, Deborah L.; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Payne, Lisa; Edward M. Bowden; Jung-Beeman, Mark; Kounios, John

    2008-01-01

    Transliminality reflects individual differences in the threshold at which unconscious processes or external stimuli enter into consciousness. Individuals high in transliminality possess characteristics such as magical ideation, belief in the paranormal, and creative personality traits, and also report the occurrence of manic/mystic experiences. The goal of the present research was to determine if resting brain activity differs for individuals high versus low in transliminality. We compared ba...

  6. Optimization of active magnetic regenerative refrigeration systems using Design of Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Roudaut, Julien; Bouchekara, Houssem; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Coulomb, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    International audience This paper attends to demonstrate the usefulness of Design of Experiments (DOE) method in magnetic refrigeration (MR) understanding and optimization. A numerical DOE is applied to a simple 1D finite difference model describing an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system. The heat transfer fluid is water, the regenerator consists of stacked gadolinium plates and the model is based on the assumption of an equivalent single plate. A two-level 27-3 fracti...

  7. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of human hair and related radiotracer experiments on washing and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work done under the IAEA-contract 2440/RB is summarized. The aim was to develop a fast and reliable system for the determination of tracer elements in human head hair by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and radiotracer washing experiments. The standardized procedure for INAA was applied to hair samples collected by the Coronel Laboratory of the University of Amsterdam. The correlation between trace element contents is considered

  8. Deriving rules from activity diary data: A learning algorithm and results of computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentze, Theo A.; Hofman, Frank; Timmermans, Harry J. P.

    Activity-based models consider travel as a derived demand from the activities households need to conduct in space and time. Over the last 15 years, computational or rule-based models of activity scheduling have gained increasing interest in time-geography and transportation research. This paper argues that a lack of techniques for deriving rules from empirical data hinders the further development of rule-based systems in this area. To overcome this problem, this paper develops and tests an algorithm for inductively deriving rules from activity-diary data. The decision table formalism is used to exhaustively represent the theoretically possible decision rules that individuals may use in sequencing a given set of activities. Actual activity patterns of individuals are supplied to the system as examples. In an incremental learning process, the system progressively improves on the selection of rules used for reproducing the examples. Computer experiments based on simulated data are performed to fine-tune rule selection and rule value update functions. The results suggest that the system is effective and fairly robust for parameter settings. It is concluded, therefore, that the proposed approach opens up possibilities to derive empirically tested rule-based models of activity scheduling. Follow-up research will be concerned with testing the system on empirical data.

  9. Promoting physical activity for people with neurological disability: perspectives and experiences of physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Hilda; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Hale, Leigh; Thomas, David; Häger-Ross, Charlotte

    2011-08-01

    Both New Zealand and Sweden have health and disability policies that promote recreational exercise within society for people with disability. Despite these policies, levels of physical activity by people with disability in these countries are low. Physiotherapists are equipped to assist people with disabling conditions into physical activity. This qualitative study explored the perspectives and experiences of physiotherapists in New Zealand and Sweden toward promoting physically active recreation for adults with chronic neurological conditions. Nine physiotherapists who worked with adults with neurological disability in a range of long-term rehabilitation and community (home) health services were interviewed and the data analysed for themes. The physiotherapists described innovative and resourceful expertise to assist patients to be physically active. However, they perceived a lack of support for their work from within the health system and a lack of knowledge of disability issues within the recreational arena, both of which they perceived hindered their promotion of physical activity for people with neurological disability. Physiotherapists feel unable to fully support health and disability policies for the promotion of physically active recreation for people with neurological conditions, because of perceived constraints from within the recreational arena and their own health systems. If these constraints were addressed, then physiotherapists could be better agents to promote physical activity for people with neurological conditions.

  10. The transliminal brain at rest: baseline EEG, unusual experiences, and access to unconscious mental activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Jessica I; Green, Deborah L; Stevenson, Jennifer L; Payne, Lisa; Bowden, Edward M; Jung-Beeman, Mark; Kounios, John

    2008-01-01

    Transliminality reflects individual differences in the threshold at which unconscious processes or external stimuli enter into consciousness. Individuals high in transliminality possess characteristics such as magical ideation, belief in the paranormal, and creative personality traits, and also report the occurrence of manic/mystic experiences. The goal of the present research was to determine if resting brain activity differs for individuals high versus low in transliminality. We compared baseline EEG recordings (eyes-closed) between individuals high versus low in transliminality, assessed using The Revised Transliminality Scale of Lange et al. (2000). Identifying reliable differences at rest between high- and low-transliminality individuals would support a predisposition for transliminality-related traits. Individuals high in transliminality exhibited lower alpha, beta, and gamma power than individuals low in transliminality over left posterior association cortex and lower high alpha, low beta, and gamma power over the right superior temporal region. In contrast, when compared to individuals low in transliminality, individuals high in transliminality exhibited greater gamma power over the frontal-midline region. These results are consistent with prior research reporting reductions in left temporal/parietal activity, as well as the desynchronization of right temporal activity in schizotypy and related schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Further, differences between high- and low-transliminality groups extend existing theories linking altered hemispheric asymmetries in brain activity to a predisposition toward schizophrenia, paranormal beliefs, and unusual experiences.

  11. The transliminal brain at rest: baseline EEG, unusual experiences, and access to unconscious mental activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Jessica I; Green, Deborah L; Stevenson, Jennifer L; Payne, Lisa; Bowden, Edward M; Jung-Beeman, Mark; Kounios, John

    2008-01-01

    Transliminality reflects individual differences in the threshold at which unconscious processes or external stimuli enter into consciousness. Individuals high in transliminality possess characteristics such as magical ideation, belief in the paranormal, and creative personality traits, and also report the occurrence of manic/mystic experiences. The goal of the present research was to determine if resting brain activity differs for individuals high versus low in transliminality. We compared baseline EEG recordings (eyes-closed) between individuals high versus low in transliminality, assessed using The Revised Transliminality Scale of Lange et al. (2000). Identifying reliable differences at rest between high- and low-transliminality individuals would support a predisposition for transliminality-related traits. Individuals high in transliminality exhibited lower alpha, beta, and gamma power than individuals low in transliminality over left posterior association cortex and lower high alpha, low beta, and gamma power over the right superior temporal region. In contrast, when compared to individuals low in transliminality, individuals high in transliminality exhibited greater gamma power over the frontal-midline region. These results are consistent with prior research reporting reductions in left temporal/parietal activity, as well as the desynchronization of right temporal activity in schizotypy and related schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Further, differences between high- and low-transliminality groups extend existing theories linking altered hemispheric asymmetries in brain activity to a predisposition toward schizophrenia, paranormal beliefs, and unusual experiences. PMID:18814870

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; Benz, S.; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2008-10-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at -5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about -11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between -7 and -11°C with an ice nucleation (IN) active fraction of the order of 10-4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around -8°C.

  13. Experiments R285-3/4/5 (ILAS 3/4/5). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiments ILAS 3/4/5 a number of different austenitic stainless steel types and three types of vanadium samples for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300 C up to dpa (displacements per atom) levels of 2.5 dpa for the steel samples and up to 6 dpa for the vanadium samples. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of the different types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the sample materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are given in this report. (orig.)

  14. Experiments R287-4/5 (Chariot 4/5). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the title experiments a number of different austenitic stainless steel types for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 2.5 dpa. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of different types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the sample materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are given in this report. 1 fig., 1 tab., 7 refs., 3 appendices

  15. Experiments R287-1/2/3 (CHARIOT 1/2/3). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiments CHARIOT 1/2/3 a number of different austenitic stainless steel types and three types of vanadium samples for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300 C up to dpa (displacements per atom) levels of 2.5 dpa for the steel samples and up to 6 dpa for the vanadium samples. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of the different types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the sample materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are given in this report. (orig.)

  16. Experiments R312-03/04 (SINEXT-03/04). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiments SINEXT-03/04 a number of different stainless steel types for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 300C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 0.1 dpa. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of three types of sample materials are presented. The activity of the holder material is calculated for the vertical average of the irradiation position. The activities of the sample materials are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the changes in chemical composition of the different sample materials, due to nuclide transmutation, are presented. 9 refs

  17. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity.

  18. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  19. Perspective and agency during video gaming influences spatial presence experience and brain activation patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havranek Michael

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The experience of spatial presence (SP, i.e., the sense of being present in a virtual environment, emerges if an individual perceives himself as 1 if he were actually located (self-location and 2 able to act in the virtual environment (possible actions. In this study, two main media factors (perspective and agency were investigated while participants played a commercially available video game. Methods The differences in SP experience and associated brain activation were compared between the conditions of game play in first person perspective (1PP and third person perspective (3PP as well as between agency, i.e., active navigation of the video game character (active, and non-agency, i.e., mere passive observation (passive. SP was assessed using standard questionnaires, and brain activation was measured using electroencephalography (EEG and sLORETA source localisation (standard low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography. Results Higher SP ratings were obtained in the 1PP compared with the 3PP condition and in the active compared with the passive condition. On a neural level, we observed in the 1PP compared with the 3PP condition significantly less alpha band power in the parietal, the occipital and the limbic cortex. In the active compared with the passive condition, we uncovered significantly more theta band power in frontal brain regions. Conclusion We propose that manipulating the factors perspective and agency influences SP formation by either directly or indirectly modulating the ego-centric visual processing in a fronto-parietal network. The neuroscientific results are discussed in terms of the theoretical concepts of SP.

  20. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  1. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  2. [Activity and cost analysis in surgical pathology. Experience of a French university laboratory using the activity-based costing method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocq, J P; Biron, N; Kessler, S; Penaud, M; Faujour, V; Ospel, J; Supper, E; Barthel, A; Roussel, J F; Méchine-Neuville, A; Marcellin, L; Lang-Avérous, G; Chenard, M P

    2001-06-01

    Good self-knowledge enables us to have a well- reasoned adaptation to our environment. Starting from this precept based on simple common sense, activity and cost analysis, when applied to medical departments in a university hospital setting, represents a necessary phase in their scientific progression and in the continuation of their university vocation. This is all the more true given the present climate of economic and organizational restructuring of medical facilities. This paper relates the experience of a French surgical pathology department which was assessed for cost effectiveness using the Activity-Based Costing (ABC) method in 1999. This method, which originated in the business world and of which the general concepts are presented here, has given us a keener understanding of the diverse processes involved, their costs and how these costs are arrived at. Moreover, this method has identified the proportion of costs imputable to diagnostic work and of those linked to work specific to a university hospital, in particular teaching and research and development. The results can then be used for a clearer analysis of the figures required by prescribers and health care funding agencies, and, within the department, to enhance perception of work carried out by the entire staff in order to initiate a new type of management centered on activity (Activity-Based Management). Adaptable to any medical department, whatever its organizational structure, independent of the significance of any given code letter and regardless of the rating method used to grade activities, the ABC method also allows for comparisons between structures of a similar nature. The thoughts it inspires on economic performance must take into account the rules of good medical practice, the imperatives of quality assurance, the need for "breathing space" which are indispensable to research and a humanist conception of working relations.

  3. [Activity and cost analysis in surgical pathology. Experience of a French university laboratory using the activity-based costing method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocq, J P; Biron, N; Kessler, S; Penaud, M; Faujour, V; Ospel, J; Supper, E; Barthel, A; Roussel, J F; Méchine-Neuville, A; Marcellin, L; Lang-Avérous, G; Chenard, M P

    2001-06-01

    Good self-knowledge enables us to have a well- reasoned adaptation to our environment. Starting from this precept based on simple common sense, activity and cost analysis, when applied to medical departments in a university hospital setting, represents a necessary phase in their scientific progression and in the continuation of their university vocation. This is all the more true given the present climate of economic and organizational restructuring of medical facilities. This paper relates the experience of a French surgical pathology department which was assessed for cost effectiveness using the Activity-Based Costing (ABC) method in 1999. This method, which originated in the business world and of which the general concepts are presented here, has given us a keener understanding of the diverse processes involved, their costs and how these costs are arrived at. Moreover, this method has identified the proportion of costs imputable to diagnostic work and of those linked to work specific to a university hospital, in particular teaching and research and development. The results can then be used for a clearer analysis of the figures required by prescribers and health care funding agencies, and, within the department, to enhance perception of work carried out by the entire staff in order to initiate a new type of management centered on activity (Activity-Based Management). Adaptable to any medical department, whatever its organizational structure, independent of the significance of any given code letter and regardless of the rating method used to grade activities, the ABC method also allows for comparisons between structures of a similar nature. The thoughts it inspires on economic performance must take into account the rules of good medical practice, the imperatives of quality assurance, the need for "breathing space" which are indispensable to research and a humanist conception of working relations. PMID:11468559

  4. Does using active learning in thermodynamics lectures improve students’ conceptual understanding and learning experiences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encouraging ‘active learning’ in the large lecture theatre emerges as a credible recommendation for improving university courses, with reports often showing significant improvements in learning outcomes. However, the recommendations are based predominantly on studies undertaken in mechanics. We set out to examine those claims in the thermodynamics module of a large first year physics course with an established technique, called interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs). The study took place at The University of Sydney, where four parallel streams of the thermodynamics module were divided into two streams that experienced the ILDs and two streams that did not. The programme was first implemented in 2011 to gain experience and refine logistical matters and repeated in 2012 with approximately 500 students. A validated survey, the thermal concepts survey, was used as pre-test and post-test to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided insights into what the ‘active learning’ meant from student experiences. We analysed lecture recordings to capture the time devoted to different activities in a lecture, including interactivity. The learning gains were in the ‘high gain’ range for the ILD streams and ‘medium gain’ for the other streams. The analysis of the lecture recordings showed that the ILD streams devoted significantly more time to interactivity while surveys and interviews showed that students in the ILD streams were thinking in deep ways. Our study shows that ILDs can make a difference in students’ conceptual understanding as well as their experiences, demonstrating the potential value-add that can be provided by investing in active learning to enhance lectures. (paper)

  5. Shifting goals: effects of active and observational experience on infants’ understanding of higher order goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Mahajan, Neha; Sommerville, Jessica A.; Matz, Lauren; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Action perception links have been argued to support the emergence of action understanding, but their role in infants’ perception of distal goals has not been fully investigated. The current experiments address this issue. During the development of means-end actions, infants shift their focus from the means of the action to the distal goal. In Experiment One, we evaluated whether this same shift in attention (from the means to the distal goal) when learning to produce multi-step actions is reflected in infants’ perception of others’ means-end actions. Eight-months-old infants underwent active training in means-end action production and their subsequent analysis of an observed means-end action was assessed in a visual habituation paradigm. Infants’ degree of success in the training paradigm was related to their subsequent interpretation of the observed action as directed at the means versus the distal goal. In Experiment Two, observational and control manipulations provided evidence that these effects depended on the infants’ active engagement in the means-end actions. These results suggest that the processes that give rise to means-end structure in infants’ motor behavior also support the emergence of means-end structure in their analysis of others’ goals. PMID:25852622

  6. Shifting goals: effects of active and observational experience on infants' understanding of higher order goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Sarah A; Mahajan, Neha; Sommerville, Jessica A; Matz, Lauren; Woodward, Amanda L

    2015-01-01

    Action perception links have been argued to support the emergence of action understanding, but their role in infants' perception of distal goals has not been fully investigated. The current experiments address this issue. During the development of means-end actions, infants shift their focus from the means of the action to the distal goal. In Experiment One, we evaluated whether this same shift in attention (from the means to the distal goal) when learning to produce multi-step actions is reflected in infants' perception of others' means-end actions. Eight-months-old infants underwent active training in means-end action production and their subsequent analysis of an observed means-end action was assessed in a visual habituation paradigm. Infants' degree of success in the training paradigm was related to their subsequent interpretation of the observed action as directed at the means versus the distal goal. In Experiment Two, observational and control manipulations provided evidence that these effects depended on the infants' active engagement in the means-end actions. These results suggest that the processes that give rise to means-end structure in infants' motor behavior also support the emergence of means-end structure in their analysis of others' goals.

  7. Eliciting Metacognitive Experiences and Reflection in a Year 11 Chemistry Classroom: An Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2013-06-01

    Concerns regarding students' learning and reasoning in chemistry classrooms are well documented. Students' reasoning in chemistry should be characterized by conscious consideration of chemical phenomenon from laboratory work at macroscopic, molecular/sub-micro and symbolic levels. Further, students should develop metacognition in relation to such ways of reasoning about chemistry phenomena. Classroom change eliciting metacognitive experiences and metacognitive reflection is necessary to shift entrenched views of teaching and learning in students. In this study, Activity Theory is used as the framework for interpreting changes to the rules/customs and tools of the activity systems of two different classes of students taught by the same teacher, Frances, who was teaching chemical equilibrium to those classes in consecutive years. An interpretive methodology involving multiple data sources was employed. Frances explicitly changed her pedagogy in the second year to direct students attention to increasingly consider chemical phenomena at the molecular/sub-micro level. Additionally, she asked students not to use the textbook until toward the end of the equilibrium unit and sought to engage them in using their prior knowledge of chemistry to understand their observations from experiments. Frances' changed pedagogy elicited metacognitive experiences and reflection in students and challenged them to reconsider their metacognitive beliefs about learning chemistry and how it might be achieved. While teacher change is essential for science education reform, students are not passive players in change efforts and they need to be convinced of the viability of teacher pedagogical change in the context of their goals, intentions, and beliefs.

  8. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of SnomaxTM were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly spray into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°. At this temperature, about 1% of the SnomaxTM cells induced freezing of the spray droplets before they evaporated in the cloud chamber. The other suspensions of living cells didn't induce any measurable ice concentration during spray formation at −5.7°. The remaining aerosol was exposed to typical cloud activation conditions in subsequent experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets and then eventually acted as ice nuclei to freeze the droplets. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an INA fraction of the order of 10−4. The ice nucleation efficiency of SnomaxTM cells was much larger with an INA fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  9. Ben's perception of space and subitizing activity: a constructivist teaching experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Beth L.

    2015-12-01

    This 22-session constructivist teaching experiment set out to investigate a preschool student's number understanding relative to his subitizing activity. Subitizing, a quick apprehension of the numerosity of a small set of items, has been found to characterize perceptual and conceptual processes students rely on as their understanding of number develops. The purpose for this study is to investigate how a preschool student's, Ben, perceptual subitizing activity changed relative to the density of items and the development of his number understanding. Findings indicated that early on in the teaching experiment, Ben's perceptual subitizing activity was influenced by his primary reliance upon the perceived amount of space between items. Shifts in reasoning when perceptually subitizing indicated physiological and experiential development in Ben's number understanding, as Ben described the number of items increasing when the perceived amount of space between items decreased. Number conservation was considered as relevant to these findings because Ben's explanation for why a number could increase or decrease mirrored similar logic when unable to conserve number. Implications of this study suggest nuances in number understanding development which can explain preschool students' reliance upon a more refined set of perceptual subitizing.

  10. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  11. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  12. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems. PMID:27288672

  13. Ground-based activities in preparation of SELENE ISS experiment on self-rewetting fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, R.; Abe, Y.; Castagnolo, D.; Celata, G. P.; Kabov, O.; Kawaji, M.; Sato, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thome, J. R.; Van Vaerenbergh, S.

    2011-12-01

    SELENE (SELf rewetting fluids for thermal ENErgy management) is a microgravity experiment proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in response to the Announcement of Opportunities for Physical Sciences. Main objectives of the microgravity research onboard ISS include the quantitative investigation of heat transfer performances of "self-rewetting fluids" and "nano self-rewetting fluids" in model heat pipes and validation of adequate theoretical and numerical modelling able to predict their behaviour in microgravity conditions. This article summarizes the results of ground-based research activities in preparation of the microgravity experiments. They include: 1) thermophysical properties measurements; 2) study of thermo-soluto-capillary effects in micro-channels; 3) numerical modelling; 4) thermal and concentration distribution measurements with optical (e.g. interferometric) and intrusive techniques; 5) surface tension-driven effects and thermal performances test on different capillary structures and heat pipes; 6) breadboards development and support to definition of scientific requirements.

  14. Employment activities and experiences of adults with high-functioning autism and Asperger’s Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susanna; Costley, Debra; Warren, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    There is limited large-scale empirical research into the working lives of adults who have an autism spectrum disorder with no co-occurring intellectual disability. Drawing on data from a national survey, this report describes the employment activities and experiences of 130 adults with Asperger's Disorder (AD) and high functioning autism (HFA) in Australia. Outcome measures include current occupation; occupational skill level and alignment with educational attainment; type of job contract; hours of work; support received to find work; support received in the workplace; and positive and negative experiences of employment. The findings confirm and expand upon existing evidence that adults with AD and HFA, despite their capacity and willingness to work, face significant disadvantages in the labour market and a lack of understanding and support in employment settings.

  15. Employment activities and experiences of adults with high-functioning autism and Asperger’s Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susanna; Costley, Debra; Warren, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    There is limited large-scale empirical research into the working lives of adults who have an autism spectrum disorder with no co-occurring intellectual disability. Drawing on data from a national survey, this report describes the employment activities and experiences of 130 adults with Asperger's Disorder (AD) and high functioning autism (HFA) in Australia. Outcome measures include current occupation; occupational skill level and alignment with educational attainment; type of job contract; hours of work; support received to find work; support received in the workplace; and positive and negative experiences of employment. The findings confirm and expand upon existing evidence that adults with AD and HFA, despite their capacity and willingness to work, face significant disadvantages in the labour market and a lack of understanding and support in employment settings. PMID:24715257

  16. Life experiences in active addiction and in recovery among treated and untreated persons: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre; Hill, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Addiction treatment can be effective but fewer than 50% of addiction affected persons are ever treated. Little is known about the addiction and recovery experience of this large subgroup. A national sample of persons in recovery (N = 3,176, 29.5% untreated) was used to begin addressing these questions to inform strategies to encourage help-seeking and to contribute to the small knowledge base on untreated individuals. Study domains were finances, family, social and civic functioning, health, criminal justice involvement, and employment. Treated persons reported significantly greater levels of negative-and fewer positive-experiences in all areas during active addiction than did the untreated group. This gap was significantly narrowed in recovery. PMID:25775078

  17. The lived experiences of being physically active when morbidly obese: A qualitative systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Skovsby Toft

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to identify facilitators and barriers for physical activity (PA experienced by morbidly obese adults in the Western world. Inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle have become a major challenge for health and well-being, particularly among persons with morbid obesity. Lifestyle changes may lead to long-term changes in activity level, if facilitators and barriers are approached in a holistic way by professionals. To develop lifestyle interventions, the perspective and experiences of this group of patients are essential for success. The methodology of the systematic review followed the seven-step procedure of the Joanna Briggs Institute and was published in a protocol. Six databases were searched using keywords and index terms. Manual searches were performed in reference lists and in cited citations up until March 2015. The selected studies underwent quality appraisal in the Joanna Briggs-Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. Data from primary studies were extracted and were subjected to a hermeneutic text interpretation and a data-driven coding in a five-step procedure focusing on meaning and constant targeted comparison through which they were categorized and subjected into a meta-synthesis. Eight papers were included for the systematic review, representing the experiences of PA among 212 participants. One main theme developed from the meta-data analysis: “Identity” with the three subthemes: “considering weight,” “being able to,” and “belonging with others.” The theme and subthemes were merged into a meta-synthesis: “Homecoming: a change in identity.” The experiences of either suffering or well-being during PA affected the identity of adults with morbid obesity either by challenging or motivating them. A change in identity may be needed to feel a sense of “homecoming” when active.

  18. Solar flare injection as analog of active experiment in an ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzhin, Yu.; Sinelnikov, V.; Shagimuratov, I.; Kanonidi, Kh.

    At realization of active experiment are always known precisely both localization and amplitude of an entered disturbance (whether at a beam particles or mass injection, whether at heating of an ionosphere by EM wave radiation). The nuclear explosion in atmosphere was the maiden active experiment, but the action source was instant and very multicomponent (shock wave, energetic particles and EM radiation with a broadband spectrum) or, in other words, effect was too complex. The solar flare renders mixed action on near Earth space too, but it is clear separated in time (the short pulse of electromagnetic radiation reaches the Earth behind some minutes, then the solar cosmic rays and after one day (or two) the high-velocity flow of plasma arrive) and space of each components action: ionosphere, polar cap or magnitosphere. Analysis of form and dynamics of the X-ray pulse radiation (data of GOES satellites) from a solar flare (class X17) 28.10.03 shows, that there are all basis to consider it as reference source for active experiment in an ionosphere. For this short pulse of EM radiation the investigation of disturbances (SFE, SID or Crochet) of ionosphere Sq currents system and dynamics of the integral plasma contents (or TEC, the data of GPS constellation) in an ionosphere for a network of Europe midlatitude stations (IGS and INTERMAGNET) are conducted. The availability of a maximum gradient (up to 15 A/km) of loop currents and sharp increase in TEC on a narrow range of Sun zenith angles (Z0=60°-75°) is shown. The observed spatial dependence of intensity of such localized disturbance generated in an ionosphere by short EM pulse from a solar flare is discussed.

  19. Exploding metal film active anode source experiments on the LION extractor ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors report results using an extractor geometry magnetically insulated ion diode on the 0.5 TW LION accelerator. Experiments with an exploding metal film active anode plasma source (EMFAAPS) have shown that intense beams with significantly improved turn-on time compared to epoxy-filled-groove anodes can be produced. A new geometry, in which a plasma switch is used to provide the current path that explodes the thin film anode, has improved the ion efficiency (to typically 70%) compared with the previous scheme in which an electron collector on the anode provided this current. Leakage electron current is reduced when no collector is used

  20. Subjective experiences of occupational performance of activities of daily living in patients with mild stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Post, A; Poulsen, T.E.;

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the subjective experiences of occupational performance of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with mild stroke. Methodology: Data was generated from January – December 2011 and consisted of 41 individual ADL-I interviews with patients in hospital and another 41...... and risk of accidents. Conclusion: It is important to view the patients with mild stroke as heterogeneous, and consider post-stroke fatigue and emotional reactions when evaluating rehabilitation needs. Therefore, it is important to look further into structured tools, which examine how well the participant...

  1. CREAM - a Cosmic Radiation Effects and Activation Monitor for space experiments: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account is given of the design and construction of the experimental CREAM packages, intended for flight in the mid-deck area of the Space Transport System (Shuttle) Mission in 1986. The complete experiment involved; 1) a self-contained and battery powered activation monitor for measuring energy losses of charged particles; 2) CR-39 and Kapton polymer solid state nuclear track detectors for the detection of ionising particles; 3) metal foils of nickel, titanium and gold for neutron monitoring; and 4) thermoluminescent detectors for dosimetry measurements of the radiation background. The circuit design and detailed functioning of the active monitor is fully described, together with a complete discussion of the principles and operation of the passive monitors. (author)

  2. [Digital democracy and experiences in e-participation: Internet activism and public policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rafael de Paula Aguiar; Penteado, Cláudio Luis Camargo; Santos, Marcelo Burgos Pimentel dos

    2015-12-01

    The article explores processes of interaction between the State and organized civil society in an effort to assess the weight of the various social mobilization strategies utilized by different social organizations active in the city of São Paulo. The study is particularly interested in analyzing how the use of information and communications technology (ICT) influences the development of public policy as a means for shaping citizen opinion and establishing demands. A Political Participation and Influence Index was used to evaluate experiences in Internet activism in the city of São Paulo. Findings suggest that the movements and collectivities with the most inventive and broadest diversity of strategies achieve better results, signaling a new method of action in contemporary politics. PMID:26785869

  3. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Milan, S E; Korth, H; Anderson, B J

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  4. Neutron field for activation experiments in horizontal channel of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental channels of nuclear reactors often serve for nuclear data measurement and validation. The dosimetry-foils activation technique was employed to measure neutron field parameters in the horizontal radial channel of the training reactor VR-1, and to test the possibility of using the reactor for scientific purposes. The reaction rates, energy spectral indexes, and neutron spectrum at several irradiation positions of the experimental channel were determined. The experimental results show the feasibility of the radial channel for irradiating experiments and open new possibilities for data validation by using this nuclear facility. - Highlights: • Neutron activation analysis of various samples. • Neutron spectrometry and gamma-spectrometry. • Study of keff for various types of reactor core

  5. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  6. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  7. Shifting patterns of everyday activity in early dementia: experiences of men and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Alison; Dahlke, Sherry; Purves, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    In this article we draw from a larger study to examine experiences of two men and their families as they negotiate changing patterns of everyday activity in the months after receiving a diagnosis of dementia. We conducted in-depth interpretive phenomenological analysis of interview and observational data that were gathered from the men and various members of their families (n = 7) over a period several months. Findings are presented as three themes: The best kind of man (highlighting participants' historical positioning); It's a little different now (recognizing challenges posed by the dementia); and You have to do something (showing how the men and their families responded to and accommodated these challenges). We discuss these findings in terms of how everyday activity is not only important for supporting personhood in dementia, but it also contributes to sustaining family identity, and does so in a way that is deeply influenced by gender and masculinity.

  8. [Digital democracy and experiences in e-participation: Internet activism and public policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rafael de Paula Aguiar; Penteado, Cláudio Luis Camargo; Santos, Marcelo Burgos Pimentel dos

    2015-12-01

    The article explores processes of interaction between the State and organized civil society in an effort to assess the weight of the various social mobilization strategies utilized by different social organizations active in the city of São Paulo. The study is particularly interested in analyzing how the use of information and communications technology (ICT) influences the development of public policy as a means for shaping citizen opinion and establishing demands. A Political Participation and Influence Index was used to evaluate experiences in Internet activism in the city of São Paulo. Findings suggest that the movements and collectivities with the most inventive and broadest diversity of strategies achieve better results, signaling a new method of action in contemporary politics.

  9. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the determination of Crohn’s disease activity – preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a recent non-invasive modality, which may partially replace currently used techniques (endoscopy, CT enterography and MR enterography) in the diagnostics and assessment of Crohn’s disease (CD). The aim of the study was to analyze early experience in the use of CEUS for the measurement of activity and staging of CD. Eleven patients previously diagnosed with CD were included in the study. They underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (SonoVue, Bracco), low-dose CT enterography (LDCTE), assessment of laboratory markers of inflammation and clinical CD activity index (CDAI). Contrast enhancement was evaluated using a semi-quantitative method and a quantitative method that included measurement of peak enhancement (PE), enhancement curve rise time (RT) and wash-in-rate (WiR). Ileal wall thickening was observed in all patients. Semi-quantitative method was used to observe CD activity in CEUS in 10 cases that perfectly matched LDCTE findings. There was a moderate positive correlation between PE and CDAI (r=0.65, p<0.001). There was no significant relationship between perfusion parameters and laboratory markers of inflammation. CEUS is a promising modality for non-invasive assessment of pathologic ileal vascularization in the course of Crohn’s disease. Intensity of enhancement in CEUS reflects activity of the disease detected in LDCTE and correlates with CDAI

  11. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  12. Active experiments in geospace plasmas with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, James

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere provides a relatively quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the inter¬action region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and optics for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the controlled study of fundamental nonlinear plasma processes of relevance to laboratory plasmas, ionospheric irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems, artificial ionization mirrors, wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, active global magnetospheric experiments, and many more.

  13. NEA Activities in Preserving, Evaluating and Applying Data from Fast Reactor Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the area of nuclear science is to help member countries identify, collate, develop and disseminate the basic scientific and technical knowledge required to ensure safe and reliable operation of current nuclear systems and to develop next generation technologies. Within these general goals, the current nuclear science programme has three key objectives: (i) to help advance the existing scientific knowledge needed to enhance the performance and safety of current nuclear systems, (ii) to contribute to building a solid scientific and technical basis for the development of future generation nuclear systems and (iii) to support the preservation of essential knowledge in the field of nuclear science. As part of the second and third of these objectives, an extensive programme of work to preserve and evaluate data from integral experiments has been established, including reactor physics, shielding and criticality safety experiments on fast reactor systems. Data from experimental facilities are reviewed and, if necessary, archives of information are made safe. This may typically involve the indexing and scanning of key documents and archiving of logbooks, for example. Selected experiments go through a detailed evaluation process and where deemed appropriate, a benchmark description is created in a standardized format for inclusion in one of the NEA Data Bank international databases. This information is used extensively by the international nuclear science community to validate their modelling and simulation tools. The process can be viewed as part of a broader knowledge management function, where information is gathered, evaluated, linked and made accessible to a wide range of users. The presentation gives details of the main databases maintained and developed by the NEA, focusing on those related to fast reactor applications. The status of recent preservation activities for fast reactor archives in the United Kingdom is

  14. Older Adults’ Experiences Using a Commercially Available Monitor to Self-Track Their Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity contributes to older adults’ autonomy, mobility, and quality of life as they age, yet fewer than 1 in 5 engage in activities as recommended. Many older adults track their exercise using pencil and paper, or their memory. Commercially available physical activity monitors (PAM) have the potential to facilitate these tracking practices and, in turn, physical activity. An assessment of older adults’ long-term experiences with PAM is needed to understand this potential. Objective To assess short and long-term experiences of adults >70 years old using a PAM (Fitbit One) in terms of acceptance, ease-of-use, and usefulness: domains in the technology acceptance model. Methods This prospective study included 95 community-dwelling older adults, all of whom received a PAM as part of randomized controlled trial piloting a fall-reducing physical activity promotion intervention. Ten-item surveys were administered 10 weeks and 8 months after the study started. Survey ratings are described and analyzed over time, and compared by sex, education, and age. Results Participants were mostly women (71/95, 75%), 70 to 96 years old, and had some college education (68/95, 72%). Most participants (86/95, 91%) agreed or strongly agreed that the PAM was easy to use, useful, and acceptable both 10 weeks and 8 months after enrolling in the study. Ratings dropped between these time points in all survey domains: ease-of-use (median difference 0.66 points, P=.001); usefulness (median difference 0.16 points, P=.193); and acceptance (median difference 0.17 points, P=.032). Differences in ratings by sex or educational attainment were not statistically significant at either time point. Most participants 80+ years of age (28/37, 76%) agreed or strongly agreed with survey items at long-term follow-up, however their ratings were significantly lower than participants in younger age groups at both time points. Conclusions Study results indicate it is feasible for older

  15. Reproductive experience alters neural and behavioural responses to acute oestrogen receptor α activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, E M; Casey, K; Carini, L M; Bridges, R S

    2013-12-01

    demonstrate that reproductive experience alters the behavioural response to acute ERα activation. Moreover, the findings suggest that central regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis is modified as a consequence of reproductive experience.

  16. Global Indicators Analysis and Consultancy Experience Insights into Correlation between Entrepreneurial Activities and Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Krivokapić

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many researches and practical experiences clearly indicate the existence of a strong relationship between entrepreneurial activities and the business environment in which these activities are initiated. Although this topic has been quite ignored until the late twentieth century, a lot of studies and consulting practice have contributed to the fact that there are now a number of theories concerning mentioned correlation. These theories aim to offer a model that would provide better utilization of the possibilities from the business environment which could be very important for the development from both macroeconomic and microeconomic aspects. An increasing number of articles on this topic says enough about its importance, and numerous researches by many reputable globally recognized institutions go in favor of this claim. There are many indicators that observe the economic situation in a country or a region from different aspects, so the analyses of these indicators make it possible to determine the specific relationships between entrepreneurial activities and the local and the global business environment. Given the complexity of these relations, the impact cannot be observed partially, without taking into consideration other important factors, but more detailed analyses, however, result in some useful conclusions, which in the proper context can have a positive impact on many economic factors. It is very important to emphasize the fact that the correlation between the business environment and entrepreneurial activities is bidirectional, since this influence is mutual, so that changes in one of these factors can and usually cause some modifications in the other. Frequent series of such iterations actually lead to changes in the business environment, while entrepreneurial activity changes its shape and affects the economy of a country or a region, which is of particular importance for its competitiveness in the era of globalization.

  17. Design performances and chemistry program supporting the FA3 /UKEPRTM activity management: experience and modeling balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EPRTM reactor accounts with an evolutionary design that provides the appropriate features to ensure the safety implementation of different chemistry and radiochemistry options. ALARP considerations have been taken into account by EDF-AREVA for making decisions relating to the activity management in the primary circuit of Flamanville 3-EPRTM and UK-EPRTM reactors. The water chemistry and radiochemistry concept implemented in FA3-EPRTM and UK-EPRTM reactors is the result of an exhaustive selection process based on the balance between the theoretical developments, the laboratory tests and the NPP experience concerning the diverse areas associated with: - The source term identification and characterization: The understanding of the origin and behavior of fission products/actinides, corrosion products and activation products constitutes the essential support for the selection of suitable parameters and criteria to monitor the system integrity, the tramp-uranium and radiation build-up and the discharges to the environment. - The source term quantification: The balance between the baseline data from PWR forerunner reactors and the assessments performed by modeling constitutes the major demonstration of the source term accuracy. This approach ensures that activity risks are understood and can be managed with the EPRTM design options. - The EPRTM design options evaluation: The sensitivity analysis results show the influence of the fuel management, the material choice and the chemistry conditioning on several domains such as the activity coolant and the fuel/ex-core crud management. EDF-AREVA demonstrates by means of this process that the design, sizing and chemistry conditioning of EPRTM reactor primary circuit are adapted to guarantee the correct activity management. The methodology developed, based on qualitative and quantitative assessments, intends to propose to the Nuclear Industry several alternatives for evaluating and/or improving the compliance with requirements

  18. Dynamic changes in microbial activity and community structure during biodegradation of petroleum compounds: A laboratory experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With 110-d incubation experiment in laboratory, the responses of microbial quantity, soil enzymatic activity, and bacterial community structure to different amounts of diesel fuel amendments were studied to reveal whether certain biological and biochemical characteristics could serve as reliable indicators of petroleum hydrocarbons contamination in meadow-brown soil, and use these indicators to evaluate the actual ecological impacts of 50-year petroleum-refining wastewater irrigation on soil function in Shenfu irrigation area. Results showed that amendments of ≤1000 mg/kg diesel fuel stimulated the growth of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, and increased the activity of soil dehydrogenase, hydrogenperoxidase, polyphenol oxidase and substrate-induced respiration. Soil bacterial diversity decreased slightly during the first 15 d of incubation and recovered to the control level on day 30. The significant decrease of the colony forming units of soil actinomyces and filamentous fungi can be taken as the sensitive biological indicators of petroleum contamination when soil was amended with ≥5000 mg/kg diesel fuel. The sharp decrease in urease activity was recommended as the most sensitive biochemical indicator of heavy diesel fuel contamination. The shifts in community structure to a community documented by Sphingomonadaceae within α-subgroup of Proteobacteria could be served as a sensitive and precise indicator of diesel fuel contamination. Based on the results described in this paper, the soil function in Shenfu irrigation area was disturbed to some extent.

  19. Protest Activity, Social Incentives, and Rejection Sensitivity: Results From a Survey Experiment About Tuition Fees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma A. Bäck

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available People may engage in protest activity either because of collective incentives or selective incentives, or a combination of them. In this study we focus on the selective incentives part of the calculus of political participation, particularly the impact of the social dimension. We hypothesize that people will participate in demonstrations or other forms of protest, to a higher extent if they are afraid of rejection, but only if they feel that they have high social support for their own position. This hypothesis was supported in an online survey experiment where social support was manipulated. Results also revealed that individuals who were highly rejection sensitive were among the most likely to participate even though they did not believe protest activity to be an efficient way to bring about social change. This supports the notion that some individuals tend to engage in protest activity for purely social reasons. However it is still unclear whether these individuals are driven by an approach motivation to establish new social bonds or an avoidance motivation to escape possible social rejection.

  20. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  1. Role of Creative Activity in the Formation of Professional and Personal Experience of the Future Music Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Popovych

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated and substantiated the role of creative activity in the formation of professional and personal experience of the future music teacher. It was determined that the creative activity as a complex personality formation acts as a prerequisite and the result of musical and educational activities, provides an unusual approach and creative solution of professional problems. It is proved that the high level of creative activity is determined by positive motivation, strong intere...

  2. Creating a Before-School Physical Activity Program: Pre-Service Physical Educators' Experiences and Implications for PETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jaimie; van der Mars, Hans; Jahn, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences of physical education teacher education (PETE) majors enrolled in an internship course that provided them with authentic experiences promoting and facilitating a before-school physical activity (PA) program and to examine the associated implications for PETE programs within the Comprehensive…

  3. Social Experiences of Beginning Braille Readers in Literacy Activities: Qualitative and Quantitative Findings of the ABC Braille Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Sharon Z.; Kamei-Hannan, Cheryl; Erin, Jane N.; Barclay, Lizbeth; Sitar, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    This mixed-design investigation examined the social experiences of beginning braille readers who were initially taught contracted or alphabetic braille in literacy activities as part of the ABC Braille Study. No differences in the quality or quantity of social experiences were found between the two groups over time. (Contains 4 tables.)

  4. First results from the THOR experiment imaging thunderstorm activity from the ISS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanrion, Olivier; Neubert, Torsten; Mogensen, Andreas; Yair, Yoav; Stendel, Martin; Larsen, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Video imaging from the THOR experiment conducted on International Space Station by the Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen has been analyzed. The observations we report in this paper were taken with a color camera from the vantage point of the Cupola, tracking thunderstorm activity over the Bay of Bengal. Among many lightning, the observations contain a sprite, a blue jet and numerous small blue discharge regions at the top of a tall cumulonimbus cloud. The latter are interpreted as electric discharges between layers at the uppermost layers of the cloud and to the screening layer formed at the very edge between the cloud and the surrounding atmosphere. The observations are the first of their kind and give new insights into the charge structure at the top of clouds in the tropical tropopause regions, a region that is difficult to observe and to access.

  5. Design and experiments of an active isolator for satellite micro-vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Weipeng; Huang Hai; Zhou Xubin; Zheng Xintao; Bai Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a soft active isolator (SAI) derived from a voice coil motor is studied to determine its abilities as a micro-vibration isolation device for sensitive satellite payloads. Firstly, the two most important parts of the SAI, the mechanical unit and the low-noise driver, are designed and manufactured. Then, a rigid-flexible coupling dynamic model of the SAI is built, and a dynamic analysis is conducted. Furthermore, a controller with a sky-hook damper is designed. Finally, results from the performance tests of the mechanical/electronic parts and the isolation experiments are presented. The SAI attenuations are found to be more than ?20 dB above 5 Hz, and the control effect is stable.

  6. A totally active scintillator calorimeter for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). Design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Asfandiyarov, R

    2013-01-01

    The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a totally active scintillator detector to be installed in the muon beam of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1] – the main R&D project for the future neutrino factory. It is aimed at measuring the properties of the low energy beam composed of muons, electrons and pions, performing the identification particle by particle. The EMR is made of 48 stacked layers alternately measuring the X- and the Y-coordinate. Each layer consists of 59 triangular scintillator bars. It is shown that the granularity of the detector permits to identify tracks and to measure particle ranges and shower shapes. The read-out is based on FPGA custom made electronics and commercially available modules. Currently it is being built at the University of Geneva.

  7. Danger and dementia: caregiver experiences and shifting social roles during a highly active hurricane season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Janelle J; Castañeda, Heide

    2014-01-01

    This study examined disaster preparedness and decision-making by caregivers of community-dwelling persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's or a related dementia (ADRD). Interviews were conducted with 20 caregivers in South Florida. Twelve of these interviews include caregiving experiences during the highly active 2004-2005 hurricane seasons. Results indicate that persons in earlier stages of ADRD can, and often do, remain engaged in the disaster preparation and planning process. However, during the early stages, persons may also resist evacuation, even if the caregiver felt it was necessary. During later stages of the disease, caregivers reported less resistance to disaster-related decisions, however, with the tradeoff of less ability to assist with preparation.

  8. Active in-situ petroleum hydrocarbon remediation in discontinuous permafrost : practical experience and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. [WorleyParsons Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The active in-situ petroleum hydrocarbon remediation in discontinuous permafrost was presented as practical experience and lessons learned. The presentation provided background information on permafrost, the site characterization phase, and conceptual site model. Remedial options analysis, permeability enhancement, and full scale remediation system were discussed. Remediation options that were presented included: impacted soil; excavation and landfill; excavation and biocell; soil vapour extraction (SVE); and dual phase extraction (DPE). The remediation strategy of SVE and DPE was outlined, with particular reference to full scale DPE remediation; enhancing limited permeability; remediation trench installation; radius of influence; trench potential radius of influence; and fluid and vapour gathering system. The presentation also discussed challenges and lessons learned regarding seasonal operation; permafrost encroachment into trenches; flammable vapours; downhole pump freezing over time; and variable performance and balancing flows. tabs., figs.

  9. Systematic approach to training. Experiences from the training activities of regulatory body personnel in STUK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the experiences obtained of a training programme for nuclear power plant inspectors arranged in the 90's by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK). In the implementation of the programme, a systematic method was used to analyse the training needs, to plan, develop and implement the training programme as well as to assess the programme's implementation and results. The method used, 'SAT Ae Systematic Approach to Training', is presented in 'Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook', IAEA Technical Report Series No. 380, which is a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is recommended that this method be applied in the planning and implementation of nuclear power plant personnel training. The application of the method as a tool for developing the qualifications of nuclear power plant inspectors shows that the method is well suited for use in Finland. Until the 90's, STUK had no systematic approach to training activities. Some training was arranged internally, but training in most respects meant participation in external training events and international seminars. A more systematic approach was adopted in the early 90's. The main goal was to define basic competence profiles for inspectors working in different fields and to provide an internal basic training programme not available externally. The development of the training activities called for a profound renewal of the training function to ensure a systematic approach and high quality. The experiences gained in STUK are useful in co-operation with Eastern and Central European regulatory bodies; they can be utilized when the qualifications of personnel who carry out inspections are developed. This will extensively contribute to the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  10. Systematic approach to training. Experiences from the training activities of regulatory body personnel in STUK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, I.

    1998-04-01

    The report describes the experiences obtained of a training programme for nuclear power plant inspectors arranged in the 90`s by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK). In the implementation of the programme, a systematic method was used to analyse the training needs, to plan, develop and implement the training programme as well as to assess the programme`s implementation and results. The method used, `SAT Ae Systematic Approach to Training`, is presented in `Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook`, IAEA Technical Report Series No. 380, which is a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is recommended that this method be applied in the planning and implementation of nuclear power plant personnel training. The application of the method as a tool for developing the qualifications of nuclear power plant inspectors shows that the method is well suited for use in Finland. Until the 90`s, STUK had no systematic approach to training activities. Some training was arranged internally, but training in most respects meant participation in external training events and international seminars. A more systematic approach was adopted in the early 90`s. The main goal was to define basic competence profiles for inspectors working in different fields and to provide an internal basic training programme not available externally. The development of the training activities called for a profound renewal of the training function to ensure a systematic approach and high quality. The experiences gained in STUK are useful in co-operation with Eastern and Central European regulatory bodies; they can be utilized when the qualifications of personnel who carry out inspections are developed. This will extensively contribute to the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.). 2 refs.

  11. Cord blood banking activity in Iran National Cord Blood Bank: a two years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Mostafa; Atarodi, Kamran; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Abolghasemi, Hasan; Sadegh, Hosein; Faranoosh, Mohammad; Golzade, Khadije; Fadai, Razieh; Niknam, Fereshte; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2014-02-01

    Today umbilical cord blood (UCB) has known as a commonly used source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation and many cord blood banks have been established around the world for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood units. Herein, we describe our experience at Iran National Cord Blood Bank (INCBB) during 2 years of activity. From November 2010 to 2012, UCBs were collected from 5 hospitals in Tehran. All the collection, processing, testing, cryopreservation and storage procedures were done according to standard operation procedures. Total nucleated cells (TNC) count, viability test, CD34+ cell count, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, screening tests and HLA typing were done on all banked units. Within 3770 collected units, only 32.9% fulfilled banking criteria. The mean volume of units was 105.2 ml and after volume reduction the mean of TNC, viability, CD34+ cells and CFUs was 10.76×10(8), 95.2%, 2.99×10(6) and 7.1×10(5), respectively. One unit was transplanted at Dec 2012 to a 5-year old patient with five of six HLA compatibilities. In our country banking of UCB is new and high rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplants needs expanding CB banks capacity to find more matching units, optimization of methods and sharing experiences to improve biological characterization of units.

  12. Experiences of a guided smartphone-based behavioral activation therapy for depression: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of studies have investigated treatments administered via smartphones showing that this treatment format has a potential to be effective. However, we still have limited knowledge of how patients experience this treatment format. The objective of this study was to explore participants' views of a smartphone-based behavioral activation treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically (participants with different overall experiences selected participants, suffering from major depression according to the DSM-IV. The interview data were processed with the aid of thematic analysis. The analysis generated the three main themes: Commitment, Treatment and Lack of important components, with attached subthemes. In conclusion, the findings from the current study correspond with existing knowledge in the field of internet-based treatment. Considering that this kind of treatment is still quite new, the need for further research and development is considerable. Nevertheless, its availability, assimilation into users' everyday lives and possible motivational qualities speak of its potential.

  13. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

    2012-10-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In this study, the method is applied to laboratory sessions of a higher education institution course, and the students who act as teachers are referred to as "laboratory monitors." A particular way to select the monitors and its impact in the final marks is proposed. A total of 181 students participated in the experiment, experiences with laboratory monitors are discussed, and methods for motivating and training laboratory monitors and regular students are proposed. The types of laboratory sessions that can be led by classmates are discussed. This work is related to the changes in teaching methods in the Spanish higher education system, prompted by the Bologna Process for the construction of the European Higher Education Area

  14. The lived experience of physically active older prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright-St Clair, Valerie A; Malcolm, Wanda; Keogh, Justin W L

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to explore the lived experiences of physically active prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), who exercise individually. Three older men (74-88 years old) with prostate cancer, using ADT continuously for at least 12 months and regularly exercising for at least 6 months, participated in this qualitative pilot study, informed by interpretive phenomenology. Data were gathered using individual semi-structured interviews, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coherent stories were drawn from each transcript and analyzed using iterative and interpretive methods. van Manen's lifeworld existentials provided a framework for interpreting across the research text. Three notions emerged: Getting started, Having a routine and Being with music. Together they reveal what drew the participants to exercising regularly despite the challenges associated with their cancer and treatments. This study provides insights into the benefits of, and what it means for, older men with prostate cancer to regularly exercise individually. These findings may assist cancer clinicians and other allied health professionals to be more attuned to prostate cancer survivors' lived experiences when undergoing ADT, allowing clinicians to better promote regular exercise to their patients as a foundational component of living well. PMID:23862577

  15. Mediating between practitioner and developer communities: the Learning Activity Design in Education experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel Falconer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The slow uptake by teachers in post-compulsory education of new technological tools and technology- enhanced teaching methods may be symptomatic of a general split in the e-learning community between development of tools, services and standards, and research into how teachers can use these most effectively (i.e. between the teaching practitioner and technical developer communities. This paper reflects on the experience of transferring knowledge and understanding between these two communities during the Learning Activity Design in Education project funded by the UK Joint Information Systems Committee. The discussion is situated within the literature on ‘mediating representations' and ‘mediating artefacts', and shows that the practical operation of mediating representations is far more complex than previously acknowledged. The experience suggests that for effective transfer of concepts between communities, the communities need to overlap to the extent that a single representation is comprehensible to both. This representation may be viewed as a boundary object that is used to negotiate understanding. If the communities do not overlap a chain of intermediate representations and communities may be necessary. Finally, a tentative distinction is drawn between mediating representations and mediating artefacts, based not in the nature of the resources, but in their mode and context of use.

  16. Characterizing soil preferential flow using iodine--starch staining experiments and the active region model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Feng; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen iodine-starch staining experiments with different boundary conditions and measurement scales were conducted at two sites to study preferential flow processes in natural unsaturated soils. Digital imaging analyses were implemented to obtain the corresponding preferential flow patterns. The test results are used to evaluate a recently proposed active region model in terms of its usefulness and robustness for characterizing unsaturated flow processes at field scale. Test results provide useful insights into flow patterns in unsaturated soils. They show that flow pattern depends on the top boundary condition. As the total infiltrating-water depth increased form 20 mm to 80 mm for the 100 x 100 cm{sup 2} plots, the corresponding flow pattern changed from few preferential flow paths associated with a relatively small degree of stained coverage and a small infiltration depth, to a pattern characterized by a higher stained coverage and a larger infiltration depth, and to (finally) a relatively homogeneous flow pattern with few unstained area and a much larger infiltration depth. Test results also show that the preferential flow pattern became generally more heterogeneous and complex for a larger measurement scale (or size of infiltration plot). These observations support the general idea behind the active region model that preferential flow pattern in unsaturated soils are dynamic and depend on water flow conditions. Further analyses of the test results indicate that the active-region model is able to capture the major features of the observed flow pattern at the scale of interest, and the determined parameter values do not significantly depend on the test conditions (initial water content and total amount of infiltrating water) for a given test site. This supports the validity of the active region model that considers that parameter to be a property of the corresponding unsaturated soil. Results also show that some intrinsic relation seems to exist between active

  17. Sentido e experiência no âmbito da atividade cognitiva Meaning and experience in the scope of cognitive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André do Eirado Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo objetiva pensar a posição do problema do sentido em sua relação com a atividade cognitiva no que concerne à questão do significado das metodologias de primeira, segunda e terceira pessoas. Essa relação do sentido com a atividade cognitiva é analisada com a ajuda do pensamento bergsoniano, através do exemplo da percepção da fala. O sentido aparece como um movimento de pensamento que é pressuposto pela atividade cognitiva e não se esgota nela, mas corresponde à multiplicidade mais vasta da experiência e que ultrapassa tanto o eu quanto a experiência que se torna consciente para ele. Propõe-se, então, ligar o problema do sentido àquele das espécies de relação que se entretecem na experiência.The article proposes an examination of the problem of sense in its relation to cognitive activity as it concerns the question of the meaning of methodologies in first, second and third person. This relationship of sense with cognitive activity is analyzed within the perspective of Bergson's thought, through the example of speech perception. The sense appears as a movement of thought that is presupposed by cognitive activity and is not limited to it. In fact, it concerns the largest multiplicity of experience and surpasses both the self and the experience that becomes conscious to him. It is then proposed to connect the problem of sense to that referred to the sorts of relation that are interwoven in experience.

  18. Technique and experiment of active direct gas pressure measurement in coal roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-xi; MA Shang-quan; QI Li-ming

    2009-01-01

    An active measurement method and its principle was introduced considering the low success rate, special difficulty, and long measurement time of the direct gas pres-sure measurement currently used in coal roadways. The technology of drilling, borehole sealing depth, borehole sealing length, sealing control of the measuring process, com-pensatory computation of gas loss quantity and other key techniques were discussed. Fi-nally, based on the latest instrument the authors developed, a series of experiments of di-rect gas pressure measurement in the coal roadways of the Jincheng and Tongchuan mine district, were carried out. The experimental results show that active gas pressure measurement technique has advantages as follows: (1) the application scope of direct gas pressure measurement technique is wide and it does not have the restriction of coal hardness, coal seam fissure and other conditions; (2) the measured results are credible, which can be tested by the same gas pressure value acquired from a different borehole in the same place; (3) the measurement process is convenient and quick, it takes about 2 to 3 days to acquire the gas pressure value in a coal seam.

  19. Effects of early life adverse experiences on brain activity: Implications from maternal separation models in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi eNishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, adverse early life experiences can affect the formation of neuronal circuits and exert long-lasting influences on neural function. Many studies have shown that daily repeated MS, an animal model of early life stress, can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis and can affect subsequent brain function and emotional behavior during adulthood. However, the molecular basis of the long-lasting effects of early life stress on brain function has not been completely elucidated. In this review, we introduce various cases of MS in rodents and illustrate the alterations in HPA axis activity by focusing on corticosterone (CORT, an end product of the HPA axis in rodents. We then present a characterization of the brain regions affected by various patterns of MS, including repeated MS and single time MS at various stages before weaning, by investigating c-Fos expression, a biological marker of neuronal activity. These CORT and c-Fos studies suggest that repeated early life stress may affect neuronal function in region- and temporal-specific manners, indicating a critical period for habituation to early life stress. Next, we discuss how early life stress can impact behavior, namely by inducing depression, anxiety or eating disorders. Furthermore, alterations in gene expression in adult mice exposed to MS, especially epigenetic changes of DNA methylation, are discussed.

  20. Experiences in the promotion of the safety culture in radiological activities in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade, the need to promote and achieve high safety culture levels has been one of the priorities in the nuclear sector around the world, although it has been focused basically on nuclear power. Nevertheless, it is an important and current topic for any risk related activity, since it results in a greater involvement and commitment of managers and personnel to safety, thereby reducing the so called 'organizational failures', one of the most frequent contributors to several of the major industrial disasters in the recent years. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has also pointed that out and in some of its recent publications and meetings has recognized the need for extending this concept to the area of radioactive source. In Cuba, the Regulatory Body has been working in this direction during several years, promoting national research and studies in this field, issuing documents and organizing events and other activities. With this it is expected to introduce new work methods and practices to be applied by management and personnel involved in the use of radioactive sources, reflecting a higher safety culture level. This paper summarizes the experience of Cuban Regulatory Body in this field. (author)

  1. Coronal Radio Sounding Experiments with Mars Express: Scintillation Spectra during Low Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.; Tellmann, S.

    2010-03-01

    Coronal radio sounding observations were carried out with the radio science experiment MaRS on the ESA spacecraft Mars Express during the period from 25 August to 22 October 2004. Differential frequency and log-amplitude fluctuations of the dual-frequency signals were recorded during a period of low solar activity. The data are applicable to low heliographic latitudes, i.e. to slow solar wind. The mean frequency fluctuation and power law index of the frequency fluctuation temporal spectra are determined as a function of heliocentric distance. The radial dependence of the frequency fluctuation spectral index α reflects the previously documented flattening of the scintillation power spectra in the solar wind acceleration region. Temporal spectra of S-band and X-band normalized log-amplitude fluctuations were investigated over the range of fluctuation frequencies 0.01 Hzperiod of high solar activity. Ranging measurements are presented and compared with frequency and log-amplitude scintillation data. Evidence for a weak increase in the fractional electron density turbulence level is obtained in the range 10-40 solar radii.

  2. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  3. Lived experiences of self-care among older physically active urban-living individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundsli K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kari Sundsli,1,2 Geir Arild Espnes,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway, 2Centre for Caring Research, Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway, 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST-NTNU, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Promoting physical activity is a public health priority in most industrial countries, and physical function is an important factor when taking into consideration older people’s self-care and health. Despite the increasing challenges associated with urbanization and the aging population, urban life appears to be positive in many ways for urban dwellers. However, the manner in which older people live in urban settings and how this influences their ability to take care of themselves should be considered important knowledge for health professionals and politicians to acquire. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that may influence health and self-care among older urban home-dwelling individuals who are physically active.Methods: Ten subjects, three women and seven men, who were aged 65–82 years and identified to be physically active, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to the descriptive phenomenological method devised by Giorgi.Results: Our findings showed beneficial self-care. The participants lived active everyday lives and were frequently physically active. They were part of a supportive, inclusive, and promoting fellowship, and they had the opportunity to travel. They utilized their competence and experienced making themselves useful. It was a privilege to be part of a family life as a husband, wife, parent, and/or a grandparent. They

  4. Promotion of physical activity in a developing country: the Agita São Paulo experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudo, Victor; Matsudo, Sandra; Andrade, Douglas; Araujo, Timoteo; Andrade, Erinaldo; de Oliveira, Luis Carlos; Braggion, Glaucia

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present key points of an intervention programme (Agita São Paulo Program) to promote physical activity in a developing country. Agita is a multi-level, community-wide intervention designed to increase knowledge about the benefits and the level of physical activity in a mega-population of 34 million inhabitants of São Paulo State, Brazil. The main message was taken from the Centers for Disease Control/American College of Sports Medicine (CDC/ACSM) recommendation that: 'everyone should accumulate at least 30 minutes of physical activity, on most days of the weeks, of moderate intensity, in one single or in multiple sessions'. Activities were encouraged in three settings: home, transport and leisure time. Focus groups were students from elementary schools through to college, white and blue collar workers, and elderly people. Innovative aspects included: (1) a research centre leading the process, (2) scientific and institutional partnerships (over 160 groups), (3) a feasible approach--the 'one-step-ahead' model, (4) empowerment, (5) inclusion, (6) non-paid media, (7) social marketing, and (8) culture-linked. Data were obtained from 645 random, home-based questionnaires over four years--stratified by sex, age, education and socio-economic level. These data show that the Agita message reached 55.7% of the population, and among these, 23.1% knew the main message. Recall of Agita and knowledge of its purpose were well distributed among different socioeconomic levels, being known by 67% of the most educated. The prevalence of people reaching the recommendation was 54.8% (men 48.7%, women 61%); and risk of being sedentary was quite smaller among those who knew the Agita message (7.1%) compared with those who did not know (13.1%). In conclusion, based upon the Agita São Paulo experience, it appears that a multi-level, community-wide intervention to promote physical activity may obtain good results if the model contains the items listed above

  5. Student Perceptions of Value Added in an Active Learning Experience: Producing, Reviewing and Evaluating a Sales Team Video Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, James J.; Kezim, Boualem; Stewart, James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a video team-based activity as a learning experience in a sales management course. Students perceived this learning activity approach as a beneficial and effective instructional technique. The benefits of making a video in a marketing course reinforce the understanding and the use of the sales process…

  6. Experiment Dashboard - a generic, scalable solution for monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, J.; Cinquilli, M.; Dieguez, D.; Dzhunov, I.; Karavakis, E.; Karhula, P.; Kenyon, M.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Nowotka, M.; Ro, G.; Saiz, P.; Sargsyan, L.; Schovancova, J.; Tuckett, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Experiment Dashboard system provides common solutions for monitoring job processing, data transfers and site/service usability. Over the last seven years, it proved to play a crucial role in the monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services. It has been one of the key elements during the commissioning of the distributed computing systems of the LHC experiments. The first years of data taking represented a serious test for Experiment Dashboard in terms of functionality, scalability and performance. And given that the usage of the Experiment Dashboard applications has been steadily increasing over time, it can be asserted that all the objectives were fully accomplished.

  7. Experiment Dashboard - a generic, scalable solution for monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experiment Dashboard system provides common solutions for monitoring job processing, data transfers and site/service usability. Over the last seven years, it proved to play a crucial role in the monitoring of the LHC computing activities, distributed sites and services. It has been one of the key elements during the commissioning of the distributed computing systems of the LHC experiments. The first years of data taking represented a serious test for Experiment Dashboard in terms of functionality, scalability and performance. And given that the usage of the Experiment Dashboard applications has been steadily increasing over time, it can be asserted that all the objectives were fully accomplished.

  8. Patients’ experiences of using a smartphone application to increase physical activity: the SMART MOVE qualitative study in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Monica; Hayes, Patrick S; Glynn, Fergus; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; Heaney, David; Murphy, Andrew W; Glynn, Liam G

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity is known to help prevent and treat numerous non-communicable diseases. Smartphone applications (apps) have been shown to increase physical activity in primary care but little is known regarding the views of patients using such technology or how such technology may change behaviour. Aim To explore patients’ views and experiences of using smartphones to promote physical activity in primary care. Design and setting This qualitative study was embedded within t...

  9. Does Early Decompressive Craniectomy Improve Outcome? Experience from an Active UK Recruiter Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results of the recent DECRA study suggest that although craniectomy decreases ICP and ICU length of stay, it is also associated with worst outcomes. Our experience, illustrated by these two striking cases, supports that early decompressive craniectomy may significantly improve the outcome in selected patients. Case Reports. The first patient, a 20-year-old man who suffered severe brain contusion and subarachnoid haemorrhage after a fall downstairs, with refractory ICP of 35 mmHg, despite maximal medical therapy, eventually underwent decompressive craniectomy. After 18 days in intensive care, he was discharged for rehabilitation. The second patient, a 23-year-old man was found at the scene of a road accident with a GCS of 3 and fixed, dilated pupils who underwent extensive unilateral decompressive craniectomy for refractory intracranial hypertension. After three weeks of cooling, paralysis, and neuroprotection, he eventually left ICU for rehabilitation. Outcomes. Four months after leaving ICU, the first patient abseiled 40 m down the main building of St. Mary’s Hospital to raise money for the Trauma Unit. He has returned to part-time work. The second patient, was decannulated less than a month later and made a full cognitive recovery. A year later, with a titanium skull prosthesis, he is back to part-time work and to playing football. Conclusions. Despite the conclusions of the DECRA study, our experience of the use of early decompressive craniectomy has been associated with outstanding outcomes. We are currently actively recruiting patients into the RESCUEicp trial and have high hopes that it will clarify the role of the decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury and whether it effectively improves outcomes.

  10. The role of partnerships in promoting physical activity: the experience of Agita São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Strategic partnership is a logical approach to face some of the public health problems. However, its application is somewhat more complex. In this paper our experience with three networks (Agita São Paulo, Physical Activity Network of Americas, and Agita Mundo Network) was described. In the case of Agita São Paulo even the name was a consequence of a partnership with a marketing company, and is an idiomatic expression that means much more than just to move your body. It also means to move psychologically and socially, with the concept of "active citizenship". Among the important features of that intervention, we highlighted: (a) national and international intellectual partnership; (b) strong institutional partnerships, including government in one hand, and non-governmental and private sector in the other hand, in a so called: "two-hats approach"; (c) minimal formalization/maximal flexibility; (d) a signed letter of agreement: an active symbol of institutional commitment; (e) use the "mobile management" adaptation of the ecological model, in which attention was given to intrapersonal, social, and physical environmental factors, in a dynamic way; (f) attention to inter-sectoral as well as to intra-sectoral partners, in which creates incentives for participation of more than one representative from each sector; (g) the inclusion principle, that was not restricted to the institution, but affected the program actions, materials, and particularly the messages; (h) a high level of legitimacy of the coordination institution in the leadership; (i) special attention to improve environment supports for physical activity, such as: strategic partnerships established with the Metro System, that serves over 1 million persons/day; the Truck Drivers Radio Station; the State Secretariat of Environment, that built a walking path around its main building; the city of São Caetano do Sul, with the healthy sidewalk program; the city of Santana do Parnaiba building a walking path

  11. Sensors for the Senses: Meaning-making via self-active entertainment experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Brooks

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In his ACM Computers in Entertainment article, titled "Artist and Audience: Emerging the Nano-entertainment experience", the author posited on how Inhabited Information Spaces, created as core catalyst of research, may be questioned as a multisensory future virtual work of art. This themed Human-Computer Interaction for Entertainment contribution for the EAI INTETAIN 2015 conference builds upon the earlier work by questioning meaning making from such self-active entertainment experiences. Contextually, self-active relates to actor empowerment via ICT, whilst entertainment refers to HCI paradigms that are fun, engaging, and enjoyable. Conceptualizing, designing and realizing alternative digital media entertainment situations in stage performance, interactive installations and exhibitions at leading Museums for Modern Art, National and International major events, contributed to development of a sensor-based system conceived as a platform to investigate meaning making having societal impact beyond art. The system involves arrays of selectable sensor profiles mixed and matched according to requirements. Sensing of human input can be through worn (biosignal e.g. EEG, ECG, EMG, GSR, held, and/or non-worn sensors (volumetric, linear and planar interface profiles. Mapping of sourced human data is to a variety of digital content including art-based (music making, digital painting, lighting effects, video games, Virtual Reality and robotic devices. System adaptability promotes participant profile matching e.g. according to desired outcome. All ages and abilities are potential users. Preceding the commonly known camera-based game controllers such as EyeToy, Wii, and Kinect; the SoundScapes Virtual Interactive Space system has been used in institutes, hospitals and clinics to empower people with impairment to unconsciously push their limits of functionality via creative and playful expression. Rehabilitation is less mundane and boring, where variety of ICT

  12. Utility experiences in redevelopment of formerly used sites -- Wisconsin Electric's risk management and economic development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisconsin Electric Power Company, which recently celebrated its 100th anniversary, has actively promoted the redevelopment of its former sites as well as those of its customers. Serving Milwaukee and southeast Wisconsin, Wisconsin Electric's (WE) sites include former power plants, landfills, right-of-ways, and manufactured gas plant sites. In setting an example for others, as well as seeking to maximize the economic value of these sites, WE has either redeveloped or promoted the redevelopment of these sites by others. Examples include the East Wells Power Plant (now home of the Milwaukee Repertory Theater), the Lakeside Power Plant Site (now the home of Harnischfeger Corporation's headquarters), and the Commerce Street Power Plant located on the Milwaukee River near downtown Milwaukee. In each case the company evaluated the potential environmental liabilities against the unrealized asset value derived from facility location, site size, architectural uniqueness, or other characteristics. At the Commerce Street Power Plant, walking distance to the downtown Milwaukee business district combined with river frontage, were significant site values leveraged against a $5 million asbestos and lead-based paint removal project done to prepare the plant for marketing. More recently, WE has used its experience in promoting the redevelopment of the Menomonee River Valley, the original core of Milwaukee's industrial community, and in advancing a more practical regulatory approach to redeveloping older sites. Finally, the company is working with a non-profit community health clinic, community groups and local foundations in linking these redevelopment activities with the economic and physical health of inner city residents

  13. Neural activity patterns evoked by a spouse's incongruent emotional reactions when recalling marriage-relevant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, Rachel Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2015-10-01

    Resonance with the inner states of another social actor is regarded as a hallmark of emotional closeness. Nevertheless, sensitivity to potential incongruities between one's own and an intimate partner's subjective experience is reportedly also important for close relationship quality. Here, we tested whether perceivers show greater neurobehavioral responsiveness to a spouse's positive (rather than negative) context-incongruent emotions, and whether this effect is influenced by the perceiver's satisfaction with the relationship. Thus, we used fMRI to scan older long-term married female perceivers while they judged either their spouse's or a stranger's affect, based on incongruent nonverbal and verbal cues. The verbal cues were selected to evoke strongly polarized affective responses. Higher perceiver marital satisfaction predicted greater neural processing of the spouse's (rather than the strangers) nonverbal cues. Nevertheless, across all perceivers, greater neural processing of a spouse's (rather than a stranger's) nonverbal behavior was reliably observed only when the behavior was positive and the context was negative. The spouse's positive (rather than negative) nonverbal behavior evoked greater activity in putative mirror neuron areas, such as the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL). This effect was related to a stronger inhibitory influence of cognitive control areas on mirror system activity in response to a spouse's negative nonverbal cues, an effect that strengthened with increasing perceiver marital satisfaction. Our valence-asymmetric findings imply that neurobehavioral responsiveness to a close other's emotions may depend, at least partly, on cognitive control resources, which are used to support the perceiver's interpersonal goals (here, goals that are relevant to relationship stability). PMID:26219536

  14. Physical activity among African American and Latino middle school girls: consistent beliefs, expectations, and experiences across two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W C; Yancey, A K; Leslie, J; Murray, N G; Cummings, S S; Sharkey, S A; Wert, C; James, J; Miles, O; McCarthy, W J

    1999-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major public health concern. Low levels of physical activity are reported in many subgroups of women including adolescent girls. More data are needed to better understand factors related to physical activity participation in adolescent girls. Therefore, we explored adolescent girls' reasons for participating and not participating in physical activity. Two independent samples were taken in California and Texas; the total sample included thirty-four African American and Latino girls. Six focus groups were conducted by trained facilitators. Based on independent qualitative analyses, six replicated themes emerged from the focus groups. Fun, social support, and concern with body image facilitated participation in activity. In contrast, negative experiences in physical education classes, concerns about appearance after activity, and lack of opportunity impeded participation in activity. Overall, the girls showed an interest in physical activity and identified activity motivators and barriers. We discuss the implications of our findings for future research.

  15. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. PMID:27428802

  16. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzitelli, G., E-mail: giuseppe.mazzitelli@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Apicella, M.L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Pericoli-Ridolfini, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A. [JSC “RED STAR”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m{sup 2} with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m{sup 2} for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  17. Perceptual moments of conscious visual experience inferred from oscillatory brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie L; Gosselin, Frédéric; Schyns, Philippe G

    2006-04-01

    Transient periods of synchronized oscillating neuronal discharges in the brain have been proposed to support the discrete perceptual moments underlying conscious visual experience. However, the information content of these perceptual moments remains a critical challenge to the understanding of consciousness. We uncovered this information content in four observers who consciously perceived each interpretation of the ambiguous Dali painting Slave Market with the Disappearing Bust of Voltaire. For each individual observer, we isolated the stimulus spatial frequency (SF) features underlying their overt judgments of the input as "the nuns" and "Voltaire". Every 2 ms between stimulus onset and overt response, we derived the sensitivity of the observer's oscillatory brain activity (in the theta, alpha, and beta bandwidths) to these SF features. Then, in each bandwidth, we estimated the moments (between stimulus onset and perceptual judgment) when perception-specific SF features were maximally integrated, corresponding to perceptual moments. We show that the centroparietal beta oscillations support perceptual moments underlying the conscious perception of the nuns, whereas theta oscillations support the perception of Voltaire. For both perceptions, we reveal the specific information content of these perceptual moments. PMID:16567643

  18. Status of PAR Installation in Korean NPPs and Experiences in Regulatory Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Jae; Sung, Key Yong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Following TMI-2 and Chernobyl accidents, concerns on the safety problems of nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been increased, especially for severe accident phenomena including hydrogen risk. To reduce the potential of hydrogen combustion, much of international efforts have been made for decades and it resulted in development of an innovative device, i.e. passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), for hydrogen removal in containment during an accident. On the designing and implementing a PAR, Bachellerie et al. provided a good instruction. Actually not only most new NPP designs but also NPPs to be refurbished are considering the installation of PARs for hydrogen control following a design basis accident (DBA) and severe accident (SA). For some Korean NPPs, the utility, KHNP, also has decided to equip PARs in containment and KINS has performed relevant regulatory reviews and preoperational inspections. In this paper, the status of PAR installation in Korean NPPs and KINS' experiences in regulatory activities including onsite findings as well as some recommendations, are described

  19. Enriched TeO$_2$ bolometers with active particle discrimination: towards the CUPID experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Artusa, D R; Beeman, J W; Dafinei, I; Dumoulin, L; Ge, Z; Giuliani, A; Gotti, C; de Marcillac, P; Marnieros, S; Nagorny, S; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Novati, V; Olivieri, E; Orlandi, D; Pagnanini, L; Pattavina, L; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Poda, D V; Rusconi, C; Schäffner, K; Scielzo, N D; Zhu, Y

    2016-01-01

    We present the performances of two 92% enriched $^{130}$TeO$_2$ crystals operated as thermal bolometers in view of a next generation experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{130}$Te. The crystals, 435 g each, show an energy resolution, evaluated at the 2615 keV $\\gamma$-line of $^{208}$Tl, of 6.5 and 4.3 keV FWHM. The only observable internal radioactive contamination arises from $^{238}$U (15 and 8 $\\mu$Bq/kg, respectively). The internal activity of the most problematic nuclei for neutrinoless double beta decay, $^{226}$Ra and $^{228}$Th, are both evaluated as $<$3.1 $\\mu$Bq/kg for one crystal and $<$2.3 $\\mu$Bq/kg for the second. Thanks to the readout of the weak Cherenkov light emitted by $\\beta/\\gamma$ particles by means of Neganov-Luke bolometric light detectors we were able to perform an event-by-event identification of $\\beta/\\gamma$ events with a 95% acceptance level, while establishing a rejection factor of 98.21% and 99.99% for $\\alpha$ particles.

  20. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: A national study

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain under-investigated. Further, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of pe...

  1. Characteristic analysis of rotor dynamics and experiments of active magnetic bearing for HTR-10GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) at Tsinghua University of China. The helium turbine and generator system of 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10GT) is the second phase for the HTR-10 project. It is to set up a direct helium cycle to replace the current steam cycle. The active magnetic bearing (AMB) instead of ordinary mechanical bearing was chosen to support the rotor in the HTR-10GT. This rotor is vertically mounted to hold the turbine machine, compressors and the power generator together. The rotor's length is 7 m, its weight is about 1500 kg and the rotating speed is 15,000 rpm. The structure of the rotor is so complicated that dynamic analysis of the rotor becomes difficult. One of the challenging problems is to exceed natural frequencies with enough stability and safety during reactor start up, power change and shutdown. The dynamic analysis of the rotor is the base for the design of control system. It is important for the rotor to exceed critical speeds. Some kinds of softwares and methods, such as MSC.Marc, Ansys, and the transfer matrix method (TMM), are compared to fully analyze rotor dynamics characteristic in this paper. The modal analysis has been done for the HTR-10GT rotor. MSC.Marc was finally selected to analyze the vibration mode and the natural frequency of the rotor. The effects of AMB stiffness on the critical speeds of the rotor were studied. The design characteristics of the AMB control system for the HTR-10GT were studied and the related experiment to exceed natural frequencies was introduced. The experimental results demonstrate the system functions and validate the control scheme, which will be used in the HTR-10GT project

  2. Characteristic analysis of rotor dynamics and experiments of active magnetic bearing for HTR-10GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) at Tsinghua University of China. The helium turbine and generator system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10GT) is the second phase for the HTR-10 project. It is to set up a direct helium cycle to replace the current steam cycle. The active magnetic bearing (AMB) instead of ordinary mechanical bearing was chosen to support the rotor in the HTR-10GT. This rotor is vertically mounted to hold the turbine machine, compressors and the power generator together. The rotor's length is 7 m, its weight is about 1500 kg and the rotating speed is 15000 r/min. The structure of the rotor is so complicated that dynamic analysis of the rotor becomes difficult. One of the challenging problems is to exceed natural frequencies with enough stability and safety during reactor start up, power change and shutdown. The dynamic analysis of the rotor is the base for the design of control system. It is important for the rotor to exceed critical speeds. Some kinds of software and methods, such as MSC.Marc, Ansys, and the Transfer Matrix Method, are compared to fully analyze rotor dynamics characteristic in this paper. The modal analysis has been done for the HTR-10GT rotor. MSC.Marc was finally selected to analyze the vibration mode and the natural frequency of the rotor. The effects of AMB stiffness on the critical speeds of the rotor were studied. The design characteristics of the AMB control system for the HTR-10GT were studied and the related experiment to exceed natural frequencies was introduced. The experimental results demonstrate the system functions and validate the control scheme, which will be used in the HTR-10GT project. (authors)

  3. Alkaline phosphatase activity in the subtropical ocean: insights from nutrient, dust and trace metal addition experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMahaffey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all life on earth. In the ocean, the most bioavailable form of phosphorus is inorganic phosphate, but in the extensive subtropical gyres, phosphate concentrations can be chronically low and limit primary productivity and nitrogen fixation. In these regions, organisms produce hydrolytic enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase (AP, that enable them to utilize the more replete dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP pool to meet their cellular phosphorus demands. In this study, we synthesized data from 14 published studies and present our own findings from two research cruises (D326 and D361 in the eastern subtropical Atlantic to explore the relationship between AP activity (APA and nutrients, Saharan dust and trace metals. We found that below a threshold phosphate concentration of ~ 30 nM, APA increased with an inverse hyperbolic relationship with phosphate concentration. Meanwhile, DOP concentrations decreased with enhanced APA, indicating utilization of the DOP pool. We found APA rates were significantly higher in the subtropical Atlantic compared to the subtropical Pacific Ocean, even over the same low phosphate concentration range (0 to 50 nM. While the phosphate concentration may have a first order control on the APA rates, we speculate that other factors influence this basin scale contrast. Using bioassay experiments, we show that the addition of Saharan dust and zinc significantly increased the rate of APA. To our knowledge, our results are the first direct field-based evidence that APA is limited by zinc in the subtropical ocean. Further work is required to explore the relationship between trace metals such as iron and zinc, which are co-factors of phosphohydrolytic enzymes, specifically PhoX and PhoA, respectively, and APA in the ocean.

  4. Seagrasses are negatively affected by organic matter loading and Arenicola marina activity in a laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, Laura L; Pieck, Timon; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Suykerbuyk, Wouter; Smolders, Alfons J P; van Katwijk, Marieke M

    2014-06-01

    When two ecosystem engineers share the same natural environment, the outcome of their interaction will be unclear if they have contrasting habitat-modifying effects (e.g., sediment stabilization vs. sediment destabilization). The outcome of the interaction may depend on local environmental conditions such as season or sediment type, which may affect the extent and type of habitat modification by the ecosystem engineers involved. We mechanistically studied the interaction between the sediment-stabilizing seagrass Zostera noltii and the bioturbating and sediment-destabilizing lugworm Arenicola marina, which sometimes co-occur for prolonged periods. We investigated (1) if the negative sediment destabilization effect of A. marina on Z. noltii might be counteracted by positive biogeochemical effects of bioirrigation (burrow flushing) by A. marina in sulfide-rich sediments, and (2) if previously observed nutrient release by A. marina bioirrigation could affect seagrasses. We tested the individual and combined effects of A. marina presence and high porewater sulfide concentrations (induced by organic matter addition) on seagrass biomass in a full factorial lab experiment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find an effect of A. marina on porewater sulfide concentrations. A. marina activities affected the seagrass physically as well as by pumping nutrients, mainly ammonium and phosphate, from the porewater to the surface water, which promoted epiphyte growth on seagrass leaves in our experimental set-up. We conclude that A. marina bioirrigation did not alleviate sulfide stress to seagrasses. Instead, we found synergistic negative effects of the presence of A. marina and high sediment sulfide levels on seagrass biomass. PMID:24633960

  5. Maximizing Mission Science Return Through use of Spacecraft Autonomy: Active Volcanism and the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S.; Davies, A. G.; Sherwood, R.; ASE Science Team

    2005-08-01

    Deep-space missions have been unable to react to dynamic events as encounter observation sequences are planned well in advance. In the case of planet, asteroid and comet fly-bys, the limited resources available are allocated to individual instruments long beforehand. However, for monitoring or mapping mission phases, alternative strategies and technologies are now available. Now, onboard data processing allows greater spacecraft and instrument flexibility, affording the ability to react rapidly to dynamic events, and increasing the science content of returned data. Such new technology has already been successfully demonstrated in the form of the New Millennium Program Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE). In 2004 ASE successfully demonstrated advanced autonomous science data acquisition, processing, and product downlink prioritization, as well as autonomous fault detection and spacecraft command and control. ASE is software onboard the EO-1 spacecraft, in Earth-orbit. ASE controlled the Hyperion instrument, a hyperspectral imager with 220 wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.5 μm and 30 m/pixel spatial resolution. ASE demonstrated that spacecraft autonomy will be advantageous to future missions by making the best use of limited downlink, e.g., by increasing science content per byte of returned data, and by avoiding the return of null (no-change/no feature) datasets. and by overcoming communication delays through decision-making onboard enabling fast reaction to dynamic events. We envision this flight-proven science-driven spacecraft command-and-control technology being used on a wide range of missions to search for and monitor dynamic events, such as active, high-temperature volcanism on Earth and Io, and cryovolcanism on Triton and possibly other icy satellites. Acknowledgements: Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the EO-1 Flight Management Team and Chris Stevens and Art

  6. Past and recent activities in public communication on L/ILW disposal - Hungarian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four main priorities for the coming years in the field of the nuclear waste management: safety upgrading of the near surface L/ILW repository; construction a new repository for L/ILW of NPP origin; expanding the interim storage capacity for spent fuel, and identifying a site for a high-level waste repository. In Hungary, the L/ILW siting rounds to date reflect a gradual realization of the realities of public acceptability problems. When implementing these programmes one of the prerequisites is to ensure transparency with adequate communication. Past experience has taught us that when developing siting strategy, understanding of people's values is paramount of importance, and should be articulated as early as possible. Regarding the local public relations activities, the fundamental aim of all actions, events and programmes has been to establish a long term relationship between the local communities that are willing to cooperate, and to continuously keep the local residents interested and confident in the development. The lessons we learnt during some previous abortive projects are: public support depends upon the continued provision of non-nuclear benefits for the community, and that a win-win situation should be offered with emphasis on maximising joint gains which leaves them better off. In short, our strategy has been: to turn NIMBY into FLIMBY (For as Long as it Improves My Back Yard). That is the base fore cooperation. But we never compromise the fundamental principle that is safety first. Consequently volunteerism is searched for after identifying potential suitable areas. The paper spells out the approach to volunteerism and openness being followed in the new siting project. (author)

  7. Cosmogenic-neutron activation of TeO2 and implications for neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Barbara S; Scielzo, Nicholas D; Smith, Alan R; Thomas, Keenan J; Wender, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Flux-averaged cross sections for cosmogenic-neutron activation of natural tellurium were measured using a neutron beam containing neutrons of kinetic energies up to $\\sim$800 MeV, and having an energy spectrum similar to that of cosmic-ray neutrons at sea-level. Analysis of the radioisotopes produced reveals that 110mAg will be a dominant contributor to the cosmogenic-activation background in experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, such as CUORE and SNO+. An estimate of the cosmogenic-activation background in the CUORE experiment has been obtained using the results of this measurement and cross-section measurements of proton activation of tellurium. Additionally, the measured cross sections in this work are also compared with results from semi-empirical cross-section calculations.

  8. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  9. Experience in judging intent to harm modulates parahippocampal activity: an fMRI study with experienced CCTV operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Karin; McAleer, Phil; Neary, Catherine; Gillard, Julia; Pollick, Frank E

    2014-08-01

    Does visual experience in judging intent to harm change our brain responses? And if it does, what are the mechanisms affected? We addressed these questions by studying the abilities of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) operators, who must identify the presence of hostile intentions using only visual cues in complex scenes. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess which brain processes are modulated by CCTV experience. To this end we scanned 15 CCTV operators and 15 age and gender matched novices while they watched CCTV videos of 16 sec, and asked them to report whether each clip would end in violence or not. We carried out four separate whole-brain analyses including 3 model-based analyses and one analysis of intersubject correlation to examine differences between the two groups. The three model analyses were based on 1) experimentally pre-defined clip activity labels of fight, confrontation, playful, and neutral behaviour, 2) participants' reports of violent outcomes during the scan, and 3) visual saliency within each clip, as pre-assessed using eye-tracking. The analyses identified greater activation in the right superior frontal gyrus for operators than novices when viewing playful behaviour, and reduced activity for operators in comparison with novices in the occipital and temporal regions, irrespective of the type of clips viewed. However, in the parahippocampal gyrus, all three model-based analyses consistently showed reduced activity for experienced CCTV operators. Activity in the anterior part of the parahippocampal gyrus (uncus) was found to increase with years of CCTV experience. The intersubject correlation analysis revealed a further effect of experience, with CCTV operators showing correlated activity in fewer brain regions (superior and middle temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule and the ventral striatum) than novices. Our results indicate that long visual experience in action observation, aimed to predict harmful behaviour

  10. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  11. Role of Creative Activity in the Formation of Professional and Personal Experience of the Future Music Teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Popovych

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated and substantiated the role of creative activity in the formation of professional and personal experience of the future music teacher. It was determined that the creative activity as a complex personality formation acts as a prerequisite and the result of musical and educational activities, provides an unusual approach and creative solution of professional problems. It is proved that the high level of creative activity is determined by positive motivation, strong interest and focus on music and teaching activities, expression of emotions and significant willpower, self-reliance, initiative, imagination, the ability to perform the academic tasks in a non-standard way, and the availability of adequate self-assessment of one’s own musical abilities and professional activities.

  12. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; He, Biyu J; Hagmann, Patric; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  13. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ponce-Alvarez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  14. The Effect of Selected Preschool Activities on the Success of Reading Comprehension: A Turkish Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenk, Suleyman

    2003-01-01

    Considers how reading and writing experiences gained during the preschool period have enormous effect on children's first learning to read and write. Initiates a cross-cultural dimension to the subject matter from an empirical paradigm. Provides some evidence that emergent literacy is extensible to experiences regardless of linguistic forms. (SG)

  15. Role of Online Teaching Experience in Pedagogical Innovation in LIS Education: An Activity-Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the role of online teaching experience in pedagogical innovation in the area of Library and Information Science (LIS) education. Based on the data from interviews with 25 LIS faculty who have relevant experience and from the syllabi for their courses, the study provides evidence that transitioning courses to online modality…

  16. Physical Education Teacher Education Students' Knowledge, Perceptions and Experiences of Promoting Healthy, Active Lifestyles in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical education teacher education (PETE) offers a context for students to learn about the promotion of active lifestyles in secondary schools through their interactions and experiences during the teacher education process. However, previous studies have found low levels of health-related fitness knowledge amongst PETE students,…

  17. Learning Loops--Interactions between Guided Reflection and Experience-Based Learning in a Serious Game Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, B.; Heikura, T.; Ravaja, N.

    2013-01-01

    In a study on experience-based learning in serious games, 45 players were tested for topic comprehension by a questionnaire administered before and after playing the single-player serious game Peacemaker (Impact Games 2007). Players were divided into two activity conditions: 20 played a 1-h game with a 3-min half-time break to complete an affect…

  18. Removal of Aromatic Pollutant Surrogate from Water by Recyclable Magnetite-Activated Carbon Nanocomposite: An Experiment for General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Melcer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment using readily available chemicals is described to introduce college students to an exciting class of nanocomposite materials. In a one-step room temperature synthetic process, magnetite nanoparticles are embedded onto activated carbon matrix. The resultant nanocomposite has been shown to combine the…

  19. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  20. The Impact of Engagement with Extracurricular Activities on the Student Experience and Graduate Outcomes for Widening Participation Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Lido, Catherine; Morgan, Jessica; Solomon, Lucy; May, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This research examined extracurricular activity (ECA) effects on students' experiences, outcomes and future job prospects. A survey of diverse undergraduate students, along with alumni and potential employer interviews, revealed differences in students' engagement with ECAs beyond the classroom. Variations between "traditional" and "widening…

  1. Experience, Intersubjectivity, and Reflection: A Human Science Perspective on Preparation of Future Professionals in Adaptive Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standal, Øyvind F.; Rugseth, Gro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show that and how philosophy and philosophical thinking can be of relevance for the preparation of future professionals in adaptive physical activity. To this end we utilize philosophical insights from the human science perspective on two central issues, namely experience and intersubjectivity, which are weaved…

  2. MOJAVE: Monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. XI. Spectral distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovatta, Talvikki [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Clausen-Brown, Eric; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Homan, Daniel C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023 (United States); Lister, Matthew L., E-mail: thovatta@caltech.edu [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have obtained milliarcsecond-scale spectral index distributions for a sample of 190 extragalactic radio jets through the Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with the VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) project. The sources were observed in 2006 at 8.1, 8.4, 12.1, and 15.4 GHz, and we have determined spectral index maps between 8.1 and 15.4 GHz to study the four-frequency spectrum in individual jet features. We have performed detailed simulations to study the effects of image alignment and (u, v)-plane coverage on the spectral index maps to verify our results. We use the spectral index maps to study the spectral index evolution along the jet and determine the spectral distributions in different locations of the jets. The core spectral indices are on average flat with a mean value of +0.22 ± 0.03 for the sample, while the jet spectrum is in general steep with a mean index of –1.04 ± 0.03. A simple power-law fit is often inadequate for the core regions, as expected if the cores are partially self-absorbed. The overall jet spectrum steepens at a rate of about –0.001 to –0.004 per deprojected parsec when moving further out from the core with flat spectrum radio quasars having significantly steeper spectra (mean –1.09 ± 0.04) than the BL Lac objects (mean –0.80 ± 0.05). However, the spectrum in both types of objects flattens on average by ∼0.2 at the locations of the jet components indicating particle acceleration or density enhancements along the jet. The mean spectral index at the component locations of –0.81 ± 0.02 corresponds to a power-law index of ∼2.6 for the electron energy distribution. We find a significant trend that jet components with linear polarization parallel to the jet (magnetic field perpendicular to the jet) have flatter spectra, as expected for transverse shocks. Compared to quasars, BL Lacs have more jet components with perpendicular magnetic field alignment, which may explain their generally flatter spectra. The overall

  3. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Saggio, Guillaume

    2010-10-04

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning. Hence, the active tantalum hydride sites that show greater resistance to oxygen poisoning correspond to the νTa-H bands of higher wavenumbers, particularly that at 1860cm-1. These active tantalum hydride sites should correspond to tris- or monohydride species relatively far from silica surface oxygen atoms. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Foreign Experience of Activity of Chambers of Commerce and Industry and Prospects of its Introduction in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrova Bohdana V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article conducts analysis of foreign experience of activity of chambers of commerce and industry under conditions of market economy. It studies specific features of its formation and establishment in the countries of European Union and Commonwealth of Independent States. In particular, it analyses activity of chambers of commerce and industry of Germany, Denmark, Great Britain, Russia, Moldova and Belarus. It considers continental, anglo-saxon, state and mixed models of activity of a chamber of commerce and industry. It identifies specific features of functioning of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Ukraine. Having analysed the progressive experience, it offers measures for improvement of the procedure of interaction of business with the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Ukraine at the national, regional and branch levels.

  5. Subjective Experiences of an Art Museum Engagement Activity for Persons with Early Alzheimer’s disease and their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Jason D.; Liptak, Amy; Oakley, Mary Ann; Gogan, Jessica; Varner, Tresa; Lingler, Jennifer H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the subjective experiences of older adults with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease or related cognitive disorders (ADRD) and their family caregivers who participated in an art museum engagement activity. Methods Four focus groups were conducted with 10 persons with ADRD and 10 family caregivers following the completion one-time, three hour engagement activity. Participants also completed a brief satisfaction survey, and associations were examined using nonparametric statistics. Results Three key themes were identified: cognitive stimulation, social connections, and a sense of self. In addition, we identified programmatic issues such as activity-specific concerns and program logistics that could help improve future art program offerings. Past experience with art and perceived social cohesion were correlated with participants’ overall satisfaction with the program. Discussion Efforts aimed at improving the quality of life of those with Alzheimer’s and their family caregivers should consider the potential role of art museums. PMID:25216658

  6. Flow Experience as a Quality Measure in Evaluating Physically Activating Collaborative Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian J. M. Kiili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the subjective playing experience is important part of the game development process. The enjoyment level that a serious game offers is a key factor in determining whether a player will be engaged in the gameplay and achieve the objectives of the game. In this paper we report the results of a game design process in which two prototypes of a collaborative exergame were studied. The main aim of the paper is to explore to what extend the measurement of flow experience can facilitate the game evaluation and design process. Alltogether 102 junior high school students participated in two user experience studies and played collaborative exergames designed to teach soft skills. Playing experience was measured with a flow questionnaire, playing behavior was observed and some of the players were interviewed. The results showed that flow experience can be used to evaluate the overall quality of the gameplay and it provides a structured approach to consider the quality of the game. However, flow does not provide detailed information about the shortages of the game and thus complementary methods is needed to identify the causes. The results also indicated that flow experience was independent of gender that supports its use in quality measurement.

  7. Elaboration of procedure for analysis of industrial and economic activities: the experience of LUKoil petroleum company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and engineering centre within LUKoil company for economic studies has elaborated a method permitting analysis of production and economic activities of the LUKOIL petroleum production complex. The method envisages the following trends of analysis: general assessment of production and economic activities, analysis of basic production assets, manpower and wages use, net cost of marketable products, the state of finances, as well as specific features in analyzing the activities undertaken by joint ventures

  8. The Lived Experiences of Participating in Physical Activity among Young People with Mental Health Problems. A Recovery-Oriented Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staal Anna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing understanding that psychiatric treatment is more than psychotherapy and medication, and that people themselves can be active in preventing and handling mental health problems. This brings non-medical solutions into play. Physical activity (in terms of exercise, sport, and fitness becomes an important contribution in this particular context. The perceived mental and physical benefits of physical activity (both preventative and therapeutic for people experiencing mental health problems are well documented. Typically, this kind of research focuses narrowly on “size of effect” or “most successful type of intervention” or “exercise versus other treatment.” Less research has explored the lived experience of physical activity and the meaning and relevance it has for individuals in their everyday lives. This article suggests that sport and exercise can play a valuable role in and contribute to the recovery process for young people with mental health problems. Results from an evaluation study of a developmental project in Denmark shows how physical activity affects a person‟s lived experiences, relationships, and pursuits. The findings is discussed in relation to the concept of recovery, especially focusing on exercise as a form of self-care strategy, as an opportunity to create social relationships, and as a way to become part of a meaningful social activity.

  9. A Conceptual Framework for Organizing Active Learning Experiences in Biology Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory biology courses form a cornerstone of undergraduate instruction. However, the predominantly used lecture approach fails to produce higher-order biology learning. Research shows that active learning strategies can increase student learning, yet few biology instructors use all identified active learning strategies. In this paper, we…

  10. Experiences of activity measurements of primary circuit materials in a WWR-SM research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of water and gas samples taken from the primary circuit have been measured nondestructively for more than two years to monitor the technological parameters of the reactor. In the primary water samples 17 fission products and seven activated traces, as well as six radioactive conponents in the gas samples were determined routinely by Ge/Li gamma-spectrometry. (author)

  11. Why and how physical activity promotes experience-induced brain plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd eKempermann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is an unusual case of brain plasticity, since new neurons (and not just neurites and synapses are added to the network in an activity-dependent way. At the behavioral level the plasticity-inducing stimuli include both physical and cognitive activity. In reductionistic animal studies these types of activity can be studied separately in paradigms like voluntary wheel running and environmental enrichment. In both of these, adult neurogenesis is increased but the net effect is primarily due to different mechanisms at the cellular level. Locomotion appears to stimulate the precursor cells, from which adult neurogenesis originates, to increased proliferation and maintenance over time, whereas environmental enrichment, as well as learning, predominantly promotes survival of immature neurons, that is the progeny of the proliferating precursor cells. Surprisingly, these effects are additive: boosting the potential for adult neurogenesis by physical activity increases the recruitment of cells following cognitive stimulation in an enriched environment. Why is that? We argue that locomotion actually serves as an intrinsic feedback mechanism, signaling to the brain, including its neural precursor cells, that the likelihood of cognitive challenges increases. In the wild (other than in front of a TV, no separation of physical and cognitive activity occurs. Physical activity might thus be much more than a generally healthy garnish to leading an active life but an evolutionarily fundamental aspect of activity, which is needed to provide the brain and its systems of plastic adaptation with the appropriate regulatory input and feedback.

  12. A cerium glass fiber-optic active target for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-optic plate imaging system has been developed for active target and tracking applications, in which the active element is Ce(3+) in a silicate glass. Particle tracks and interactions have been recorded with a hit density of /approx gt/4/mm for minimum ionizing particles and with a spatial resolution σ /similar to/ 28μm

  13. EXPERIENCE OF THE CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY MANAGEMENT AT THE INSTITUTE OF RADIATION HYGIENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Simonova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the Institute of Radiation Hygiene educational activity during two and a half year since receiving a license are addressed in the article. Possibilities and approaches to the conduction of traditional and some unique training cycles are shown. Possible ways of educational activity enhancement are proposed.

  14. Expanding the Foci of Activity Theory: Accessing the Broader Contexts and Experiences of Mathematics Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Hamsa; Adler, Jill

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider our use of activity theory to examine empirical data from a study of reform in England--the implementation of the mathematics strand of the Key Stage 3 Strategy in two schools. Our concerns are largely methodological--we consider the aspects of reform that more traditional activity theory methods and foci were able to…

  15. Flow Experience as a Quality Measure in Evaluating Physically Activating Collaborative Serious Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian J. M. Kiili; Arttu Perttula; Antero Lindstedt; Sylester Arnab; Marko Suominen

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the subjective playing experience is important part of the game development process. The enjoyment level that a serious game offers is a key factor in determining whether a player will be engaged in the gameplay and achieve the objectives of the game. In this paper we report the results of a game design process in which two prototypes of a collaborative exergame were studied. The main aim of the paper is to explore to what extend the measurement of flow experience can facil...

  16. The passive and active nature of ocean heat uptake in idealized climate change experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Peng; Vallis, Geoffrey K. [Princeton University, AOS Program, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-02-15

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on heat uptake is explored using a simply-configured primitive equation ocean model resembling a very idealized Atlantic Ocean. We focus on the relative importance of the redistribution of the existing heat reservoir (due to changes in the circulation) and the contribution from anomalous surface heat flux, in experiments in which the surface boundary conditions are changed. We perform and analyze numerical experiments over a wide range of parameters, including experiments that simulate global warming and others that explore the robustness of our results to more general changes in surface boundary conditions. We find that over a wide range of values of diapycnal diffusivity and Southern Ocean winds, and with a variety of changes in surface boundary conditions, the spatial patterns of ocean temperature anomaly are nearly always determined as much or more by the existing heat reservoir redistribution than by the nearly passive uptake of temperature due to changes in the surface boundary conditions. Calculating heat uptake by neglecting the existing reservoir redistribution, which is similar to treating temperature as a passive tracer, leads to significant quantitative errors notably at high-latitudes and, secondarily, in parts of the main thermocline. Experiments with larger circulation changes tend to produce a relatively larger magnitude of existing reservoir redistribution, and a faster growing effective heat capacity of the system. The effective heat capacity is found to be sensitive to both vertical diffusivity and Southern Ocean wind. (orig.)

  17. Pupils as Active Participants: Diamond Ranking as a Tool to Investigate Pupils' Experiences of Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Reetta; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a pedagogical action research initiative carried out in a Finnish primary school. Twenty-four 5th grade pupils and their teacher participated in the study. The research initiative was guided by two questions: (1) How do pupils experience their classroom practices? (2) How can pupils participate in the process of developing…

  18. Natural Interactions in Artifical Situations: Focus Groups as an Active Social Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    the interactions going on in the group can be described as natural occurring data (cf. Silverman, 2007). Thus this approach comes to terms with some of the problems addressed within both positivistic as well as constructivist uses of focus group methods. Secondly, framing focus groups as social experiments also...

  19. Immigrants as Active Citizens: Exploring the Volunteering Experience of Chinese Immigrants in Vancouver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shibao

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that immigration has played an important role in transforming Canada into an ethno-culturally diverse and economically prosperous nation, immigrants themselves are often criticised as passive citizens. This study attempts to deconstruct this myth by investigating the volunteering experiences of Chinese immigrants in Vancouver. The…

  20. Online Social Networks as Formal Learning Environments: Learner Experiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, George; Navarrete, Cesar C.

    2012-01-01

    While the potential of social networking sites to contribute to educational endeavors is highlighted by researchers and practitioners alike, empirical evidence on the use of such sites for formal online learning is scant. To fill this gap in the literature, we present a case study of learners' perspectives and experiences in an online course…

  1. Group Project Work and Student-centered Active Learning: Two Different Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, David; Lynch, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Compared experiences with group-based student projects in a Geographical Information Systems degree taught by one faculty member and in geography degree modules taught by another. Concludes that care must be taken in the design and execution of these projects to avoid problems that might reinforce myths about negative effects of team-based…

  2. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühring, Solveig I.; Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Kamp, Anja;

    2006-01-01

    investigated the pathway of settling particulate organic carbon through the benthic food web. The diatom Ditylum brightwellii was labelled with the stable carbon isotope 13C and injected into incubation chambers. On-board incubations lasted 12, 30 and 132 h, while the in situ experiment was incubated for 32 h...

  3. Impact of an outdoor gym on park users' physical activity: A natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranney, Leonie; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Kariuki, Maina; Stride, Vicki; Scott, Ashleigh; Hua, Myna; Bauman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of an outdoor gym installation on park users' physical activity levels and examined the characteristics of outdoor gym users. A before-after time series design was employed, consisting of nine data collection periods: three each at baseline, post outdoor gym installation, and at 12-month follow-up. Repeated observational surveys and park intercept interviews were conducted. There was a small but significant increase in senior park users engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity at follow-up (1.6 to 5.1%; pgym area for: MVPA (6 to 40%; pgyms on physical activity outcomes.

  4. Scoring inflammatory activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a multireader experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Cédric; Braun, Jürgen; van der Heijde, Désirée;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is increasingly important in the assessment of inflammatory activity in clinical trials with patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We investigated feasibility, inter-reader reliability, sensitivity to change, and discriminatory ability...... the Ankylosing Spondylitis spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging-activity [ASspiMRI-a, grading activity (0-6) per vertebral unit in 23 units]; the Berlin modification of the ASspiMRI-a; and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) scoring system, which scores the 6 vertebral units considered...

  5. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented, but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain underinvestigated. Furthermore, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non-veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of individuals in recovery (N = 3,208), we compare addiction and recovery experiences among veterans (n = 481) and non-veterans. Veterans' addiction phase was 4 years longer than non-veterans and they experienced significantly more financial and legal problems. Dramatic improvements in functioning were observed across the board in recovery with subgroup differences leveling off. We discuss possible strategies to address the specific areas where veterans are most impaired in addiction and note study limitations including the cross-sectional design. PMID:24783976

  6. MOJAVE: monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. V. Multi-epoch VLBA images

    OpenAIRE

    Lister, M. L.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Cohen, M. H.; Homan, D. C.; Kadler, M.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Ros, E.; Savolainen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Vermeulen, R. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present images from a long-term program (MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with VLBA Experiments) to survey the structure and evolution of parsec-scale jet phenomena associated with bright radio-loud active galaxies in the northern sky. The observations consist of 2424 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images of a complete flux-density-limited sample of 135 AGNs above declination –20°, spanning the period 1994 August to 2007 September. These data were acquire...

  7. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes.

  8. Participation in physical and social activities among home-dwelling persons with dementia – experiences of next of kin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn U

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulrika Söderhamn,1 Bjørg Landmark,2,3 Sissel Eriksen,2 Olle Söderhamn11Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Institute of Research and Development for Nursing and Care Services, Municipality of Drammen, Drammen, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, NorwayIntroduction: To be next of kin to a home-dwelling person with dementia is known to be a heavy burden, especially early in the process. Studies have revealed a need for information and support during the disease process. Likewise, there is support for the positive impacts of physical and social activities for wellbeing in home-dwelling people with dementia. It is important to obtain experiences from next of kin whose spouses or parents participate in such physical and social activities.Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of next of kin to home-dwelling persons in an early stage of dementia who had an opportunity to participate in organized physical and social activities.Method: The study has a qualitative design. Focus group interviews were conducted with ten next of kin to home-dwelling dementia sufferers, who participated in physical and social activities in an activity center. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Findings: In the analysis, two categories emerged: "a break in the everyday" and "being attended and cared about." Two sub-categories identified in each of the two main categories were: "need of relief" and "meaningful activities;" and "being confirmed" and "sharing experiences and getting advice and help," respectively. These categories were interpreted in an overall theme: "contentment with adapted activities and group meetings provided with a person-centered approach."Conclusion: Adapted physical and social activities led by highly qualified personnel can provide needed relief and support to the next of kin, and

  9. Management experience on microthrix parvicella bulking in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated sludge wastewater treatment processes may give inefficiencies due to biological imbalances involving biomass. In fact, external causes as temperature lowering can increase the proliferation of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella into activated sludge flocks. Microthrix parvicella increases may create dangerous bulking phenomena compromising secondary settling without varying bio-kinetic parameters. In this case of study, a method to defeat growth of Microthrix parvicella has been set up. Aluminium poly-chloride (PAC) has been added to activated sludge contained into oxidation tanks of a municipal wastewater treatment plant, where a large growth of Microthrix parvicella has been periodically observed. It has been demonstrated that a definite PAC concentration can reduce Microthrix parvicella proliferation into activated sludge flocks so bulking phenomena can be well reduced

  10. Model-Based Control Design for Flexible Rotors Supported by Active Gas Bearings - Theory & Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo

    the critical speeds. In order to overcome such limitations, a mechatronic device has been proposed as a possible solution. This device named "hybrid active radial gas bearing" or simply "active gas bearing", combines an aerodynamic gas journal bearing with piezoelectrically controlled injectors. In the present...... the effect of external pressurization. In order to validate the theoretical model, a test rig is used, which consists of a flexible rotor supported by a ball bearing and the active gas bearing. This thesis has three main focuses and original contributions: Firstly, contribute to improving a existing...... theoretical model for active gas bearings, with special attention to the modelling of the injection system. Secondly, experimentally validate the improved mathematical model in terms of static properties (journal equilibrium position and resulting aerodynamic forces) and dynamic properties (natural...

  11. Is the experience of meaningful activities understood in nursing homes? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Gómez-Calero, Cristina; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Velarde-García, Juan Francisco; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Pérez-De-Heredia, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Lack of occupation can lead to boredom, apathy, social exclusion and solitude. Occupation should incorporate meaningful activities. The aim of this study is to describe how Spanish Nursing Home residents experienced and made sense of meaningful activities. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2012 and 2014. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Thirty-eight residents (20 female and 18 male) participated. Three main themes describing the significance of meaningful activity in nursing homes emerged from the data: Feeling the passage of time, Seeking an occupation, and Living with restrictions. Nursing homes should strive to develop diverse and meaningful activity programs for residents in order to occupy their time and provide them with a greater sense of purpose. PMID:26626463

  12. Activation energies for oxygen reduction on platinum alloys: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alfred B; Roques, Jérôme; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Murthi, Vivek S; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2005-01-27

    A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the electrode potential dependencies of activation energies is presented for the first step in oxygen reduction over platinum and platinum alloy catalysts in both polycrystalline and carbon supported form. Tafel data for several of the catalysts are used to predict potential-dependent activation energies for oxygen reduction over the 0.6-0.9 V range in strong and weak acid. Comparisons with the theoretical curve show good agreement above 0.8 V, suggesting a fairly constant preexponential factor. Arrhenius determinations of activation energies over the 0.7-0.9 V range yield little trend for weak acid, possibly because of the larger uncertainties in the Arrhenius fits, but the strong acid results have smaller uncertainties and for them the measured activation energies trend up with potential. PMID:16851081

  13. A simple experiment to determine the activation energy of the viscous flow of polymer solutions using a glass capillary viscometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohindra, D. R.; Lata, R. A.; Coll, R. K.

    2012-09-01

    A simple viscometry experiment undertaken by an undergraduate polymer class as a research project is described. Viscosity is a measure of a fluid's resistance to flow and is affected by several factors, such as concentration and temperature. In this experiment, the viscosities of polyvinylpyrrolidone solutions (a polymeric material) of different concentrations were prepared in water and measured at various temperatures. The solution viscosity was found to increase gradually with increasing concentration up to ∼5 mass%, with a dramatic increase after this. The calculated viscosity of water at different temperatures was comparable to reported values. The activation energy of viscous flow (Ea) of the different solutions was calculated and followed a similar trend as that for the viscosities of solutions of various concentrations. This experiment allowed students to better understand and explain the behaviour of macromolecules with respect to changing concentration and temperature. Furthermore, students correlated the viscosity and Ea results to understand how an increase in the concentration of a polymer solution resulted in increased entanglement of the polymer chains, consequently leading to an increase in viscosity and an increase in the activation energy of viscous flow. This experiment is safe, low cost, simple and requires only readily available apparatus.

  14. CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevič, G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Bienaymé, O. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Kordopatis, G. [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-36012 Asiago (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Wyse, R. F. G., E-mail: marusa.zerjal@fmf.uni-lj.si [Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ∼44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ∼14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2σ confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  15. Spatial learning in virtual environments by children and adults after active or passive experience

    OpenAIRE

    Sandamas, George

    2006-01-01

    Theories of spatial learning, such as those of Siegal and White (1975) and Piaget and Inhelder (1967) have considered active exploration of environments to be beneficial or essential for the development of specific spatial knowledge. Real world empirical research in the form of both laboratory experimental and broader environmental studies tends to support this suggestion, demonstrating that active exploration of an environment, in both children and adults, gives better spatial learning than ...

  16. A cerium glass fiber-optic active target for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-optic plate imaging system has been developed for active target and tracking applications, in which the active element is Ce(3+) in a silicate glass. Particle tracks and interactions have been recorded with a hit density of greater than or equal to 4/mm for minimum ionizing particles and with a spatial resolution sigma approx. = 28μ m.) The properties of cerium scintillation glass are discussed

  17. Transient finite element simulations and experiments on active control of sound transmission loss through plates

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, Maarten Cornelis

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the sound transmission loss of a plate has been investigated. It serves as an abstract model for the noise barrier between engine and passengers in a bus. A finite element simulation model has been developed to be able to predict the plate's noise reduction effect. To increase this reduction without adding too much mass, the integration of active noise control (ANC) has been investigated. The active system contained a controller, microphones and piezoelectric actuators. The inf...

  18. Exploring experiences of active ageing among older residents in a retirement village / Ismat Tarr

    OpenAIRE

    Tarr, Ismat

    2014-01-01

    The population of older persons has increased dramatically over the years in South Africa as well as internationally. As populations continue to age, the concept of active ageing has received increasing attention from researchers. Active ageing can be defined as the process of optimising older persons’ opportunities for health promotion, participation, and security in order to enhance their quality of life. In this definition, “health” refers to physical, mental, and social well-being. “Parti...

  19. Identification of active oxalotrophic bacteria by Bromodeoxyuridine DNA labeling in a microcosm soil experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Daniel; Martin, Gaëtan; David, Maude M; Cailleau, Guillaume; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway (OCP) leads to a potential carbon sink in terrestrial environments. This process is linked to the activity of oxalotrophic bacteria. Although isolation and molecular characterizations are used to study oxalotrophic bacteria, these approaches do not give information on the active oxalotrophs present in soil undergoing the OCP. The aim of this study was to assess the diversity of active oxalotrophic bacteria in soil microcosms using the Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) DNA labeling technique. Soil was collected near an oxalogenic tree (Milicia excelsa). Different concentrations of calcium oxalate (0.5%, 1%, and 4% w/w) were added to the soil microcosms and compared with an untreated control. After 12 days of incubation, a maximal pH of 7.7 was measured for microcosms with oxalate (initial pH 6.4). At this time point, a DGGE profile of the frc gene was performed from BrdU-labeled soil DNA and unlabeled soil DNA. Actinobacteria (Streptomyces- and Kribbella-like sequences), Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were found as the main active oxalotrophic bacterial groups. This study highlights the relevance of Actinobacteria as members of the active bacterial community and the identification of novel uncultured oxalotrophic groups (i.e. Kribbella) active in soils. PMID:24033776

  20. Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn U

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ulrika Söderhamn,1 Live Aasgaard,2 Bjørg Landmark2,3 1Centre for Caring Research Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Institute of Research and Development for Nursing and Care Services, Municipality of Drammen, 3Faculty of Health, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway Background: In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.Methods: The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.Results: Four categories, ie, “appreciated activities”, “praised nurses and volunteers”, “being more active”, and “being included in a fellowship”, as well as the overall theme “participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being” emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants’ health and well-being.Conclusion: In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to

  1. Monte Carlo neutron fluence calculations, activation measurements and spectrum adjustment for the KORPUS dosimetry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KORPUS is an irradiation facility located at the lateral core surface of the 6 MW experimental reactor RBT-6 in Dimitrovgrad. In this work the KORPUS irradiation experiment has been used to demonstrate the capability of the pressure vessel dosimetry methodology developed in Rossendorf to solve these problems. At the same time the experiments were used to test recent improvements of this methodology including a new procedure for treatment of elastic scattering in the Monte Carlo code TRAMO and a new multispectrum version of the adjustment code. By means of a series of calculations the influence of model and data approximations were investigated aiming at an evaluation of the uncertainties of the calculations. Further, uncertainty investigations were carried out in connection with spectrum adjustment resulting in covariances of spectra, measured reaction rates and fluence integrals. (orig.)

  2. Building local competences to meet mining activities – strategies based on experiences from Greenland and Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ulrik; Gjedssø Bertelsen, Rasmus; Hendriksen, Kåre

    Mineral extraction in the Arctic is seen as a key to overcome future shortages of raw materials and local economic challenges in northern regions. Governmental strategies aim at building competence in governance and a local workforce that can be employed in mining industries and related businesses....... However many mining companies envisage potentials for a fast extraction of the resources using immigrant and migrant laborers that work intensively over a period of time while living in shantytowns. Past Greenland experiences with this type of work organization is not particularly positive. Experiences......, operation as well as closing down of mines. These impact assessments are embedded in wider socio-technical regimes framing the conditions for operation and the ways mining is integrated into the development of knowledge, skills, economy and social living conditions and practices. EIA and SIA have...

  3. Does Early Decompressive Craniectomy Improve Outcome? Experience from an Active UK Recruiter Centre

    OpenAIRE

    E. García Vicente; Garnelo Rey, V.; Manikon, M.; Ashworth, S.; Wilson, M H

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The results of the recent DECRA study suggest that although craniectomy decreases ICP and ICU length of stay, it is also associated with worst outcomes. Our experience, illustrated by these two striking cases, supports that early decompressive craniectomy may significantly improve the outcome in selected patients. Case Reports. The first patient, a 20-year-old man who suffered severe brain contusion and subarachnoid haemorrhage after a fall downstairs, with refractory ICP of 35 ...

  4. Research activities on radioecology for the past ten years: Experiments and modeling at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in a greenhouse have been conducted to evaluate the effects of radionuclides on various plants. Transfer factors, translocation factors, and other parameters have been measured particularly for major foodstuffs, such as rice and vegetables. A computer code was established to assess the environment in case of acute radionuclide release by accident. Verification and sensitivity analysis have been carried out for the integrity of this code. (author)

  5. Perceptual moments of conscious visual experience inferred from oscillatory brain activity

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Marie L.; Gosselin, Frédéric; Philippe G Schyns

    2006-01-01

    Transient periods of synchronized oscillating neuronal discharges in the brain have been proposed to support the discrete perceptual moments underlying conscious visual experience. However, the information content of these perceptual moments remains a critical challenge to the understanding of consciousness. We uncovered this information content in four observers who consciously perceived each interpretation of the ambiguous Dali painting Slave Market with the Disappearing Bust of Voltaire. F...

  6. Aggression by ovariectomized female rats with testosterone implants: competitive experience activates aggression toward unfamiliar females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1990-04-01

    Female hooded rats (250 to 325 g) were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted with testosterone-filled or empty Silastic tubes. The testosterone-filled space in each tube was 10 mm long and this should produce a serum testosterone concentration 4 to 5 times that of an intact female, but well below that of a male. Three weeks following surgery, half of the animals with testosterone implants were housed with an animal with an empty implant and left for 6 weeks. The remaining animals were placed on a 23-hr food deprivation schedule, housed in testosterone implant/empty implant pairs, and then subjected to a series of food competition tests. Following the competition tests, all animals were individually tested in their living cage for aggression toward an unfamiliar female. In food competition, females with testosterone implants were more successful and more aggressive than their cagemates with empty implants. When tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar intruder, females with testosterone implants given competitive experience were more aggressive toward an intruder than were their cagemates with empty implants or females with testosterone implants not given the competitive experience. Females with testosterone implants but without competitive experience were not more aggressive toward an unfamiliar female than were their cagemates with empty implants. These results suggest that, in ovariectomized females with testosterone implants, hormone-dependent aggression fostered by a competitive situation is displayed toward unfamiliar females.

  7. Computational modeling of epileptiform activities in medial temporal lobe epilepsy combined with in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sora; Jun, Sang Beom; Lee, Hyang Woon; Lee, Seungjun

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a comprehensive computational model that is able to reproduce three epileptiform activities. The model targets a hippocampal formation that is known to be an important lesion in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. It consists of four sub-networks consisting of excitatory and inhibitory neurons and well-known signal pathways, with consideration of propagation delay. The three epileptiform activities involve fast and slow interictal discharge and ictal discharge, and those activities can be induced in vitro by application of 4-Aminopyridine in entorhinal cortex combined hippocampal slices. We model the three epileptiform activities upon previously reported biological mechanisms and verify the simulation results by comparing them with in vitro experimental data obtained using a microelectrode array. We use the results of Granger causality analysis of recorded data to set input gains of signal pathways in the model, so that the compatibility between the computational and experimental models can be improved. The proposed model can be expanded to evaluate the suppression effect of epileptiform activities due to new treatment methods. PMID:27416961

  8. Art Activity and Personal Intelligence: Its Influence to Children Adaptation Skill (Experiments at Hidayatullah Islamic School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana, M. Pd

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Art, one of the elements of human culture has been evolving over a long time. It is a product of working which involving skills, creative, sense, thought and heart sensibility to produce a piece of work, beauty, and harmony. The aim of this research was to find art activities for children with personal intelligence. In term of my hypothesis, children have ability to adapt and confidence to show their feelings, also demonstrate cooperated work with others. Singing and drawing were used as treatments to present how it all works to show any influence for children in the classroom. These activities were chosen in order to capture the condition as singing and drawing were rarely used by teachers in managing children in the first time they came into the classroom. Researcher discovered that drawing was one of the activities teachers used only in a spare time, otherwise as a stimuli to adjust children in the new place. This condition also happened in singing activity, teachers tend to introduce national anthem and let students only to memorise the songs. Using T-test for analysing the data, researcher found out that Fsum= 3,604 and Ftable = 2,861. It meant that there was a significant interaction between singing and drawing activity with personal intelligence to children adaptation skill.

  9. Experiment study on water-rock interaction about gold activation and migration in different solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions on gold active and migratory quantities and rates between tuffaceous slate and solu-tions with different compositions were experimentally studied at 200 ℃, 20 MPa, in a high-pressure apparatus. After reaction, tuffaceous slate became light colored and soft, and its mass density reduced. The amount of gold extracted from tuffaceous slate ranges widely, from 0.027 to 0.234 μg/g. Chlorine solution may activate appreciable amount of gold, and the gold migratory rate is high enough, from 50.70% to 92.30%, which reveals that sulphur and chlorine work together in solutions to accelerate gold activation and migration, and to realize gold mineralization in favorable places.

  10. Matrix viscoplasticity and its shielding by active mechanics in microtissue models: experiments and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alan S.; Wang, Hailong; Copeland, Craig R.; Chen, Christopher S.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical behavior of tissues under mechanical stimulation is critically important to physiological function. We report a combined experimental and modeling study of bioengineered 3D smooth muscle microtissues that reveals a previously unappreciated interaction between active cell mechanics and the viscoplastic properties of the extracellular matrix. The microtissues’ response to stretch/unstretch actuations, as probed by microcantilever force sensors, was dominated by cellular actomyosin dynamics. However, cell lysis revealed a viscoplastic response of the underlying model collagen/fibrin matrix. A model coupling Hill-type actomyosin dynamics with a plastic perfectly viscoplastic description of the matrix quantitatively accounts for the microtissue dynamics, including notably the cells’ shielding of the matrix plasticity. Stretch measurements of single cells confirmed the active cell dynamics, and were well described by a single-cell version of our model. These results reveal the need for new focus on matrix plasticity and its interactions with active cell mechanics in describing tissue dynamics. PMID:27671239

  11. Experiments on feedback control of multiple resistive wall modes comparing different active coil arrays and sensor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been carried out on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch device to study several important issues related to feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). The feedback system includes a sensor coil array, a feedback controller implementing a feedback law and an active coil array. The issues include 1) effects of sideband harmonics produced by the feedback system, 2) the form of the controller and the feedback law, 3) feedback system stability, 4) selection of the sensor coil configuration and 5) effects of field errors on the feedback system. Side band harmonics are produced by the feedback system because the active saddle coil array consists of discrete coils. The presence of side bands can couple modes thus preventing simultaneous stabilisation of the coupled modes. The side band effect sets requirements for the minimum number of active coils in the array in both the poloidal and toroidal directions. Recent experiments using the intelligent shell concept with proportional-integral-derivative controller action have achieved complete simultaneous stabilisation of all RWMs modes when the requirements are satisfied. In addition to the intelligent shell concept, preliminary experiments have been performed to test the fake rotating shell concept. For this concept, the sensor coil array is shifted in phase relative to the active coil array thus a detected harmonic is induced to rotate by the active coil-produced control field. Under the condition that the phase shift is less than a quarter-wave length of the mode, mode suppression can be achieved. Feedback using a controller incorporating individual mode control has also been tested. This has enabled the first feedback experiments using a sensor array measuring the toroidal field component to be carried out. For this concept, an array consisting of localised toroidal field sensor coils is used. Mode suppression has been successfully accomplished. However pick-up of high order field error harmonics due

  12. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  13. A small and robust active beamstop for scattering experiments on high-brilliance undulator beamlines

    OpenAIRE

    Clement E. Blanchet; Hermes, Christoph; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Fiedler, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A small active in-vacuum beamstop has been developed to monitor the flux of intense third-generation synchrotron X-ray beams protecting the downstream detector from the direct beam. Standard active beamstops, where a built-in diode directly absorbs the beam, have limitations in size and lifetime. In the present design, a silicon PIN diode detects the photons back-scattered from a cavity in the beamstop. This approach drastically reduces the radiation dose on the diode and thus increases its l...

  14. Operation experience with the TRIGA Mainz and research activities at this station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, N. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Kernchemie)

    1999-12-15

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor Mainz has been in operation for more than 33 years. So far no serious problems occurred and there was only a seven months shut-down period in 1995 in order to replace the heat exchanger and to install a new primary, secondary and purification circuit. The experimental programme at the TRIGA Mainz covers a wide range of applications in nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, neutron activation analysis and isotope production. The experimental facilities are mainly used for neutron activation analysis, for the development of fast chemical separation procedures using short lived fission products and for the production of polarized neutrons. (orig.)

  15. [Change of cholinesterase relative activity under modulated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation in experiments in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashovkina, M S; Pashovkin, T N

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the activity of enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) have been experimentally investigated under the influence of amplitude-modulated super-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (carrier frequency of 2.375 MHz; power flux density of 8 mW/cm2, 20 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2; modulation frequency range 10 to 210 Hz; exposure time 5 min). The appearance of peaks of the cholinesterase increased relative activity, as well as the changes in the direction and intensity of the reaction associated with the modulation frequency and power flux are observed at equal power flux densities and exposure times.

  16. A Study on the Kinetics of Propane-Activated Carbon: Theory and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Azhar bin

    2013-08-01

    Experimental kinetics results of propane in Maxsorb III activated carbon is obtained at temperatures of 10°C and 30°C, and pressures up to 800kPa using a magnetic suspension balance. A multi-gradient linear driving force (LDF) approximation is used for adsorbate uptake as a function of time. The LDF mass-transfer-rate coefficients were thus determined. Using this approach, the experimentally derived LDF coefficients based on independently measured kinetic parameters for propane in the activated-carbon bed agree very well with experimental results. The computational efficiency is gained by adopting this extended LDF model. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  17. Tilting-Pad Journal Bearings with Active Lubrication Applied as Calibrated Shakers: Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerda Varela, Alejandro Javier; Santos, Ilmar

    2014-01-01

    dependent calibration function, i.e. the transfer function between control signal and force over the rotor. This work presents a theoretical model of the calibration function for a tilting-pad journal bearing with active lubrication. The bearing generates controllable forces by injecting pressurized oil...... form of the Reynolds equation. The oil film model is formulated considering an elastothermohydrodynamic lubrication regime. The model is used to study the relevance and effects of different parameters on the calibration function, aiming at providing general guidelines for the active bearing design...

  18. The DOSIS and DOSIS 3D Experiments onboard the International Space Station - Results from the Active DOSTEL Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Beaujean, Rudolf; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes; Kortmann, Onno

    2012-07-01

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems experienced in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18th. It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The DOSTELs measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 18th 2009 to June 16th 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the DOSIS-3D experiment. The hardware will be launched with the Soyuz 30S flight to the ISS on May 15th 2012 and activated approximately ten days later. Data will be transferred from the DOSTEL units to ground via the EPM rack which is activated approximately every four weeks for this action. First Results for the active DOSIS-3D measurements such as count rate profiles

  19. The Ben Franklin Book of Easy and Incredible Experiments, Activities, Projects, and Science Fun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Lisa Jo, Ed.

    Benjamin Franklin was the first great American scientist. This book contains activities which are organized into six subjects that Benjamin Franklin investigated: observation and experimentation, meteorology, electricity, sound and music, paper and printing, and lenses and vision. At the end of each chapter is a list of resources and ideas. The…

  20. Experiences in Education Innovation: Developing Tools in Support of Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Carlos; Felez, Jesus; Cobos, Jose Antonio; Sanchez-Naranjo, Maria Jesus; Pinto, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    The paper focuses on educational projects developed in the ETSII (Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales) of the Polytechnic University of Madrid during the past few years. These projects were developed as new tools for enhancing the active role of students, for improving practical teaching, especially by means of virtual laboratories…

  1. "Power, Regulation and Physically Active Identities": The Experiences of Rural and Regional Living Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M.; Mooney, A.; Smyth, J.; Payne, W.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on interpretations of Foucault's techniques of power, we explored the discourses and power relations operative between groups of girls that appeared to influence their participation in Physical Education (PE) and outside of school in sport and physical activity (PA) in rural and regional communities. Interviews and focus groups were…

  2. A Didactic Activity for Introducing Design and Optimization of Experiments Assisted by Revised Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Gabriela; Balestrassi, Pedro; Paiva, Anderson; Gottzandt, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    The methodology used in this study was action-research and the considered activity is been applied successfully for at least five years to undergraduate and to master classes for Industrial Engineering students in Brazil. It showed a significant result in both cases, providing the basis for the deepening in the subject in further lessons.…

  3. The Role of Family Experiences for Adolescents' Readiness to Use and Participate in Illegal Political Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Terese; Dahl, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    This study used reactance theory as a starting point to explain what role a perceived undemocratic and controlling family has for adolescents' readiness to use illegal political activity. Additionally, we examined whether adolescents' readiness to use illegal political means was related to actual political behaviour, which has been lacking in…

  4. An Anesthetic Drug Demonstration and an Introductory Antioxidant Activity Experiment with "Eugene, the Sleepy Fish"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena, Homar; Chen, Peishan

    2016-01-01

    Students are introduced to spectrophotometry in comparing the antioxidant activity of pure eugenol and oil of cloves from a commercial source using a modified ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The extraction of the essential oil from dried cloves is demonstrated to facilitate discussions on green chemistry. The anesthetic properties…

  5. A Science Fair Partnership: An Active Learning Experience for Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deborah Louise

    2015-01-01

    STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education is a national instructional priority. As part of Southeastern Louisiana University's STEM Outreach Initiative, funded by a Shell Oil Company Foundation grant to raise interest in STEM-related activities, teacher candidates were given the opportunity to leave their classroom to…

  6. [Community vegetable gardens as a health promotion activity: an experience in Primary Healthcare Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christiane Gasparini Araújo; Garcia, Mariana Tarricone; Ribeiro, Silvana Maria; Salandini, Marcia Fernanda de Sousa; Bógus, Cláudia Maria

    2015-10-01

    Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) is being practiced in different settings, contributing to the improvement of health in communities and healthier environments. In order to identify the meanings and implications of the practice of UPA in Primary Healthcare Units (PHU) as an activity of health promotion (HP), and to what extent its therapeutic dimension characterizes it as an activity aligned with complementary and integrative practices (CIP), a qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in Embu das Artes, State of São Paulo. From the analysis, the following main themes arose: health concept, health outcomes, the return to traditional practices and habits and the reorientation of health services. It was possible to identify the close link between the cultivation of vegetable gardens and HP guidelines and fields of action, such as creating healthier environments, boosting community actions, developing personal skills, stimulating autonomy and empowerment and demands for the reorientation of services. The garden activities, set up in PHU areas, proved to be an implementation strategy of CIP. The conclusion reached is that vegetable gardening activities in community gardens are seen to be health promotion practices that integrate key elements of CIP. PMID:26465852

  7. Active aeroelastic control aspects of an aircraft wing by using synthetic jet actuators: modeling, simulations, experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnell, K.O.; Schober, S.; Stolk, M.; Marzocca, P.; De Breuker, R.; Abdalla M.; Nicolini, E.; Gürdal, Z.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses modeling, simulations and experimental aspects of active aeroelastic control on aircraft wings by using Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs). SJAs, a particular class of zero-net mass-flux actuators, have shown very promising results in numerous aeronautical applications, such as boun

  8. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In…

  9. Data processing of the active neutron experiment DAN for a Martian regolith investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanin, A.B., E-mail: sanin@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, I.G.; Litvak, M.L.; Lisov, D.I. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Starr, R. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Boynton, W. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Behar, A.; DeFlores, L. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hardgrove, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kozyrev, A.S. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, R.O. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vernadsky Institute for Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Malakhov, A. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Milliken, R. [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Mischna, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Moersch, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Mokrousov, M.I. [Space Research Institute (IKI), RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-07-21

    Searching for water in the soil of Gale Crater is one of the primary tasks for the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover named Curiosity. The primary task of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment on board the rover is to investigate and qualitatively characterize the presence of water along the rover’s traverse across Gale Crater. The water depth distribution may be found from measurements of neutrons generated by the Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) included in the DAN instrument, scattered by the regolith and returned back to the detectors. This paper provides a description of the data processing of such measurements and data products of DAN investigation.

  10. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  11. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

  12. Aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud droplet activation of extracts of filters from biomass burning experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Engling, Guenter; Malm, William C.

    2008-04-01

    In this laboratory closure study, we compare sub- and supersaturated water uptake properties for aerosol particles possessing a range of hygroscopicity. Measurements for water sub-saturated conditions used a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Simultaneously, measurements of particle critical supersaturation were conducted on the same sample stream with a continuous flow cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. For these experiments, we used filter-collected samples of biomass smoke generated in the combustion of two common wildland fire fuels, western sagebrush and Alaskan duff core. Extractions of separate sections of the filter were performed using two solvents, ultrapure water and methanol. The extracts were subsequently atomized, producing aerosols having a range of hygroscopic responses. HTDMA and CCN measurements were fit to a single-parameter model of water uptake, in which the fit parameter is denoted κ, the hygroscopicity parameter. Here, for the four extracts we observed mean values of the hygroscopicity parameter of 0.06 CCN-derived values of κ for each experiment agreed within approximately 20%. Applicability of the κ-parameterization to other multicomponent aerosols relevant to the atmosphere remains to be tested.

  13. Low-activity radioiodine for remnant ablation after surgery for differentiated thyroid cancer - Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: residual thyroid tissue ablation with radioiodine after total thyroidectomy is one of the key elements in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) therapy. Clinicians worldwide have been trying to address what is the lowest effective radioiodine activity to successful ablation. This study intends to show our initial results using a low 131I activity -1850 MBq (50 mCi) - for that purpose in patients (pts) with low-risk DTC. Material and methods: 13 patients (12 female, 1 male; mean age 43.7 years; range 23-66 years), with histologically confirmed DTC (12 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma- 3 pT1a N0, 1 pT1a N1, 4 pT1b N0, 2 pT2 N0 and 2 pT3 N0 and 1 case of follicular thyroid carcinoma - pT3 N0), underwent total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative 131I activity of 1850 MBq. An 131I whole body scan (WBS) was performed 6 months after the ablative activity as well as thyroglobulin (Tg) level determination. Ablative therapy, WBS and Tg measurements were performed at least 4 weeks after thyroid hormone withdrawal. Six months after ablative therapy, patients with negative WBS and stimulated Tg levels < 2 ng/ml were considered to have successful ablation. Results: complete thyroid tissue ablation was obtained in 9/13 pts with a success rate of 69.2%. Of the four remaining pts: one (pT1bN0) presented positive WBS; one (pT1aN0) showed both positive WBS and elevated Tg levels and the other two (pT2N0; pT3N0) presented Tg levels above the considered limit despite negative WBS. 3 of those patients who did not achieve a successful complete ablation presented high Tg levels (> 30 ng/ml) at the time of radioiodine treatment. Conclusion: although several studies have demonstrated good rates of ablation using low 131I activities, each center must assess whether the same results are found in its particular context. Our preliminary data reveals a successful ablation rate for post-thyroidectomy remnant thyroid tissue, in patients with low

  14. The Effect of Corporate Citizenship Activities (CCAS on Financial Performance and Market Performance: The Omani Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Al Ani Mawih K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate and analyze the effects of corporate citizenship activities on the financial performance and market performance of Omani manufacturing companies in the Sultanate of Oman for the period 2009-2013. The Financial performance of companies is measured by two independent variables: return on assets (ROA and return on equity (ROE. Market performance is measured by the fair market value of shares (FMV. CCAs are determined by the voluntary disclosures of corporate citizenship activities by the companies. The study concludes that there is a positive impact by CCAs on the financial and market performance of the Omani companies that leads to profit maximization.

  15. Value Added Tax Impacton Economic Activity: Importance, Implication and Assessment –The Romanian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana MUREȘAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact of VAT upon the economic activity in Romania. By developing a new mathematical model we offer several dy-namic and effcient possibilities for observing the modifcations caused by the temporary reduc-tion of taxes upon the personal incomes which suggest that the resulting additional incomes are often saved and less consumed. Analyzing several temporary reductions in incomes, the model describes also a scheme regarding the developments of economic growth. Based on this scheme, are revealed the different arrangements in which a present economic activity infuences a future one. According to the proposed model, it is highlighted that the national income increases as a response to the aggregated demand.

  16. Experiments and modelling of active quasi-single helicity regime generation in a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    The interaction of a static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) with a tearing mode (TM) is becoming a relevant topic in fusion plasma physics. RMPs can be generated by active coils and then used to affect the properties of TMs and of the corresponding magnetic islands. This paper shows how the feedback system of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) can produce a RMP that affects a rotating TM and stimulate the transition to the so-called quasi-single helicity (QSH) regime, a RFP plasma state characterized by a magnetic island surrounded by low magnetic chaos. The application of the RMP can increase the QSH probability up to 10% and enlarge the size of the corresponding island. Part of the experimental results are supported by a theoretical study that models the effect of the active coils on the magnetic island.

  17. Recent developments for an active UF6 gas target for photon-induced fission experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freudenberger M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments for an active uranium-hexafluoride-loaded gas target as well as results on the detector gas properties are presented. The gas of choice is a mixture of argon with small amounts of UF6. This contribution presents the experimental setup and focusses on the electron drift velocity with increasing UF6 content. A time-dependent decrease in electron drift velocity is observed in our setup.

  18. Recent developments for an active UF6 gas target for photon-induced fission experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Freudenberger M.; Eckardt C.; Enders J.; Göök A.; von Neumann-Cosel P.; Oberstedt A.; Oberstedt S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments for an active uranium-hexafluoride-loaded gas target as well as results on the detector gas properties are presented. The gas of choice is a mixture of argon with small amounts of UF6. This contribution presents the experimental setup and focusses on the electron drift velocity with increasing UF6 content. A time-dependent decrease in electron drift velocity is observed in our setup.

  19. Hydrovolcanic activity in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Does nature mimic laboratory experiments?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Gupta, S.M.; Charan, S.N.; Mukherjee, A.D.

    -a-vis Si-enriched areas. The spherules are very similar to those experimentally produced by simulated hydrovolcanic activity involving interaction of a thermite melt with water-saturated qua&o-feldspathic sand. Our finding seems to indicate such a process... investigated from different geologic materials and environments. * Corresponding author; iyer@csnio.ren.nic.in Besides these types occurrence of opaque magnetic and metallic spherules have been reported in man- ganese nodules (Murray and Renard, 18841...

  20. Repurposing a learning activity on academic integrity: the experience of three universities

    OpenAIRE

    Fill, Karen; Leung, Samuel; DiBiase, David; Nelson, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: There is currently great interest in reuse of digital learning resources, from single items to multi-task activities, to whole units or programmes of study. Associated with this interest is the ongoing development of tools to enable such resources to be placed in or recovered from repositories, to facilitate searching for them and their instantiation on different learning platforms. Many of these tools are highly technical, in terms of both technology and terminology, and th...

  1. An experiment with reactive data-flow tasking in active robot~vision

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Éric; Marchand, Eric; Chaumette, François

    1997-01-01

    International audience Active vision-based robot design involves a variety of techniques and formalisms, from kinematics to control theory, signal processing, and computer science. The programming of such systems therefore requires environments with many different functionalities, in a very integrated fashion to ensure consistency of the different parts. In significant applications, the correct specification of the global controller is not simple to achieve, as it mixes different levels of...

  2. Experiences of counselling on physical activity during pregnancy Gestational diabetes mellitus : screening and pregnancy outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are global health problems with several adverse health effects that threaten public health. In Sweden, almost four of ten pregnant women are overweight or obese, conditions that are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a metabolic disorder that complicates pregnancy. Globally, physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for mortality. The recommendation for physical activity (i.e., ≥150 minutes/w...

  3. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-García, Miguel Angel; Moreda Cantero, Guillermo P.; Hernández Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño López, Vanesa

    2012-01-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In this study, the method is applied to laboratory sessions of a higher education institution course, and the students who act as teache...

  4. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria : new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; S. Benz; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; M. Schnaiter; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature...

  5. A National Experience on Physical Activity Initiatives for Adolescent Girls and Their Mothers: CASPIAN Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide a low-cost and simple model of culturally-appropriate and low cost facilities for improvement of physical activity for girls and their mothers through an after-school program and to determine the changes in anthropometric indexes after this trial.Methods: This national study was conducted in 2006-2007 in 7 provinces with different socioeconomic situations in Iran. Female students who studied in the 7th through 10th grade and their mothers were selected by random cluster sampling. In each province, 24 sessions of after-school aerobic physical activity were held for 90 minutes, two days a week, and 3 months long at school sites in the afternoon.Findings: The study comprised 410 participants (204 mothers and 206 daughters, with a mean age of 15.86±1.01 and 40.71±6.3 years in girls and their mothers, respectively. The results of the focus group discussions showed that in general, both mothers and daughters were satisfied from the program and found it feasible and successful. After the trial, the indexes of generalized and abdominal obesity improved significantly both in girls and in their mothers (P-value <0.0001 for weight, body mass index and waist circumference.Conclusion: Our findings may provide a low-cost and simple effective model of motivation for physical activity with targeted interventions for girls and their mothers. We suggest that the success of this trial might be a result of bonding and accompaniment of mothers and daughters. Such model can be integrated in the existing health and education systems to increase the physical activity level.

  6. Dynamics of firing patterns, synchronization and resonances in neuronal electrical activities: experiments and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qishao Lu; Huaguang Gu; Zhuoqin Yang; Xia Shi; Lixia Duan; Yanhong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the experimental and theore-tical study of dynamics of neuronal electrical firing activi-ties are reviewed. Firstly, some experimental phenomena of neuronal irregular firing patterns, especially chaotic and sto-chastic firing patterns, are presented, and practical nonlinear time analysis methods are introduced to distinguish deter-ministic and stochastic mechanism in time series. Secondly, the dynamics of electrical firing activities in a single neu-ron is concerned, namely, fast-slow dynamics analysis for classification and mechanism of various bursting patterns, one- or two-parameter bifurcation analysis for transitions of firing patterns, and stochastic dynamics of firing activities (stochastic and coherence resonances, integer multiple and other firing patterns induced by noise, etc.). Thirdly, different types of synchronization of coupled neurons with electri-cal and chemical synapses are discussed. As noise and time delay are inevitable in nervous systems, it is found that noise and time delay may induce or enhance synchronization and change firing patterns of coupled neurons. Noise-induced resonance and spatiotemporal patterns in coupled neuronal networks are also demonstrated. Finally, some prospects are presented for future research. In consequence, the idea and methods of nonlinear dynamics are of great significance in exploration of dynamic processes and physiological func-tions of nervous systems.

  7. Calculations of Induced Activity in the ATLAS Experiment for Nuclear Waste Zoning.

    CERN Document Server

    Morev, M N

    2007-01-01

    Extensive calculations were performed with the general activation formula using the fluxes of high-energy hadrons and low-energy neutrons previously obtained from simulations with the GCALOR code of the ATLAS detector. Three sets of proton cross-sections were used for hadrons energy above 20 MeV: (a) one set calculated with the YIELDX code (i.e., the Silberberg-Tsao formula of partial proton spallation cross-sections), (b) one set calculated with the Rudstam formula, and (c) the ‘best-estimate' dataset which was a compilation of the available experimental and calculated data. In the energy region below 20 MeV, neutron activation cross-sections were taken from evaluated nuclear data files. The activity of each nuclide for a predefined operation scenario (i.e., number and duration of irradiation and shutdown cycles) was normalized to reference values taken from the European or Swiss legislations, to obtain an aggregate estimate of the radiological hazard comparable with a nuclear waste zoning definition cr...

  8. In vivo broiler experiments to assess anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of a live Enterococcus faecalis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn, J; Rasschaert, G; Hermans, D; Pasmans, F; Heyndrickx, M

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial gastroenteritis caused by thermotolerant Campylobacter species, mainly Campylobacter jejuni, has been the most reported zoonotic disease in many developed countries in recent years. Reducing Campylobacter shedding on the farm could result in a reduction of the number of campylobacteriosis cases. In 2 independent broiler seeder experiments, in which broiler chickens were orally inoculated with 2 amounts of Enterococcus faecalis MB 5259, we established whether a live E. faecalis strain was capable of reducing cecal Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens. In previous in vitro experiments it has been demonstrated that this E. faecalis MB 5259 displays anti-Campylobacter activity. The effect of pH and bile salts on E. faecalis MB 5259 showed that growth and survival of E. faecalis MB 5259 can be impaired during passage through the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. Despite these results E. faecalis MB 5259 was capable of colonizing the broiler ceca. Contrary to the in vitro experiments, in which E. faecalis MB 5259 inhibited C. jejuni MB 4185 growth, no inhibition was observed in the in vivo experiments independent of the inoculum size. PMID:23243257

  9. Preliminary structural control results from the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David W.; Saarmaa, Erik; Jacques, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of on-going closed-loop ground experiments on the MACE test article, the objective of which is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero gravity can be predicted, as well as to examine orbit system identification and control reconfiguration. The MACE hardware consists of three torque wheels, a two-axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors, and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this is to represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. When linear quadratic Gaussian control is used, payload pointing accuracy is improved by an order of magnitude when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The successes and failures of the design and implementation process are discussed.

  10. Initial experience of using an active beam delivery technique at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At PSI a new proton therapy facility has been assembled and commissioned. The major features of the facility are the spot scanning technique and the very compact gantry. The operation of the facility was started in 1997 and the feasibility of the spot scanning technique has been demonstrated in practice with patient treatments. In this report we discuss the usual initial difficulties encountered in the commissioning of a new technology, the very positive preliminary experience with the system and the optimistic expectations for the future. The long range goal of this project is to parallel the recent developments regarding inverse planning for photons with a similar advanced technology optimized for a proton beam. (orig.)

  11. Examining and contrasting the cognitive activities engaged in undergraduate research experiences and lab courses

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, N G

    2016-01-01

    While the positive outcomes of undergraduate research experiences (UREs) have been extensively categorized, the mechanisms for those outcomes are less understood. Through lightly structured focus group interviews, we have extracted the cognitive tasks that students identify as engaging in during their UREs. We also use their many comparative statements about their coursework, especially lab courses, to evaluate their experimental physics-related cognitive tasks in those environments. We find there are a number of cognitive tasks consistently encountered in physics UREs that are present in most experimental research. These are seldom encountered in lab or lecture courses, with some notable exceptions. Having time to reflect and fi?x or revise, and having a sense of autonomy, were both repeatedly cited as key enablers of the bene?fits of UREs. We also identify tasks encountered in actual experimental research that are not encountered in UREs. We use these findings to identify opportunities for better integratio...

  12. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karyono, E-mail: karyonosu@gmail.com [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia); OSLO University (Norway); Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton [OSLO University (Norway); Lupi, Matteo [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Syafri, Ildrem [Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  13. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calculation consistency with the experimental results, the knowledge of the material impurities content is mandatory

  14. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cepraga, D G

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calcul...

  15. Borehole prompt gamma neutron activation and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation using MCNP code Borehole PGNAA experiment comparison with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohrabpour, M. [Gamma Irradiation Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahriari, M. [Physics Department, Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarifian, V.; Moghadam, K.K. [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    A borehole experiment using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been performed in a large sample box having a volume of 1 m{sup 3}. Brine solutions having a salt concentration in the range of 0-10 wt% of sodium chloride has been used. Chlorine prompt gamma spectral response as a function of the salt concentrations have been obtained. A simulation of the above experiments has also been carried out using the MCNP4A Monte Carlo code. Comparison of the experimental spectral response versus the simulated MCNP4A data has produced excellent agreement. In view of the good benchmark data it is proposed that due to the inherent problems associated with the ordinary calibration procedures for the borehole logging tools, one could employ a combined calibration/simulation scheme to circumvent these difficulties and achieve more effective results.

  16. Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Erik Mathiassen

    Full Text Available Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during "diverting" periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI. A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC, pressure pain threshold (PPT over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some

  17. New approaches to evaluate sympathoadrenal system activity in experiments on Earth and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Noskov, V. B.; Blazicek, P.; Macho, L.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Goldstein, D. S.; Kopin, I. J.

    In previous studies the activity of the sympathoadrenal system (SAS) in cosmonauts during space flights was evaluated by measuring plasma catecholamines (CA) levels and urinary CA and their metabolites concentrations. Plasma CA levels are accepted indicators of SAS activity, however, they are determined by the plasma clearances as well as the rates of CA release (spillover-SO) into the bloodstream. Nowadays methods are available which evaluate not only plasma levels of CA but also their release, spillover, uptake, reuptake, degradation and also CA synthesis in vivo measured by plasma levels of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Plasma concentrations of DOPA, the CA noradrenaline (NE), adrenaline (ADR), and dopamine (DA), the deaminated catechol metabolites dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and the O-methylated metabolites methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured during immobilization stress (IMO) in conscious rats. Radiotracer methods were used to measure NE SO. IMO markedly increased arterial NE levels but NE SO was less elevated bacause the NE clearance was slightly reduced in IMO rats. Simultaneous measurements of plasma CA and their metabolites provide another means to obtain information about SAS function. For instance, dissociation between changes of plasma DHPG and NE levels can indicate changes in neuronal reuptake of NE. We found marked parallel increases in plasma NE and DHPG levels during acute IMO; however after repeated IMO, plasma NE levels were increased but DHPG responses were less pronounced suggesting a reduced NE reuptake. DOPA, the CA precursor, circulates in plasma at a concentration higher than NE. During stress, increased sympathoneural outflow stimulates DOPA synthesis and release into the circulation supporting the view that changes in plasma DOPA levels during stress reflect in vivo changes in the rate of CA synthesis. We propose to measure the new plasma indicators of SAS

  18. A National Experience on Physical Activity Initiatives for Adolescent Girls and their Mothers: CASPIAN Study

    OpenAIRE

    Roya Kelishadi; Vahid Ziaee; Gelayol Ardalan; Ascieh Namazi; Pardis Noormohammadpour; Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan; Hoda Sadraei; Parisa Mirmoghtadaee; Parinaz Poursafa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a low-cost and simple model of culturally-appropriate and low cost facilities for improvement of physical activity for girls and their mothers through an after-school program and to determine the changes in anthropometric indexes after this trial.Methods: This national study was conducted in 2006-2007 in 7 provinces with different socioeconomic situations in Iran. Female students who studied in the 7th through 10th grade and their mothers were selected by random cluster ...

  19. A small and robust active beamstop for scattering experiments on high-brilliance undulator beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchet, Clement E., E-mail: clement.blanchet@embl-hamburg.de; Hermes, Christoph; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Fiedler, Stefan, E-mail: clement.blanchet@embl-hamburg.de [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg Outstation c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-04

    Using an indirect detection scheme, a small-size beamstop was developed to accurately measure X-ray beam flux in a wide energy range with reduced radiation level on the electronics and significantly increased in-beam lifetime. A small active in-vacuum beamstop has been developed to monitor the flux of intense third-generation synchrotron X-ray beams protecting the downstream detector from the direct beam. Standard active beamstops, where a built-in diode directly absorbs the beam, have limitations in size and lifetime. In the present design, a silicon PIN diode detects the photons back-scattered from a cavity in the beamstop. This approach drastically reduces the radiation dose on the diode and thus increases its lifetime. The beamstop with a diameter of 2 mm has been fabricated to meet the requirements for the P12 bioSAXS beamline of EMBL Hamburg at PETRA III (DESY). The beamstop is in regular user operation at the beamline and displays a good response over the range of energies tested (6–20 keV). Further miniaturization of the diode is easily possible as its size is not limited by the PIN diode used.

  20. A small and robust active beamstop for scattering experiments on high-brilliance undulator beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Clement E; Hermes, Christoph; Svergun, Dmitri I; Fiedler, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    A small active in-vacuum beamstop has been developed to monitor the flux of intense third-generation synchrotron X-ray beams protecting the downstream detector from the direct beam. Standard active beamstops, where a built-in diode directly absorbs the beam, have limitations in size and lifetime. In the present design, a silicon PIN diode detects the photons back-scattered from a cavity in the beamstop. This approach drastically reduces the radiation dose on the diode and thus increases its lifetime. The beamstop with a diameter of 2 mm has been fabricated to meet the requirements for the P12 bioSAXS beamline of EMBL Hamburg at PETRA III (DESY). The beamstop is in regular user operation at the beamline and displays a good response over the range of energies tested (6-20 keV). Further miniaturization of the diode is easily possible as its size is not limited by the PIN diode used. PMID:25723949

  1. [Counterfeit Medicines in Internet and the Fakeshare European Project: Experiences and Activities in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán-Matamoros, Daniel; González-Ochando, Nuria; Pecharroman-Arribas, Henar; Fernández-Muelas, Ana; Bentolila-Benchimol, Stella Sandra; IbarraLorente, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The illicit trafficking of medicines over the Internet is a growing problem that affects public health. Since 2013, the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices (AEMPS) participates in the European project Fakeshare, co-funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Italian Medicines Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco, AIFA). This project aims to coordinate initiatives against the illegal supply of medicines, including from purchases through websites engaged in illegal activity, to thefts and other diversions of medicines to the illicit trafficking.This paper presents the activities in that area as well as strategies and elaborated materials at the national level. The keys to fight or face the illegal sale of medicines over the internet are coordinated cooperation with all the stakeholders, development of communication campaigns to raise awareness and sensitize consumers, health professionals and industry organizations about the risks of buying medicines on illegal websites, creating databases to share information on thefts and other deviations to the illegal market and disseminate national practices to combat illicit medicines trafficking at European and international levels. PMID:27529446

  2. Operational experience of low active β-γ solid waste treatment system at OARAI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low active β-γ solid waste treatment system II was installed at Oarai in order to improve the radioactive solid wastes stream, especially to reduce the number of waste packages. THE SYSTEM II is composed of a bailing machine and pre-treatment machines in a gloved box, e.g. a filter crusher, dehydrater and hoistes. The function of each machine is as follows; 1) Bailing machine; compression of metal waste and other compressible (non combustible) wastes. 2) Filter crusher; separation of wooden frame from HEPA filter and cutting of wooden frame prior to incineration, 3) Dehydrater; dehydration of wet rags prior to incineration, From last two years operation, followings have been improved comparing with former processing system; 1) The number of packages from metal waste has become a quarter, 2) The number of packages from HEPA filter has become a quarter, 3) Wets rags can be burnt rather easily after dehydration, 4) Many packages have become more stable in both chemical and physical properties, 5) The total number of packages from low active β-γ solid wastes has decreased to 70% with combination of the incinerator. (author)

  3. Balance control and anti-gravity muscle activity during the experience of fear at heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuehr, Max; Kugler, Guenter; Schniepp, Roman; Eckl, Maria; Pradhan, Cauchy; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Fear of heights occurs when a visual stimulus causes the apprehension of losing balance and falling. A moderate form of visual height intolerance (vHI) affects about one third of the general population and has relevant consequences for the quality of life. A quantitative evaluation of balance mechanisms in persons susceptible to vHI during height exposure is missing. VHI-related changes in postural control were assessed by center-of-pressure displacements and electromyographic recordings of selected leg, arm, and neck muscles in 16 subjects with vHI while standing at heights on an emergency balcony versus standing in the laboratory at ground level. Characteristics of open- and closed-loop postural control were analyzed. Body sway and muscle activity parameters were correlated with the subjective estimates of fear at heights. During height exposure, (1) open-loop control was disturbed by a higher diffusion activity (P anti-gravity leg and neck muscles, both of which depend on the severity of evoked fear at heights. PMID:24744901

  4. OPTIFER, a further step in development of low activation martensitic steels. Results of characterization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe 9.5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb, and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys. After double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between requests in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behaviour during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12% Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior. Both an upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 C. With an only moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge(Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (orig.)

  5. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys, after double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12%Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior, both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (Author) 21 refs

  6. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contentsof tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys. After double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12degree centigree Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact tougness behavior. Both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strenght values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact tougness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron

  7. A scintillating glass fiber-optic active target for vertex detection and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution, fast gateable active target has been developed for Fermilab experiment E687 in order to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon and hadron induced processes. The detector consists of a GS1 Cerium scintillating glass fiber-optic target, a multi-stage image intensifier and CCD camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. We currently detect ≤ 4 photoelectrons per mm with a resolution per photoelectron of σ/sub pe/ < 25 μm

  8. A scintillating glass fiber-optic active target for vertex detection and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution, fast gateable active target has been developed for Fermilab experiment E687 in order to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon and hadron induced processes. The detector consists of a GS1 Cerium scintillating glass fiber-optic target, a multi-stage image intensifier and CCD camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. The authors currently detect ≤ 4 photoelectrons per mm with a resolution per photoelectron of σ/sub pe/ < 25μm

  9. Activating people to address their health care needs: learning from people with lived experience of chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Henwood, Benjamin F

    2014-08-01

    One of the primary goals of health care reform is improving the quality and reducing the costs of care for people with co-morbid mental health and physical health conditions. One strategy is to integrate primary and behavioral health care through care coordination and patient activation. This qualitative study using community based participatory research methods informs the development of integrated care by presenting the perspectives of those with lived experience of chronic illnesses and homelessness. Themes presented include the internal and external barriers to addressing health needs and the key role of peer support in overcoming these barriers.

  10. Surface activity and radiation field measurements of the TMI-2 reactor building gross decontamination experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C V

    1983-10-01

    Surface samples were collected from concrete and metal surfaces within the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building on December 15 and 17, 1981 and again on March 25 and 26, 1982. The Reactor Building was decontaminated by hydrolasing during the period between these dates. The collected samples were analyzed for radionuclide concentration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The sampling equipment and procedures, and the analysis methods and results are discussed. The measured mean surface concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr on the 305-ft elevation floor before decontamination were, respectively, 3.6 +- 0.9 and 0.17 +- 0.04 ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/. Their mean concentrations on the 347-ft elevation floor were about the same. On both elevations, walls were found to be considerably less contaminated than floors. The fractions of the core inventories of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 129/I deposited on Reactor Building surfaces prior to decontamination were calculated using their mean concentrations on various types of surfaces. The calculated values for these three nuclides are 3.5 +- 0.4 E-4, 2.4 +- 0.8 E-5, and 5.7 +- 0.5 E-4, respectively. The decontamination operations reduced the /sup 137/Cs surface activity on the 305- and 347-ft elevations by factors of 20 and 13, respectively. The /sup 90/Sr surface activity reduction was the same for both floors, that being a factor of 30. On the whole, decontamination of vertical surfaces was not achieved. Beta and gamma exposure rates that were measured during surface sampling were examined to determine the degree to which they correlated with measured surface activities. The data were fit with power functions of the form y = ax/sup b/. As might be expected, the beta exposure rates showed the best correlation. Of the data sets fit with the power function, the set of December 1981 beta exposure exhibited the least scatter. The coefficient of determination for this set was calculated to be 0.915.

  11. IAEA activities and experience in Iraq under the relevant resolutions of the United Nations Security Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    United National Security Council Resolution 687 (1991) mandated, inter alia, the destruction of all weapons of mass destruction - chemical, biological, ballistic and nuclear - existing in Iraq, including equipment, facilities and materials used for their production. Resolution 715 (1991) adopted an open-ended plan for ongoing monitoring and verification aimed at preventing a reconstruction of Iraq's capabilities in the production of weapons of mass destruction. Under these resolutions the IAEA was given responsibility to implement the Security Council mandate in the nuclear area, with the assistance and co-operation of the United Nations Special Commission. The paper provides an overview of the IAEA's activities in Iraq under United Nations Security Council resolutions and offers some comments on the lessons to be learned. (author)

  12. Activity Approach and Practice-oriented Primary Teacher Training, Experience of the Siberian Federal University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolyaninova O.G.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Current issue was done under the Federal Target Education Development Program from 2011 to 2015, with the aim of networking development in vocational secondary education for teacher training based on new modules of applied bachelor programs focused on strengthening the practical orientation of future teacher training. This is considered as a basis of improvement of the federal higher educational standards, the development of new basic exemplary educational programs and finding new ways of educational outcomes assess according to the teacher professional standard. The authors believe that the successful activity in this area will improve the quality of primary school teachers training and will reduce the shortage of personnel in primary education and in secondary vocational education in Russia and Krasnoyarsk Territory in particular.

  13. Role of National Coordination for Effective Border Monitoring Activity: Malaysia's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2005, Malaysia has embarked on several initiatives to enhance the country's capability in combating the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials at its identified strategic points of entry and exit. This concern is addressed through the installation of Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) and the creation of its operational supporting systems, combining the availability of supporting nuclear and other radiation identification devices, resources, concept of operation and standard operating procedures. With RPM installations involving a complex set up at points of entry and exit with the presence of several law enforcement agencies with their existing dedicated roles, there is obviously a demand for a coordinated approach to ensure effective border monitoring activity in the country. (author)

  14. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  15. From Hybrid to Actively-Controlled Gas Lubricated Bearings – Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morosi, Stefano

    experimentally, showing dependency on the supply pressure and, less prominently, the rotational velocity. Moreover, additional research is carried out in order to perform a feasibility study on a new kind of hybrid permanent magnetic – aerodynamic gas bearing. This new kind of machine is intended to exploit...... bearings, tilting pad and flexure pivot gas bearings. These solutions proved to be effective in improving static and dynamic properties of the bearings, however issues related to the manufacturing and accuracy of predictions has so far limited their applications. Another drawback is that passive bearings...... offer a low degree of robustness, meaning that an accurate optimization is necessary for each application. Another way of improving gas bearings operation performance is by using active control systems, transforming conventional gas bearings in an electro-mechanical machine component. In this framework...

  16. Activity Theories and the Ontology of Psychology: Learning from Danish and Russian Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jens; Mironenko, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Psychology has permanent problems of theoretical coherence and practical, analytic and critical efficiency. It is claimed that Activity Theory (AT) with roots in a long European philosophical tradition and continued in Russian AT is a first step to remedy this. A Danish version of AT may have a key to exceed some, mostly implicit, ontological restrictions in traditional AT and free it from an embracement of functionalism and mechanicism, rooted in Renaissance Physics. The analysis goes back to Aristotle's understanding of the freely moving animal in its ecology and introduces some dualities in the encounter between subject and object which replace the dualistic dichotomies traditionally splitting Psychology in Naturwissenschaft vs. Geisteswissenshaft. This also implies a "Copernican turn" of Cartesian dualism. The perspectives are to give place for a phenomenology of meaning without cutting human psyche out of Nature and to open Psychology to its domain.

  17. Activity and toxicity of 2-CDA in Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of immature and abnormal bone marrow derived langerhans cells. Treatment is usually multimodal. Potent anti-monocyte as well as immunomodulatory activity of 2-CDA and its proven efficacy in many lymphoproliferative disorders has made 2-CDA a rational choice in treatment of LCH. Aim : To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity profile of 2-CDA in children with relapsed or refractory LCH. Setting and Design : This is a pilot study and we present the initial data of the first seven patients treated at our institution. Materials and Methods : Seven patients of relapsed and refractory LCH were enrolled from July 2000 to June 2004. The cohort of seven patients included six males and one female with a median age at initiation of cladribine was 2.25 years (range, 1.67 to 7.0 years. Three patients had received one prior chemotherapy regimen while the rest were heavily pretreated. Cladribine was administered over two hours IV daily for five days and repeated every four weeks. Results : After a median of six courses of cladribine (range, 2 to 9, two (33% patients achieved PR and two (33% patients have SD on imaging but are clinically better. None experienced grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity. At a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 8 to 52 months, five patients remain alive and one patient has died. Conclusion : Our study shows that single agent 2-CDA is active and well-tolerated in children with relapsed or refractory LCH.

  18. Scintillating glass, fiber-optic plate detectors for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the performance of scintillating glass fiber-optic plates using 10 GeV/c particles at the SLAC test beam. The plates were composed of: Terbium activated cladded-glass cores in a matrix of 15 μm spacing; and Cerium activated cladded-glass cores in a matrix of variable spacing 6-10 μm. The target plates were viewed with a three-stage, gatable image intensifier. Particle tracks and nuclear interactions were recorded on film for both materials. We observe 5 detected hits/mm for minimum ionizing particles for the Tb glass, and 1-2 hits/mm for the Ce glass. The test results indicate that scintillating glass fiber-optic plates can be used as high spatial resolution tracking detectors for both fixed target and colliding beam experiments

  19. I-f Starting and Active Flux Based Sensorless Vector Control of Reluctance Synchronous Motors, with Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarlita, Sorin-Christian; Fatu, M.; Tutelea, L. N.;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, hybrid, motion sensorless control of an axially laminated anisotropic (ALA) reluctance synchronous machine (RSM). By separately controlling Id and Iq currents with the reference currents Id*, Iq* being held constant, and ramping the reference frequency, the motor starts...... flux based sensorless vector control and vice versa when the frequency reaches a certain level. The control also integrates a state observer based on the active “flux concept” used to deliver RSM rotor position and speed information. Experimental results validate the proposed control strategies....... with a robust start-up method called I-f control. This kind of control strategy also allows the motor to experience low speeds without initial position estimation or machine parameters identification. The control uses first order lag compensators to ensure smooth transitions from I-f control to active...

  20. Decoding humor experiences from brain activity of people viewing comedy movies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Sawahata

    Full Text Available Humans naturally have a sense of humor. Experiencing humor not only encourages social interactions, but also produces positive physiological effects on the human body, such as lowering blood pressure. Recent neuro-imaging studies have shown evidence for distinct mental state changes at work in people experiencing humor. However, the temporal characteristics of these changes remain elusive. In this paper, we objectively measured humor-related mental states from single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data obtained while subjects viewed comedy TV programs. Measured fMRI data were labeled on the basis of the lag before or after the viewer's perception of humor (humor onset determined by the viewer-reported humor experiences during the fMRI scans. We trained multiple binary classifiers, or decoders, to distinguish between fMRI data obtained at each lag from ones obtained during a neutral state in which subjects were not experiencing humor. As a result, in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right temporal area, the decoders showed significant classification accuracies even at two seconds ahead of the humor onsets. Furthermore, given a time series of fMRI data obtained during movie viewing, we found that the decoders with significant performance were also able to predict the upcoming humor events on a volume-by-volume basis. Taking into account the hemodynamic delay, our results suggest that the upcoming humor events are encoded in specific brain areas up to about five seconds before the awareness of experiencing humor. Our results provide evidence that there exists a mental state lasting for a few seconds before actual humor perception, as if a viewer is expecting the future humorous events.

  1. Experiences Gained from Radiation Protection Activities in Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    My official duties and responsibilities in Egypt and Saudi Arabia as radiation safety officer, qualified expert and head of dosimetry section covered the specified branch of radiation protection. This branch may be called Applied Radiation Protection. This branch covers all aspects of personal and environmental dosimetry and monitoring, as well as, radiation measurements and shielding. This branch has been implemented at many universities, medical centers and nuclear organizations in both Egypt and Saudi Arabia. As a result, three subjects have been highlighted 1] Radiation Protection of workers, public and environment, 2) Safety of radioactive materials to ensure its control and 3) Security from unauthorized removal. A program has been proposed as (RPSS program). In this program, radiation workers are responsible for the security of all radioactive materials in their possession including radioactive waste in storage cabinets and sources left unattended on laboratory benches. Occupational radiation exposures have been kept below dose limits at all radiation areas by training increased experience and ability of radiation workers. All radioactive materials that are not in locked storage are under constant surveillance and immediate control at all times by Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) or medical physicist departments. Precautionary measures serve as a guide to safe operations in handling radioactive materials and radiation sources. Certain restricted areas, which contain large quantities of radioactive materials, required additional security measures. Implementation of this program led to secure of radioactive materials from unauthorized removal or access, public health, maintaining exposures as low as reasonably achievable and promoting a protective safe working environment with no contamination. It is recommended to include this program in Radiation Protection Manual and Emergency preparedness procedures at academic institutions, nuclear research facilities and

  2. Initial experience with active breathing control of liver motion during ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent evidence has shown that some patients with hepatic tumors can be safely irradiated to a dose well over twice the whole liver tolerance dose if portions of normal liver are spared. Correction during treatment planning for the ventilatory motion of the liver can add a large volume of normal liver to the planning target volume. Any reduction in ventilatory motion has the potential to allow a higher dose of radiation to be given safely. Active Breathing Control (ABC) can be used to temporarily stop the airflow to a patient, thus immobilizing the liver, at any part of a patient's ventilatory cycle. ABC during helical CT scanning can be used to study the full three dimensional motion of the liver and other abdominal organs during ventilation. Ultimately, if the use of ABC is found to be clinically feasible, tolerable for patients, and, most importantly, reproducible over time, then ABC may be used during radiation treatment. Materials and Methods: An ABC apparatus was constructed using a flow monitor and scissor valves on both the inhalation and exhalation paths to the patient. The patient breathed through either a mouthpiece or facemask during the procedure. The ventilatory cycle was displayed in real time. When a stable breathing pattern was observed, the ABC was activated at a specific lung volume, closing both scissors valves, and preventing ventilation. The length of time for comfortable activation of the ABC machine for the individual patient was determined during a teaching and practice period prior to CT scanning. Helical CT scans (slice thickness 0.5 cm) to assess the potential benefit of immobilizing breathing were obtained for normal breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration. The reproducibility of ABC over time was assessed by repeating the end-inspiration scan both immediately and one week later. The contours of the liver and kidneys were entered for each study. Results: Five patients have undergone ABC study of the abdomen. End

  3. Experiences with Extra-Vehicular Activities in Response to Critical ISS Contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cise, E. A.; Kelly, B. J.; Radigan, J. P.; Cranmer, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of the International Space Station (ISS) design from the proposed Space Station Freedom to today's current implementation resulted in external hardware redundancy vulnerabilities in the final design. Failure to compensate for or respond to these vulnerabilities could put the ISS in a posture where it could no longer function as a habitable space station. In the first years of ISS assembly, these responses were to largely be addressed by the continued resupply and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) capabilities of the Space Shuttle. Even prior to the decision to retire the Space Shuttle, it was realized that ISS needed to have its own capability to be able to rapidly repair or replace external hardware without needing to wait for the next cargo resupply mission. As documented in a previous publication, in 2006 development was started to baseline Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA, or spacewalk) procedures to replace hardware components whose failure would expose some of the ISS vulnerabilities should a second failure occur. This development work laid the groundwork for the onboard crews and the ground operations and engineering teams to be ready to replace any of this failed hardware. In 2010, this development work was put to the test when one of these pieces of hardware failed. This paper will provide a brief summary of the planning and processes established in the original Contingency EVA development phase. It will then review how those plans and processes were implemented in 2010, highlighting what went well as well as where there were deficiencies between theory and reality. This paper will show that the original approach and analyses, though sound, were not as thorough as they should have been in the realm of planning for next worse failures, for documenting Programmatic approval of key assumptions, and not pursuing sufficient engineering analysis prior to the failure of the hardware. The paper will further highlight the changes made to the Contingency

  4. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based on the d(40)-Li neutron source reaction which produces the white neutron spectrum with mean energy of 14 MeV, energy range with high intensity of neutron beam up to 35 MeV, and weak tail up to 55 MeV. At the Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR in Rez near Prague, the source reaction of p+Be was investigated for proton energy of 35 MeV and beam current intensity of 9.2μA. The produced white spectrum with neutron flux up to 1011 cm−2 s−1 was determined by the dosimetry foils activation technique at two sample-to-target distances and validated against the Monte Carlo predictions. The neutron field of these high-flux p(35)-Be white neutron source represents the useful tool for experimental simulation of the spectrum of the IFMIF facility, validating the activation cross-section data in the energy range relevant to the IFMIF, studying the radiation hardness of electronics against the high-energy neutron fields, and various activation experiments. - Highlights: • Development of accelerator-driven neutron sources. • Fast neutron spectrometry. • Multi-foil activation technique. • Nuclear data measurement and validation in the energy range of IFMIF

  5. Treatment of active steroid-refractory inflammatory bowel diseases with granulocytapheresis: Our experience with a prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bresci Giampaolo; Parisi Giuseppe; Bertoni Michele; Mazzoni Alessandro; Scatena Fabrizio; Copria Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with the use of granulocytapheresis (GCAP) in 14 patients with active steroidrefractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in order to evaluate its efficacy in achieving remission and maintaining a long lasting symptom-free period.METHODS: The activity of the disease was evaluated by clinical activity index (CAI) and endoscopic index (EI)in ulcerative colitis (UC), while by Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) in Crohn's disease (CD). The patients were treated using the AdacolumnTM system, an adsorption column which selectively binds to granulocytes and monocytes. One session/week of GCAP was performed for 5 wk. Steroids were stopped during apheresis.RESULTS: All the patients completed the five-week course showing no complications. At the end of the last session, 93% of patients showed a clinical remission of the disease that persisted for 6 mo. Nine months after the end of the treatment, 60% of the cases maintained remission, while 23% of the patients were still in clinical remission after 12 mo.CONCLUSION: Even if the number of our patients with steroid-refractory IBDs was not big, we can assert that GCAP is well tolerated and effective, especially in the first six months after the treatment, in a significant percentage of cases. The rate of sustained response drops slightly after 6 mo and significantly after 12 mo, however the absence of severe side effects can be a stimulus for further evaluating new schedules of treatment.

  6. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  7. Natural Environments and Childhood Experiences Promoting Physical Activity, Examining the Mediational Effects of Feelings about Nature and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    The importance of natural environments (NEs) for physical activity (PA) has been studied extensively. However, there is scant evidence to explain the motivational processes underlying the NE-PA relation. The aim of this study was to investigate the NE-PA relation using an ecological framework, focusing on perception of NEs, childhood experiences and possible intra- and inter-individual mediators. Data were retrieved from a cross-sectional survey among 2168 adults from all over Norway. In addition, the coverage of NEs by municipalities was retrieved from national registers. Logistic regression showed that, unlike the self-reported proximity to NEs, higher ratings of perceived supportiveness of NEs for PA predicted participation in NE-based PA for at least 60 min/week or 150 min/week, before and after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. Reporting frequent experiences in nature during childhood was also an important predictor of higher levels of NE-based PA. Furthermore, a mediational analysis showed that the effect of both predictors was mediated by “feelings about nature” and “social networks”. These findings indicate that to encourage the use of local NE for PA, not only should environmental perceptions be taken into account, positive feelings towards nature alongside opportunities to share activity in nature with others should also be promoted. PMID:27110802

  8. The LVD Core Facility: a study of LVD as muon veto and active shielding for dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Selvi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the possibility of using the existing structure of a running experiment, the LVD supernova observatory at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, as an active shield and veto for the muon-induced background. In our vision LVD could become (without affecting in any way its main purpose of SN neutrino telescope) a host for a relatively compact but massive experiment looking for rare events. The empty volume that can be obtained removing 2 modules from the most internal part of the detector is 2.1m x 6.2m x 2.8m; we will call it LVD Core Facility (LVD-CF). We have evaluated the active vetoing and shielding power of LVD, with a detailed MC simulation (based on Geant4) of the detector and the rock that surrounds it. The results show that the flux of neutrons that are not associated with a visible muon in LVD is very low; it results reduced by a factor 50, equivalent to the one present in a much deeper underground laboratory, i.e. Sudbury. Moreover we present the results of on-going measur...

  9. Experiment on large scale plume interaction with a stratified gas environment resembling the thermal activity of a autocatalytic recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, G.; Kapulla, R.; Paladino, D.; Zboray, R. [Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, Nuclear Energy and Safety Dept., Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics codes (CFD) are increasingly being used to simulate containment conditions after various transient accident scenarios. Consequently, the reliability of such codes must be tested against experimental data. Such validation experiments related to gas mixing and hydrogen transport within containment compartments addressing the effect of heat source are presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted in the large-scale thermal-hydraulics PANDA facility located at the Paul-Scherrer-Inst. (PSI) in Switzerland, in the frame of the OECD/SETH-2 project. A 10 kW electric heater simulating the thermal activity of the autocatalytic recombiner was activated at full power in a containment vessel at the top of which a thick helium layer is initially present. The hot plume interacts with the bottom of the helium layer which is slowly eroded until complete break up at 1350 s. After final erosion of the layer a strong temperature and concentration gradient is maintained in the vessel below the heater inlet as well as in the adjacent vessel below the interconnecting pipe. A detailed characterization of the operating heater suggests the presence of cold gas ingress at the outlet that affects the flow in the chimney. This can be of concern if present in a real PAR unit. (authors)

  10. 开展职工文体活动的体会%Experience of Developing Employee Recreational Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈颖

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper mainly analysis significance of organize staff activitiesan and the experience. Methods Elaborated in the current situation, to strengthen the importance of staff problem activities. Results In view of the work experiences and research achievements were summarized, share study of workers to carry out recreational and sports activities. Conclusion We hope that through this article analysis can help to create a good environment for the development of the relevant units.%目的:针对目前组织开展职工活动的意义以及体会两方面进行分析。方法阐述了在当前形势下,加强…开展职工问题活动的重要性。结果笔者通过研究、总结和归纳自身多年工作经验,分享一些职工文体活动开展的体会。结论希望通过本文的分析能帮助相关单位营造良好的发展环境。

  11. Monitoring soil water dynamics at 0.1-1000 m scales using active DTS: the MOISST experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, C.; Moreno, D.; Legrand, C.; Dong, J.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Actively Heated Fiber Optics (AHFO) method can measure soil water content at high temporal (39,000 locations simultaneously for each heat pulse. Six soil monitoring stations along the fiber optic path were installed to provide additional validation and calibration of the AHFO data. Gravimetric soil moisture and soil thermal samplings were performed periodically to provide additional distributed validation and calibration of the DTS data. In this work we present the preliminary results of this experiment. We will also address the experience learned from this large scale deployment of the AHFO method. In particular, we will present the in-situ soil moisture calibration method developed to tackle the calibration challenges associated with the high spatial heterogeneity of the soil physical and thermal properties. The material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AP58G, with equipment and assistance also provided by CTEMPs.org with support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA or the National Science Foundation. Sayde, C., J. Benitez Buelga, L. Rodriguez-Sinobas, L. El Khoury, M. English, N. van de Giesen, and J.S. Selker (2014). Mapping Variability of Soil Water Content and Flux across 1-1,000 m scales using the Actively Heated Fiber Optic Method, Accepted for publication in Water Resour. Res.

  12. EFFICIENT FORMS OF SPORTS AND RECREATION ACTIVITIES IN A UNIVERSITY: RUSSIAN AND FOREIGN EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Пупышева, Жанна; Карвунис, Юлия

    2015-01-01

    Сделана попытка провести анализ российского и зарубежного опыта эффективной организации спортивно-оздоровительной работы в высших учебных заведениях с целью выработки новых подходов к данному направлению деятельности на современном этапе модернизации образовательной системы.The problems of organization of physical culture and sports and recreational activities in the universities of our country acquires a new format in terms of introduction of modern educational standards and changes of requi...

  13. Characterization of metoprolol biodegradation and its transformation products generated in activated sludge batch experiments and in full scale WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubirola, A; Llorca, M; Rodriguez-Mozaz, S; Casas, N; Rodriguez-Roda, I; Barceló, D; Buttiglieri, G

    2014-10-15

    Metoprolol (MTP) is a compound of concern, considered as an emerging contaminant due to its high consumption, pseudopersistence and potential ecotoxicity. Activated sludge batch experiments were performed to evaluate the biological transformation of MTP and the formation of transformation products under different treatment conditions. Total MTP removal was obtained in aerobic conditions, and the formation of MTP known metabolites (metoprolol acid (MTPA), α-hydroxymetoprolol (α-HMTP) and O-desmethylmetoprolol (O-DMTP)) and unknown transformation products (TPs) was investigated. The three known metabolites and two new TPs generated along the experiments were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. For the two new TPs plausible structures were proposed based on the tentative identification. MTPA had the major ratio formation for the TPs identified along the experiments (up to 40% of initial MTP concentration after 96 h treatment) and its persistence through biological treatment was proven. Ecotoxicity studies using Vibrio fischeri bioluminescent bacteria in an acute toxicity test showed that MTP and its known TPs are not toxic with the exception of o-DMTP. Finally, MTP and its TPs were monitored in a full scale membrane bioreactor and in a full scale conventional urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and the results were compared with those obtained in batch experiments. α-HMTP was detected for the first time in a WWTP influent whereas MTPA was detected in influent and effluent WWTP samples at much higher levels (up to 100 folds higher) than MTP itself remarking its high persistence. PMID:24973729

  14. Temperament moderates the influence of periadolescent social experience on behavior and adrenocortical activity in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, M J; McClintock, M K; Cavigelli, S A

    2014-08-01

    Adolescence is a period of significant behavioral and physiological maturation, particularly related to stress responses. Animal studies that have tested the influence of adolescent social experiences on stress-related behavioral and physiological development have led to complex results. We used a rodent model of neophobia to test the hypothesis that the influence of adolescent social experience on adult behavior and adrenocortical function is modulated by pre-adolescent temperament. Exploratory activity was assessed in 53 male Sprague-Dawley rats to classify temperament and then they were housed in one of the three conditions during postnatal days (PND) 28-46: (1) with familiar kin, (2) with novel social partners, or (3) individually with no social partners. Effects on adult adrenocortical function were evaluated from fecal samples collected while rats were individually-housed and exposed to a 1-hour novel social challenge during PND 110-114. Adolescent-housing with novel or no social partners led to reduced adult glucocorticoid production compared to adolescent-housing with familiar littermates. Additionally, highly-exploratory pre-weanling rats that were housed with novel social partners during adolescence exhibited increased exploratory behavior and a more rapid return to basal glucocorticoid production in adulthood compared to those housed with familiar or no social partners during adolescence and compared to low-exploratory rats exposed to novel social partners. In sum, relatively short-term adolescent social experiences can cause transient changes in temperament and potentially longer-term changes in recovery of glucocorticoid production in response to adult social challenges. Furthermore, early temperament may modulate the influence of adolescent experiences on adult behavioral and adrenocortical function.

  15. Experiments on feedback control of multiple resistive wall modes comparing different active coil arrays and sensor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Experiments have been carried out on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch device to study several important issues related to feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). In the first series of experiments, the effect of side band coupling due to the limited number of coils in the array was investigated. Different feedback schemes have been used in order to overcome the coupling effect such as the mode control scheme, which includes real time spatial FFT to obtain action on individual modes. The unstable RWM spectrum consists of about 16 modes with m=1 and different toroidal mode number n. In recent experiments using the intelligent shell scheme with a full PID controller action and higher feedback gains, complete stabilisation of the modes is achieved. The active array consists of 128 coils at 4 poloidal and 32 toroidal positions. The pulse length is equivalent to 10 wall times, limited by the power supply. Without feedback the discharge pulse ends prematurely after 3-4 wall times due effects associated with the RWM mode growth. With feedback stabilization, plasma rotation and tearing mode rotation is maintained throughout the pulse, thereby avoiding the locked mode phenomenon often observed in RFPs and manifested in an increased local plasma wall interaction. With feedback control the influx from the wall is maintained at a low level throughout the pulse. The first feedback experiments using a sensor array measuring the toroidal field component have been carried out. The critical gain required for suppression has been compared for the radial and toroidal field sensor cases, and found in qualitative agreement with theory. The phase shift of the control field has been varied. Optimal suppression is achieved at the predicted complex feedback gain phase. Mode rotation is induced at other complex gain phases, in agreement with modelling. Previously developed linear models have guided the feedback experiments. Open-loop experiments have been used for

  16. Design, construction, and operation of an actively controlled deep-sea CO2 enrichment experiment using a cabled observatory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, William J.; Walz, Peter M.; Peltzer, Edward T.; Barry, James P.; Herlien, Robert A.; Headley, Kent L.; Kecy, Chad; Matsumoto, George I.; Maughan, Thom; O'Reilly, Thomas C.; Salamy, Karen A.; Shane, Farley; Brewer, Peter G.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the design, testing, and performance of an actively controlled deep-sea Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (dp-FOCE) system for the execution of seafloor experiments relating to the impacts of ocean acidification on natural ecosystems. We used the 880 m deep MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cable site offshore Monterey Bay, California for this work, but the Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) system concept is designed to be scalable and can be modified to be used in a wide variety of ocean depths and locations. The main frame is based on a flume design with active thruster control of flow and a central experimental chamber. The unit was allowed to free fall to the seafloor and connected to the cable node by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation. For operation at depth we designed a liquid CO2 containment reservoir which provided the CO2 enriched working fluid as ambient seawater was drawn through the reservoir beneath the more buoyant liquid CO2. Our design allowed for the significant lag time associated with the hydration of the dissolved CO2 molecule, resulting in an e-folding time, τ, of 97 s between fluid injection and pH sensing at the mean local T=4.31±0.14 °C and pHT of 7.625±0.011. The system maintained a pH offset of ~0.4 pH units compared to the surrounding ocean for a period of ~1 month. The unit allows for the emplacement of deep-sea animals for testing. We describe the components and software used for system operation and show examples of each. The demonstrated ability for active control of experimental systems opens new possibilities for deep-sea biogeochemical perturbation experiments of several kinds and our developments in open source control systems software and hardware described here are applicable to this end.

  17. The DOSIS -Experiment onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station -First Mission Results from the Active DOSTEL Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Beaujean, Rudolf; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Kortmann, Onno; Labrenz, Johannes; Reitz, Guenther

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long dura-tion human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the DLR experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18th. It consists in a first part of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory. The second part are two active radiation detectors (DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSIS Data and Power Unit) in a nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. After the successful installation the active part has been activated on the 18th July 2009. Each of the DOSTEL units consists of two 6.93 cm PIPS silicon detectors forming a telescope with an opening angle of 120. The two DOSTELs are mounted with their telescope axis perpendicular to each other to investigate anisotropies of the radiation field inside the COLUMBUS module especially during the passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and during Solar Particle Events (SPEs). The data from the DOSTEL units are transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated

  18. Geophysical variables and behavior: LXXI. Differential contribution of geomagnetic activity to paranormal experiences concerning death and crisis: an alternative to the ESP hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A

    1993-04-01

    A total of 621 reports (experienced over an approximately 70-year period) of putative psi experiences concerning death or crisis were differentiated according to traditional labels: telepathic, precognitive, and postmortem phenomena. The 232 telepathic experiences occurred during 24-hour periods in which the global geomagnetic activity was significantly less (quieter) than during the days before or after the experiences; this relationship was not displayed by the 186 precognitive or 203 postmortem cases. Key day differences in geomagnetic activity for the three classes of experiences were equivalent to a correlation of about 0.35. Although content analysis suggests that nocturnal psi experiences and temporal lobe epilepsy may share a similar mechanism, different classes of subjective psi experiences may not be affected by the same stimuli. PMID:8483667

  19. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme: A Research-Inspired Methods Optimization Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbur, Jaime F.; Vail, Justin D.; Mitchell, Lindsey N.; Jakeman, David L.; Timmons, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern…

  20. Indigenous teachers' experiences of the implementation of culture-based mathematics activities in Sámi school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutti, Ylva Jannok

    2013-03-01

    The goal of Indigenous education is that it should be approached on the basis of the Indigenous language and culture; this is also the case with Sámi education. The Sámi School Board has stated that all teaching in Sámi schools should be culturally based, despite the fact that Sámi culture-based teaching is not specifically defined. Therefore, teachers themselves must adapt the teaching and as a result, usually no Sámi culture-based mathematics teaching takes place. The aim of this article is to discuss Indigenous teachers' experiences with designing and implementing culture-based mathematics activities in Sámi preschool and primary school. The teachers' work with culture-based mathematics activities took the form of Sámi cultural thematic work with ethnomathematical content, Multicultural school mathematics with Sámi cultural elements, and Sámi intercultural mathematics teaching. Culture-based mathematics activities took place within an action research study in the Swedish part of Sápmi. Sápmi comprises northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland, as well as the Kola Peninsula in Russia. In the action research study, six teachers conducted culture-based mathematics activities in preschool and primary school on the basis of the action research loop "plan-act-observe-reflect." During the study the teachers changed from a problem-focused perspective to a possibility-focused culture-based teaching perspective characterised by a self-empowered Indigenous teacher role, as a result of which they started to act as agents for Indigenous school change. The concept of "decolonisation" was visible in the teachers' narratives. The teachers' newly developed knowledge about the ethnomathematical research field seemed to enhance their work with Indigenous culture-based mathematics teaching.

  1. A tracker for the Mu3e experiment based on high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Niklaus, E-mail: nberger@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Augustin, Heiko; Bachmann, Sebastian; Kiehn, Moritz [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Perić, Ivan [Zentralinstitut für technische Informatik, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Philipp, Raphael; Schöning, André; Stumpf, Kevin; Wiedner, Dirk; Windelband, Bernd; Zimmermann, Marco [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay μ{sup +}→e{sup +}e{sup −}e{sup +}, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10{sup −16}. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimise multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50μm and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25μm thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium.

  2. Experiment of exploration using the active-faults exploration system; Katsudanso tansa system wo mochiita chika tansa jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikada, H.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Hirata, N. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Earthquake Research Institute; Ikeda, Y. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science; Ikawa, T.; Kawabe, Y.; Aoki, Y. [JAPEX Geoscience Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    A system for exploration of active-faults by seismic reflection profiling method was introduced at Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo. A test-run was conducted to check the performance of this system at Ranzan, Saitama Prefecture. This paper describes the confirmed performance of mini-VIB as a wide band frequency seismic source, the quality of data obtained using a digital data acquisition system, and problems for data processing of fault exploration in the future. For the test-run at Ranzan, two-dimensional exploration was conducted by the quasi-three-dimensional data acquisition method using three geophones of 8 Hz, 28 Hz, and 40 Hz, simply arranged in parallel on the measurement line. Using an active seismic vibrator, mini-VIB, data acquisition of faults in the wide band frequency was achieved, which would result in the highly accurate imaging. Operation of data acquisition and processing systems is easy, and the system can be also used as a kind of black box. The existing methods are to be used sufficiently as a tool for imaging of faults. Further research for accumulating experience may become necessary toward the extension of the system expected in the future. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Activation energy of diffusivities for deuterated water in compacted sodium-bentonite. Through-diffusion experiment and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to quantify effect of temperature on diffusivity of deuterated water (HDO) in compacted sodium-bentonite, through-diffusion experiments were conducted at elevated temperature from 298 to 333 K. Kunipia F (Na-montmorillonite content > 98 wt. %; Kunimine Industry Co.) was compacted to a dry density of 0.9 and 1.35 Mg/m3. Since smectite flakes were perpendicularly oriented to a direction of compaction, anisotropy of diffusivity was investigated parallel and normal to the preferred orientation of smectite. Effective diffusion coefficient De of HDO was larger for a diffusional direction parallel to the preferred orientation than normal to that for both dry densities. These results well agreed to the previously reported ones for tritiated water. Activation energies of De in compacted bentonite increased with increasing dry density in the range of 19-25 kJ/mol which was slightly larger than that in bulk water (18 kJ/mol). This relationship can be considered to be due to both the pore structure development and high activation energy of water (18-23 kJ/mol) in the vicinity of smectite surface (within 2 nm) on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations. (author)

  4. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and greasy sludge from flotation process: Batch versus CSTR experiments to investigate optimal design

    OpenAIRE

    Girault, R.; Bridoux, G.; Nauleau, F.; Poullain, C.; Buffet, J.; Peu, P.; Sadowski, A.G.; Béline, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the maximum ratio of greasy sluvdge to incorporate with waste activated sludge was investigated in batch and CSTR experiments. In batch experiments, inhibition occurred with a greasy sludge ratio of more than 20-30% of the feed COD. In CSTR experiments, the optimal greasy sludge ratio was 60% of the feed COD and inhibition occurred above a ratio of 80%. Hence, batch experiments can predict the CSTR yield when the degradation phenomenon are additive but cannot be used to determi...

  6. Physical activity among children with type 1 diabetes: an exploration of children’s experiences and development of an intervention to promote self-efficacy and participation

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Regular physical activity among children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) can help optimise long-term health outcomes. This thesis explores the experience of physical activity among children aged 9-11 years with T1DM and their parents, develops a physical activity intervention and evaluates its feasibility. Social cognitive theories have been drawn upon to develop our understanding and inform theoretically-driven behaviour change strategies. First, a systematic review with meta-analys...

  7. Experiments Relating to Whole-Body Activation Analysis in Man In Vivo Using 14-MeV Incident Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium eczema is a well-known phenomenon in dermatological practice. Different explanations may be given for it. According to one of these the specific texture of the skin of patients is assumed to allow more chromium to pass through the upper layers. As a result, the chromium accumulates faster in the dermis of patients so that a critical value is reached sooner. Another explanation might be that die sensitivity threshold for chromium in patients is lower than in normal persons and can more easily be exceeded. To distinguish between these possibilities and to obtain more information, an investigation was started in which the chromium content in the skin was compared for eczema patients and normal people. The sample weight (10 mg) and the chromium content (0.2 - 0.4 ppm) involved require a sensitive technique. Neutron activation analysis is well suited to this purpose. Under our operation conditions (irradiation time 10 days, neutron flux 1014n/cm2s) it is possible to determine quantities as low as 5 x 1011 g of chromium. Preliminary experiments show relatively large variations in chromium content of comparable samples, even in skin samples taken from the back of a single person. It is further suggested by the results of these experiments that the chromium content in the skin of eczema patients is lower than in that of normal patients. The results of the analysis may be seriously affected by chromium contamination during sample preparation. Therefore chromium-free instruments must be used. To avoid chromium migration in the skin due to degeneration processes, samples must be taken from persons alive or shortly after their death. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the legal consequences of action affects neural activity and emotional experience during the resolution of moral dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletti, Carolina; Sarlo, Michela; Palomba, Daniela; Rumiati, Rino; Lotto, Lorella

    2015-03-01

    In any modern society killing is regarded as a severe violation of the legal codes that is subjected to penal judgment. Therefore, it is likely that people take legal consequences into account when deciding about the hypothetical killing of one person in classic moral dilemmas, with legal concerns contributing to decision-making. In particular, by differing for the degree of intentionality and emotional salience, Footbridge- and Trolley-type dilemmas might promote differential assignment of blame and punishment while implicating the same severity of harm. The present study was aimed at comparing the neural activity, subjective emotional reactions, and behavioral choices in two groups of participants who either took (Legal group) or did not take (No Legal group) legal consequences into account when deciding on Footbridge-type and Trolley-type moral dilemmas. Stimulus- and response-locked ERPs were measured to investigate the neural activity underlying two separate phases of the decision process. No difference in behavioral choices was found between groups. However, the No Legal group reported greater overall emotional impact, associated with lower preparation for action, suggesting greater conflict between alternative motor responses representing the different decision choices. In contrast, the Legal group showed an overall dampened affective experience during decision-making associated with greater overall action readiness and intention to act, reflecting lower conflict in responding. On these bases, we suggest that in moral dilemmas legal consequences of actions provide a sort of reference point on which people can rely to support a decision, independent of dilemma type. PMID:25638294

  9. A Cross-Sectional Survey Study About the Most Common Solitary and Social Flow Activities to Extend the Concept of Optimal Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tímea Magyaródi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous assumptions note that the most powerful experiences of engagement are shared with others. Therefore, in the framework of positive psychology, to expand the dynamic interactionism-related flow theory, we have attempted to conduct an exploratory study about flow to reveal the most common activities that can trigger this experience during solitary or social situations. The study involved 1,709 adult participants from Hungary (Age: M = 26.95, SD = 11.23. They read descriptions about optimal experience in solitary and social situations and were asked to identify the activity from their life that is most typically followed by the described experiences. The social context was supplemented by other flow-related questions for a deeper understanding and to contribute to the research. According to the results the most typical solitary flow activities are found to be work, sports, creative activities and reading. The most common flow-inducing social activities are work and sports. The choice of the most frequent flow-inducing activities in both solitary and interpersonal situations is dependent on the gender of the respondent, and various demographical factors can influence the frequency of flow experiences in different contexts. Analysis reveal that optimal experience during a social interaction is determined by the perceived level of challenges, the perceived level of cooperation, the immediateness and clarity of the feedback, and the level of the skill. Our study may contribute to the broadening purpose of positive psychology as it focuses on the interpersonal level in relation to flow experience, which, in turn, may also support a higher level of well-being.

  10. A Cross-Sectional Survey Study About the Most Common Solitary and Social Flow Activities to Extend the Concept of Optimal Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyaródi, Tímea; Oláh, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Previous assumptions note that the most powerful experiences of engagement are shared with others. Therefore, in the framework of positive psychology, to expand the dynamic interactionism-related flow theory, we have attempted to conduct an exploratory study about flow to reveal the most common activities that can trigger this experience during solitary or social situations. The study involved 1,709 adult participants from Hungary (Age: M = 26.95, SD = 11.23). They read descriptions about optimal experience in solitary and social situations and were asked to identify the activity from their life that is most typically followed by the described experiences. The social context was supplemented by other flow-related questions for a deeper understanding and to contribute to the research. According to the results the most typical solitary flow activities are found to be work, sports, creative activities and reading. The most common flow-inducing social activities are work and sports. The choice of the most frequent flow-inducing activities in both solitary and interpersonal situations is dependent on the gender of the respondent, and various demographical factors can influence the frequency of flow experiences in different contexts. Analysis reveal that optimal experience during a social interaction is determined by the perceived level of challenges, the perceived level of cooperation, the immediateness and clarity of the feedback, and the level of the skill. Our study may contribute to the broadening purpose of positive psychology as it focuses on the interpersonal level in relation to flow experience, which, in turn, may also support a higher level of well-being. PMID:27247682

  11. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  12. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the Gerda 0ν β β -experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Pelczar, K.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-10-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the Gerda experiment. Similar to Gerda, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m^3, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to Gerda. Suppression factors of a few times 10^3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6)× 10^{-2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of Gerda Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural ^{42}Ar abundance (parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2ν β β -decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in Gerda Phase II is pursued.

  13. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10-2 cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural 42Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  14. International activities and experience in offshore wind power generation; Internationale Aktivitaeten und Erfahrungen im Bereich der Offshore-Windenergienutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehfeldt, K.; Gerdes, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Current activities in the area of offshore wind energy are being made only in the European Community in the form of concrete plans or as projects. Denmark and Sweden began as pioneers in the setting up of offshore wind parks along their coast in the Baltic Sea. As a world-wide first, Denmark saw the practicality of offshore wind energy as a way of reducing the emission of CO{sub 2} and opening new doors in the wind energy branch. Essential is not to name the ambitious goals, but that at the designated suitable regions, pilot projects are implemented therefore initiating extensive research and development projects. Our European neighbours have shown us through their own experience what great potential and underlying dynamic offshore wind energy has. The development of projects can be given with confidence to private sector, if however the main consensus from promoters and environmentalists is desired, then in this instance the governmental participation as a guide would be desirable. (orig.)

  15. Scintillating glass, fiber-optic plate detectors for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing a scintillating glass fiber-optic imaging system for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments. Extensive measurements have been performed on several scintillating-glass compositions, one of which is a silicate-glass containing 0.6 mole % of Ce2O3 known commercially as NRL glass. For this material, fabricated into coherent fiber-optic plates of 10 μm and 25 μm diameter cladded-glass fibers, have observed clear particle tracks and interactions and a yield of about 2 photoelectrons per millimeter of path length for minimum ionizing particles. Additionally, for the bulk NRL glass formed in disks of 1'' diameter and 4 mm thickness, we have observed a about 80% retention of optical transmission through 4 mm of material at 395 mm (the peak of the fluorescence spectrum) for a radiation dose in excess of 107 rads acquired over several days. Results of these tests and others suggest that Ce2O3 based scintillating glasses constitute very promising materials for the fabrication of high resolution tracking detectors for fixed target and colliding beam applications

  16. The APSEL4D Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor and its Usage in a Single Electron Interference Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi

    We have realized a Data Acquisition chain for the use and characterization of APSEL4D, a 32 x 128 Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor, developed as a prototype for frontier experiments in high energy particle physics. In particular a transition board was realized for the conversion between the chip and the FPGA voltage levels and for the signal quality enhancing. A Xilinx Spartan-3 FPGA was used for real time data processing, for the chip control and the communication with a Personal Computer through a 2.0 USB port. For this purpose a firmware code, developed in VHDL language, was written. Finally a Graphical User Interface for the online system monitoring, hit display and chip control, based on windows and widgets, was realized developing a C++ code and using Qt and Qwt dedicated libraries. APSEL4D and the full acquisition chain were characterized for the first time with the electron beam of the transmission electron microscope and with 55Fe and 90Sr radioactive sources. In addition, a beam test was performed at ...

  17. Observing Dynamics in Large-Scale Birkeland Currents with the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Olson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of the magnetic perturbations that predominantly reflect Birkeland currents. The data are acquired by avionics magnetometers of the Iridium satellites and allow measurements from 66 satellites in near-polar circular, low altitude orbits. The configuration of the Iridium satellite constellation determines the longitude sampling spacing of ~ 2 hours and the re-sampling cadence of the system which is 9 minutes. From 2008 to 2013 the AMPERE system was developed which included new flight software on the Iridium satellites to allow telemetry of higher rate data to the ground and the Science Data Center to derive Birkeland current perturbations from the data and invert these signals to derive the global distributions of the currents using data windows of ten minutes. There were many challenges in developing AMPERE including automating inter-calibration between satellites and the baseline determination and removals. The results of AMPERE provide stunning confirmation of many of the statistical estimates for the distribution of currents but more significantly open a new window to understand their instantaneous distribution and dynamics. Examples of new features of the currents and their dynamics revealed by AMPERE are presented. In addition, prospects for new data products and increased data quality anticipated from AMPERE-NEXT to be implemented on the Iridium-NEXT generation of satellites are discussed.

  18. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year′s experience of a multi-disciplinary group′s activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Scala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients′ clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma. It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  19. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Budjas, D.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Barnabe-Heider, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cattadori, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institut for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Center Kurchatov Institut, Moscow (Russian Federation); Heisel, M.; Smolnikov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pelczar, K. [Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Zuzel, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m{sup 3}, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10{sup -2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  20. Limits on Active to Sterile Neutrino Oscillations from Disappearance Searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Bay, Daya; Collaborations, MINOS+; :; Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.(University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Chicago, U.S.A); Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, S. Blyth G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been independently performed by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to pro...

  1. Art Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodek, Bernard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents four articles that examine the role of art experiences in early childhood education: "Educationally Appropriate Art Activities for Young Children," by Bernard Spodek; "Teachers and Children Together: Constructing New Learning," by Lella Gandini; "Fostering Experiences between Young Children and Clay," by Cathy Weisman Topal; and…

  2. Carbon sink activity is stronger under grazing than under mowing: results from a paired eddy flux towers experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Krisztina; Balogh, János; Koncz, Péter; Hidy, Dóra; Cserhalmi, Dóra; Papp, Marianna; Fóti, Szilvia; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Effect of grazing vs. mowing on carbon balance of a grassland was investigated by a paired eddy towers (one of them measuring the grazed, the another the mowed treatment) experiment at the Bugacpuszta sandy grassland site (HU-Bug, 46.69° N, 19.6° E, 114m asl, 10.4 ° C annual mean temperature, 562 mm annual precipitation sum) located in the Hungarian Plain. Eddy covariance measurements started in July, 2002. The area of the mowed treatment is 1 ha, it is located within the grazed treatment (500 ha). Electric fence was set up around the selected area in spring of 2011. Study years include 2011, 2012 and 2013. The pasture is managed extensively (average grazing pressure of 0.5 cattle per hectare), the cattle herd regularly took several kilometres during a grazing day. Annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of the grassland is strongly limited by precipitation, there were 2 source years within the 11 years (2003-2013) of measurements, during which the average annual balance was -109 gCm-2year-1 with standard deviation of 106 gCm-2year-1. Carbon sink activity of the grassland was stronger in the grazed treatment than in the mowed treatment during the three year study period (paired t-test, P=0.058). In the grazed treatment the average sink strength was -142.8 ±40 gCm-2year-1, while in the mowed treatment the average sink strength was -61.5 ±46.5 gCm-2year-1. Differences of carbon balances between the treatments were positively correlated to the annual sum of evapotranspiration (ET), while ETs of the treatments were almost identical (differences within a 10mm year-1 range) in each study year. Water use efficiency in the mowed treatment was 44% of that in the grazed treatment (P=0.045) as a result of the differences in sink capacity. The higher sensitivity to drought by the mowed treatment manifested in decreased sink capacity during summer and in decreased regeneration capacity during autumn rains as shown by the cumulative NEE in the different years. Minor but

  3. Safety evaluation by living probabilistic safety assessment. Procedures and applications for planning of operational activities and analysis of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a daily safety management system and it is based on a plant-specific PSA and supporting information systems. In the living use of PSA, plant status knowledge is used to represent actual plant safety status in monitoring or follow-up perspective. The PSA model must be able to express the risk at a given time and plant configuration. The process, to update the PSA model to represent the current or planned configuration and to use the model to evaluate and direct the changes in the configuration, is called living PSA programme. The main purposes to develop and increase the usefulness of living PSA are: Long term safety planning: To continue the risk assessment process started with the basic PSA by extending and improving the basic models and data to provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of changes in plant design and procedures. Risk planning of operational activities: To support the operational management by providing means for searching optimal operational maintenance and testing strategies from the safety point of view. The results provide support for risk decision making in the short term or in a planning mode. The operational limits and conditions given by technical specifications can be analyzed by evaluating the risk effects of alternative requirements in order to balance the requirements with respect to operational flexibility and plant economy. Risk analysis of operating experience: To provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of incidents and plant status changes. The analyses are used to: identify possible high risk situations, rank the occurred events from safety point of view, and get feedback from operational events for the identification of risk contributors. This report describes the methods, models and applications required to continue the process towards a living use of PSA. 19 tabs, 20 figs

  4. Analysis of science team activities during the 1999 Marsokhod Rover Field Experiment: Implications for automated planetary surface exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geb; Cabrol, Nathalie; Rathe, April

    2001-04-01

    This work analyzes the behavior and effectiveness of a science team using the Marsokhod mobile robot to explore the Silver Lake region in the Mojave Desert near Baker, California. The work addresses the manner in which the geologists organized themselves, how they allocated their time in different activities, how they formed and communicated scientific hypotheses, and the frequency with which they requested different types of data from the mission archive during the first 3 days of the mission. Eleven scientists from the NASA Ames Research Center and three of the five scientists who participated from their home institutions were videotaped as they worked throughout the 3-day experiment. The videotape record indicates that 46% of available person-hours were consumed in semistructured or formal meetings and that only 1% of their time was spent studying immersive, three-dimensional virtual reality models of the robot's surroundings. The remainder of their time was spent in unstructured work sessions in groups of two or three. Hypothesis formation and evolution patterns show a meager flow of information from the distributed science team to the on-site team and a bias against reporting speculative hypotheses. Analysis of the visual imagery received from the robot indicates that acquisition of the large panoramic information leads to high levels of redundancy in the data acquired. The scientists' archive requests indicate that small, specifically requested image targets were the most frequently accessed information. The work suggests alternative organizational structures that would expedite the flow of information within the geologic team. It also advocates emphasizing specific science targets over high-resolution, stereoscopic, panoramic imaging when programming a mobile robot's onboard cameras.

  5. Preliminary experience with air transfer of patients for rescue endovascular therapy after failure of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamada, Noriaki; Matsumaru, Naoki; Kumada, Keisuke; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes our experience with air transfer of patients with acute ischemic stroke in whom intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) failed for rescue endovascular therapy (EVT). Twenty-three consecutive patients in whom IV t-PA failed were transferred to our hospital for rescue EVT between February 2011 and April 2013. The amount of time required for transfer, distance, clinical outcomes, and complications were compared between patients transferred by ground (TG group; n = 17) and by air (TA group; n = 6). Computed tomography imaging on arrival revealed hemorrhagic transformation in 1 (5.9%) patient in the TG group, whereas none of the patients in the TA group developed any type of complication. The remaining 22 patients received rescue EVT. The elapsed time from the request call to arrival at our hospital did not significantly differ between the TG and TA groups (45.8 ± 4.9 min vs. 41.6 ± 2.3 min). However, the distance from the primary hospital to our institution was significantly longer for the TA group than for the TG group (38.8 ± 10.4 km vs. 13.5 ± 1.2 km, p = 0.001). The frequency of favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days after onset) in the TG and TA groups were 25.0% and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.267). Air transfer for patients after IV t-PA failure allowed for more rapid delivery of patients over longer distances than ground transfer. PMID:25739430

  6. The non-proliferation experiment and gas sampling as an on-site inspection activity: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Non-proliferation Experiment (NPE) is contributing to the development of gas sampling methods and models that may be incorporated into future on-site inspection (OSI) activities. Surface gas sampling and analysis, motivated by nuclear test containment studies, have already demonstrated the tendency for the gaseous products of an underground nuclear test to flow hundreds of meters to the surface over periods ranging from days to months. Even in the presence of a uniform sinusoidal pressure variation, there will be a net flow of cavity gas toward the surface. To test this barometric pumping effect at Rainier Mesa, gas bottles containing sulfur hexaflouride and 3He were added to the pre-detonation cavity for the 1 kt chemical explosives test. Pre-detonation measurements of the background levels of both gases were obtained at selected sites on top of the mesa. The background levels of both tracers were found to be at or below mass spectrographic/gas chromatographic sensitivity thresholds in the parts-per-trillion range. Post-detonation, gas chromatographic analyses of samples taken during barometric pressure lows from the sampling sites on the mesa indicate the presence of significant levels (300--600 ppt) of sulfur hexaflouride. However, mass spectrographic analyses of gas samples taken to date do not show the presence of 3He. To explain these observations, several possibilities are being explored through additional sampling/analysis and numerical modeling. For the NPE, the detonation point was approximately 400 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa and the event did not produce significant fracturing or subsidence on the surface of the mesa. Thus, the NPE may ultimately represent an extreme, but useful example for the application and tuning of cavity gas detection techniques

  7. Limits on Active to Sterile Neutrino Oscillations from Disappearance Searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bay, The Daya; Adamson, P; An, F P; Anghel, I; Aurisano, A; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, S Blyth G J; Bogert, D; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, R; Chen, S M; Chen, Y; Chen, Y X; Cheng, J; Cheng, J -H; Chen, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Childress, S; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; De Rijck, S; Deng, Z Y; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gill, R; Gomes, R A; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grassi, M; Grzelak, K; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Habig, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hahn, S R; Han, R; Hans, S; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Holin, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, J; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; James, C; Jen, K L; Jensen, D; Jetter, S; Ji, X L; Ji, X P; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; de Jong, J K; Joshi, J; Kafka, T; Kang, L; Kasahara, S M S; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kramer, M; Kreymer, A; Kwan, 1 K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lang, K; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y -C; Link, J J Ling J M; Litchfield, P J; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J C; Liu, J L; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Lucas, P; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mayer, N; McDonald, K T; McGivern, C; McKeown, R D; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Nakajima, Y; Naples, D; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Ngai, H Y; Nichol, R J; Ning, Z; Nowak, A; O'Connor, J; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Orchanian, M; R.,; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patterson, R B; Patton, S; Pawloski, G; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Perch, A; Pfutzner, M M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Pinsky, L; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Raper, N; Rebel, B; Ren, J; Rosenfeld, C; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sher, S Moed; Sousa, A; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Timmons, X Tian A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webb, R C; Weber, A; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C; Whitehead, L Whitehead L H; Wise, T; Wojcicki, S G; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C -H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J L; Xu, J Y; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye., M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhang, L ZhanC; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been independently performed by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Stringent limits on $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{\\mu e}$ are set over six orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting $\\Delta m^2_{41}$. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for $\\Delta m^2_{41} < 0.8$ eV$^2$ at 95\\% C.L.

  8. 主动网络试验模型的研究%The Research of the Experiment Model of Active Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王汝传; 王绍棣; 孙知信; 张莉

    2002-01-01

    Traditional Internet architecture is lack of flexibility and process of protocol standardization and compati-bil-ity is time-consuming and costly. Active network (AN) is one of the approaches to solve these technical problems.AN uses open intermediate nodes that make the network to be programmable. Active codes of the message create newnetwork service dynamically and this makes the network architecture more flexible. This paper gives an AN experi-mental modal and this modal is simulated and analysed systematically.

  9. The effectiveness of active travel initiatives in Irish provincial towns: an evaluation of a quasi-experimental natural experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Lambe, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Ireland is a car dependent country with low levels of active travel and also low levels of total physical activity. There is a paucity of studies, internationally, that have evaluated active travel initiatives in a real world setting. This thesis contributes new knowledge to the evidence base on the implementation, effectiveness and design of active travel initiatives at the community level and their impact on physical activity. This thesis is comprised of a series of quasi-experimental de...

  10. A new experiment to investigate the origin of optical activity using a low energy positron beam of controlled helicity. [molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Previous experiments undertaken in search of a correlation between the origin of optical activity in biological molecules and the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay have not provided any useful results. A description is presented of an experiment in which a low energy polarized positron beam of controlled helicity interacts with an optically active material to form positronium in vacuum. Advantages of the current study compared to the previous experiments are mainly related to a much greater sensitivity. Initially, it will be possible to detect a helicity-dependent asymmetry in triplet positronium formation of 1 part in 10,000. Improvements to better than 1 part in 100,000 should be attainable.

  11. Motivações do conceito de corpo-si: corpo-si, atividade, experiência = Motivations of the concept of selfbody: selfbody, activity, experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto busca explicar a função de convergências e questões possibilitadoras do desenvolvimento da tese segundo a qual toda atividade de trabalho é sempre “uso de si, por si e por outros” (SCHWARTZ, 1987. Sucessivas reformulações levaram ao estabelecimento do seguinte princípio: toda atividade industriosa é sempre uma “dramática do uso de um corpo-si” (remetendo “dramática” à necessidade contínua de travar debates com normas. Sendo a atividade humana identificada assim como um contínuo debate de normas cujo lócus é o corpo-si, convém perguntar como, em termos de diferentes medidas temporais, esses debates se encaixam (à maneira das bonecas russas, ou seja, de que maneira as relações valorativas nos meios de vida e de trabalho se incorporam ao âmago do corpo-si, inclusive em termos de temporalidades mais curtas, “escondidas no corpo”. Cabe assim entender qual é a unidade enigmática dessa entidade – o corpo-si – que acumula experiência e saberes de formas extremamente diversas, notadamente em sua relação com a linguagem, que articula patrimônio epistêmico e sensibilidade axiológica, sem deixar de estar disponível para ou restrita por micro-escolhas e reajustamentos que a vida não cessa de lhe propor ou impor. O texto, retomando parcialmente, segundo seus objetivos, a distinção entre idem e ipse (RICOEUR, pretende conceber debates de normas encaixados como o cerne da dialética entre essas dimensões

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and greasy sludge from flotation process: batch versus CSTR experiments to investigate optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, R; Bridoux, G; Nauleau, F; Poullain, C; Buffet, J; Peu, P; Sadowski, A G; Béline, F

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the maximum ratio of greasy sludge to incorporate with waste activated sludge was investigated in batch and CSTR experiments. In batch experiments, inhibition occurred with a greasy sludge ratio of more than 20-30% of the feed COD. In CSTR experiments, the optimal greasy sludge ratio was 60% of the feed COD and inhibition occurred above a ratio of 80%. Hence, batch experiments can predict the CSTR yield when the degradation phenomenon are additive but cannot be used to determine the maximum ratio to be used in a CSTR configuration. Additionally, when the ratio of greasy sludge increased from 0% to 60% of the feed COD, CSTR methane production increased by more than 60%. When the greasy sludge ratio increased from 60% to 90% of the feed COD, the reactor yield decreased by 75%.

  13. Cortical activation during Braille reading is influenced by early visual experience in subjects with severe visual disability: a correlational fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, P; Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Price, R R; Wall, R S; Ebner, F F

    2001-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed on blind adults resting and reading Braille. The strongest activation was found in primary somatic sensory/motor cortex on both cortical hemispheres. Additional foci of activation were situated in the parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes where visual information is processed in sighted persons. The regions were differentiated most in the correlation of their time courses of activation with resting and reading. Differences in magnitude and expanse of activation were substantially less significant. Among the traditionally visual areas, the strength of correlation was greatest in posterior parietal cortex and moderate in occipitotemporal, lateral occipital, and primary visual cortex. It was low in secondary visual cortex as well as in dorsal and ventral inferior temporal cortex and posterior middle temporal cortex. Visual experience increased the strength of correlation in all regions except dorsal inferior temporal and posterior parietal cortex. The greatest statistically significant increase, i.e., approximately 30%, was in ventral inferior temporal and posterior middle temporal cortex. In these regions, words are analyzed semantically, which may be facilitated by visual experience. In contrast, visual experience resulted in a slight, insignificant diminution of the strength of correlation in dorsal inferior temporal cortex where language is analyzed phonetically. These findings affirm that posterior temporal regions are engaged in the processing of written language. Moreover, they suggest that this function is modified by early visual experience. Furthermore, visual experience significantly strengthened the correlation of activation and Braille reading in occipital regions traditionally involved in the processing of visual features and object recognition suggesting a role for visual imagery.

  14. Expression, purification, and characterization of a carbohydrate-active enzyme: A research-inspired methods optimization experiment for the biochemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbur, Jaime F; Vail, Justin D; Mitchell, Lindsey N; Jakeman, David L; Timmons, Shannon C

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern techniques and instrumentation commonly found in a research laboratory. Unlike in a traditional cookbook-style experiment, students generate their own hypotheses regarding expression conditions and quantify the amount of protein isolated using their selected variables. Over the course of three 3-hour laboratory periods, students learn to use sterile technique to express a protein using recombinant DNA in E. coli, purify the resulting enzyme via affinity chromatography and dialysis, analyze the success of their purification scheme via SDS-PAGE, assess the activity of the enzyme via an HPLC-based assay, and quantify the amount of protein isolated via a Bradford assay. Following the completion of this experiment, students were asked to evaluate their experience via an optional survey. All students strongly agreed that this laboratory module was more interesting to them than traditional experiments because of its lack of a pre-determined outcome and desired additional opportunities to participate in the experimental design process. This experiment serves as an example of how research-inspired, discovery-based experiences can benefit both the students and instructor; students learned important skills necessary for real-world biochemistry research and a more concrete understanding of the research process, while generating new knowledge to enhance the scholarly endeavors of the instructor.

  15. A cross-sectional study on attitudes toward gender equality, sexual behavior, positive sexual experiences, and communication about sex among sexually active and non-sexually active adolescents in Bolivia and Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sara De; Jaruseviciene, Lina; Zaborskis, Apolinaras; Decat, Peter; Vega, Bernardo; Cordova, Kathya; Temmerman, Marleen; Degomme, Olivier; Michielsen, Kristien

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely agreed upon that gender is a key aspect of sexuality however, questions remain on how gender exactly influences adolescents’ sexual health.Objective: The aim of this research was to study correlations between gender equality attitudes and sexual behavior, sexual experiences and communication about sex among sexually active and non-sexually active adolescents in 2 Latin American countries.Design: In 2011, a cross-sectional study was carried out among 5,913 adolescents ...

  16. Activity and effects in tourist development in EU Possibility experiences for touristic policy in R. of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Temjanovski, Riste; Angelovski, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    Tourism is an activity which affects our society in many different ways and has a profound impact on our social, cultural and economic life. It relates to a wide range of areas, such as employment, regional development, education, environment, men's physical and mental states, new technology, culture etc. Therefore, tourism in EU is activity whish is strongly interacts with other activity such as transport, environment, regional planning, energy, trade and business, information technology etc...

  17. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part II: Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    This is the second paper in a two-part study on active rotor-blade vibration control. This part presents an experimental contribution into the work of active controller design for rotor-blade systems. The primary aim is to give an experimental validation and show the applicability of the theoreti...

  18. Measuring work activities and skill requirements of occupations: experiences from a European pilot study with a web-survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Tijdens; J. de Ruijter; E. de Ruijter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this article is to evaluate a method for measuring work activities and skill requirements of 160 occupations in eight countries, used in EurOccupations, an EU-FP6 project. Additionally, it aims to explore how the internet can be used for measuring work activities and skill r

  19. Collector attachment to lead-activated sphalerite - Experiments and DFT study on pH and solvent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvaramini, A.; Larachi, F.; Hart, B.

    2016-03-01

    The interactions of diisobutyl dithiophosphinate with bare (un-activated) and lead-activated sphalerite were studied both experimentally and through DFT simulations. Sphalerite activated by lead in acidic and alkaline conditions showed considerably greater affinity for diisobutyl dithiophosphinate adsorption than bare sphalerite. Experimental observations supported by DFT simulations concur in that attachment of the solvated collector to the activated sphalerite surface is through adsorbed lead cations or lead hydroxides where as for the bare sphalerite, the collector was most stable in its solvated state and not as an adsorbed specie. Accounting for solvation effects by including a swarm of water molecules in DFT simulations was necessary to infer plausible surface interactions between collector, solvent, and bare or lead-activated sphalerite. The experimental data and DFT simulations indicate, affinity of the collector toward surface-adsorbed lead species was predicted to form stable covalent bonds between collector sulfur atoms and lead.

  20. Participating in politics resembles physical activity: general action patterns in international archives, United States archives, and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M; Albarracín, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  1. Application of the RTOP-CA code for analysis of MIR-reactor high burnup experiments and activity release from WWER fuel of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the RTOP-CA code calculations for experiments in the research MIR reactor are presented. The MIR-reactor tests were made to study the activity release from defective WWER fuel at high burnup (∼60 MWd/kgU). The RTOP-CA calculations are compared to experimental data on radial distributions of burnup as well as radial profiles of Pu and Xe concentrations in fuel pellets. The RTOP-CA predictions are also compared to the data on activity release (radionuclides of I, Cs, Xe and Kr) from the test fuel rod with an artificial defect in cladding. Additional calculations were performed for WWER-1000 fuel of an advanced design. In these calculation series the effect of design innovations on activity release from defective fuel rods was estimated. It is demonstrated that in case of a failure the new generation of WWER fuel shows lower levels of activity release into primary coolant. (authors)

  2. A cultural historical activity theory perspective to understand preservice science teachers' reflections on and tensions during a microteaching experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Tran, Minh-Dan; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-09-01

    This study draws from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to analyze preservice teachers' reflections on a microteaching activity. Microteaching activities involved preservice educators teaching middle school students from local schools. The study was conducted with 23 preservice teachers enrolled in a large university's teacher education program. During this secondary science teaching methods course, every pair of preservice teachers engaged in 20 minute microteaching activity with 3-5 middle school students. The microteaching was videotaped, and the teachers subsequently provided voice-over reflections on a second audio track. Transcriptions of the microteaching events were analyzed through the formation of event maps showing the phases of activity and the organizational sequence of actions. Event maps were used to investigate the focus of preservice teachers' reflections. The results showed that while learning from their microteaching, preservice teachers focused primarily on the mediating artifacts and gave least attention to the larger teaching community surrounding these activities. Use of CHAT helped to identify challenges in different elements of the microteaching activity. The study contributes to how reflective practice can be enhanced through attention to the social and cultural dimensions of the teaching.

  3. "In Vitro" Synthesis and Activity of Reporter Proteins in an "Escherichia coli" S30 Extract System: An Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Pamela J.

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate laboratory experiment integrates multiple techniques ("in vitro" synthesis, enzyme assays, Western blotting) to determine the production and detection sensitivity of two common reporter proteins (beta-galactosidase and luciferase) within an "Escherichia coli" S30 transcription/translation extract. Comparison of the data suggests…

  4. User experience network. Supply gas failure alarm on Cardinal Health Infant Flow SiPAP units may not activate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The supply gas failure alarm on Cardinal Health Infant Flow SiPAP units manufactured before April 2009 may not activate in the event of a gas supply loss if the device's silencer accessory is attached. However, the unit's FiO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) and low-airway-pressure alarms will activate in such cases. If both of these alarms activate simultaneously, users should suspect a failure of the gas supply pressure. Identifying affected units requires testing that can be conducted during the device's next scheduled maintenance.

  5. Organization of Practical Training of Research Master Students Enrolled in the Program of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education”: Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximov L. K.,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the testing experience of the practical training of research master students in the integrative module of basic professional educational program of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education”, training direction of “Psycho-pedagogical education”. We reviewed the organization of the practical training, its object and purpose, formed competence and educational outcomes, the content and form of organization of activity of students that achieve these results; assessment tools. We discussed the place of introductive training in the structure of integrative module as well as possible risks.

  6. The Mutual Relationship Between Immigrants' Disrupted Everyday Activities and Their Health: A Grounded Theory of Experiences of Korean Immigrants Settling in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hagyun; Hocking, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For Asian immigrants, immigration has the potential to disrupt all familiar routines. That is a threat to their health and well-being. This grounded theory study explored how immigrants adjust to a new environment by analyzing the experiences of 25 Korean immigrants in New Zealand. The findings suggest that immigration is a stress-inducing phenomenon that requires adjustment of valued activities and adversely affects their health. In response, participants worked on regaining control over disrupted activities by opting for two world perspectives. The study helps social workers to develop effective interventions and services for immigrants to better handle health problems. PMID:26954511

  7. The Mutual Relationship Between Immigrants' Disrupted Everyday Activities and Their Health: A Grounded Theory of Experiences of Korean Immigrants Settling in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hagyun; Hocking, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For Asian immigrants, immigration has the potential to disrupt all familiar routines. That is a threat to their health and well-being. This grounded theory study explored how immigrants adjust to a new environment by analyzing the experiences of 25 Korean immigrants in New Zealand. The findings suggest that immigration is a stress-inducing phenomenon that requires adjustment of valued activities and adversely affects their health. In response, participants worked on regaining control over disrupted activities by opting for two world perspectives. The study helps social workers to develop effective interventions and services for immigrants to better handle health problems.

  8. Introduction to Professor HUA Yan-ling's Acupuncture Experience: Ⅲ. Wanning and Activating Yang of Governor Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Li-zhen; XIAO yuan-chun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Warming and activating Yang of Governor Vessel therapy works mainly on the acupoints in Governor Vessel. It is a therapeutic method of accelerating qi and blood circulation, balancing the human body and improving immunity through warm or hot techniques.

  9. Experimenting with cigarettes and physical activity among Mexican origin youth: a cross sectional analysis of the interdependent associations among sensation seeking, acculturation, and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson Anna V; Okeke Nnenna L; Springer Andrew E; Stigler Melissa H; Gabriel Kelley P; Bondy Melissa L; Prokhorov Alexander V; Spitz Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensation seeking tendencies tend to manifest during adolescence and are associated with both health-compromising behaviors and health-enhancing behaviors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between sensation seeking and physical activity, a health-enhancing behavior, and between sensation seeking and experimenting with cigarettes, a health compromising-behavior, among a cohort of Mexican origin adolescents residing in the United States with differen...

  10. Desorption experiments and modeling of micropollutants on activated carbon in water phase: application to transient concentrations mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Bourneuf, Séda; Jacob, Matthieu; Albasi, Claire; Sochard, Sabine; Richard, Romain; Manero, Marie-Hélène

    2016-01-01

    International audience Experimental studies and numerical modeling were conducted to assess the feasibility of a granular activated carbon column to buffer load variations of contaminants before wastewater treatment devices. Studies of cycles of adsorption, and more especially desorption, of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and 2,4-dimethylphenol (2,4-DMP) have been carried out on granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic variations of contaminants concentrations were run at several conditions o...

  11. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and five terpenoid compounds against Campylobacter jejuni in pure and mixed culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurekci, Cemil; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Hassan, Errol; Al Jassim, Rafat A M; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2013-09-16

    The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial potential of three essential oils (EOs: tea tree oil, lemon myrtle oil and Leptospermum oil), five terpenoid compounds (α-bisabolol, α-terpinene, cineole, nerolidol and terpinen-4-ol) and polyphenol against two strains of Campylobacter jejuni (ACM 3393 and the poultry isolate C338), Campylobacter coli and other Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Different formulations of neem oil (Azadirachta indica) with these compounds were also tested for synergistic interaction against all organisms. Antimicrobial activity was determined by the use of disc diffusion and broth dilution assays. All EOs tested were found to have strong antimicrobial activity against Campylobacter spp. with inhibitory concentrations in the range 0.001-1% (v/v). Among the single compounds, terpinen-4-ol showed the highest activity against Campylobacter spp. and other reference strains. Based on the antimicrobial activity and potential commerciality of these agents, lemon myrtle oil, α-tops (α-terpineol+cineole+terpinen-4-ol) and terpinen-4-ol were also evaluated using an in vitro fermentation technique to test antimicrobial activity towards C. jejuni in the microbiota from the chicken-caecum. EO compounds (terpinen-4-ol and α-tops) were antimicrobial towards C. jejuni at high doses (0.05%) without altering the fermentation profile. EOs and terpenoid compounds can have strong anti-Campylobacter activity without adversely affecting the fermentation potential of the chicken-caeca microbiota. EOs and their active compounds may have the potential to control C. jejuni colonisation and abundance in poultry. PMID:24041998

  12. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and five terpenoid compounds against Campylobacter jejuni in pure and mixed culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurekci, Cemil; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Hassan, Errol; Al Jassim, Rafat A M; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2013-09-16

    The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial potential of three essential oils (EOs: tea tree oil, lemon myrtle oil and Leptospermum oil), five terpenoid compounds (α-bisabolol, α-terpinene, cineole, nerolidol and terpinen-4-ol) and polyphenol against two strains of Campylobacter jejuni (ACM 3393 and the poultry isolate C338), Campylobacter coli and other Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Different formulations of neem oil (Azadirachta indica) with these compounds were also tested for synergistic interaction against all organisms. Antimicrobial activity was determined by the use of disc diffusion and broth dilution assays. All EOs tested were found to have strong antimicrobial activity against Campylobacter spp. with inhibitory concentrations in the range 0.001-1% (v/v). Among the single compounds, terpinen-4-ol showed the highest activity against Campylobacter spp. and other reference strains. Based on the antimicrobial activity and potential commerciality of these agents, lemon myrtle oil, α-tops (α-terpineol+cineole+terpinen-4-ol) and terpinen-4-ol were also evaluated using an in vitro fermentation technique to test antimicrobial activity towards C. jejuni in the microbiota from the chicken-caecum. EO compounds (terpinen-4-ol and α-tops) were antimicrobial towards C. jejuni at high doses (0.05%) without altering the fermentation profile. EOs and terpenoid compounds can have strong anti-Campylobacter activity without adversely affecting the fermentation potential of the chicken-caeca microbiota. EOs and their active compounds may have the potential to control C. jejuni colonisation and abundance in poultry.

  13. Evaluation of macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: single center experience over a one-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Yücel, Gözde; Sinoplu, Ada Bulut; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the demographic, clinical, laboratory properties of patients with macrophage activation syndrome and treatment outcomes. Material and Methods: The data of the patients who were diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome secondary to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis between June 2013–May 2014 were evaluated by screening patient records. Results: Ten patients with macrophage activation syndrome were followed up in one year. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was found to be 7.6±4.5 years. The most common clinical finding at presentation (80%) was increased body temperature. Hepatosplenomegaly was found in half of the patients. The most common hematological finding (90%) was anemia. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was found to be 71.8±36.2 mm/h, whereas it was measured to be lower (31.2±25.2 mm/h) at the time of the diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome. Increased ferritin level was found in all of our patients (the mean ferritin level was found to be 23 957±15 525 ng/mL). Hypertriglyceridemia was found in nine patients (90%). The mean triglyceride level was found to be 397±332 mg/dL. Systemic steroid treatment was administered to all patients. Cyclosporine A was given to eight patients (80%), canakinumab was given to four patients (40%) and anakinra was given to five patients (50%). Plasmapheresis was performed in two patients. Improvement was found in all patients except for one patient. The patient in whom no improvement was observed showed a chronic course. Conclusions: The diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in presence of sudden disturbance in general condition, resistant high fever and systemic inflammation findings in children with active rheumatic disease. Complete recovery can be provided with early and efficient treatment in macrophage activation syndrome which develops secondary to systemic juvenil idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26884689

  14. Effects of task complexity and time pressure on activity-travel choices: heteroscedastic logit model and activity-travel simulator experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.; Chorus, C.G.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives, estimates and applies a discrete choice model of activity-travel behaviour that accommodates potential effects of task complexity and time pressure on decision-making. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that both factors (task complexity and time pressure) are j

  15. Experimenting with cigarettes and physical activity among Mexican origin youth: a cross sectional analysis of the interdependent associations among sensation seeking, acculturation, and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Anna V

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensation seeking tendencies tend to manifest during adolescence and are associated with both health-compromising behaviors and health-enhancing behaviors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between sensation seeking and physical activity, a health-enhancing behavior, and between sensation seeking and experimenting with cigarettes, a health compromising-behavior, among a cohort of Mexican origin adolescents residing in the United States with different levels of acculturation. Methods In 2009, 1,154 Mexican origin youth (50.5% girls, mean age 14.3 years (SD = 1.04 provided data on smoking behavior, physical activity, linguistic acculturation, and sensation seeking. We conducted Pearson’s χ2 tests to examine the associations between categorical demographic characteristics (i.e. gender, age, country of birth and parental educational attainment and both cigarette experimentation and physical activity and Student’s t-tests to examine mean differences on the continuous variables (i.e. sensation seeking subscale by the behaviors. We examined mean differences in the demographic characteristics, acculturation, and both behaviors for each of the sensation seeking subscales using analysis of variance (ANOVA. To examine relationships between the sensation seeking subscales, gender, and both behaviors, at different levels of acculturation we completed unconditional logistic regression analyses stratified by level of acculturation. Results Overall, 23.3% had experimented with cigarettes and 29.0% reported being physically active for at least 60 minutes/day on at least 5 days/week. Experimenting with cigarettes and being physically active were more prevalent among boys than girls. Among girls, higher levels of sensation seeking tendencies were associated with higher levels of acculturation and experimentation with cigarettes, but not with physical activity. Among boys, higher levels of sensation seeking

  16. Design of High-Neutron-Yield, Polar-drive targets for diagnostic activation experiments on the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenty, P W; Craxton, R S; Marshall, F J; Sangster, T C; Marozas, J A; Cok, A M; Bonino, M J; Harding, D R; Meyerhofer, D D; McCrory, R L [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Fooks, J; Hoppe, M L [General Atomics Corporation, La Jolla, CA (United States); Edwards, J M; MacKinnon, A J; Munro, D H; Wallace, R J, E-mail: pmck@lle.rochester.ed [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Polar-drive (PD) target implosions have been designed for neutron diagnostic development on the NIF. These experiments use thin, room-temperature glass shells filled with low pressures of DT. Initial target implosions on the NIF will produce DT yields in the range of a few 10{sup 14} neutrons. The predicted yields are consistent with earlier data (10{sup 14} neutrons at 30 kJ) and recent PD scoping experiments performed on OMEGA. The experiments will use existing x-ray-drive phase plates with judicious repointing and defocusing to drive the implosions as uniformly as possible. These implosions have been modeled with three codes: LILAC, to optimize the 1-D design; SAGE, to optimize the pointing uniformity; and DRACO, to predict the yield from 2-D implosion simulations. Current simulation results indicate that the required yields will be obtained using up to 200-kJ UV light formed into a 1500-ps Gaussian pulse. Large-diameter glass shells ({approx}1500-{mu}m OD) are under development and fabrication at General Atomics. As tritium and environmental conditions evolve, similar target designs, with larger diameters and higher laser energies, are expected to produce thermonuclear yields approaching 10{sup 16} neutrons.

  17. 论幼儿艺术体验活动的有效途径%Discussion on Effective Approaches of Children's Art Experience Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文丽君; 曹春红

    2011-01-01

    Experience is the best way for children to know and taste the world.Basing on the point of children's art experience,the writer discuss as several important approaches of it,which are as follows:First,experiencing local and special art;Second,experiencing artist work through games and activities;Third,amalgamation of art experience;Fourth,art experience of certain subject;Fifth,creating good art experience by using multimedia.%体验活动是幼儿认识世界、感受世界的最佳途径。本文从幼儿艺术体验的特点出发,探讨幼儿艺术体验的五个重要途径:体验本土化、特色化的艺术;以游戏活动体验艺术作品;多元统整的艺术体验;主题化的艺术体验;利用多媒体创造良好的艺术体验环境。

  18. Can iron-making and steelmaking slag products be used to sequester CO2? Passive weathering and active carbonation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Fred; Dobrzański, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The high calcium content of iron and steel-making slags has been highlighted as providing a suitable feedstock material and medium with which to sequester CO2 into geologically stable carbonate phases. Optimisation of the natural carbonation process provides the potential for increasing the degree of carbonation above that possible via passive weathering. This study has assessed the baseline passive carbonation potential of several different slag products (graded steel slag aggregate, pellite, GBFS) within the climate of the northern UK. This baseline was then used as a comparison to the carbonation values achieved by the same products when actively reacted in a CO2-rich environment. The active carbonation phase of the project involved a factorial experimental study of materials reacted at 1MPa/10MPa CO2 pressure and 25˚C/125˚C. This study has shown: 1) That active carbonation of these products can successfully sequester additional CO2. 2) Carbonation potential in general is highly dependent upon grain size within material types, 3) There is a material-dependant cost-benefit issue when using different active carbonation conditions as well as the choice to use active vs. passive carbonation. The median sequestration potential of the slag products in this study is equivalent to the total emissions from 910 people from the UK; the CO2 emissions from 10000 tonnes of cement production; or 340000 tonnes of steel production.

  19. A cross-sectional study on attitudes toward gender equality, sexual behavior, positive sexual experiences, and communication about sex among sexually active and non-sexually active adolescents in Bolivia and Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara De Meyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely agreed upon that gender is a key aspect of sexuality however, questions remain on how gender exactly influences adolescents’ sexual health. Objective: The aim of this research was to study correlations between gender equality attitudes and sexual behavior, sexual experiences and communication about sex among sexually active and non-sexually active adolescents in 2 Latin American countries. Design: In 2011, a cross-sectional study was carried out among 5,913 adolescents aged 14–18 in 20 secondary schools in Cochabamba (Bolivia and 6 secondary schools in Cuenca (Ecuador. Models were built using logistic regressions to assess the predictive value of attitudes toward gender equality on adolescents’ sexual behavior, on experiences and on communication. Results: The analysis shows that sexually active adolescents who consider gender equality as important report higher current use of contraceptives within the couple. They are more likely to describe their last sexual intercourse as a positive experience and consider it easier to talk with their partner about sexuality than sexually experienced adolescents who are less positively inclined toward gender equality. These correlations remained consistent whether the respondent was a boy or a girl. Non-sexually active adolescents, who consider gender equality to be important, are more likely to think that sexual intercourse is a positive experience. They consider it less necessary to have sexual intercourse to maintain a relationship and find it easier to communicate with their girlfriend or boyfriend than sexually non-active adolescents who consider gender equality to be less important. Comparable results were found for boys and girls. Conclusions: Our results suggest that gender equality attitudes have a positive impact on adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health (SRH and wellbeing. Further research is necessary to better understand the relationship between gender

  20. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  1. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    OpenAIRE

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed act...

  2. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie;

    2016-01-01

    of household fridge performance in terms of response time and ramp-up rate, as well as the impact on fridge temperature and behaviour after the control period. The experimental results show that TCLs are fast responsive loads for DR activation, with the average control signal response time of 24 s......This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive...

  3. Opening-up Classroom Discourse to Promote and Enhance Active, Collaborative and Cognitively-Engaging Student Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This paper places classroom discourse and interaction right at the heart of the teaching and learning process. It is built on the argument that high quality talk between the teacher and student(s) provides a fertile ground for an active, highly collaborative and cognitively stimulating learning process leading to improved learning outcomes. High…

  4. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting.

  5. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting. PMID:9306648

  6. Executive University Managers' Experiences of Strike and Protest Activity: A Qualitative Case Study of a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Whitehead, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Strike and protest activity at South African universities continues to be prevalent nearly two decades after the dismantling of apartheid, although there has been a shift away from directing strikes and protests against the government (during the apartheid era), to directing them against higher education institutions and management (since the…

  7. Engineers and Their Role in Public Policy: An Active Learning Experience for Enhancing the Understanding of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Jorge; Barros, Ricardo; Ramirez, Catalina; Realpe, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    To achieve effective intervention of engineers in the public sector, engineers should develop skills to comprehend their ethical and professional responsibility, and they should gain the necessary education to understand the possible impact of engineering solutions in a global and social context. An active learning process has been conceived,…

  8. Medical students' and facilitators' experiences of an Early Professional Contact course: Active and motivated students, strained facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnarsson Ronny

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, medical students are introduced to patient contact, communication skills, and clinical examination in the preclinical years of the curriculum with the purpose of gaining clinical experience. These courses are often evaluated from the student perspective. Reports with an additional emphasis on the facilitator perspective are scarce. According to constructive alignment, an influential concept from research in higher education, the learning climate between students and teachers is also of great importance. In this paper, we approach the learning climate by studying both students' and facilitators' course experiences. In 2001, a new "Early Professional Contact" longitudinal strand through term 1–4, was introduced at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. General practitioners and hospital specialists were facilitators. The aim of this study was to assess and analyse students' and clinical facilitators' experiences of the Early Professional Contact course and to illuminate facilitators' working conditions. Methods Inspired by a Swedish adaptation of the Course Experience Questionnaire, an Early Professional Contact Questionnaire was constructed. In 2003, on the completion of the first longitudinal strand, a student and facilitator version was distributed to 86 students and 21 facilitators. In the analysis, both Chi-square and the Mann-Whitney tests were used. Results Sixty students (70% and 15 facilitators (71% completed the questionnaire. Both students and facilitators were satisfied with the course. Students reported gaining iiration for their future work as doctors along with increased confidence in meeting patients. They also reported increased motivation for biomedical studies. Differences in attitudes between facilitators and students were found. Facilitators experienced a greater workload, less reasonable demands and less support, than students. Conclusion In this project, a new Early

  9. The International Allocation of R&D Activity by US Multinationals: The East Asian Experience in Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Prema-chandra Athukorala; Archanun Kohpaiboon

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines patterns and determinants of overseas R&D expenditure of MNEs, with emphasis on the East Asian experience, using a new panel dataset relating to US-based manufacturing MNEs over the period 1990-2001. It is found that inter-country differences in R&D intensity of operation of US MNE affiliates are fundamentally determined by the domestic market size, overall R&D capability and cost of hiring R&D personnel. The impact of domestic market orientation of affiliates on R&D prope...

  10. Assessing the mutagenic activities of smoke from different cigarettes in direct exposure experiments using the modified Ames Salmonella assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Kanemaru, Yuki; Nara, Hidenori; Erami, Kazuo; Nagata, Yasufumi

    2016-06-01

    The Ames assay is useful for evaluating the mutagenic potentials of chemicals, and it has been used to evaluate the mutagenic potential of cigarette smoke (CS). In vitro direct exposure systems have been developed to mimic CS exposure in the human respiratory tract, and the Ames assay has been used with such systems. Ames tests were performed using the Vitrocell(®) direct exposure system in this study. The mutagenic potentials of whole mainstream CS and gas/vapor phase fractions produced by conventional combustible cigarettes under two smoking regimens were compared. Salmonella Typhimurium TA98 and TA100 were used with and without metabolic activation, and the number of revertants induced by exposure to each CS was determined. The amount of smoke particles to which cells were exposed were also determined, and dose-response curves describing the relationships between exposure to smoke particles and the number of revertants induced were plotted. The slopes of linear regressions of the dose-response curves were determined, and the slope for each CS was used as a mutagenic activity index for that CS. A new heated cigarette was also tested and smoke from the heated cigarette had a lower mutagenic activity in TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation than did the conventional CS. The results indicate that the direct exposure system and the Ames test can be used to determine the mutagenic potentials of CS produced by different cigarettes under different conditions (i.e., using different Salmonella Typhimurium strains with and without metabolic activation, and using different smoking conditions). PMID:27265375

  11. Neural activity to positive expressions predicts daily experience of schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms in adults with high social anhedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Christine I; Benson, Taylor L; Gyurak, Anett; Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura M; Lincoln, Sarah Hope

    2014-02-01

    Social anhedonia (SA), the diminished pleasure from social relationships, is a prominent characteristic of the vulnerability and manifestation of schizophrenia disorder. However, SA can develop for multiple reasons and little is known about its neural basis; these 2 issues hinder the utility and sensitivity of SA as a marker of schizophrenia pathology. This study investigated whether lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) deficits in social reward processing are associated with both SA and other schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms. During functional MRI (fMRI), a community sample of healthy adults (N = 30) with high and low SA viewed positive, negative, and neutral facial expressions. Afterward, participants completed an online daily diary in which they rated schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms and occurrence of interpersonal conflict each day for 21 days. Compared with low SA, high SA participants had less ventral (V)LPFC activity to positive versus neutral expressions. In addition, participants with a combination of high SA and low VLPFC activity to positive versus neutral expressions had worse daily diary ratings of schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms, including worse cognition, paranoia, motivation/productivity, and vigor/positive affect (i.e., psychomotor activation). Finally, among high SA participants, VLPFC activity predicted the daily relationship between distress from interpersonal conflict and symptom-severity; specifically, high SA participants with low VLPFC activity had worse paranoia on days of high conflict distress. These findings indicate that VLPFC deficits in positive emotion are associated with both SA and other schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms and that understanding the interaction of SA, VLPFC function, and social stress could facilitate the use of SA in the prevention and treatment of schizophrenia.

  12. Shifts in developmental timing, and not increased levels of experience-dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Fetter-Pruneda

    Full Text Available Birth-enucleated rodents display enlarged representations of whiskers (i.e., barrels of the posteromedial subfield in the primary somatosensory cortex. Although the historical view maintains that barrel expansion is due to incremental increases in neuronal activity along the trigeminal pathway during postnatal development, recent evidence obtained in experimental models of intramodal plasticity challenges this view. Here, we re-evaluate the role of experience-dependent neuronal activity on barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats by combining various anatomical methods and sensory deprivation paradigms. We show that barrels in birth-enucleated rats were already enlarged by the end of the first week of life and had levels of metabolic activity comparable to those in control rats at different ages. Dewhiskering after the postnatal period of barrel formation did not prevent barrel expansion in adult, birth-enucleated rats. Further, dark rearing and enucleation after barrel formation did not lead to expanded barrels in adult brains. Because incremental increases of somatosensory experience did not promote barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats, we explored whether shifts of the developmental timing could better explain barrel expansion during the first week of life. Accordingly, birth-enucleated rats show earlier formation of barrels, accelerated growth of somatosensory thalamocortical afferents, and an earlier H4 deacetylation. Interestingly, when H4 deacetylation was prevented with a histone deacetylases inhibitor (valproic acid, barrel specification timing returned to normal and barrel expansion did not occur. Thus, we provide evidence supporting that shifts in developmental timing modulated through epigenetic mechanisms, and not increased levels of experience dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth.

  13. Effect on development of proportional reasoning skill of physical experience and cognitive abilities associated with prefrontal lobe activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Ju; Lawson, Anton E.; Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Young-Shin

    2000-12-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that maturing prefrontal lobes play a role in the development of proportional reasoning skill because the prefrontal lobes are involved in the inhibition of task-irrelevant information and the representation of task-relevant information. The hypothesis that reasoning development is in part dependent upon physical experience was also tested. Students (all males) who failed to solve a diagnostic proportions task were administered several tests of prefrontal lobe functions. The students were then randomly assigned to manipulative or verbal tutoring groups. Both groups received a series of individual testing, tutoring and testing sessions on proportional reasoning. As predicted, performance on the prefrontal lobe tasks (measures of inhibiting ability, planning ability, dissembedding ability, and working memory capacity) significantly predicted performance on proportional reasoning tasks following tutoring. Students' computational skills were not a significant predictor. Also, the manipulative group's proportional reasoning performance was significantly higher than that of the verbal tutoring group. Therefore, the present results provide support for the hypothesis that maturing prefrontal lobes and physical experience play roles in the development of proportional reasoning skill.

  14. Understanding tourist behaviour in terms of activeness and intra-destination movement patterns for managing tourism experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltan, Judit; Maggi, Rico

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation is focusing on the demand side of tourism, in particular on tourists’ consumption of a destination and on the conceptualization of their decision process during visitation. Travel behaviour can be related to and motivated by several factors and the analysis of these factors allows a better understanding of tourists’ movements and activity participation. This information can be used for creating customized tourism products that can bring additional benefits to the tourists ...

  15. Provision of secondary frequency control via demand response activation on thermostatically controlled loads: Solutions and experiences from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Marinelli, Mattia; Hu, Junjie; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the provision of secondary frequency control in electric power systems based on demand response (DR) activation on thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) and quantifies the computation resource constraints for the control of large TCL population. Since TCLs are fast responsive loads, they represent a suitable alternative to conventional sources for providing such control. An experimental investigation with domestic fridges representing the TCLs was conducted in an islande...

  16. Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Mally

    1992-01-01

    A series of four activities are presented to enhance students' abilities to appreciate and use trigonometry as a tool in problem solving. Activities cover problems applying the law of sines, the law of cosines, and matching equivalent trigonometric expressions. A teacher's guide, worksheets, and answers are provided. (MDH)

  17. Co-Parenting Relationship Experiences of Black Adolescent Mothers in Active Romantic Partnerships With the Fathers of Their Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Thach, Chia T; Shelton, Melissa M; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2015-08-01

    We conducted an interpretive description of co-parenting relationship experiences of romantically involved Black adolescent mothers and fathers with shared biological children. The study was conducted in Brooklyn, New York, using data from individual in-depth interviews with adolescent mothers and fathers (n = 10). Four themes were identified: (a) putting our heads together; (b) balancing childhood and parenthood; (c) less money, more problems; and (d) if we use condoms, it is for contraception. The co-parenting couples managed very complex relationships, but their mutual interest in the welfare of their children was a relational asset. Co-parents had sparse financial resources but used a moral economy strategy to provide mutual support. Future research is needed that focuses on identifying other co-parent relationship assets and integrating and evaluating their utility for enhancing interventions for adolescent families. PMID:25486931

  18. The Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  19. Emergency preparedness activities during an ongoing seismic swarm: the experience of the 2011-2012 Pollino (Southern Italy) sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, A.; Mucciarelli, M.; Chiauzzi, L.; De Costanzo, G.; Loperte, G.

    2012-04-01

    Facing natural disasters effects can be a very difficult task lacking suitable activities and tools to preventively prepare the involved community (people, authorities, professionals, …) to the expected events. Therefore, a suite of preventive actions should be carried out to mitigate natural risks, in particular working to reduce the territorial vulnerability with respect to the specific natural hazard at hand, and to increase people response capacity. In fact, building social capacity helps to increase the risk perception and the people capacity to adapt to and cope with natural hazards. Since October 2011 a seismic swarm is affecting the Pollino mountain range, Southern Italy. At present the sequence is still ongoing, with more than 500 events with M>1, at least 40 well perceived by the population and a maximum magnitude at 3.6. The area mainly affected by the seismic sequence includes 12 villages, with a total population of about 50.000 inhabitants and, according to the current seismic hazard map it has high seismicity level. Such area was hit by a magnitude Ml=5.7 event in 1998 that produced macroseismic intensity not higher that VII-VIII degree of MCS scale and caused one dead, some injured and widespread damage in at least six municipalities. During the sequence, the National Department of Civil Protection (DPC) and the Civil Protection of Basilicata Region decided to put in action some measures aimed at verifying and enhancing emergency preparedness. These actions have been carried out with a constant and fruitful collaboration among the main stakeholders involved (scientific community, local and national governmental agencies, civil protection volunteers, etc) trough the following main activities: 1. collaboration between scientific community and the local and national offices of Civil Protection especially in the relationship with local authorities (e.g. mayors, which are civil protection authorities in their municipality); 2. interaction between DPC

  20. Experiment Study on Active-passive Mode-locking Using Cr4+∶YAG as Saturable Absorber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LENG Yuxin; LU Haihe; LIN Lihuang; XU Zhizhan

    2002-01-01

    Cr4+∶YAG crystal was used as a saturable absorber in an active-passive mode-locked Nd∶YAG laser. The stable and complete mode-locked pulse train was achieved at 1064 nm. The duration of ~0.8 ns to 2.4 ns for a single pulse was obtained by using Cr4+∶YAG crystals with the different initial transmissions, and there was a shortest pulse width. The mode-locking dynamic process of Cr4+∶YAG crystal was discussed to explain the experimental result, and the effect of excited-state absorption was considered.

  1. Pilot plant experience of ultrafiltration membrane technology for removal of activity from fuel pond water in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafiltration membrane technology has been applied for removal of alpha and beta activity from fuel pond water. Pilot plant scale results showed that 12000 liters of fuel pond water was successfully treated and DF of 4 and 5 was obtained with respect to alpha and beta respectively. The final product obtained from UF has turbidity in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 (feed turbidity :0.3 NTU). Based on the same results, application can be proposed for the treatment of FHA water which could eliminate the use of ion-exchange columns for this purpose and provide a clean technology for treating FHA water. (author)

  2. Experimental evaluation of the oxygen transfer in bubble aeration systems. Full scale experiences in lengthened activated sludge reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of some full-scale oxygen transfer measurements conduced at the lengthened activate sludge tanks of two WWTPs of Trentino Region, are presented and discussed. As far at the tests in clean water are concerned, the non-liner regression method seems non accurate; important conclusion on the correlation between oxygen transfer process and typical parameters (i.e., fine-bubble diffusers, specific air flux) are derived. As far as the test in the wastewater is concerned, an increase of α-value from the inlet to the end of aeration tanks has been observed in the 'Andalo' WWTP

  3. Attitudes to and Experiences of Physical Activity among Migrant Women from Former Yugoslavia——a qualitative interview study about physical activity and its beneficial effect on heart health, in Malmö, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Sandström

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many risk factors for heart disease can be reduced by lifestyle modifications such as physical activity, but the attitude to and the knowledge about the beneficial effect of physical activity vary among the population. Migrant women are reported to have a higher BMI and to be less physically active than the Swedish-born women. In order to motivate them to participate in physical activity it is necessary to understand that they are not a homogenous group, and thus their knowledge about, needs for, and attitude to physical activity have to be examined. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore structural and individual factors working either as barriers against or as motivation for a change towards higher levels of physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate if the migration had changed the women's level of physical activity and what would be required to increase it. Method: Seven women from Bosnia living in Malmö, Sweden, were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview guide. The data was analyzed using Burnard's content analysis method. Results: The findings were presented in two categories, namely, “barriers against physical activity” and “motivational factors for physical activity”. With regard to the category “barriers against physical activity”, the move to Sweden had led to losses and shifts in lifestyles for the women. The greatest lifestyle changes were reported among women who had moved from rural areas in Bosnia to urban areas in Sweden. They found it troublesome to reach the same activity level in Sweden and expressed a greater need to do so. Earlier negative experiences or no experiences at all, of performing physical activity, as well as the winter climate, were seen as obstacles to being active. All the women prioritized family, work, school, and club activities above physical activity. With respect to the category “motivational factors for physical activity

  4. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences, Results, and Implications for Tuberculosis Control Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Guesly J; Francois, Ingrid; Claassen, Cassidy W; Dorestan, Darwin; Bastien, Barbara; Medina-Moreno, Sandra; Fort, Dumesle St; Redfield, Robert R; Buchwald, Ulrike K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Haiti has the highest tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in the Americas with 254 cases per 100,000 persons. Case detection relies on passive detection and TB services in many regions suffer from poor diagnostic and clinical resources. Methods. Mache Chache ("Go and Seek") was a TB REACH Wave 3 funded TB case finding project in Port-au-Prince between July 2013 and September 2014, targeting four intervention areas with insufficient TB diagnostic performance. Results. Based on a verbal symptom screen emphasizing the presence of cough, the project identified 11,150 (11.75%) of all screened persons as TB subjects and 2.67% as smear-positive (SS+) TB cases. Enhanced case finding and strengthening of laboratory services led to a 59% increase in bacteriologically confirmed cases in the evaluation population. In addition, smear grades dropped significantly, suggesting earlier case detection. Xpert® MTB/RIF was successfully introduced and improved TB diagnosis in HIV-infected, smear-negative clinic patients, but not in HIV-negative, smear-negative TB suspects in the community. However, the number needed to screen for one additional SS+ case varied widely between clinic and community screening activities. Conclusion. Enhanced and active TB case finding in Haiti can improve TB diagnosis and care. However, screening algorithms have to be tailored to individual settings, necessitating long-term commitment. PMID:27668093

  5. Surface micro-topography causes hot spots of biogeochemical activity in wetland systems: A virtual modeling experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, S.; Knorr, K. H.; Peiffer, S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands provide important ecohydrological services by regulating fluxes of nutrients and pollutants to receiving waters, which can in turn mitigate adverse effects on water quality. Turnover of redox-sensitive solutes in wetlands has been shown to take place in distinct spatial and temporal patterns, commonly referred to as hot spots and hot moments. Despite the importance of such patterns for solute fluxes the mechanistic understanding of their formation is still weak and their existence is often explained by variations in soil properties and diffusive transport only. Here we show that surface micro-topography in wetlands can cause the formation of biogeochemical hot spots solely by the advective redistribution of infiltrating water as a result of complex subsurface flow patterns. Surface and subsurface flows are simulated for an idealized section of a riparian wetland using a fully integrated numerical code for coupled surface-subsurface systems. Biogeochemical processes and transport along advective subsurface flow paths are simulated kinetically using the biogeochemical code PHREEQC. Distinct patterns of biogeochemical activity (expressed as reaction rates) develop in response to micro-topography induced subsurface flow patterns. Simulated vertical pore water profiles for various redox-sensitive species resemble profiles observed in the field. This mechanistic explanation of hot spot formation complements the more static explanations that relate hot spots solely to spatial variability in soil characteristics and can account for spatial as well as temporal variability of biogeochemical activity, which is needed to assess future changes in the biogeochemical turnover of wetland systems.

  6. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences, Results, and Implications for Tuberculosis Control Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Guesly J.; Fort, Dumesle St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Haiti has the highest tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in the Americas with 254 cases per 100,000 persons. Case detection relies on passive detection and TB services in many regions suffer from poor diagnostic and clinical resources. Methods. Mache Chache (“Go and Seek”) was a TB REACH Wave 3 funded TB case finding project in Port-au-Prince between July 2013 and September 2014, targeting four intervention areas with insufficient TB diagnostic performance. Results. Based on a verbal symptom screen emphasizing the presence of cough, the project identified 11,150 (11.75%) of all screened persons as TB subjects and 2.67% as smear-positive (SS+) TB cases. Enhanced case finding and strengthening of laboratory services led to a 59% increase in bacteriologically confirmed cases in the evaluation population. In addition, smear grades dropped significantly, suggesting earlier case detection. Xpert® MTB/RIF was successfully introduced and improved TB diagnosis in HIV-infected, smear-negative clinic patients, but not in HIV-negative, smear-negative TB suspects in the community. However, the number needed to screen for one additional SS+ case varied widely between clinic and community screening activities. Conclusion. Enhanced and active TB case finding in Haiti can improve TB diagnosis and care. However, screening algorithms have to be tailored to individual settings, necessitating long-term commitment. PMID:27668093

  7. Testing the Feasibility of a Passive and Active Case Ascertainment System for Multiple Rare Conditions Simultaneously: The Experience in Three US States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Suzanne; Ruttenber, Margaret; Mann, Joshua; Smith, Michael G; Royer, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background Owing to their low prevalence, single rare conditions are difficult to monitor through current state passive and active case ascertainment systems. However, such monitoring is important because, as a group, rare conditions have great impact on the health of affected individuals and the well-being of their caregivers. A viable approach could be to conduct passive and active case ascertainment of several rare conditions simultaneously. This is a report about the feasibility of such an approach. Objective To test the feasibility of a case ascertainment system with passive and active components aimed at monitoring 3 rare conditions simultaneously in 3 states of the United States (Colorado, Kansas, and South Carolina). The 3 conditions are spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and fragile X syndrome. Methods Teams from each state evaluated the possibility of using current or modified versions of their local passive and active case ascertainment systems and datasets to monitor the 3 conditions. Together, these teams established the case definitions and selected the variables and the abstraction tools for the active case ascertainment approach. After testing the ability of their local passive and active case ascertainment system to capture all 3 conditions, the next steps were to report the number of cases detected actively and passively for each condition, to list the local barriers against the combined passive and active case ascertainment system, and to describe the experiences in trying to overcome these barriers. Results During the test period, the team from South Carolina was able to collect data on all 3 conditions simultaneously for all ages. The Colorado team was also able to collect data on all 3 conditions but, because of age restrictions in its passive and active case ascertainment system, it was able to report few cases of fragile X syndrome. The team from Kansas was able to collect data only on spina bifida. For all states, the implementation of an

  8. Activity based costing for regulated services. Experiences, fundamental guidance and possible application to network activity in the electric power sector; Aktivitetsbasert kalkulasjon for regulerte tjenester. Erfaringer, prinsipielle retningslinjer og mulig anvendelse for nettvirksomhet i kraftsektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerndal, Mette; Bjoernenak, Trond; Johnsen, Thore

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses the application of norm cost models to income regulation of distribution networks in the electric power sector. It deals in particular with the possibility of using activity based costing (ABC), but also discusses more general use of structural cost models in income regulation. The report presents experiences with the ABC method in various regulated service industries. For income regulation in the network activities, the relevance of ABC based systems is primarily related to activities conducted by the number of customers. Analyses of costs in the sector show large variations in these costs, which may indicate a potential for this type of regulation model. Finally the report discusses the handling of capital costs in the regulation model, which is important for any regulation regime.

  9. A Cooperative Activity on Quenching Process Simulation--- Japanese IMS-VHT Project on the Benchmark Analysis and Experiment ---

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuo Inoue; Youichi Watanabe; Kazuo Okamura; Michiharu Narazaki; Hayato Shichino; Dong-Ying Ju; Hideo Kanamori; Katsumi Ichitani

    2004-01-01

    Japanese IMS-VHT project on the Virtual Heat Treatment tool for monitoring and optimising HT process in relation with the international cooperative programs is briefly introduced. This project motivates to develop virtual tools for computer to optimize the heat treatment condition and to support decision for HT operation by knowledge based database in addition to process simulation. As one of the activities with the cooperation of the Society of Materials Science, Japan and the Japan Society for Heat Treatment, a benchmark project is undergoing. This includes simulation of carburized quenching process of a cylinder, disc, and ring as well as a helical gear by use of common data of materials properties and cooling characteristics by several available simulation programs. A part of the newly obtained results is presented as an interim report.

  10. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R. T.; Victor, Bruno L.; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide’s free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  11. Permanent prostate implant using high activity seeds and inverse planning with fast simulated annealing algorithm: A 12-year Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report outcomes and toxicity of the first Canadian permanent prostate implant program. Methods and Materials: 396 consecutive patients (Gleason ≤6, initial prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≤10 and stage T1-T2a disease) were implanted between June 1994 and December 2001. The median follow-up is of 60 months (maximum, 136 months). All patients were planned with fast-simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm with high activity seeds ([gt] 0.76 U). Acute and late toxicity is reported for the first 213 patients using a modified RTOG toxicity scale. The Kaplan-Meier biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) is reported according to the ASTRO and Houston definitions. Results: The bFFS at 60 months was of 88.5% (90.5%) according to the ASTRO (Houston) definition and, of 91.4% (94.6%) in the low risk group (initial PSA ≤10 and Gleason ≤6 and Stage ≤T2a). Risk factors statistically associated with bFFS were: initial PSA >10, a Gleason score of 7-8, and stage T2b-T3. The mean D90 was of 151 ± 36.1 Gy. The mean V100 was of 85.4 ± 8.5% with a mean V150 of 60.1 ± 12.3%. Overall, the implants were well tolerated. In the first 6 months, 31.5% of the patients were free of genitourinary symptoms (GUs), 12.7% had Grade 3 GUs; 91.6% were free of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIs). After 6 months, 54.0% were GUs free, 1.4% had Grade 3 GUs; 95.8% were GIs free. Conclusion: The inverse planning with fast simulated annealing and high activity seeds gives a 5-year bFFS, which is comparable with the best published series with a low toxicity profile

  12. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R T; Victor, Bruno L; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide's free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  13. Experience and activities in the field of plutonium recycling in civilian nuclear power plants in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Union industry has established a world-wide leadership position in manufacturing and exploiting plutonium bearing fuel (MOX). About 15 to 20 tons of plutonium have been manufactured in the MOX fuel fabrication plants of E.U. companies. The current capacity of about 60 tons of MOX fuel per year is being upgraded to reach 400 tons/year by the year 2000. As a result, the excess amounts of separated plutonium, presently stored in the European Union, should no longer raise but should steadily decrease to converge to zero. Studies by the European Commission have indicated that the best use at present of weapons-grade and reactor-grade plutonium is to burn it in operating and future planned nuclear reactors. Disposing of plutonium by blending it with fission products or immobilising it into synthetic matrices appears to be far from being an industrially viable option. Following this path would mean to continue storing the excess plutonium of both military and civilian origin for an unknown, but very long period of time. For these and other reasons, the European Commission is striving to foster international cooperation between the European Union companies, having a long industrial experience accumulated in the field of recycling plutonium, and, so far, the Russian Federation and the Newly Independent States. This cooperation is aiming at supporting projects that could be mutually beneficial to all parties involved. To meet this objective, several programmes have been established either bilaterally or multilaterally, in particular within the framework of the International Science and Technology Centre (I.S.T.C.) in Moscow. Some examples of such collaborations will be described. (author)

  14. Delivering Science to Large Audiences: Experiments in Active Learning and Public Lectures at the University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, T.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of disseminating scientific knowledge to the broader community in an effective and efficient way is always with us. At the University of Michigan we have been addressing this problem in several ways. Every year we teach introductory physics to about 3000 students. We believe that, in addition to a pedagogical responsibility, this is an important opportunity for outreach. We report on a variety of approaches to active learning in large lecture classes which are aimed at aiding student comprehension of conceptual material. These have the side affect of improving their general impression of science. In addition to the traditional classroom, we have also engaged in a broader outreach program through the Saturday Morning Physics lecture series, which through a combination of programming and advertising draws audiences of 250 a week to 15 weeks of lectures on topics of current research. We conclude with some general observations about the relation between the success of these public lectures and our large lecture classes. This work is supported by a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, the University of Michigan, and the Ted Annis Foundation.

  15. Drug use in relation to clinical activities as an instrument for prospective drug budgeting. The Belgian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closon, M C; Crott, R; Even-Adin, D

    1996-03-01

    In an effort to control escalating health expenditures, especially in hospitals, many countries are planning or experimenting with prospective budgeting systems. Belgium is no exception and has recently introduced, with some success, limited fixed charges per hospital admission and/or per hospitalisation day for laboratory tests and radiographic investigations. More recently, the focus has shifted to hospital drug expenditures, which have shown high growth rates over the past few years. Until now, such expenditures have been reimbursed on a fee-for-service system, often with limited out-of-pocket charges for hospitalised patients. In order to curb the growth of drug expenditures, it is appropriate to investigate whether the financing of hospital drugs through a prospective budgeting system could be a feasible solution. Therefore, we constructed a database of over 270 000 admissions from a sample of 23 Belgian general and teaching (university) hospitals for the year 1991. Data were obtained from the official Minimum Basic Data Set or Résumé Clinique Minimum, which contains summarised clinical and administrative information, plus detailed expenditures (including medications) for each hospital stay. This information allowed us to categorize each stay into an appropriate diagnosis-related group (DRG). Our first descriptive analysis identified a number of major variables that influenced patients' drug expenditures: all-patient DRG (APDRG), age, disease severity, length of stay in an intensive care unit, emergency admission, death during hospitalisation, and hospital type (teaching or general). A covariance analysis was then performed on all hospital stays combined, and separately on surgical and medical stays. The results indicated that these variables taken together account for between 56.5 and 76.3% of drug expenditures in medical and surgical stays, respectively, with the major variance explained by differences in APDRG category. However, when the data were

  16. Physical activity practice as health promotion help: report of a successful experience of Pró Saúde and Pet Saúde UNIFOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carminda Maria Goersch Fontenele Lamboglia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience of one year of physical activity program with users of Family Health Unit (FHU Maria de Lourdes Jereissati in Fortaleza-CE. Data Synthesis: Some very important points were highlighted and reported as: target public, location, inclusion and exclusion criteria, implementation of the project, description of lessons, integration between undergraduate and graduate studies, interdisciplinarity, reports of the fellows and students, profile of participants, program evaluation and challenges. The program is developed within the Viva Vida, located in Region VI, whose target public was middle-aged people and elderly assisted by FHU Maria de Lourdes Jereissati. The activities started in 2009 and were performed twice a week, lasting 60 minutes, with theoretical approach (related to various topics relevant to health promotion and practice (aerobic exercise, strength exercises, flexibility, balance and conscience of the body. Besides the teacher in charge, were included in the program Fellows PRO-SAÚDE, PET-SAÚDE and students of some practical disciplines of Physical Education course. Interdisciplinarity was being developed effectively across fields of Physical Education and Nutrition. Conclusions: During a year of the program, it was possible to develop the work into two parts significantly, working in the development and implementation of a program of health promotion for the local population, providing rich academic experience for undergraduate students.

  17. PALS (Passive Active L-band System) Radiometer-Based Soil Moisture Retrieval for the SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Chan, S.; Bindlish, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Chazanoff, S. L.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Powers, J.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in early January 2015. For pre-launch soil moisture algorithm development and validation, the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June 7-July 19, 2012. Coincident active and passive airborne L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) on 17 days during the experiment. Simultaneously with the PALS measurements, soil moisture ground truth data were collected manually. The vegetation and surface roughness were sampled on non-flight days. The SMAP mission will produce surface (top 5 cm) soil moisture products a) using a combination of its L-band radiometer and SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements, b) using the radiometer measurement only, and c) using the SAR measurements only. The SMAPVEX12 data are being utilized for the development and testing of the algorithms applied for generating these soil moisture products. This talk will focus on presenting results of retrieving surface soil moisture using the PALS radiometer. The issues that this retrieval faces are very similar to those faced by the global algorithm using the SMAP radiometer. However, the different spatial resolution of the two observations has to be accounted for in the analysis. The PALS 3 dB footprint in the experiment was on the order of 1 km, whereas the SMAP radiometer has a footprint of about 40 km. In this talk forward modeled brightness temperature over the manually sampled fields and the retrieved soil moisture over the entire experiment domain are presented and discussed. In order to provide a retrieval product similar to that of the SMAP passive algorithm, various ancillary information had to be obtained for the SMAPVEX12 domain. In many cases there are multiple options on how to choose and reprocess these data

  18. The role of nuclear medicine in inflammatory bowel disease. A review with experiences of aspecific bowel activity using immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    or intensity. Discussion: These findings of aspecific bowel activity using imuunoscintigraphy are in contrast with the results of former studies, while the existence of non-specific activity decreases the reliability of the method. Based on the literature and our experiences, we conclude that 99mTc HMPAO labelling should be the method of choice for the investigation of IBD patients

  19. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  20. High School Teachers visit CERN to attend a series of seminars aimed towards promoting science in highschool. The teachers also participated in helping to plan outreach activities for the experiments at the LHC.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2009-01-01

    High School Teachers visit CERN to attend a series of seminars aimed towards promoting science in highschool. The teachers also participated in helping to plan outreach activities for the experiments at the LHC.

  1. Mean individual muscle activities and ratios of total muscle activities in a selective muscle strengthening experiment: the effects of lower limb muscle activity based on mediolateral slope angles during a one-leg stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide basic data for research on selective muscle strengthening by identifying mean muscle activities and calculating muscle ratios for use in developing strengthening methods. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy volunteers were included in this study. Muscle activity was measured during a one-leg stance under 6 conditions of slope angle: 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°. The data used in the analysis were root mean square and % total muscle activity values. [Results] There were significant differences in the root mean square of the gluteus medius, the hamstring, and the medial gastrocnemius muscles. There were significant differences in % total muscle activity of the medial gastrocnemius. [Conclusion] Future studies aimed at developing selective muscle strengthening methods are likely to yield more effective results by using muscle activity ratios based on electromyography data. PMID:27799690

  2. Total Plasma Density Determination In The Earth's Space Environment From The Active and Passive Measurements of The Cluster/whisper Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Darrouzet, F.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Hitier, R.; Le Guirriec, E.; Lemaire, J.; Rauch, J. L.; Rème, H.

    The WHISPER experiment that is onboard the four CLUSTER satellites is a classical relaxation sounder. It therefore sends short pulses (0.5 ms or 1 ms) at given frequen- cies in the surrounding medium. The answer from the probed plasma is subsequently received and analysed onboard. A fast Fourier transform is applied to the received sig- nal and the calculated frequency spectrum transmitted to the ground. The frequency at which the pulse is transmitted varies step by step, 1 kHz or 2 kHz in width, from 2 kHz to 80 kHz, i.e., in a frequency range that includes the plasma frequency expected in the Earth's space environment from the plasmapause to the solar wind. In active (sounding) mode, plasma resonances are thus triggered by WHISPER at characteris- tic frequencies from which the total plasma density and, possibly, the magnetic field modulus are derived. Whenever the transmitter is switched off, the WHISPER behaves like a simple wave receiver. The electric field component of natural waves are then recorded, its frequency spectrum determined onboard and fed into the telemetry. The objective of the presentation is to show how the total plasma density is derived from the active and passive measurements of the WHISPER. Different types of plasma res- onances are actually excited depending on the nature of the encountered plasma. Once the resonances are identified, their frequency locations are used for plasma density determinations. The characteristic frequencies of the plasma being known from the active measurements, natural waves (passive measurements) may be identified more easily. Their characteristics, such as cut-off or maximum-intensity frequencies, may be used for plasma density measurement purposes, which allows the gaps between active sequences to be filled in. Some examples in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the plasmapause are shown. A particular attention is paid to the latter. The hot to cold electron density ratio may indeed be estimated, and

  3. R+D works for the further development of high temperature reactors. (1) Captive bearing experiments for active magnetic bearings. (2) Captive bearing test for HTR blowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When using active magnetic bearings as blower shaft bearings, blower motors and bearings must be protected against mechanical damage in case of faults (example: total electrical supply failure due to the supply cables breaking). So-called captive bearings are provided, in order to be able to shut the blowers down safely in such faults. These captive bearings are roller bearings which are additionally fitted in the area of the blower shaft bearings, to prevent mechanical contact between the blower rotor and stator. As there was little experience available for the given boundary conditions, such as - speed, - acceleration, - bearing load, - bearing dimensions, - ambient conditions, appropriate development and tests had to be carried out. It was important to determine suitable captive bearings and the necessary ambient conditions, which will make it possible to support the failures of the magnetic bearings to be expected in 40 years' operation of the reactor without damage and to meet the requirements of the captive bearings. (orig./GL)

  4. Investigation of Toshiba 130nm CMOS process as a possible candidate for active silicon sensors in HEP and X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yunan; Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Testsuichi; Krueger, Hans; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wermes, Norbert [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Following the advances of commercial semiconductor manufacturing technologies there has recently been an increased interest within experimental physics community in applying CMOS manufacturing processes to developing active silicon sensors. Possibility of applying high voltage bias combined with high resistivity substrate allows for better depletion of sensor and therefore quicker and more efficient charge collection. One of processes that accommodates those features is Toshiba 130 nm CMOS technology (CMOS3E). Within our group a test chip was designed to examine the suitability of this technology for physics experiment (both for HEP and X-ray imaging). Design consisted of 4 pixel matrices with total of 12 different pixel flavors allowing for evaluation of various pixel geometries and architectures in terms of depletion depth, noise performance, charge collection efficiency, etc. During this talk initial outcome of this evaluation is presented, starting with brief introduction to technology itself, followed by results of TCAD simulations, description of final design and first measurements results.

  5. Transfer of technology construction management activities to preparation of NPP development in Indonesia (an experience of multi propose reactor 30 development at Serpong)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management and development of a nuclear installation could not be separated from the role of Construction Management in the planning stages of the project start until the commissioning. On the construction of nuclear installations MPR 30 Serpong, the role of human resource of Indonesia particularly Batan has received a lot of knowledge and experiences in the development process, the ongoing process of transfer of technology from the foreign consultants (Bechtel-USA) to Batan has been conducted at the time, and at least we are able to absorb knowledge and prove it through to completion development including commissioning activities. In the course of the time human resource challenges are required to have individual skills and expertise sufficient to handle a mega project such as nuclear power plants. Construction Management is managing a major project stages from planning, construction, procurement, installation commissioning until hand over to the owner. Based on the experience of the construction of the RSG-LP, it is expected that human resources that meet to the standards required competencies for the preparation of NPP in Indonesia are fulfilled. (author)

  6. Shielding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding mock-up experiments for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) are carried out in shielding corner facility of APSARA reactor, to assess the overall accuracy of the codes and nuclear data used in reactor shield design. As APSARA is a swimming pool-type thermal reactor, for fast reactor experiments, typical fast reactor shielding facility was created by using uranium assemblies as spectrum converter. The flux was also enhanced by replacing water by air. Experiments have been carried out to study neutron attenuation through typical fast reactor radial and axial bulk shielding materials such as steel, sodium, graphite, borated graphite and boron carbide. A large number of reaction rates, sensitive to different regions of the neutron energy spectrum, were measured using foil activation and Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) techniques. These experimental results were analysed using computational tools normally used in design calculations, viz., discrete ordinate transport codes with multigroup cross section sets. Comparison of measured reaction rates with calculations provided suitable bias factors for parameters relevant to shield design, such as sodium activation, fast neutron fluence, fission equivalent fluxes etc. The measured neutron spectrum on the incident face of shield model compares well with the calculated fast reactor blanket leakage neutron spectrum. The comparison of calculated reaction rates within shield model indicate that the calculations suffer from considerable uncertainties, in shield models with boron carbide/borated graphite. For AHWR shielding experiments, no spectrum converter was used as it is also a thermal reactor. Radiation streaming studies through penetrations/ducts of various shapes and sizes relevant to AHWR shielding were carried out. (author)

  7. pH-driven shifts in overall and transcriptionally active denitrifiers control gaseous product stoichiometry in growth experiments with extracted bacteria from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof eBrenzinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil pH is a strong regulator for activity as well as for size and composition of denitrifier communities. Low pH not only lowers overall denitrification rates but also influences denitrification kinetics and gaseous product stoichiometry. N2O reductase is particularly sensitive to low pH which seems to impair its activity post-transcriptionally, leading to higher net N2O production. Little is known about how complex soil denitrifier communities respond to pH change and whether their ability to maintain denitrification over a wider pH range relies on phenotypic redundancy. In the present study, we followed the abundance and composition of an overall and transcriptionally active denitrifier community extracted from a farmed organic soil in Sweden (pHH2O = 7.1 when exposed to pH 5.4 and drifting back to pH 6.6. The soil was previously shown to retain much of its functioning (low N2O/N2 ratios over a wide pH range, suggesting a high functional versatility of the underlying community. We found that denitrifier community composition, abundance and transcription changed throughout incubation concomitant with pH change in the medium, allowing for complete reduction of nitrate to N2 with little accumulation of intermediates. When exposed to pH 5.4, the denitrifier community was able to grow but reduced N2O to N2 only when near-neutral pH was reestablished by the alkalizing metabolic activity of an acid-tolerant part of the community. The genotypes proliferating under these conditions differed from those dominant in the control experiment run at neutral pH. Denitrifiers of the nirS-type appeared to be severely suppressed by low pH and nirK-type and nosZ-containing denitrifiers showed strongly reduced transcriptional activity and growth, even after restoration of neutral pH. Our study suggests that low pH episodes alter transcriptionally active populations which shape denitrifier communities and determine their gas kinetics.

  8. pH-driven shifts in overall and transcriptionally active denitrifiers control gaseous product stoichiometry in growth experiments with extracted bacteria from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenzinger, Kristof; Dörsch, Peter; Braker, Gesche

    2015-01-01

    Soil pH is a strong regulator for activity as well as for size and composition of denitrifier communities. Low pH not only lowers overall denitrification rates but also influences denitrification kinetics and gaseous product stoichiometry. N2O reductase is particularly sensitive to low pH which seems to impair its activity post-transcriptionally, leading to higher net N2O production. Little is known about how complex soil denitrifier communities respond to pH change and whether their ability to maintain denitrification over a wider pH range relies on phenotypic redundancy. In the present study, we followed the abundance and composition of an overall and transcriptionally active denitrifier community extracted from a farmed organic soil in Sweden (pH H2O = 7.1) when exposed to pH 5.4 and drifting back to pH 6.6. The soil was previously shown to retain much of its functioning (low N2O/N2 ratios) over a wide pH range, suggesting a high functional versatility of the underlying community. We found that denitrifier community composition, abundance and transcription changed throughout incubation concomitant with pH change in the medium, allowing for complete reduction of nitrate to N2 with little accumulation of intermediates. When exposed to pH 5.4, the denitrifier community was able to grow but reduced N2O to N2 only when near-neutral pH was reestablished by the alkalizing metabolic activity of an acid-tolerant part of the community. The genotypes proliferating under these conditions differed from those dominant in the control experiment run at neutral pH. Denitrifiers of the nirS-type appeared to be severely suppressed by low pH and nirK-type and nosZ-containing denitrifiers showed strongly reduced transcriptional activity and growth, even after restoration of neutral pH. Our study suggests that low pH episodes alter transcriptionally active populations which shape denitrifier communities and determine their gas kinetics. PMID:26441895

  9. Preparation and Characterization of the Activated Carbon-Nylon Beads: Novel Material for In Situ Microbe Sampler and Microcosm Experiment in Groundwater Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The organic pollution of groundwater is a widespread problem in the word. It is significant to study the microbial community especially related to organic contaminant biodegradation and their variation with groundwater environment parameters, so as to evaluate the biodegradability of the organic contaminants and then make a right decision for bioremediation. One of good ways for this study is to build a microcosm in groundwater containing target contaminant, where microbes especially relating to biodegradation will grow in the microcosm and be collected for analysis. This research aims to prepare a novel material for in situ microbe sampler and microcosm experiment in groundwater environment. The novel material, namely, the activated carbon-nylon (AC-N) beads, was prepared using activated carbon and nylon as main raw materials. The material consists of 3-4mm diameter spherical beads (Fig.1A and Fig.2 A) which have an internal surface area greater than 500 m2 g-1. FT-IR spectra (Fig.3) indicated the composition of activated carbon and nylon due to the variation of the peaks at the near 1627 cm-1and 1558 -1538 cm-1 before and after complex reaction. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of benzene on the beads was 16.76 mg/g at the initial concentration of 100 mg/L. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (Fig.4). The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model. Camera and SEM images (Fig.1 B and Fig.2 A and B) showed that the beads had an open and channel pore structures, the microbes might enter into and grow up in the beads (Fig.1 C and Fig.2 C). All these results showed that the AC-N beads could form the in situ microcosm of organic pollutants and microbes, which provided a promising prospect for assessing the biodegradability of the organic pollutants by intrinsic microbes in the groundwater.

  10. Spatial dynamics of receptive fields in cat primary visual cortex related to the temporal structure of thalamocortical feedforward activity. Experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Katrin; Funke, Klaus; Zhao, Yongqiang; Kerscher, Nicolas; Wennekers, Thomas; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2002-06-01

    We investigated how changes in the temporal firing rate of thalamocortical activity affect the spatiotemporal structure of receptive field (RF) subunits in cat primary visual cortex. Spike activity of 67 neurons (48 simple, 19 complex cells) was extracellulary recorded from area 17/18 of anesthetized and paralyzed cats. A total of 107 subfields (on/off) were mapped by applying a reverse correlation technique to the activity elicited by bright and dark rectangles flashed for 300 ms in a 20x10 grid. We found that the width of the (suprathreshold) discharge fields shrank on average by 22% during this 300-ms-long stimulus presentation time. Fifty-eight subfields (54%) shrank by more than 20% of peak width and only ten (less than 10%) showed a slight increase over time. The main size reduction took place 40-60 ms after response onset, which corresponded to the transition from transient peak firing to tonic visual activity in thalamocortical relay cells (TC). The experimentally obtained RFs were then fitted with the aid of a neural field model of the primary visual pathway. Assuming a Gaussian-shaped spatial sensitivity profile across the RF subfield width, the model allowed us to estimate the subthreshold RF (depolarization field, D-field) from the minimal discharge field (MDF). The model allowed us to test to what degree the temporal dynamics of thalamocortical activity contributes to the spatiotemporal changes of cortical RFs. To this end, we performed the fitting procedure either with a pure feedforward model or with a field model that also included intracortical feedback. Spatial and temporal parameters obtained from fits of the experimental RFs matched closely to those achieved by simulating a pure feedforward system with the field model but were not compatible with additional intracortical feedback. Thus, our results show that dot stimulation, which optimally excites thalamocortical cells, leads to a shrinkage with respect to the size of the RF subfield at the

  11. Experiment Dashboard for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Herrala, Juha; Maier, Gerhild; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Sidorova, Irina; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Grid is to provide a coherent access to distributed computing resources. All LHC experiments are using several Grid infrastructures and a variety of the middleware flavors. Due to the complexity and heterogeinity of a distributed system the monitoring represents a challenging task. Independently of the underlying platform , the experiments need to ave a complete and uniform picture of their activities on the Grid ideally seen by the users as a single powerful computing resource. Overall operation of the infrastructure used by experiments is defined both by the quality of the Grid and the quality of the tools and services developed/used by the experiments. Correspondingly the required monitoring information should combine both Grid-related and experiment/application specific data. On the other hand, users of the LHC experiments have various roles and need different levels of details regarding monitoring data. The paper will focus on the Grid monitoring from the experiment/user perspectives with...

  12. Approximating ambient D-region electron densities using dual-beam HF heating experiments at the high-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Divya

    Dual-beam ELF/VLF wave generation experiments performed at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska are critically compared with the predictions of a newly developed ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating model that accounts for the simultaneous propagation and absorption of multiple HF beams. The dual-beam HF heating experiments presented herein consist of two HF beams transmitting simultaneously: one amplitude modulated (AM) HF beam modulates the conductivity of the lower ionosphere in the extremely low frequency (ELF, 30 Hz to 3 kHz) and/or very low frequency (VLF, 3 kHz to 30 kHz) band while a second HF beam broadcasts a continuous waveform (CW) signal, modifying the efficiency of ELF/VLF conductivity modulation and thereby the efficiency of ELF/VLF wave generation. Ground-based experimental observations are used together with the predictions of the theoretical model to identify the property of the received ELF/VLF wave that is most sensitive to the effects of multi-beam HF heating, and that property is determined to be the ELF/VLF signal magnitude. The dependence of the generated ELF/VLF wave magnitude on several HF transmission parameters (HF power, HF frequency, and modulation waveform) is then experimentally measured and analyzed within the context of the multi-beam HF heating model. For all cases studied, the received ELF/VLF wave magnitude as a function of transmission parameter is analyzed to identify the dependence on the ambient D-region electron density (Ne) and/or electron temperature ( Te), in turn identifying the HF transmission parameters that provide significant independent information regarding the ambient conditions of the D-region ionosphere. A theoretical analysis is performed to determine the conditions under which the effects of Ne and Te can be decoupled, and the results of this analysis are applied to identify an electron density profile that can reproduce the unusually high level of ELF

  13. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0νββ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay, which can be investigated using 76Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0νββ decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) 76Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new 76Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of ≤10-2 events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of ≤10-3 events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in 76Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced 60Co is expected to be ∝2.5.10-3 events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV (λ=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for 60Co and a factor 17 for 232Th around Qββ = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for 232Th and 60Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength shifter/reflector combination for the light detection has been developed, leading to a photo electron (pe) yield of as much as 1.2 pe

  14. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0{nu}{beta}{beta} experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-07-25

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, which can be investigated using {sup 76}Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) {sup 76}Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new {sup 76}Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of {<=}10{sup -2} events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of {<=}10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in {sup 76}Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced {sup 60}Co is expected to be {proportional_to}2.5.10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV ({lambda}=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for {sup 60}Co and a factor 17 for {sup 232}Th around Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for {sup 232}Th and {sup 60}Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength

  15. The cross-section data from neutron activation experiments on niobium in the NPI p-7Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honusek, M.; Bém, P.; Fischer, U.; Götz, M.; Novák, J.; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, E.

    2010-10-01

    The reaction of protons on 7Li target produces the high-energy quasi- monoenergetic neutron spectrum with the tail to lower energies. Proton energies of 19.8, 25.1, 27.6, 30.1, 32.6, 35.0 and 37.4 MeV were used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with energies of 18, 21.6, 24.8, 27.6, 30.3, 32.9 and 35.6 MeV, respectively. Nb cross-section data for neutron energies higher than 22.5 MeV do not exist in the literature. Nb is the important material for fusion applications (IFMIF) as well. The variable-energy proton beam of NPI cyclotron is utilized for the production of neutron field using thin lithium target. The carbon backing serves as the beam stopper. The system permits to produce neutron flux density about 109 n/cm2/s in peak at 30 MeV neutron energy. The niobium foils of 15 mm in diameter and approx. 0.75 g weight were activated. The nuclear spectroscopy methods with HPGe detector technique were used to obtain the activities of produced isotopes. The large set of neutron energies used in the experiment allows us to make the complex study of the cross-section values. The reactions (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,4n), (n,He3), (n,α) and (n,2nα) are studied. The cross-sections data of the (n,4n) and (n,2nα) are obtained for the first time. The cross-sections of (n,2n) and (n,α) reactions for higher neutron energies are strongly influenced by low energy tail of neutron spectra. This effect is discussed. The results are compared with the EAF-2007 library.

  16. The cross-section data from neutron activation experiments on niobium in the NPI p-7Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov S.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of protons on 7Li target produces the high-energy quasi- monoenergetic neutron spectrum with the tail to lower energies. Proton energies of 19.8, 25.1, 27.6, 30.1, 32.6, 35.0 and 37.4 MeV were used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with energies of 18, 21.6, 24.8, 27.6, 30.3, 32.9 and 35.6 MeV, respectively. Nb cross-section data for neutron energies higher than 22.5 MeV do not exist in the literature. Nb is the important material for fusion applications (IFMIF as well. The variable-energy proton beam of NPI cyclotron is utilized for the production of neutron field using thin lithium target. The carbon backing serves as the beam stopper. The system permits to produce neutron flux density about 109  n/cm2/s in peak at 30 MeV neutron energy. The niobium foils of 15 mm in diameter and approx. 0.75 g weight were activated. The nuclear spectroscopy methods with HPGe detector technique were used to obtain the activities of produced isotopes. The large set of neutron energies used in the experiment allows us to make the complex study of the cross-section values. The reactions (n,2n, (n,3n, (n,4n, (n,He3, (n,α and (n,2nα are studied. The cross-sections data of the (n,4n and (n,2nα are obtained for the first time. The cross-sections of (n,2n and (n,α reactions for higher neutron energies are strongly influenced by low energy tail of neutron spectra. This effect is discussed. The results are compared with the EAF-2007 library.

  17. Building Block Experiment System for Off-class Research Activities%积木式课外科技活动实验系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红; 叶丰

    2014-01-01

    本文讨论了笔者开发的积木式课外科技活动实验系统。该实验系统具有可重构、灵活、易扩展、兼具数据处理和控制等特点,因此可以实现多种应用设计的开发。学生在课堂之外利用本系统能够独立动手实践,熟悉基本的电子电路知识,提高软硬件开发能力和创新能力。%A set of self-developed building block experiment system for off-class research activities,with the advan-tages of reconfiguration,flexibility,extensibility,strong data processing and control capability and so on,is pro-posed. This system can carry out a variety of development of application designs,and can make students think in-dependently,practice in person in order to study basic knowledge of electronic circuit,improve the hardware and software development capabilities and innovation ability.

  18. User experiences of wearable activity monitor among 3-6-year-old preschool children – Are children willing to wear monitor 7 days 24 hours per day?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Määttä

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted as a part of long-term DAGIS project that aims to improve the health behaviors and diminish socioeconomic inequalities in health behaviors among preschool children in Finland. A large cross-sectional survey is conducted in autumn 2015. Children (N=800, aged 3-6 years wear Actigraph WGT3X-BT accelerometer for seven days, 24 hours per day. Simultaneously with accelerometer use, parents fill in diary with informing the user experiences of accelerometer and possible non-wearing times. Parents are advised that the child wears accelerometer 24 hours and remove the belt only when in water (e.g. in shower. The accelerometer data are checked straight after data collection. Choi (2011 wear time analyses are conducted for data. The device acceptability, compliance for wearing times and reported barriers for using accelerometer 24 hours in seven days among 3-6-year-old children are reported. Conclusions This study provides new information about the usability of wearable activity monitors among 3-6-year-old children, an age group that is less studied.

  19. Deep-sea nematodes actively colonise sediments, irrespective of the presence of a pulse of organic matter: results from an in-situ experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Guilini

    Full Text Available A colonisation experiment was performed in situ at 2500 m water depth at the Arctic deep-sea long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN to determine the response of deep-sea nematodes to disturbed, newly available patches, enriched with organic matter. Cylindrical tubes,laterally covered with a 500 µm mesh, were filled with azoic deep-sea sediment and (13C-labelled food sources (diatoms and bacteria. After 10 days of incubation the tubes were analysed for nematode response in terms of colonisation and uptake. Nematodes actively colonised the tubes, however with densities that only accounted for a maximum of 2.13% (51 ind.10 cm(-2 of the ambient nematode assemblages. Densities did not differ according to the presence or absence of organic matter, nor according to the type of organic matter added. The fact that the organic matter did not function as an attractant to nematodes was confirmed by the absence of notable (13C assimilation by the colonising nematodes. Overall, colonisation appears to be a process that yields reproducible abundance and diversity patterns, with certain taxa showing more efficiency. Together with the high variability between the colonising nematode assemblages, this lends experimental support to the existence of a spatio-temporal mosaic that emerges from highly localised, partially stochastic community dynamics.

  20. Principal working group No. 1 on operating experience and human factors (PWG1). Report of the task group on reviewing the activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Task Group was formed by PWG-1 in the latter part of 1999 to review the mandate of PWG1 in light of new directions and assignments from CSNI, and to prepare a report that suggests future directions of the Working Group, in harmony with directions from CSNI. This report is the response of the Task Group. Principal Working Group no.1 was organized in September 1982. The group formed its charter, which included: - reviewing periodically activities for the collection, dissemination, storage and analysis of incidents reported under the IRS; - examining annually the incidents reported during the previous year in order to select issues (either technical or human-factor-oriented) with major safety significance and report them to CSNI; - encouraging feed-back through CSNI of lessons derived from operating experience to nuclear safety research programmes, including human factors studies; - providing a forum to exchange information in the field of human factors studies; - establishing short-term task forces, when necessary to carry out information exchange, special studies or any other work within its mandate; - making recommendations to CSNI for improving and encouraging these activities. The mandate of the working group was systematically re-examined in 1994. The purpose was to determine whether changes since the formation of the original mandate would indicate some need to refocus the directions of the working group. It was concluded that the main line of work (sometimes called the core business) of PWG1, which was shown to be an efficient tool for exchanging safety-significant operating experience and lessons learned from safety-significant issues, remained as valid and necessary in 1994 as it was in 1982. Some recommendations for improvement of efficiency were made, but the core business was unchanged. Very little of the mandate needed modification. With little change over nearly 20 years, these six items have constituted the mandate of PWG1. There have been twenty

  1. Satellite SAR imagery for site discovery, change detection and monitoring activities in cultural heritage sites: experiments on the Nasca region, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapete, D.; Cigna, F.; Masini, N.; Lasaponara, R.

    2012-04-01

    Besides their suitability for multi-temporal and spatial deformation analysis, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image archives acquired by space-borne radar sensors can be exploited to support archaeological investigations over huge sites, even those partially or totally buried and still to be excavated. Amplitude information is one of the main properties of SAR data from which it is possible to retrieve evidences of buried structures, using feature extraction and texture analysis. Multi-temporality allows the reconstruction of past and recent evolution of both landscape and built-up environment, with the possibility to detect natural and/or anthropogenic changes, including human-induced damages to the conservation of cultural heritage. We present the methodology and first results of the experiments currently undertaken using SAR data in the Nasca region (Southern Peru), where two important civilizations such as Paracas and Nasca developed and flourished from 4th century BC to the 6th century AD. The study areas include a wide spectrum of archaeological and environmental elements to be preserved, among which: the archaeological site of Cahuachi and its surroundings, considered the largest adobe Ceremonial Centre in the World; the Nasca lines and geoglyphs in the areas of Palpa, Atarco and Nasca; the ancient networks of aqueducts and drainage galleries in the Puquios area, built by Nasca in the 1st-6th centuries AD. Archaeological prospection and multi-purpose remote sensing activities are currently carried out in the framework of the Italian mission of heritage Conservation and Archaeogeophysics (ITACA), with the direct involvement of researchers from the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage and the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, Italian National Research Council. In this context, C- and L-band SAR images covering the Nasca region since 2001 were identified for the purposes of this research and, in particular, the following

  2. Applied Experiment on CODMn Removal from Drinking Water by Ozone Activated Carbon Process%臭氧活性炭工艺去除饮用水中CODMn的应用试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任基成; 费杰

    2001-01-01

    通过臭氧活性炭工艺去除饮用水中CODMn的应用试验,探讨了工艺参数的选择对CODMn去除效果的影响。在此基础上,提出了臭氧活性炭二级串联工艺布置方式,试验结果表明能大幅度提高CODMn的去除率。%Based on the applied experiments on CODMn removal from drinking water by ozone activated carbon process, the effects of parameters selection on CODMn removal were discussed. On this basis, the process of duplicate ozone activated carbon was put forward. Results of experiment showed that removal efficiency of CODMn was improved greatly. And the practical experience was also provided for advanced drinking water purification by ozone activated carbon process.

  3. The chemical activities of the Viking biology experiments and the arguments for the presence of superoxides, peroxides, gamma-Fe2O3 and carbon suboxide polymer in the Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.; Woeller, F.; Lehwalt, M.

    1978-01-01

    The evolution of N2, Ar, O2, and CO2 from Martian soil as a function of humidity in the Gas Exchange Experiment are correlated with the mean level of water vapor in the Martian atmosphere. All but O2 are associated with desorption. The evolution of oxygen is consistent with the presence of alkaline earth and alkali metal superoxides; and their peroxides and the gamma-Fe2O3 in the soil can account for the generation of radioactive gas in the Labeled Release Experiment. The slower evolution of CO2 from both the Gas Exchange Experiment and the Labeled Release Experiment are associated with the direct oxidation of organics by gamma-Fe2O3. The Pyrolytic Release Experiment's second peak may be carbon suboxide as demonstrated by laboratory experiments. A necessary condition is that the polymer exists in the Martian soil. We ascribe the activity of the surface samples to the reaction of Martian particulates with an anhydrous CO2 atmosphere activated by uv and ionizing radiations. The surface particles are ultimately altered by exposure to small but significant amounts of water at the sites. From the working model, we have predicted the peculiar nature of the chemical entities and demonstrated that the model is justified by laboratory data. The final confirmation of this model will entail a return to Mars, but the nature and implications of this chemistry for the Martian surface is predicted to reveal even more about Mars with further simulations in the laboratory.

  4. Monitoring glaciers and indications of subglacial volcanic activity using small-scale Top-Hat reflectors - An IsViews experiment on Myrdalsjökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, Christian; Duque Biarge, Sergi; Jaenicke, Julia; Münzer, Ulrich; Mayer, Christoph; Franke, Jonas; Guðmundsson, Águst; Parizzi, Alessandro; Fritz, Thomas; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Subglacial volcanic eruptions often provide indications of activity some time before the actual catastrophic event. Surface undulations appear on top of the ice cap and meltwater torrents can occur at the glacier margin. Even large scale uplifts of ice caps have been observed. Within the project IsViews a processing chain, based on high spatially and temporally resolved remote sensing imagery, will be developed in order to automatically identify such early indications. The main data used for this analysis are acquired by the TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X and RapidEye satellites. First investigations concerning the feasibility of the near real-time warning system and the general baseline conditions are carried out on two large plateau glaciers in southern Iceland, namely Mördalsjökull and Vatnajökull. Within the 2013 IsViews field work an experiment was started in order to test a new way of glacier monitoring. Two test sites were established on the Mördalsjökull ice cap (one at the equilibrium line and one below), each consisting of a permanent GPS station and two nearby RADAR reflectors. These RADAR reflectors are specially designed Top-Hat reflectors, which are cheap to manufacture, small (50 cm diameter) and lightweight and therefore easy to handle, transport and deploy. Their special design makes them visible in SAR images independent of orientation, so different acquisition geometries and even different sensors can be used. The drawback of the small, low reflecting Top-Hat can be overcome by using the newly implemented Staring Spotlight Mode of the German SAR Satellite TerraSAR-X, providing an unprecedented resolution of down to 20 cm in the azimuth direction. The reflectors, as point targets, allow absolute positioning within the cm-level in the TerraSAR-X data. Time series of SAR data can be used to derive position and altitude changes of the reflector itself and possibly even melting rates by exploiting the different signal paths. The visibility of the Top

  5. Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma experiment: a part of the Plasma Wave Investigation consortium aboard the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotignon, Jean Gabriel; Trotignon, Jean Gabriel; Lagoutte, Dominique; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kojima, Hiro; Blomberg, Lars; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    The Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma experiment, AM2 P, is designed to measure the thermal electron density and temperature in the environment of planet Mercury from the solar wind down to the inner magnetosphere. Detailed analyses of the returned data should also give more information on the electron distribution function itself. AM2 P as part of the Plasma Wave Investigation consortium, PWI, shall then contribute to the study of the intricate and poorly known interaction between the solar wind and the Mercury's magnetosphere, exosphere, and surface. AM2 P shall indeed give another insight into the thermal coupling between neutral and charged particles, the characterization of the spectral distribution of natural waves, the detection of plasma boundaries, and the identification of the plasma regimes inside the Hermean magnetosphere. The AM2 P basic mode is to measure the self-impedance of the MEFISTO (Mercury Electric Field In Situ TOol) double-sphere antenna in a frequency range comprising the plasma frequency which is expected to lie in the various regions encountered by the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, MMO. In this mode, different operations are possible, giving complementary plasma parameter information, mainly in the vicinity of the plasma resonance: normal dipole, monopole, and mutual impedance, according to the antenna elements that are used for the transmitting and receiving functions. In the secondary MEFISTO double-wire antenna mode, the external shield of the wire-boom is used as a 2 x 15 m long dipole antenna. As the dependence upon plasma parameters of the double-wire antenna impedance differs significantly from the double-sphere one, both modes may be of great benefit for achieving reliable and complementary plasma diagnoses. This is actually very useful in the Mercury's dilute media. As a bonus, AM2 P will contribute to the onboard calibrations of the WPT wire electric-antenna and the SC-DB and SC-LF search coils (calibration signal

  6. THE ADVERTISING-VALUE-EQUIVALENT (AVE METHOD IN QUANTIFYING ECONOMIC VALUES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS ACTIVITIES: EXPERIENCE OF A PUBLIC-LISTED COMPANY IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Abu Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Why should public relations (PR not be evaluated for its economic value? Despite the point of its social or intangible values, the argument goes on and on in most management meetings where PR practitioners always face the challenges of justifying their worth – often in monetary terms. In an open dialogue with Grunig during his visit to Malaysia in 2004, this renowned PR guru also expressed the difficulty of quantifying the actual PR worth. It is best to qualify PR values by assessing its priceless relationships with the company’s stakeholders. However, in our routine business life, especially at the middle management level, the above question seems unavoidable. In enhancing excellence for PR and communication management, Ehling (1992 placed the logic underlying the economic values of PR on the relationship between benefits and costs associated with the implementation of a PR programme. The above question and problem serve as the main objective of this article. In exploring the solutions for the quantification of PR values in Malaysia, economic education is taken as a remedy for the absence of knowledge and skills in making intelligent decisions in the marketplace (Baskin et al., 1997; Lattimor et al., 2004. In this research context, the researchers (a combination of a practitioner and an academician respectively confined the scope to the experience of a selected public-listed company for its PR campaign implemented in 2004. Quantification was attempted by evaluating the assessment in print media exposures. All earned media coverage for that particular PR campaign was measured for the media type, space, position, and the corresponding advertising rate. Monetary value was assigned to every single piece of PR news in the way disbursements are made to paid media for advertising activities. The explication of this advertising-value-equivalent (AVE method in quantifying economic values for PR news with regard to the selected campaign was made

  7. Social construction of physical knowledge of shadows: A study of five preoperational children's perceptions, collaborative experiences, and activities across knowledge domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy M.

    The first purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand the process of social construction of physical knowledge of shadows among preoperational thinkers by examining collaborative behaviors that may lead to new knowledge. The second purpose was to understand children's perspectives concerning the connection between social interaction and learning. The study focused on group collaboration and physical knowledge building as they relate to preoperational thought, a phase of cognitive development in early childhood. The case study consisted of five kindergarten children enrolled in a private, laboratory school at a southern, urban university. Across the eight-week data collection period, the children explored shadows through planned activities on 10 occasions and were interviewed three times in a focus group context. Primary methods for collecting data included videotaping the interviews and participant observations. Data were transcribed and coded inductively to discover emerging patterns while relating these patterns to existing constructivist theories. In addition, field notes, artifacts, and interviews with the children's teacher served to verify the findings. The findings revealed four major themes. Firstly, in terms of collaborative learning, children, while exhibiting a focus on the self, were attracted to learning with each other. Secondly, interactions seldom involved dialogic complexity, revealing minimal rationale, even during conflict. Thirdly, negative behaviors, such as tattling and exclusion, and prosocial behaviors, such as helping, were perceived as integral to the success of social construction of knowledge. The children considered each of these moral behaviors from the personal standpoint of how it affected them emotionally and in accomplishing a learning-related task. Fourthly, in terms of knowledge building, the findings indicated children's knowledge of shadows evolved over time as they participated in a developing scientific community

  8. Experience in public goods experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Anna; Levati, M. Vittoria; Montinari, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    We use information on students' past participation in economic experiments, as stored in our database, to analyze whether behavior in public goods games is affected by experience (i.e., previous participation in social dilemma-type experiments) and history (i.e., participation in experiments of a different class than the social dilemma). We have three main results. First, at the aggregate level, the amount subjects contribute and expect others to contribute decrease with experience. Second, a...

  9. A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Perspective to Understand Preservice Science Teachers' Reflections on and Tensions during a Microteaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Tran, Minh-Dan; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    This study draws from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to analyze preservice teachers' reflections on a microteaching activity. Microteaching activities involved preservice educators teaching middle school students from local schools. The study was conducted with 23 preservice teachers enrolled in a large university's teacher…

  10. Examining experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lakeman, G. J. T.

    2012-01-01

    I think visual experiences are intentional. And I think that different philosophical views about visual experience may be understood in terms of what they say about the intentionality of visual experience. In this thesis, I evaluate different views of experience and experiential intentionality by examining connections between experiential intentionality and further phenomenological, doxastic, epistemic and content-fixing features present in cases of perception and hallucinat...

  11. Atividade educativa no alojamento conjunto: relato de experiência Actividad educativa en el alojamento conjunto: relato de experiencia Educational activity during rooming-in: the account of an experience

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Frederico; Luciana Mara Monti Fonseca; Anne Muniz Costa Nicodemo

    2000-01-01

    Com este estudo, propusemo-nos a descrever a experiência vivida por um grupo de alunas de enfermagem junto ao binômio mãe-filho no alojamento conjunto de um Hospital Universitário, no desenvolvimento de uma atividade educativa relacionada aos cuidados com o recém-nascido e a mãe, durante o período de internação. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo e para o desenvolvimento da atividade utilizamos o método participativo e técnicas de ensino. Durante o processo de aprendizagem observamos interesse ...

  12. Technology Advancement for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space Using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obland, Michael D.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa; Antill, Charles; Campbell, Joel; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Meadows, Byron; Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Moore, Berrien; Crowell, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a newly developed lidar developed at NASA Langley Research Center and funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technology advancements targeted include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration autonomous operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are critical towards developing not only spaceborne instruments but also their airborne simulators, with lower platform requirements for size, mass, and power, and with improved instrument performance for the ASCENDS mission. ACES transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1.57 microns, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26 microns. The three EDFAs are capable of transmitting up to 10 watts average optical output power each and are seeded by compact, low noise, stable, narrow-linewidth laser sources stabilized with respect to a CO2 absorption line using a multi-pass gas absorption cell. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number

  13. Experiencias en Lenguaje Para su Nino ed Edad Pre-escolar. Parte I: Actividades Para la Casa. (Language Experiences for Your Preschooler. Part I: Activities at Home.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    The purpose of this manuscript (written in Spanish) is to encourage the development of communication skills of preschool children by introducing their parents to a number of learning activities suitable for home use. It is written to be used by an instructor who is working with preschool parents. The activities, which are designed to be…

  14. [L-Lysine-α-Oxidase in vitro Activity in Experiments on Models of Viruses Sindbis, Forest-Spring Encephalitis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I P; Larichev, V F; Shneider, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor effect of L-lysine-α-oxidase from the culture fluid of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180 was investigated for the first time. The in vitro studies revealed its high activity on a model of the forest-spring encephalitis virus and no activity against the Sindbis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori viruses. PMID:26415376

  15. Plotting Confucian and Disability Rights Paradigms on the Advocacy-Activism Continuum: Experiences of Chinese Parents of Children with Dyslexia in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon-McBrayer, Kim Fong; McBrayer, Philip Allen

    2014-01-01

    This study represents an initial effort to understand the advocacy journey of Chinese parents of children with dyslexia in Hong Kong. Qualitative methods involving individual and group interviews were used to solicit detailed recount and perceptions of the experiences of 25 parents. Findings revealed a largely sequenced three-stage journey of…

  16. Determining the Quantum Efficiency for Activation of an Organometallic Photoinitiator for Cationic Polymerization: An Experiment for the Physical or Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David M.; Mahar, Maura; Schnabel, R. Chris; Shah, Paras; Lees, Alistair J.; Jakubek, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    We present a new laboratory experiment on the photochemistry of organometallic [eta][superscript 5],[eta][superscript 6]-mixed-sandwich compounds, which is suitable for both the physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry laboratory. Specifically, students use 1,10-phenanthroline to trap the intermediate formed when…

  17. Steps in the Plantain Project: The Ideas, Activities, and Experiences of the Plantain Project, a Scheme To Safeguard Children and their Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kirsti Vindal

    1995-01-01

    The Plantain Project focuses on the vulnerable aspects of children's local environments. The project is designed to safeguard children in their own communities in Kristiansand, Norway through the participation of local elementary schools. Project ideas include sharing cultural experiences outdoors in nature to increase community spirit. The…

  18. EXPERIMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF HOME-MADE ACTIVATED CARBON FIBRE CARTRIDGE%国产活性炭纤维滤芯性能测试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万春新; 陈建国; 黄金钟; 胡望钧

    2001-01-01

    本文通过对国产活性炭纤维滤芯与国外进口活性炭纤维滤芯进行的各项性能对比测试结果的分析,指出国产活性炭纤维滤芯可替代国外进口同类产品。%The performance of home-made and import activated carbon fibre cartridge is studied here. By comparing the performances of these two kinds, we found that home-made activated carbon fibre cartridge can be substituted for import activated carbon fibre cartridge of the same kind.

  19. Fate of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds in batch experiments simulating soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Abel, Chol D T

    2013-06-30

    Reduction of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds from primary effluent during managed aquifer recharge was investigated using laboratory-scale batch reactors. Biologically stable batch reactors were spiked with different concentrations of sodium azide to inhibit biological activity and probe the effect of microbial activity on attenuation of various pollutants of concern. The experimental results obtained revealed that removal of dissolved organic carbon correlated with active microbial biomass. Furthermore, addition of 2 mM of sodium azide affected nitrite-oxidizing bacteria leading to accumulation of nitrite-nitrogen in the reactors while an ammonium-nitrogen reduction of 95.5 % was achieved. Removal efficiencies of the hydrophilic neutral compounds phenacetin, paracetamol, and caffeine were independent of the extent of the active microbial biomass and were >90 % in all reactors, whereas removal of pentoxifylline was dependent on the biological stability of the reactor. However, hydrophobic ionic compounds exhibited removal efficiency >80 % in batch reactors with the highest biological activity as evidenced by high concentration of adenosine triphosphate. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  20. TRIO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.