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Sample records for activating transcription factor-2

  1. (-)-Epicatechin gallate (ECG) stimulates osteoblast differentiation via Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ)-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Mi Ran; Sung, Mi Kyung; Kim, A Rum; Lee, Cham Han; Jang, Eun Jung; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Noh, Minsoo; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease characterized by low bone mass and is caused by an imbalance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. It is known that the bioactive compounds present in green tea increase osteogenic activity and decrease the risk of fracture by improving bone mineral density. However, the detailed mechanism underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the osteogenic effect of (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), a major bioactive compound found in green tea. We found that ECG effectively stimulates osteoblast differentiation, indicated by the increased expression of osteoblastic marker genes. Up-regulation of osteoblast marker genes is mediated by increased expression and interaction of the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). ECG facilitates nuclear localization of TAZ through PP1A. PP1A is essential for osteoblast differentiation because inhibition of PP1A activity was shown to suppress ECG-mediated osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the results showed that ECG stimulates osteoblast differentiation through the activation of TAZ and RUNX2, revealing a novel mechanism for green tea-stimulated osteoblast differentiation.

  2. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate.

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    TyAnna L Lovato

    Full Text Available Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2 is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification.

  3. Phosphorylation of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) within the activation domain is a key determinant of sensitivity to tamoxifen in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Bharath; Droog, Marjolein; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Zwart, Wilbert; Giannoudis, Athina; Malki, Mohammed I; Moore, David; Patel, Hetal; Shaw, Jacqui; Ellis, Ian O; Chan, Steve; Brooke, Greg N; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Lo Nigro, Christiana; Carroll, Jason; Coombes, R Charles; Bevan, Charlotte; Ali, Simak; Palmieri, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    Activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) has been implicated as a tumour suppressor in breast cancer (BC). c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK phosphorylate ATF-2 within the activation domain (AD), which is required for its transcriptional activity. To date, the role of ATF-2 in determining response to endocrine therapy has not been explored. Effects of ATF-2 loss in the oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive luminal BC cell line MCF7 were explored, as well as its role in response to tamoxifen treatment. Genome-wide chromatin binding patterns of ATF-2 when phosphorylated within the AD in MCF-7 cells were determined using ChIP-seq. The expression of ATF-2 and phosphorylated ATF-2 (pATF-2-Thr71) was determined in a series of 1,650 BC patients and correlated with clinico-pathological features and clinical outcome. Loss of ATF-2 diminished the growth-inhibitory effects of tamoxifen, while tamoxifen treatment induced ATF-2 phosphorylation within the AD, to regulate the expression of a set of 227 genes for proximal phospho-ATF-2 binding, involved in cell development, assembly and survival. Low expression of both ATF-2 and pATF-2-Thr71 was significantly associated with aggressive pathological features. Furthermore, pATF-2 was associated with both p-p38 and pJNK1/2 (ATF-2 is not associated with outcome, pATF-2 is associated with longer disease-free (p = 0.002) and BC-specific survival in patients exposed to tamoxifen (p = 0.01). Furthermore, multivariate analysis confirmed pATF-2-Thr71 as an independent prognostic factor. ATF-2 is important for modulating the effect of tamoxifen and phosphorylation of ATF-2 within the AD at Thr71 predicts for improved outcome for ER-positive BC receiving tamoxifen.

  4. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2 and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

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    Koh Terauchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1, which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1 regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA.

  5. Direct regulation of rRNA transcription by fibroblast growth factor 2.

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    Sheng, Zhi; Liang, Yanping; Lin, Chih-Yin; Comai, Lucio; Chirico, William J

    2005-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which is highly expressed in developing tissues and malignant cells, regulates cell growth, differentiation, and migration. Five isoforms (18 to approximately 34 kDa) of FGF-2 are derived from alternative initiation codons of a single mRNA. The 18-kDa FGF-2 isoform is released from cells by a nonclassical secretory pathway and regulates gene expression by binding to cell surface receptors. This isoform also localizes to the nucleolus, raising the possibility that it may directly regulate ribosome biogenesis, a rate-limiting process in cell growth. Although several growth factors have been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus, their function and mechanism of action remain unclear. Here we show that 18-kDa FGF-2 interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF), an architectural transcription factor essential for rRNA transcription. The maximal activation of rRNA transcription in vitro by 18-kDa FGF-2 requires UBF. The 18-kDa FGF-2 localizes to rRNA genes and is necessary for the full activation of pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo. Our results demonstrate that 18-kDa FGF-2 directly regulates rRNA transcription.

  6. Helicobacter pylori VacA enhances prostaglandin E2 production through induction of cyclooxygenase 2 expression via a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/activating transcription factor 2 cascade in AZ-521 cells

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    Hisatsune, Junzo; Yamasaki, Eiki; Nakayama, Masaaki;

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of AZ-521 cells with Helicobacter pylori VacA increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580, blocked elevation of COX-2 mRNA levels, whereas PD98059, which blocks the Erk1/2 cascade......A-induced COX-2 expression. In parallel with COX-2 expression, VacA increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production, which was inhibited by SB203580 and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor. VacA-induced PGE(2) production was markedly attenuated in AZ-521 cells stably expressing DN-p38. VacA increased transcription...... promoter activation. The reduction of ATF-2 expression in AZ-521 cells transformed with ATF-2-small interfering RNA duplexes resulted in suppression of COX-2 expression. Thus, VacA enhances PGE(2) production by AZ-521 cells through induction of COX-2 expression via the p38 MAPK/ATF-2 cascade, leading...

  7. Low- and high-dose hydrogen peroxide regulation of transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Jiao-lin; MO Li-wen; LAI Xi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play both physiological and pathophysiological roles. Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated genes expression and coordinates induction of chemoprotective proteins in response to physical and chemical stresses. The exact role of Nrf2 in cellular responses to different levels of oxidative stresses remains unknown.Methods Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were cultured and treated with 0 mmol/L, 0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L, 1.0 mmol/L and 2.0 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide solution for 2 hours. Nrf2 gene expression was assayed by reverse transcription-PCR, Nrf2-ARE binding activity was assayed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and localization of Nrf2 was detected with immunohistochemistry.Results Low and moderate (0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L) doses hydrogen peroxide exposure of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells led to the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, increased activity of transcription regulation and up-regulation of ARE-medicated gene expression. In contrast, high doses of hydrogen peroxide (1 mmol/L, 2 mmol/L) exposure of the cells led to the nuclear exclusion of Nrf2, decreased activity transcription regulation and down-regulation of ARE-mediated gene expression.Conclusion Low and moderate doses of hydrogen peroxide play protective roles by increasing transcription activity of Nrf2, whereas high- dose hydrogen peroxide plays a deleterious role by decreasing transcription activity of Nrf2.

  8. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

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    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  9. The role for runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) as a transcriptional repressor in luteinizing granulosa cells.

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    Park, Eun-Sil; Park, Jiyeon; Franceschi, Renny T; Jo, Misung

    2012-10-15

    Transcription factors induced by the LH surge play a vital role in reprogramming the gene expression in periovulatory follicles. The present study investigated the role of RUNX2 transcription factor in regulating the expression of Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 using cultured granulosa cells isolated from PMSG-primed immature rats. hCG or forskolin+PMA induced the transient increase in Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 expression, while the expression of Runx2 continued to increase until 48 h. The knockdown of the agonist-stimulated Runx2 expression increased Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 expression and PGE(2) levels in luteinizing granulosa cells. Conversely, the over-expression of RUNX2 inhibited the expression of these genes and PGE(2) levels. The mutation of RUNX binding motifs in the Runx1 promoter enhanced transcriptional activity of the Runx1 promoter. The knockdown and overexpression of Runx2 increased and decreased Runx1 promoter activity, respectively. ChIP assays revealed the binding of RUNX2 in the Runx1 and Ptgs2 promoters. Together, these novel findings provide support for the role of RUNX2 in down-regulation of Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 during the late ovulatory period to support proper ovulation and/or luteinization.

  10. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

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    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung [Hormone Research Center, School of Biological Sciences and Technology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Romanelli, Maria Grazia [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy); Lee, Keesook, E-mail: klee@chonnam.ac.kr [Hormone Research Center, School of Biological Sciences and Technology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  11. Structural basis of transcription activation.

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    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2C, an Osteoblast Transcription Factor Identified by Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO)-enhanced Mineralization*

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    Stephens, Alexandre S.; Stephens, Sebastien R.; Hobbs, Carl; Hutmacher, Deitmar W.; Bacic-Welsh, Desa; Woodruff, Maria Ann; Morrison, Nigel A.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid mineralization of cultured osteoblasts could be a useful characteristic in stem cell-mediated therapies for fracture and other orthopedic problems. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a small amphipathic solvent molecule capable of stimulating cell differentiation. We report that, in primary human osteoblasts, DMSO dose-dependently enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, similar DMSO-mediated mineralization enhancement was observed in primary osteoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse mesenchymal cells derived from fat, a promising source of starter cells for cell-based therapy. Using a convenient mouse pre-osteoblast model cell line MC3T3-E1, we further investigated this phenomenon showing that numerous osteoblast-expressed genes were elevated in response to DMSO treatment and correlated with enhanced mineralization. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) was identified as the transcription factor most induced by DMSO, among the numerous DMSO-induced genes, suggesting a role for Mef2c in osteoblast gene regulation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Mef2c in osteoblast-like cells in mouse mandible, cortical, and trabecular bone. shRNAi-mediated Mef2c gene silencing resulted in defective osteoblast differentiation, decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization and knockdown of osteoblast specific gene expression, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. A flow on knockdown of bone-specific transcription factors, Runx2 and osterix by shRNAi knockdown of Mef2c, suggests that Mef2c lies upstream of these two important factors in the cascade of gene expression in osteoblasts. PMID:21652706

  13. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c, an osteoblast transcription factor identified by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-enhanced mineralization.

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    Stephens, Alexandre S; Stephens, Sebastien R; Hobbs, Carl; Hutmacher, Deitmar W; Bacic-Welsh, Desa; Woodruff, Maria Ann; Morrison, Nigel A

    2011-08-26

    Rapid mineralization of cultured osteoblasts could be a useful characteristic in stem cell-mediated therapies for fracture and other orthopedic problems. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a small amphipathic solvent molecule capable of stimulating cell differentiation. We report that, in primary human osteoblasts, DMSO dose-dependently enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, similar DMSO-mediated mineralization enhancement was observed in primary osteoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse mesenchymal cells derived from fat, a promising source of starter cells for cell-based therapy. Using a convenient mouse pre-osteoblast model cell line MC3T3-E1, we further investigated this phenomenon showing that numerous osteoblast-expressed genes were elevated in response to DMSO treatment and correlated with enhanced mineralization. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) was identified as the transcription factor most induced by DMSO, among the numerous DMSO-induced genes, suggesting a role for Mef2c in osteoblast gene regulation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Mef2c in osteoblast-like cells in mouse mandible, cortical, and trabecular bone. shRNAi-mediated Mef2c gene silencing resulted in defective osteoblast differentiation, decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization and knockdown of osteoblast specific gene expression, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. A flow on knockdown of bone-specific transcription factors, Runx2 and osterix by shRNAi knockdown of Mef2c, suggests that Mef2c lies upstream of these two important factors in the cascade of gene expression in osteoblasts.

  14. Direct Regulation of rRNA Transcription by Fibroblast Growth Factor 2

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    Sheng, Zhi; Liang, Yanping; Lin, Chih-Yin; Comai, Lucio; Chirico, William J

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which is highly expressed in developing tissues and malignant cells, regulates cell growth, differentiation, and migration. Five isoforms (18 to ∼34 kDa) of FGF-2 are derived from alternative initiation codons of a single mRNA. The 18-kDa FGF-2 isoform is released from cells by a nonclassical secretory pathway and regulates gene expression by binding to cell surface receptors. This isoform also localizes to the nucleolus, raising the possibility that it may...

  15. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    +) in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which...... is a p38MAPK substrate and binds to the AP-1 site of the IL-8 promoter, inhibited VacA-induced IL-8 production. VacA activated an IL-8 promoter containing an NF-IL-6 site, but not a mutated AP-1 or NF-kappaB site, suggesting direct involvement of the ATF-2/CREB binding region or NF-kappaB-binding regions...... in VacA-induced IL-8 promoter activation. Thus, in U937 cells, VacA directly increases IL-8 production by activation of the p38 MAPK via intracellular Ca(2+) release, leading to activation of the transcription factors, ATF-2, CREB, and NF-kappaB....

  16. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    the mechanisms by which VacA enhanced IL-8 production by promonocytic U937 cells, which demonstrated the greatest VacA-induced IL-8 release of the cells tested. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580), ERK1/2 (PD98059), IkappaBalpha ((E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile), Ca(2+) entry (SKF96365......+) in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which...... in VacA-induced IL-8 promoter activation. Thus, in U937 cells, VacA directly increases IL-8 production by activation of the p38 MAPK via intracellular Ca(2+) release, leading to activation of the transcription factors, ATF-2, CREB, and NF-kappaB....

  17. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

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    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  18. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime;

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined the mechan......Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined...... the mechanisms by which VacA enhanced IL-8 production by promonocytic U937 cells, which demonstrated the greatest VacA-induced IL-8 release of the cells tested. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580), ERK1/2 (PD98059), IkappaBalpha ((E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile), Ca(2+) entry (SKF96365......+) in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which...

  19. The brain-specific neural zinc finger transcription factor 2b (NZF-2b/7ZFMyt1 suppresses cocaine self-administration in rats

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    Vijay Chandrasekar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-specific neural-zinc-finger transcription factor-2b (NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic region after chronic cocaine exposure and lentiviral-mediated expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens results in decreased locomotor activity (Chandrasekar and Dreyer, 2009. In this study the role of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in active cocaine seeking and of its interaction with histone deacetylase on the altered behavior has been observed. Localized expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens resulted in attenuated cocaine self-administration, whereas silencing this transcription factor with lentiviruses expressing siRNAs increased the animal′s motivation to self-infuse cocaine. Low doses of sodium butyrate, a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase, were sufficient to reverse the NZF2b/7ZFMyt1-mediated decrease in cocaine self-administration. NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression resulted in strong induction of transcription factors REST1 and NAC1 and of the dopamine D2 receptor, with concomitant inhibition of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. We show that NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 colocalizes with histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2, probably overcoming the suppression of transcriptional activity caused by Lingo1. These findings show that molecular adaptations mediated by NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression possibly lead to decreased responsiveness to the reinforcing properties of cocaine and play a prominent role in affecting the behavioral changes induced by the drug.

  20. Runt-related transcription factor 2 in human colon carcinoma: a potent prognostic factor associated with estrogen receptor.

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    Sase, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miura, Koh; Shiiba, Kenichi; Sato, Ikuro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Onodera, Yoshiaki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ryuichiro; Karasawa, Hideaki; Shibata, Chikashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-11-15

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) belongs to the RUNX family of heterodimeric transcription factors, and is mainly associated with osteogenesis. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that RUNX2 increased the cell proliferation of mouse and rat colon carcinoma cells but the status of RUNX2 has remained unknown in human colon carcinoma. Therefore, we examined clinical significance and biological functions of RUNX2 in colon carcinoma. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was examined in 157 colon carcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was evaluated as percentage of positive carcinoma cells [i.e., labeling index (LI)]. We used SW480 and DLD-1 human colon carcinoma cells, expressing estrogen receptor-β (ER) in subsequent in vitro studies. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was detected in colon carcinoma cells, and the median value of RUNX2 LI was 67%. RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with Dukes' stage, liver metastasis and ERβ status. In addition, RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with adverse clinical outcome of the colon carcinoma patients, and turned out an independent prognostic factor following multivariate analysis. Results of in vitro studies demonstrated that both SW480 and DLD-1 cells transfected with small interfering RNA against RUNX2 significantly decreased their cell proliferation, migration and invasive properties. In addition, RUNX2 mRNA level was significantly decreased by ER antagonist in these two cells. These findings all suggest that RUNX2 is a potent prognostic factor in human colon carcinoma patients through the promotion of cell proliferation and invasion properties, and is at least partly upregulated by estrogen signals through ERβ of carcinoma cells.

  1. Interactions between mitochondria and the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) regulate neuronal structural and functional plasticity and metaplasticity.

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    Brusco, Janaina; Haas, Kurt

    2015-08-15

    The classical view of mitochondria as housekeeping organelles acting in the background to simply maintain cellular energy demands has been challenged by mounting evidence of their direct and active participation in synaptic plasticity in neurons. Time-lapse imaging has revealed that mitochondria are motile in dendrites, with their localization and fusion and fission events regulated by synaptic activity. The positioning of mitochondria directly influences function of nearby synapses through multiple pathways including control over local concentrations of ATP, Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have also shown that mitochondrial protein cascades, classically associated with apoptosis, are involved in neural plasticity in healthy cells. These findings link mitochondria to the plasticity- and metaplasticity-associated activity-dependent transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), further repositioning mitochondria as potential command centres for regulation of synaptic plasticity. Intriguingly, MEF2 and mitochondrial functions appear to be intricately intertwined, as MEF2 is a target of mitochondrial apoptotic caspases and, in turn, MEF2 regulates mitochondrial genome transcription essential for production of superoxidase and hydrogen peroxidase. Here, we review evidence supporting mitochondria as central organelles controlling the spatiotemporal expression of neuronal plasticity, and attempt to disentangle the MEF2-mitochondria relationship mediating these functions. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  2. Expression and localization of forkhead transcriptional factor 2 (Foxl2 in the gonads of protogynous wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus

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    Kobayashi Yasuhisa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-spot wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus, is a marine protogynous hermaphrodite fish. Individuals mature either as initial phase (IP males or females. Appropriate social cues induce the sex change from IP female to terminal phase (TP male. However, the molecular mechanisms behind such a sex change remain largely unknown. Recently, the forkhead transcription factor 2 (Foxl2 was identified as an essential regulator of vertebrate ovarian development/function/phenotype. Inspired by this information, we characterized the expression patterns of Foxl2 in the protogynous wrasse assuming Foxl2 as the female-specific marker in this species. Methods First, we clonedFoxl2 cDNA from ovary by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR followed by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. Next, we analysed expression pattern of Foxl2 messenger RNA (mRNA and protein in gonads of different sexual phases by real time quantitative PCR assay and flour fluorescence immunohistochemical method, respectively. Additionally, we studied the changes in Foxl2 expression pattern during aromatase inhibitor (AI-induced sex change. Results The amino acid sequence (306 AA of wrasse Foxl2, especially the forkhead domain, shows high identity with that of other reported teleost Foxl2s. Quite unexpectedly, no sexual dimorphism was observable between the testes and ovary in the expression pattern of Foxl2. In female phase fish, signals for Foxl2 protein were detectable in the granulosa cells, but not the theca cells. Transcript levels of Foxl2 in the testes of IP and TP males were identical to that in the ovaries of females and, further, Foxl2 protein was found to be localized in the interstitial cells including tubules and Leydig cells. Treatment with AI induced sex change in male gonads and an up-regulation was seen in the expression of Foxl2 in these gonads. Conclusions Unlike in other vertebrates, including teleosts, Foxl2 may have a different

  3. Novel Mutation of Cleidocranial Dysplasia-related Frameshift Runt-related Transcription Factor 2 in a Sporadic Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xue-Yan; Jia, Pei-Zeng; Zhao, Hua-Xiang; Li, Wei-Ran; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jiu-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects the skeletal system. Common symptoms of CCD include hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, delayed or even absent closure of the fontanels, midface hypoplasia, short stature, and delayed eruption of permanent and supernumerary teeth. Previous studies reported a connection between CCD and the haploinsufficiency of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Here, we report a sporadic Chinese case presenting typical symptoms of CCD. Methods: We made genetic testing on this sporadic Chinese case and identified a novel RUNX2 frameshift mutation: c.1111dupT. In situ immunofluorescence microscopy and osteocalcin promoter luciferase assay were performed to compare the functions of the RUNX2 mutation with those of wild-type RUNX2. Results: RUNX2 mutation was observed in the perinuclear region, cytoplasm, and nuclei. In contrast, wild-type RUNX2 was confined in the nuclei, which indicated that the subcellular compartmentalization of RUNX2 mutation was partially perturbed. The transactivation function on osteocalcin promoter of the RUNX2 mutation was obviously abrogated. Conclusions: We identified a sporadic CCD patient carrying a novel insertion/frameshift mutation of RUNX2. This finding expanded our understanding of CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:28091408

  4. Epicatechin induces NF-kappaB, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2) via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signalling in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Martín, María Angeles; Haegeman, Guy; Goya, Luis; Bravo, Laura; Ramos, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    The dietary flavonoid epicatechin has been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent regulation by epicatechin on the activity of the main transcription factors (NF-kappaB, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2)) related to antioxidant defence and survival and proliferation pathways in HepG2 cells. Treatment of cells with 10 microm-epicatechin induced the NF-kappaB pathway in a time-dependent manner characterised by increased levels of IkappaB kinase (IKK) and phosphorylated inhibitor of kappaB subunit-alpha (p-IkappaBalpha) and proteolytic degradation of IkappaB, which was consistent with an up-regulation of the NF-kappaB-binding activity. Time-dependent activation of the AP-1 pathway, in concert with enhanced c-Jun nuclear levels and induction of Nrf2 translocation and phosphorylation were also demonstrated. Additionally, epicatechin-induced NF-kappaB and Nrf2 were connected to reactive oxygen species intracellular levels and to the activation of cell survival and proliferation pathways, being phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) associated to Nrf2 modulation and ERK to NF-kappaB induction. These data suggest that the epicatechin-induced survival effect occurs by the induction of redox-sensitive transcription factors through a tight regulation of survival and proliferation pathways.

  5. Transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D regulates interleukin-10 production in microglia to protect neuronal cells from inflammation-induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaosong; Gao, Li; Lu, Fangfang; Wang, Bao; Gao, Fei; Zhu, Gang; Cai, Zhibiao; Lai, Juan; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-20

    Neuroinflammatory responses have been recognized as an important aspect in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Transcriptional regulation plays a critical role in the process of inflammation. Transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) is identified as a central factor in transmission of extracellular signals and activation of the genetic programs in response to a wide range of stimuli in several cell types, including neurons. But its presence and function in microglia have not been reported. We therefore investigated the effect of MEF2D in activated microglia on the progress of neuroinflammation and the survival of neurons. BV2 cells and primary cultured glial cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Samples from cells were examined for MEF2D expression, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by immunoblotting, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of MEF2D was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). Recombinant lentivirus expressing shRNA specific to MEF2D was used to silence MEF2D expression in BV2 cells. The role of IL-10 transcriptionally induced by MEF2D on neuronal survival was assessed by anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibody. The survival of neurons was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Male C57bl/6 mice were used to establish an acute PD model. Brain sections and cell slides were tested by immunofluorescence. We demonstrated that MEF2D was present in microglia. Activation of microglia was associated with an increase in MEF2D level and activity in response to different stimuli in vivo and in vitro. MEF2D bound to a MEF2 consensus site in the promoter region of IL-10 gene and stimulated IL-10 transcription. Silencing MEF2D decreased the level of IL

  6. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induces osteogenic differentiation through a Runx2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Sato, Hiroko; Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Matsui, Hiroki; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Sato, Mahito; Iso, Tatsuya; Arai, Masashi [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Kurabayashi, Masahiko, E-mail: mkuraba@med.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    Expression of bone-associated proteins and osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2 in arterial cells has been implicated in the development of vascular calcification. However, the signaling upstream of the Runx2-mediated activation of osteoblastic program in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is poorly understood. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an important regulator of bone formation, on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC. Stimulation of cultured rat aortic SMC (RASMC) with FGF-2 induced the expression of the osteoblastic markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin. Luciferase assays showed that FGF-2 induced osteocyte-specific element (OSE)-dependent transcription. Downregulation of Runx2 by siRNA repressed the basal and FGF-2-stimulated expression of the OPN gene in RASMC. FGF-2 produced hydrogen peroxide in RASMC, as evaluated by fluorescent probe. Induction of OPN expression by FGF-2 was inhibited not only by PD98059 (MEK1 inhibitor) and PP1 (c-Src inhibitor), but also by an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Nuclear extracts from FGF-2-treated RASMC exhibited increased DNA-binding of Runx2 to its target sequence. Immunohistochemistry of human coronary atherectomy specimens and calcified aortic tissues showed that expression of FGF receptor-1 and Runx2 was colocalized. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF-2 plays a role in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC by activating Runx2 through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent- and oxidative stress-sensitive-signaling pathways.

  7. High-Content Positional Biosensor Screening Assay for Compounds to Prevent or Disrupt Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Intermediary Factor 2 Protein–Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J.; Johnston, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor–transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein–protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) “prey” and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) “bait” compon...

  8. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  9. Chromatin insulation by a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Nathan B; Scalzo, David; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I K

    2003-02-04

    In eukaryotic genomes, transcriptionally active regions are interspersed with silent chromatin that may repress genes in its vicinity. Chromatin insulators are elements that can shield a locus from repressive effects of flanking chromatin. Few such elements have been characterized in higher eukaryotes, but transcriptional activating elements are an invariant feature of active loci and have been shown to suppress transgene silencing. Hence, we have assessed the ability of a transcriptional activator to cause chromatin insulation, i.e., to relieve position effects at transgene integration sites in cultured cells. The transgene contained a series of binding sites for the metal-inducible transcriptional activator MTF, linked to a GFP reporter. Clones carrying single integrated transgenes were derived without selection for expression, and in most clones the transgene was silent. Induction of MTF resulted in transition of the transgene from the silent to the active state, prolongation of the active state, and a marked narrowing of the range of expression levels at different genomic sites. At one genomic site, prolonged induction of MTF resulted in suppression of transgene silencing that persisted after withdrawal of the induction stimulus. These results are consistent with MTF acting as a chromatin insulator and imply that transcriptional activating elements can insulate active loci against chromatin repression.

  10. Structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis as activators of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate cytoprotective genes which may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In order to better understand the structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis L., we isolated carnosic acid, carnosol, epirosmanol, rosmanol, 12-methoxy-carnosic acid, sageone, and carnosaldehyde using polyamide column, centrifugal partition chromatography, and semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Isolated compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to active the Nrf2 and general cellular toxicity using mouse primary cortical cultures. All compounds except 12-methoxy-carnosic acid were able to activate the antioxidant response element. Furthermore both carnosol and carnoasldehyde were able to induce Nrf2-dependent gene expression as well as protect mouse primary cortical neuronal cultures from H(2)O(2) induced cell death.

  11. The stress signalling pathway nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 is activated in the liver of sows during lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Susann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently been shown that the lactation-induced inflammatory state in the liver of dairy cows is accompanied by activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 pathway, which regulates the expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes and thereby protects tissues from inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS. The present study aimed to study whether the Nrf2 pathway is activated also in the liver of lactating sows. Findings Transcript levels of known Nrf2 target genes, UGT1A1 (encoding glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1, HO-1 (encoding heme oxygenase 1, NQO1 (encoding NAD(PH dehydrogenase, quinone 1, GPX1 (encoding glutathione peroxidase, PRDX6 (encoding peroxiredoxin 6, TXNRD1 (encoding thioredoxin reductase 1, and SOD (encoding superoxide dismutase, in the liver are significantly elevated (between 1.7 and 3.1 fold in lactating sows compared to non-lactating sows. The inflammatory state in the liver was evidenced by the finding that transcript levels of genes encoding acute phase proteins, namely haptoglobin (HP, fibrinogen γ (FGG, complement factor B (CFB, C-reactive protein (CRP and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP, were significantly higher (2 to 8.7 fold in lactating compared to non-lactating sows. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the Nrf2 pathway in the liver of sows is activated during lactation. The activation of Nrf2 pathway during lactation in sows might be interpreted as a physiologic means to counteract the inflammatory process and to protect the liver against damage induced by inflammatory signals and ROS.

  12. Activation of the Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2/Antioxidant Response Element Pathway Is Neuroprotective after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI. PMID:21806470

  13. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element pathway is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E; Keane, Robert W

    2012-03-20

    The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI.

  14. Paternal Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (Igf2 Regulates Stem Cell Activity During Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Barroca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2 belongs to the IGF/Insulin pathway, a highly conserved evolutionarily network that regulates growth, aging and lifespan. Igf2 is highly expressed in the embryo and in cancer cells. During mouse development, Igf2 is expressed in all sites where hematopoietic stem cells (HSC successively expand, then its expression drops at weaning and becomes undetectable when adult HSC have reached their niches in bones and start to self-renew. In the present study, we aim to discover the role of IGF2 during adulthood. We show that Igf2 is specifically expressed in adult HSC and we analyze HSC from adult mice deficient in Igf2 transcripts. We demonstrate that Igf2 deficiency avoids the age-related attrition of the HSC pool and that Igf2 is necessary for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our study reveals that the expression level of Igf2 is critical to maintain the balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, presumably by regulating the interaction between HSC and their niche. Our data have major clinical interest for transplantation: understanding the changes in adult stem cells and their environments will improve the efficacy of regenerative medicine and impact health- and life-span.

  15. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...... RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels.......Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...

  16. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-19

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNA(i)). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNA(i), implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNA(i) and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10(-4) for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases.

  17. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNAi). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNAi, implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNAi and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10−4 for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  18. High-Content Positional Biosensor Screening Assay for Compounds to Prevent or Disrupt Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Intermediary Factor 2 Protein–Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The androgen receptor–transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein–protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) “prey” and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) “bait” components of the biosensor was directed by recombinant adenovirus constructs that expressed the ligand binding and activation function 2 surface domains of AR fused to RFP with nuclear localization and nuclear export sequences, and three α-helical LXXLL motifs from TIF2 fused to GFP and an HIV Rev nucleolar targeting sequence. In unstimulated cells, AR-RFP was localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and TIF2-GFP was localized to nucleoli. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment induced AR-RFP translocation into the nucleus where the PPIs between AR and TIF2 resulted in the colocalization of both biosensors within the nucleolus. We adapted the translocation enhanced image analysis module to quantify the colocalization of the AR-RFP and TIF2-GFP biosensors in images acquired on the ImageXpress platform. DHT induced a concentration-dependent AR-TIF2 colocalization and produced a characteristic condensed punctate AR-RFP PPI nucleolar distribution pattern. The heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and antiandrogens flutamide and bicalutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR-TIF2 PPI formation with 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s) of 88.5±12.5 nM, 7.6±2.4 μM, and 1.6±0.4 μM, respectively. Images of the AR-RFP distribution phenotype allowed us to distinguish between 17-AAG and flutamide, which prevented AR translocation, and bicalutamide, which blocked AR-TIF2 PPIs. We screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active

  19. High-content positional biosensor screening assay for compounds to prevent or disrupt androgen receptor and transcriptional intermediary factor 2 protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    The androgen receptor-transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein-protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) "prey" and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) "bait" components of the biosensor was directed by recombinant adenovirus constructs that expressed the ligand binding and activation function 2 surface domains of AR fused to RFP with nuclear localization and nuclear export sequences, and three α-helical LXXLL motifs from TIF2 fused to GFP and an HIV Rev nucleolar targeting sequence. In unstimulated cells, AR-RFP was localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and TIF2-GFP was localized to nucleoli. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment induced AR-RFP translocation into the nucleus where the PPIs between AR and TIF2 resulted in the colocalization of both biosensors within the nucleolus. We adapted the translocation enhanced image analysis module to quantify the colocalization of the AR-RFP and TIF2-GFP biosensors in images acquired on the ImageXpress platform. DHT induced a concentration-dependent AR-TIF2 colocalization and produced a characteristic condensed punctate AR-RFP PPI nucleolar distribution pattern. The heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and antiandrogens flutamide and bicalutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR-TIF2 PPI formation with 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s) of 88.5±12.5 nM, 7.6±2.4 μM, and 1.6±0.4 μM, respectively. Images of the AR-RFP distribution phenotype allowed us to distinguish between 17-AAG and flutamide, which prevented AR translocation, and bicalutamide, which blocked AR-TIF2 PPIs. We screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) set

  20. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  1. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  2. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 overexpression promotes oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 expression in the brains of neonatal rats exposed to hypoxia****☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Aijun Yang; Wenxing Jiang

    2011-01-01

    To examine the expression profiles of oligodendrocyte transcription factors 1 and 2 (Olig1 and Olig2) and the interaction between these two proteins, Olig1 was transfected into the lateral ventricles of neonatal rats subjected to hypoxia. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Olig2 was expressed throughout the nuclei in the brain, and expression increased at 3 days following hypoxia and was higher than levels at 7 days following Ad5-Olig1 transfection. Western blot revealed that Olig1 and Olig2 expression increased in Olig1-transfected brain cells 3 days after hypoxia, but Olig1 and Olig2 expression decreased at 7 days. These results indicate that Olig1 overexpression enhances Olig2 expression in brain tissues of hypoxia rats.

  3. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn K White

    Full Text Available The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR. NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  4. Increased expression of protease-activated receptor 4 and Trefoil factor 2 in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Yu

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4, a member of G-protein coupled receptors family, was recently reported to exhibit decreased expression in gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cancer, yet increased expression during the progression of prostate cancer. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2, a small peptide constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa, plays a protective role in restitution of gastric mucosa. Altered TFF2 expression was also related to the development of gastrointestinal cancer. TFF2 has been verified to promote cell migration via PAR4, but the roles of PAR4 and TFF2 in the progress of colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, the expression level of PAR4 and TFF2 in colorectal cancer tissues was measured using real-time PCR (n = 38, western blotting (n=38 and tissue microarrays (n = 66. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PAR4 and TFF2 were remarkably increased in colorectal cancer compared with matched noncancerous tissues, especially in positive lymph node and poorly differentiated cancers. The colorectal carcinoma cell LoVo showed an increased response to TFF2 as assessed by cell invasion upon PAR4 expression. However, after intervention of PAR4 expression, PAR4 positive colorectal carcinoma cell HT-29 was less responsive to TFF2 in cell invasion. Genomic bisulfite sequencing showed the hypomethylation of PAR4 promoter in colorectal cancer tissues and the hypermethylation in the normal mucosa that suggested the low methylation of promoter was correlated to the increased PAR4 expression. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the up-regulated expression of PAR4 and TFF2 frequently occurs in colorectal cancer tissues, and that overexpression of PAR4 may be resulted from promoter hypomethylation. While TFF2 promotes invasion activity of LoVo cells overexpressing PAR4, and this effect was significantly decreased when PAR4 was knockdowned in HT-29 cells. Our findings will be helpful in further investigations into the

  5. Repurposing CRISPR System for Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Qi, Lei Stanley

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has become the most popular one for genome editing. When the nuclease domains of Cas9 protein are mutated into deactivated form (dCas9), CRISPR/dCas9 still retains the ability to bind the targeted DNA sequence, but loses the endonuclease cleavage activity. Taking advantage of the characteristics of this engineered nuclease inactive Cas9, the CRISPR/dCas system has been repurposed into versatile RNA-guided, DNA-targeting platforms, such as genome imaging, gene regulation, and epigenetic modification. Specifically, fusion of dCas9 with activation domains allows specific and efficient transcriptional activation on a genome-wide scale among diverse organisms. The purpose of this chapter is to review most important the recently published literature on CRISPR/dCas9-based transcriptional activation systems. Compared with the conventional approaches for enhancement of the expression of specific genes of interest, CRISPR/Cas9-based system has emerged as a promising technology for genome regulation, allowing specificity, convenience, robustness, and scalability for endogenous gene activation.

  6. Expression level of pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 2 (PBX2) as a prognostic marker for gingival squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying QIU; Zhu-ling WANG; Shu-qing JIN; Yu-fei PU; Satoru TOYOSAWA; Katsuyuki AOZASA; Eiichi MORII

    2012-01-01

    Objective:In this study,we investigated the interrelationship between clinicopathologic findings and pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 2 (PBX2) expression in gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC).Methods:Expression level of PBX2 was immunohistochemically examined in 66 GSCC subjects (30 men and 36 women) with ages ranging from 42 to 85 (median 64.5) years,in which staining intensity in tumor cells was categorized as either weaker (level 1) or equal to/stronger (level 2) than that in the endothelial cells.Results:PBX2 expression is correlated with valosin-containing protein (VCP) expression.Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed a high level of PBX2 expression to be a poor prognosticator for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS),and PBX2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS in GSCC.Conclusions:PBX2 expression level in GSCC is prognostic.PBX2 may be a useful marker to identify the potential for progression in GSCC.

  7. Regulation of the nuclear gene that encodes the alpha-subunit of the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase complex. Activation by upstream stimulatory factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, G A; Jordan, E M

    1997-04-18

    We have previously identified several positive cis-acting regulatory regions in the promoters of the bovine and human nuclear-encoded mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase alpha-subunit genes (ATPA). One of these cis-acting regions contains the sequence 5'-CACGTG-3' (an E-box), to which a number of transcription factors containing a basic helix-loop-helix motif can bind. This E-box element is required for maximum activity of the ATPA promoter in HeLa cells. The present study identifies the human transcription factor, upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), as a nuclear factor that binds to the ATPA E-box and demonstrates that USF2 plays a critical role in the activation of the ATPA gene in vivo. Evidence includes the following. Antiserum directed against USF2 recognized factors present in HeLa nuclear extracts that interact with the ATPA promoter in mobility shift assays. Wild-type USF2 proteins synthesized from expression vectors trans-activated the ATPA promoter through the E-box, whereas truncated USF2 proteins devoid of the amino-terminal activation domains did not. Importantly, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of USF2 lacking the basic DNA binding domain but able to dimerize with endogenous USF proteins significantly reduced the level of activation of the ATPA promoter caused by ectopically coexpressed USF2, demonstrating the importance of endogenous USF2 in activation of the ATPA gene.

  8. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content, to...

  9. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  10. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  11. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  12. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Prakash; Pramod C Rath

    2010-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2) is an important transcription factor involved in cell growth regulation, immune response and cancer. IRF-2 can function as a transcriptional repressor and activator depending on its DNA-binding activity and protein–protein interactions. We compared the amino acid sequences of IRF-2 and found a C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317) of mouse IRF-2 to be different (314SSSM317) from human IRF-2. Recombinant GST-IRF-2 with 314PAPV317 (wild type) and 314SSSM317 (mutant) expressed in Escherichia coli were assessed for DNA-binding activity with 32P-(GAAAGT)4 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Wild type- and mutant GST-IRF-2 showed similar expression patterns and immunoreactivities but different DNA-binding activities. Mutant (mt) IRF-2 formed higher-molecular-mass, more and stronger DNA–protein complexes in comparison to wild type (wt) IRF-2. Anti-IRF-2 antibody stabilized the DNA–protein complexes formed by both wt IRF-2 and mt IRF-2, resolving the differences. This suggests that PAPV and SSSM sequences at 314-317 in the C-terminal region of mouse and human IRF-2 contribute to conformation of IRF-2 and influence DNA-binding activity of the N-terminal region, indicating intramolecular interactions. Thus, evolution of IRF-2 from murine to human genome has resulted in subtle differences in C-terminal amino acid motifs, which may contribute to qualitative changes in IRF-2-dependent DNA-binding activity and gene expression.

  13. A new type of NtrC transcriptional activator.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster-Hartnett, D; Cullen, P. J.; Monika, E M; Kranz, R G

    1994-01-01

    The enteric NtrC (NRI) protein has been the paradigm for a class of bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs) that activate transcription of RNA polymerase containing the sigma 54 factor. Activators in the NtrC class are characterized by essentially three properties: (i) they bind to sites distant from the promoters that they activate (> 100 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site), (ii) they contain a conserved nucleotide-binding fold and exhibit ATPase activity that is required for a...

  14. Inhibition of elongation factor-2 kinase augments the antitumor activity of Temozolomide against glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common form of brain cancer with an average survival of less than 12 months, is a highly aggressive and fatal disease characterized by survival of glioma cells following initial treatment, invasion through the brain parenchyma and destruction of normal brain tissues, and ultimately resistance to current treatments. Temozolomide (TMZ is commonly used chemotherapy for treatment of primary and recurrent high-grade gliomas. Nevertheless, the therapeutic outcome of TMZ is often unsatisfactory. In this study, we sought to determine whether eEF-2 kinase affected the sensitivity of glioma cells to treatment with TMZ. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RNA interference approach, a small molecule inhibitor of eEF-2 kinase, and in vitro and in vivo glioma models, we observed that inhibition of eEF-2 kinase could enhance sensitivity of glioma cells to TMZ, and that this sensitizing effect was associated with blockade of autophagy and augmentation of apoptosis caused by TMZ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrated that targeting eEF-2 kinase can enhance the anti-glioma activity of TMZ, and inhibitors of this kinase may be exploited as chemo-sensitizers for TMZ in treatment of malignant glioma.

  15. Protein engineering,expression,and activity of a novel fusion protein possessing keratinocyte growth factor 2 and fibronectin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wonmo Kang; Junhyeog Jang

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor-induced proliferation and differentiation often require adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin(FN).In this study,we aimed to investigate the effect of protein engineering of the keratinocyte growth factor 2(KGF2)fused to the FN on the mitogenic activity of KGF2.The fusion protein(KGF2-FN10),which was expressed in Escherichia coli,showed significantly enhanced mitogenic activity of KGF2 on human keratinocytes.Moreover,KGF2-FN10 fusion protein showed significantly increased activity to differentiate keratinocytes from native KGF2.In conclusion,these results suggest that KGF2-FN10 fusion protein has certain advantages over native KGF2 and may offer a novel strategy to potentiate the therapeutic effect of KGF2.

  16. Transcriptional activators enhance polyadenylation of mRNA precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaike, Takashi; Manley, James L.

    2011-01-01

    3′ processing of mRNA precursors is frequently coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). This coupling is well known to involve the C-terminal domain of the RNAP II largest subunit, but a variety of other transcription-associated factors have also been suggested to mediate coupling. Our recent studies have provided direct evidence that transcriptional activators can enhance the efficiency of transcription-coupled 3′ processing. In this point-of-view, we discuss the mechanisms t...

  17. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  18. Transcriptional Activation of the Zygotic Genome in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melissa M; Eisen, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    During the first stages of metazoan development, the genomes of the highly specified sperm and egg must unite and be reprogrammed to allow for the generation of a new organism. This process is controlled by maternally deposited products. Initially, the zygotic genome is largely transcriptionally quiescent, and it is not until hours later that the zygotic genome takes control of development. The transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome is tightly coordinated with the degradation of the maternal products. Here, we review the current understanding of the processes that mediate the reprogramming of the early embryonic genome and facilitate transcriptional activation during the early stages of Drosophila development.

  19. MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of Runx2 and plays a role in bone development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Watanabe

    Full Text Available Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1 is a transcriptional co-activator in the Notch signaling pathway. Recently, however, several reports revealed novel and unique roles for MAML1 that are independent of the Notch signaling pathway. We found that MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2, a transcription factor essential for osteoblastic differentiation and chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. MAML1 significantly enhanced the Runx2-mediated transcription of the p6OSE2-Luc reporter, in which luciferase expression was controlled by six copies of the osteoblast specific element 2 (OSE2 from the Runx2-regulated osteocalcin gene promoter. Interestingly, a deletion mutant of MAML1 lacking the N-terminal Notch-binding domain also enhanced Runx2-mediated transcription. Moreover, inhibition of Notch signaling did not affect the action of MAML1 on Runx2, suggesting that the activation of Runx2 by MAML1 may be caused in a Notch-independent manner. Overexpression of MAML1 transiently enhanced the Runx2-mediated expression of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteoblast differentiation, in the murine pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2. MAML1(-/- embryos at embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5 had shorter bone lengths than wild-type embryos. The area of primary spongiosa of the femoral diaphysis was narrowed. At E14.5, extended zone of collagen type II alpha 1 (Col2a1 and Sox9 expression, markers of chondrocyte differentiation, and decreased zone of collagen type X alpha 1 (Col10a1 expression, a marker of hypertrophic chondrocyte, were observed. These observations suggest that chondrocyte maturation was impaired in MAML1(-/- mice. MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of Runx2 and plays a role in bone development.

  20. Sumoylation delays the ATF7 transcription factor subcellular localization and inhibits its transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Camuzeaux, Barbara; Dujardin, Denis; Hauss, Charlotte; Oelgeschläger, Thomas; Vigneron, Marc; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification has emerged as an important regulator of diverse pathways and activities including protein localization and transcriptional regulation. We identified a consensus sumoylation motif (IKEE), located within the N-terminal activation domain of the ATF7 transcription factor and thus investigated the role of this modification. ATF7 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor, homologous to ATF2, that binds to CRE elements within specific promoters. This protein is able to heterodimerize with Jun or Fos proteins and its transcriptional activity is mediated by interaction with TAF12, a subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID. In the present article, we demonstrate that ATF7 is sumoylated in vitro (using RanBP2 as a E3-specific ligase) and in vivo. Moreover, we show that ATF7 sumoylation affects its intranuclear localization by delaying its entry into the nucleus. Furthermore, SUMO conjugation inhibits ATF7 transactivation activity by (i) impairing its association with TAF12 and (ii) blocking its binding-to-specific sequences within target promoters.

  1. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  2. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  3. Dataset of transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Garruss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via B cell receptors (BCR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs result in activation of B cells with distinct physiological outcomes, but transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that drive activation and distinguish these pathways remain unknown. At early time points after BCR and TLR ligand exposure, 0.5 and 2 h, RNA-seq was performed allowing observations on rapid transcriptional changes. At 2 h, ChIP-seq was performed to allow observations on important regulatory mechanisms potentially driving transcriptional change. The dataset includes RNA-seq, ChIP-seq of control (Input, RNA Pol II, H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and a separate RNA-seq for miRNA expression, which can be found at Gene Expression Omnibus Dataset GSE61608. Here, we provide details on the experimental and analysis methods used to obtain and analyze this dataset and to examine the transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation.

  4. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  5. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen.

  6. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  7. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 2 dimer with superagonist in vitro activity improves granulation tissue formation during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Caitlin G; Wang, Yu; Paluck, Samantha J; Shen, Lu; Loo, Joseph A; Levine, Alex J; Miller, Lloyd S; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific chemical dimerization of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) with the optimal linker length resulted in a FGF2 homodimer with improved granulation tissue formation and blood vessel formation at exceptionally low concentrations. Homodimers of FGF2 were synthesized through site-specific linkages to both ends of different molecular weight poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs). The optimal linker length was determined by screening dimer-induced metabolic activity of human dermal fibroblasts and found to be that closest to the inter-cysteine distance, 70 Å, corresponding to 2 kDa PEG. A straightforward analysis of the kinetics of second ligand binding as a function of tether length showed that, as the polymerization index (the number of monomer repeat units in the polymer, N) of the tether decreases, the mean time for second ligand capture decreases as ∼N(3/2), leading to an enhancement of the number of doubly bound ligands in steady-state for a given (tethered) ligand concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 induced greater fibroblast metabolic activity than FGF2 alone, all other dimers, and all monoconjugates, at each concentration tested, with the greatest difference observed at low (0.1 ng/mL) concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 further exhibited superior activity compared to FGF2 for both metabolic activity and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as well as improved angiogenesis in a coculture model in vitro. Efficacy in an in vivo wound healing model was assessed in diabetic mice. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 increased granulation tissue and blood vessel density in the wound bed compared to FGF2. The results suggest that this rationally designed construct may be useful for improving the fibroblast matrix formation and angiogenesis in chronic wound healing.

  9. HTLV-1 Tax activates HIV-1 transcription in latency models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Victor Emmanuel Viana; José, Diego Pandeló; Leal, Fabio E; Nixon, Douglas F; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 latency is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Coinfection with HTLV-1 has been associated with faster progression to AIDS. HTLV-1 encodes the transactivator Tax which can activate both HTLV-1 and HIV-1 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Tax activates HIV transcription in latent CD4(+) T cells. Tax promotes the activation of P-TEFb, releasing CDK9 and Cyclin T1 from inactive forms, promoting transcription elongation and reactivation of latent HIV-1. Tax mutants lacking interaction with the HIV-1-LTR promoter were not able to activate P-TEFb, with no subsequent activation of latent HIV. In HIV-infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells, Tax-1 reactivated HIV-1 transcription up to five fold, confirming these findings in an ex vivo latency model. Finally, our results confirms that HTLV-1/Tax hijacks cellular partners, promoting HIV-1 transcription, and this interaction should be further investigated in HIV-1 latency studies in patients with HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epithelium-specific ets transcription factor 2 upregulates cytokeratin 18 expression in pulmonary epithelial cells through an interaction with cytokeratin 18 intron 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deanna YANIW; Jim HU

    2005-01-01

    The role of Ese-2, an Ets family transcription factor, in gene regulation is not known. In this study, the interaction between Ese-2 and cytokeratin 18 (K18) intron 1 was characterized in lung epithelial cells. Reporter gene assays showed Ese-2 was able to upregulate K18 intron 1 enhanced reporter gene expression by approximately 2-fold. We found that full length Ese-2 did not bind DNA strongly, therefore truncated versions of the protein, containing the ETS domain or Pointed domain, were created and tested in electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Multiple interactions between the ETS domain and putative DNA binding sites within K18 intron 1 were observed, which led to the determination of a possible Ese-2 DNA binding consensus sequence. These experiments suggest that Ese-2 could play a role in the regulation of K18 expression in lung epithelial cells.

  11. Transcriptional activity of transposable elements in coelacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forconi, Mariko; Chalopin, Domitille; Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; De Moro, Gianluca; Galiana, Delphine; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The morphological stasis of coelacanths has long suggested a slow evolutionary rate. General genomic stasis might also imply a decrease of transposable elements activity. To evaluate the potential activity of transposable elements (TEs) in "living fossil" species, transcriptomic data of Latimeria chalumnae and its Indonesian congener Latimeria menadoensis were compared through the RNA-sequencing mapping procedures in three different organs (liver, testis, and muscle). The analysis of coelacanth transcriptomes highlights a significant percentage of transcribed TEs in both species. Major contributors are LINE retrotransposons, especially from the CR1 family. Furthermore, some particular elements such as a LF-SINE and a LINE2 sequences seem to be more expressed than other elements. The amount of TEs expressed in testis suggests possible transposition burst in incoming generations. Moreover, significant amount of TEs in liver and muscle transcriptomes were also observed. Analyses of elements displaying marked organ-specific expression gave us the opportunity to highlight exaptation cases, that is, the recruitment of TEs as new cellular genes, but also to identify a new Latimeria-specific family of Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements called CoeG-SINEs. Overall, transcriptome results do not seem to be in line with a slow-evolving genome with poor TE activity.

  12. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2016-01-01

    real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily......,cis-muconic acid at different levels, and found that reporter gene output correlated with production. The transplantation of prokaryotic transcriptional activators into the eukaryotic chassis illustrates the potential of a hitherto untapped biosensor resource useful for biotechnological applications....... of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs). We identified a design supporting LTTR-dependent activation of reporter gene expression in the presence of cognate small-molecule inducers. As proof of principle, we applied the biosensors for in vivo screening of cells producing naringenin or cis...

  13. Genome-wide signatures of transcription factor activity: connecting transcription factors, disease, and small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Identifying transcription factors (TF involved in producing a genome-wide transcriptional profile is an essential step in building mechanistic model that can explain observed gene expression data. We developed a statistical framework for constructing genome-wide signatures of TF activity, and for using such signatures in the analysis of gene expression data produced by complex transcriptional regulatory programs. Our framework integrates ChIP-seq data and appropriately matched gene expression profiles to identify True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. It provides genome-wide quantification of the likelihood of regulatory TF-gene interaction that can be used to either identify regulated genes, or as genome-wide signature of TF activity. To effectively use ChIP-seq data, we introduce a novel statistical model that integrates information from all binding "peaks" within 2 Mb window around a gene's transcription start site (TSS, and provides gene-level binding scores and probabilities of regulatory interaction. In the second step we integrate these binding scores and regulatory probabilities with gene expression data to assess the likelihood of True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. We demonstrate the advantages of TREG framework in identifying genes regulated by two TFs with widely different distribution of functional binding events (ERα and E2f1. We also show that TREG signatures of TF activity vastly improve our ability to detect involvement of ERα in producing complex diseases-related transcriptional profiles. Through a large study of disease-related transcriptional signatures and transcriptional signatures of drug activity, we demonstrate that increase in statistical power associated with the use of TREG signatures makes the crucial difference in identifying key targets for treatment, and drugs to use for treatment. All methods are implemented in an open-source R package treg. The package also contains all data used in the analysis

  14. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2016-04-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest thatNrf2plays a role in adipogenesisin vitro, and deletion of theNrf2gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity inNrf2(-/-)mice is associated with a 20-30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed thatNrf2(-/-)white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase inUcp1gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increasedUcp1expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such asN-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor ofUcp1expression) decreasedUcp1and oxygen consumption inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limitingNrf2function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The flavonoid fisetin promotes osteoblasts differentiation through Runx2 transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2014-06-01

    Flavonoids represent a group of polyphenolic compounds commonly found in daily nutrition with proven health benefits. Among this group, the flavonol fisetin has been previously shown to protect bone by repressing osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the role of fisetin in regulating osteoblasts physiology. In vivo mice treated with LPSs exhibited osteoporosis features associated with a dramatic repression of osteoblast marker expression. In this model, inhibition of osteocalcin and type I collagen alpha 1 transcription was partially countered by a daily consumption of fisetin. Interestingly, in vitro, fisetin promoted both osteoblast alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization process. To decipher how fisetin may exert its positive effect on osteoblastogenesis, we analyzed its ability to control the runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a key organizer in developing and maturing osteoblasts. While fisetin did not impact Runx2 mRNA and protein levels, it upregulated its transcriptional activity. Actually, fisetin stimulated the luciferase activity of a reporter plasmid driven by the osteocalcin gene promoter that contains Runx2 binding sites and promoted the mRNA expression of osteocalcin and type I collagen alpha 1 targets. Bone sparing properties of fisetin also rely on its positive influence on osteoblast differentiation and activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Exploring cellular memory molecules marking competent and active transcriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu De-Pei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development in higher eukaryotes involves programmed gene expression. Cell type-specific gene expression is established during this process and is inherited in succeeding cell cycles. Higher eukaryotes have evolved elegant mechanisms by which committed gene-expression states are transmitted through numerous cell divisions. Previous studies have shown that both DNase I-sensitive sites and the basal transcription factor TFIID remain on silenced mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that certain trans-factors might act as bookmarks, maintaining the information and transmitting it to the next generation. Results We used the mouse globin gene clusters as a model system to examine the retention of active information on M-phase chromosomes and its contribution to the persistence of transcriptional competence of these gene clusters in murine erythroleukemia cells. In cells arrested in mitosis, the erythroid-specific activator NF-E2p45 remained associated with its binding sites on the globin gene loci, while the other major erythroid factor, GATA-1, was removed from chromosome. Moreover, despite mitotic chromatin condensation, the distant regulatory regions and promoters of transcriptionally competent globin gene loci are marked by a preserved histone code consisting in active histone modifications such as H3 acetylation, H3-K4 dimethylation and K79 dimethylation. Further analysis showed that other active genes are also locally marked by the preserved active histone code throughout mitotic inactivation of transcription. Conclusion Our results imply that certain kinds of specific protein factors and active histone modifications function as cellular memory markers for both competent and active genes during mitosis, and serve as a reactivated core for the resumption of transcription when the cells exit mitosis.

  17. Codependent activators direct myoblast-specific MyoD transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A; Tjian, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here, we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell-based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight codependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a preinitiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD downregulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription.

  18. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-18

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer-promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them.

  19. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  20. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  1. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  2. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  3. MRTF potentiates TEAD-YAP transcriptional activity causing metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tackhoon; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Dahye; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Young; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2017-02-15

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) and myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF) play similar roles and exhibit significant crosstalk in directing transcriptional responses to chemical and physical extracellular cues. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk, however, remains unclear. Here, we show MRTF family proteins bind YAP via a conserved PPXY motif that interacts with the YAP WW domain. This interaction allows MRTF to recruit NcoA3 to the TEAD-YAP transcriptional complex and potentiate its transcriptional activity. We show this interaction of MRTF and YAP is critical for LPA-induced cancer cell invasion in vitro and breast cancer metastasis to the lung in vivo We also demonstrate the significance of MRTF-YAP binding in regulation of YAP activity upon acute actin cytoskeletal damage. Acute actin disruption induces nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MRTF, and this process underlies the LATS-independent regulation of YAP activity. Our results provide clear evidence of crosstalk between MRTF and YAP independent of the LATS kinases that normally act upstream of YAP signaling. Our results also suggest a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli can coordinate physiological events downstream of YAP. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  5. Expression of the fibroblast growth factor-2 isoforms and the FGF receptor 1-4 transcripts in the rat model system of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Peter; Werner, Stefan; Timmer, Marco; Grothe, Claudia

    2004-04-29

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 occurs in different isoforms representing different translation products of a single mRNA. We have previously shown that the high molecular weight FGF-2 isoforms (21, 23 kD) stimulated survival- and neurite-promoting activities and protective effects on cultured embryonic dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra (Neuroscience 100 (2000) 73). In this study the expression of FGF-2 isoforms in the striatum and substantia nigra was analyzed by Western blot in adult intact rats and following complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. In intact rats, all three FGF-2 isoforms (18, 21, 23 kD) are expressed. Neurotoxin-mediated lesion of nigral DA neurons revealed no change of the FGF-2 isoform expression pattern in the nigrostriatal system. Additionally, the FGF receptors 1, 2 and 3 are expressed in these tissues and displayed no alterations after 6-OHDA injection as demonstrated by RT-PCR. The presence of all three FGF-2 isoforms and the FGFR 1-3, together with the previous demonstrated neurotrophic effects of FGF-2 on dopaminergic neurons, suggest a physiological function of the FGF-2 isoforms in the nigrostriatal system.

  6. A transcription activator-like effector toolbox for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjana, Neville E; Cong, Le; Zhou, Yang; Cunniff, Margaret M; Feng, Guoping; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-05

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas sp. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules that can be rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Here we describe a toolbox for rapid construction of custom TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) and nucleases (TALENs) using a hierarchical ligation procedure. This toolbox facilitates affordable and rapid construction of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs within 1 week and can be easily scaled up to construct TALEs for multiple targets in parallel. We also provide details for testing the activity in mammalian cells of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Surveyor nuclease, respectively. The TALE toolbox described here will enable a broad range of biological applications.

  7. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L.; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G. David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4–/– bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4–/– BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity. PMID:20628199

  8. Assembly of a Notch transcriptional activation complex requires multimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Kaplan, Fred M; Weaver, Kelly L; VanWye, Jeffrey D; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2011-04-01

    Notch transmembrane receptors direct essential cellular processes, such as proliferation and differentiation, through direct cell-to-cell interactions. Inappropriate release of the intracellular domain of Notch (N(ICD)) from the plasma membrane results in the accumulation of deregulated nuclear N(ICD) that has been linked to human cancers, notably T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Nuclear N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex by interacting with the coactivator protein Mastermind-like 1 and the DNA binding protein CSL (for CBF-1/Suppressor of Hairless/Lag-1) to regulate target gene expression. Although it is well understood that N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex, little is known about how the complex is assembled. In this study, we demonstrate that N(ICD) multimerizes and that these multimers function as precursors for the stepwise assembly of the Notch activation complex. Importantly, we demonstrate that the assembly is mediated by N(ICD) multimers interacting with Skip and Mastermind. These interactions form a preactivation complex that is then resolved by CSL to form the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA.

  9. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4-/- bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4-/- BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity.

  10. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2’s activation in transgenic mice fed with dosage of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids using in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mariani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To counteract oxidative stress cells developed several mechanisms, including the transcription factor Nuclear Factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. The aim of the study was to evaluate the activation of Nrf2 in transgenic mice fed saturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids and the anti-inflammatory effect of estrogens on organism. Forty-eight ARE CRE OMO reporter mice were divided into 3 groups, consisting of 16 animals, based on presence/absence of estrogens (ovariectomized or sham female, OVX - SH; male, MA. Each group was further split in 4 subgroups of 4 animals each and fed different diets (7.5% lard, 7.5% tuna oil, 20.0 % lard and 20.0% tuna oil. Two times a week animals were anaesthetized and injected i.p. with 100µL luciferin 15 min before the imaging session. Using the Living Image Software, photon emission was mapped for selected body areas. On day 70, animals were sacrificed after a challenge with Sodium Arsenite. Specific organs were dissected and immediately subjected to ex vivo imaging session. MIXED and GLM procedures of SAS software were used for statistical analysis. Dietary treatments did not affect body weight and feed intake as well as Nrf2 expression in both pre- and post-challenge phases, with the exception of the abdominal region (P=0.031 pre-challenge; in this area, during the pre-challenge phase, OVX showed lower Nrf2 activation (P<0.001. Ex vivo results outlined a significant effect of the challenge on all the considered organs (P<0.001, while OVX subjects had higher Nrf2 expression on urinary bladder and kidney (P<0.05 and high fat diet increased Nrf2 in urinary bladder (P<0.05. The present trial shows how saturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in the diet do not exert significant effects on oxidative stress in mice, but confirms the protective role of estrogens under physiological condition.

  11. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  12. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjoedt, Mette L; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Arsovska, Dushica; Eichenberger, Michael; Goedecke, Tobias J; Rajkumar, Arun S; Zhang, Jie; Kristensen, Mette; Lehka, Beata J; Siedler, Solvej; Borodina, Irina; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-11-01

    Whole-cell biocatalysts have proven a tractable path toward sustainable production of bulk and fine chemicals. Yet the screening of libraries of cellular designs to identify best-performing biocatalysts is most often a low-throughput endeavor. For this reason, the development of biosensors enabling real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs). We identified a design supporting LTTR-dependent activation of reporter gene expression in the presence of cognate small-molecule inducers. As proof of principle, we applied the biosensors for in vivo screening of cells producing naringenin or cis,cis-muconic acid at different levels, and found that reporter gene output correlated with production. The transplantation of prokaryotic transcriptional activators into the eukaryotic chassis illustrates the potential of a hitherto untapped biosensor resource useful for biotechnological applications.

  13. Identification of Post-Transcriptional Modulators of Breast Cancer Transcription Factor Activity Using MINDy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified transcription factors (TFs) that are key drivers of breast cancer risk. To better understand the pathways or sub-networks in which these TFs mediate their function we sought to identify upstream modulators of their activity. We applied the MINDy (Modulator Inference by Network Dynamics) algorithm to four TFs (ESR1, FOXA1, GATA3 and SPDEF) that are key drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk, as well as cancer progression. Our computational analysis identified over 500 potential modulators. We assayed 189 of these and identified 55 genes with functional characteristics that were consistent with a role as TF modulators. In the future, the identified modulators may be tested as potential therapeutic targets, able to alter the activity of TFs that are critical in the development of breast cancer. PMID:27997592

  14. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  15. Transcriptionally Active Heterochromatin in Rye B Chromosomes[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchilan, Mariana; Delgado, Margarida; Ribeiro, Teresa; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Caperta, Ana; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor; Jones, R. Neil; Viegas, Wanda; Houben, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    B chromosomes (Bs) are dispensable components of the genomes of numerous species. Thus far, there is a lack of evidence for any transcripts of Bs in plants, with the exception of some rDNA sequences. Here, we show that the Giemsa banding-positive heterochromatic subterminal domain of rye (Secale cereale) Bs undergoes decondensation during interphase. Contrary to the heterochromatic regions of A chromosomes, this domain is simultaneously marked by trimethylated H3K4 and by trimethylated H3K27, an unusual combination of apparently conflicting histone modifications. Notably, both types of B-specific high copy repeat families (E3900 and D1100) of the subterminal domain are transcriptionally active, although with different tissue type–dependent activity. No small RNAs were detected specifically for the presence of Bs. The lack of any significant open reading frame and the highly heterogeneous size of mainly polyadenylated transcripts indicate that the noncoding RNA may function as structural or catalytic RNA. PMID:17586652

  16. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  17. An Ikaros Promoter Element with Dual Epigenetic and Transcriptional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Elizabeth A; Georgopoulos, Katia; Yoshida, Toshimi

    2015-01-01

    Ikaros DNA binding factor plays critical roles in lymphocyte development. Changes in Ikaros expression levels during lymphopoiesis are controlled by redundant but also unique regulatory elements of its locus that are critical for this developmental process. We have recently shown that Ikaros binds its own locus in thymocytes in vivo. Here, we evaluated the role of an Ikaros binding site within its major lympho-myeloid promoter. We identified an Ikaros/Ets binding site within a promoter sub-region that was highly conserved in mouse and human. Deletion of this binding site increased the percentage of the reporter-expressing mouse lines, indicating that its loss provided a more permissive chromatin environment. However, once transcription was established, the lack of this site decreased transcriptional activity. These findings implicate a dual role for Ikaros/Ets1 binding on Ikzf1 expression that is exerted at least through its promoter.

  18. An Ikaros Promoter Element with Dual Epigenetic and Transcriptional Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Perotti

    Full Text Available Ikaros DNA binding factor plays critical roles in lymphocyte development. Changes in Ikaros expression levels during lymphopoiesis are controlled by redundant but also unique regulatory elements of its locus that are critical for this developmental process. We have recently shown that Ikaros binds its own locus in thymocytes in vivo. Here, we evaluated the role of an Ikaros binding site within its major lympho-myeloid promoter. We identified an Ikaros/Ets binding site within a promoter sub-region that was highly conserved in mouse and human. Deletion of this binding site increased the percentage of the reporter-expressing mouse lines, indicating that its loss provided a more permissive chromatin environment. However, once transcription was established, the lack of this site decreased transcriptional activity. These findings implicate a dual role for Ikaros/Ets1 binding on Ikzf1 expression that is exerted at least through its promoter.

  19. Transcriptional Activation of Virulence Genes of Rhizobium etli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-03-15

    Recently, Rhizobium etli, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., has emerged as a prokaryotic species whose genome encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we show that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induces R. etli vir gene expression both in an R. etli background and in an Agrobacterium tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter transfer DNA (T-DNA). Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium but not from nonhost plants. The early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a than of T-DNA transfer of pTiC58 of A. tumefaciensIMPORTANCE The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by the genome of a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into the plant cell genome. In this study, we explored the transcriptional

  20. Characterization of the transcriptional activation domains of human TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Cheng; Jiang, Yajie; Deng, Cuilan; Huang, Zebo; Teng, Kaixuan; Chen, Lan; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1) is a human transcriptional factor, which has a N-terminal TEA/ATTS domain supposedly for DNA binding and C-terminal PRD and STY domains for transcriptional activation. Taking advantage of the efficient reporter design of yeast two-hybrid system, we characterized the TEF3-1 domains in activating gene expression. Previously study usually mentioned that the C-terminal domain of TEF3-1 has the transcriptional activity, however, our data shows that the peptides TEF3-11-66 and TEF3-1197-434 functioned as two independent activation domains, suggesting that N-terminal domain of TEF3-1 also has transcriptional activation capacity. Additionally, more deletions of amino acids 197-434 showed that only the peptides TEF3-1197-265 contained the minimum sequences for the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain. The protein structure is predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix structure in TEF3-11-66 and four β sheets in TEF3-1197-265. Finally, after the truncated fragments of TEF3-1 were expressed in HUVEC cells, the whole TEF3-1 and the two activation domains could increase F-actin stress fiber, cell proliferation, migration and targeted gene expression. Further analysis and characterization of the activation domains in TEF3-1 may broaden our understanding of the gene involved in angiogenesis and other pathological processes.

  1. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  2. Differences in transcriptional activity of cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Nielsen, Lone; Doherty, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    and 96 URR was up-regulated by cellular differentiation, linking the activity of these HPVs to the cellular state. UV-B irradiation activated HPV-8 but inhibited HPV-38 and HPV-93 whereas HPV-92 and 96 were not affected. As there are variable UV-B responses among the HPV types, further studies......The interaction between UV-B irradiation and cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been suggested to be of relevance for the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. We investigated the activity within the upstream regulatory region (URR) of the HPV types 8, 38, 92, 93 and 96, as well...... as their responsiveness to UV-B irradiation and cellular differentiation. Promoter activities were higher in HaCaT than in SiHa cells, corresponding to the HPV tissue tropism. Transcriptional start sites were mapped at P(92) (HPV-38), P(45) (HPV-92), P(7439) (HPV-93) and P(256) (HPV-96). Transcription from HPV-8, 93...

  3. Clinical application of transcriptional activators of bile salt transporters☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Chiba, Peter; Trauner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hepatobiliary bile salt (BS) transporters are critical determinants of BS homeostasis controlling intracellular concentrations of BSs and their enterohepatic circulation. Genetic or acquired dysfunction of specific transport systems causes intrahepatic and systemic retention of potentially cytotoxic BSs, which, in high concentrations, may disturb integrity of cell membranes and subcellular organelles resulting in cell death, inflammation and fibrosis. Transcriptional regulation of canalicular BS efflux through bile salt export pump (BSEP), basolateral elimination through organic solute transporters alpha and beta (OSTα/OSTβ) as well as inhibition of hepatocellular BS uptake through basolateral Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) represent critical steps in protection from hepatocellular BS overload and can be targeted therapeutically. In this article, we review the potential clinical implications of the major BS transporters BSEP, OSTα/OSTβ and NTCP in the pathogenesis of hereditary and acquired cholestatic syndromes, provide an overview on transcriptional control of these transporters by the key regulatory nuclear receptors and discuss the potential therapeutic role of novel transcriptional activators of BS transporters in cholestasis. PMID:24333169

  4. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2011-02-01

    A growing number of human diseases are linked to abnormal gene expression which is largely controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. The gene-specific activator promotes the initiation of transcription through its interaction with one or more components of the transcriptional initiation machinery, hence leading to stimulated transcriptional initiation or activation. However, all activator proteins do not target the same component(s) of the transcriptional initiation machinery. Rather, they can have different target specificities, and thus, can lead to distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation. Two such distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation in yeast are mediated by the SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase) and TFIID (Transcription factor IID) complexes, and are termed as "SAGA-dependent" and "TFIID-dependent" transcriptional activation, respectively. SAGA is the target of the activator in case of SAGA-dependent transcriptional activation, while the targeting of TFIID by the activator leads to TFIID-dependent transcriptional activation. Both the SAGA and TFIID complexes are highly conserved from yeast to human, and play crucial roles in gene activation among eukaryotes. The regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID are discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The 26S Proteasome: When degradation is just not enough!

  5. Rethinking transcriptional activation in the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelmark, Karl; Troein, Carl

    2014-07-01

    Circadian clocks are biological timekeepers that allow living cells to time their activity in anticipation of predictable daily changes in light and other environmental factors. The complexity of the circadian clock in higher plants makes it difficult to understand the role of individual genes or molecular interactions, and mathematical modelling has been useful in guiding clock research in model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. We present a model of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis, based on a large corpus of published time course data. It appears from experimental evidence in the literature that most interactions in the clock are repressive. Hence, we remove all transcriptional activation found in previous models of this system, and instead extend the system by including two new components, the morning-expressed activator RVE8 and the nightly repressor/activator NOX. Our modelling results demonstrate that the clock does not need a large number of activators in order to reproduce the observed gene expression patterns. For example, the sequential expression of the PRR genes does not require the genes to be connected as a series of activators. In the presented model, transcriptional activation is exclusively the task of RVE8. Predictions of how strongly RVE8 affects its targets are found to agree with earlier interpretations of the experimental data, but generally we find that the many negative feedbacks in the system should discourage intuitive interpretations of mutant phenotypes. The dynamics of the clock are difficult to predict without mathematical modelling, and the clock is better viewed as a tangled web than as a series of loops.

  6. Rethinking transcriptional activation in the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Fogelmark

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are biological timekeepers that allow living cells to time their activity in anticipation of predictable daily changes in light and other environmental factors. The complexity of the circadian clock in higher plants makes it difficult to understand the role of individual genes or molecular interactions, and mathematical modelling has been useful in guiding clock research in model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. We present a model of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis, based on a large corpus of published time course data. It appears from experimental evidence in the literature that most interactions in the clock are repressive. Hence, we remove all transcriptional activation found in previous models of this system, and instead extend the system by including two new components, the morning-expressed activator RVE8 and the nightly repressor/activator NOX. Our modelling results demonstrate that the clock does not need a large number of activators in order to reproduce the observed gene expression patterns. For example, the sequential expression of the PRR genes does not require the genes to be connected as a series of activators. In the presented model, transcriptional activation is exclusively the task of RVE8. Predictions of how strongly RVE8 affects its targets are found to agree with earlier interpretations of the experimental data, but generally we find that the many negative feedbacks in the system should discourage intuitive interpretations of mutant phenotypes. The dynamics of the clock are difficult to predict without mathematical modelling, and the clock is better viewed as a tangled web than as a series of loops.

  7. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the stimulator of interferon genes by transcription factors CREB and c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Xu, Hua-Guo

    2016-12-20

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) plays an important role in host defense, autoimmune disease, osteoclast differentiation and anti-tumor response. Although many downstream targets have been studied in depth, the regulation of STING gene expression remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc maintain the transcriptional activity of STING. By 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis, we identified the transcriptional start site (TSS) of STING. We illustrated that the region -124/+1 relative to TSS was sufficient for full promoter activity by a series of 5' deletion promoter constructs. Transcriptional activity of the STING minimal promoter was dependent on CREB and c-Myc binding motifs and was abolished after mutation of these two DNA elements. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc bind to STING promoter in vivo. Overexpression of CREB and c-Myc increased the STING promoter activity. Meanwhile, knocking-down of CREB and c-Myc by a small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategy markedly reduced endogenous STING expression. In summary, these results demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc are involved in the regulation of STING transcription.

  8. Analyzing phosphorylation-dependent regulation of subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji Suk; Gettys, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a nuclear transcriptional coactivator that regulates the genes involved in energy metabolism. Recent evidence has been provided that alternative splicing of PPARGC1A gene produces a functional but predominantly cytosolic isoform of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α). We have demonstrated that transcriptional coactivation capacity of NT-PGC-1α is directly correlated with its nuclear localization in a PKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. In this chapter, we describe quantitative imaging analysis methods that are developed to measure the relative fluorescence intensity of the protein of interest in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a single cell and the frequency distribution of nuclear/cytoplasmic intensity ratios in the population of cells, respectively. This chapter also describes transient cotransfection and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay that examine the ability of coactivators to activate the transcriptional activity of transcription factors.

  9. Transcription of human resistin gene involves an interaction of Sp1 with peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor gamma (PPARgamma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistin is a cysteine rich protein, mainly expressed and secreted by circulating human mononuclear cells. While several factors responsible for transcription of mouse resistin gene have been identified, not much is known about the factors responsible for the differential expression of human resistin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We show that the minimal promoter of human resistin lies within approximately 80 bp sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (-240 whereas binding sites for cRel, CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP-alpha, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2 and activator protein 1 (AP-1 transcription factors, important for induced expression, are present within sequences up to -619. Specificity Protein 1(Sp1 binding site (-276 to -295 is also present and an interaction of Sp1 with peroxisome proliferator activating receptor gamma (PPARgamma is necessary for constitutive expression in U937 cells. Indeed co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated a direct physical interaction of Sp1 with PPARgamma in whole cell extracts of U937 cells. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA upregulated the expression of resistin mRNA in U937 cells by increasing the recruitment of Sp1, ATF-2 and PPARgamma on the resistin gene promoter. Furthermore, PMA stimulation of U937 cells resulted in the disruption of Sp1 and PPARgamma interaction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay confirmed the recruitment of transcription factors phospho ATF-2, Sp1, Sp3, PPARgamma, chromatin modifier histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 and the acetylated form of histone H3 but not cRel, C/EBP-alpha and phospho c-Jun during resistin gene transcription. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a complex interplay of Sp1 and PPARgamma along with other transcription factors that drives the expression of resistin in human monocytic U937 cells.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c-Myc...

  11. Dynamic Mechanism for the Transcription Apparatus Orchestrating Reliable Responses to Activators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The transcription apparatus (TA) is a huge molecular machine. It detects the time-varying concentrations of transcriptional activators and initiates mRNA transcripts at appropriate rates. Based on the general structural organizations of the TA, we propose how the TA dynamically orchestrates transcriptional responses. The activators rapidly cycle in and out of a clamp-like space temporarily formed between the enhancer and the Mediator, with the concentration of activators encoded as their temporal occupancy rate (RTOR) within the space. The entry of activators into this space induces allostery in the Mediator, resulting in a facilitated circumstance for transcriptional reinitiation. The reinitiation rate is much larger than the cycling rate of activators, thereby RTOR guiding the amount of transcripts. Based on this mechanism, stochastic simulations can qualitatively reproduce and interpret multiple features of gene expression, e.g., transcriptional bursting is not mere noise as traditionally believed, but rather the basis of reliable transcriptional responses.

  12. NCOA4 transcriptional coactivator inhibits activation of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Roberto; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guida, Teresa; Limongello, Roberto; Dathan, Nina Alayne; Merolla, Francesco; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Affuso, Andrea; Masai, Hisao; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Grieco, Domenico; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    NCOA4 is a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear hormone receptors that undergoes gene rearrangement in human cancer. By combining studies in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we show here that NCOA4 is a minichromosome maintenance 7 (MCM7)-interacting protein that is able to control DNA replication. Depletion-reconstitution experiments in Xenopus laevis egg extracts indicate that NCOA4 acts as an inhibitor of DNA replication origin activation by regulating CMG (CDC45/MCM2-7/GINS) helicase. NCOA4(-/-) MEFs display unscheduled origin activation and reduced interorigin distance; this results in replication stress, as shown by the presence of fork stalling, reduction of fork speed, and premature senescence. Together, our findings indicate that NCOA4 acts as a regulator of DNA replication origins that helps prevent inappropriate DNA synthesis and replication stress.

  13. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  14. Activator protein 1 promotes the transcriptional activation of IRAK-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peipei; Bo, Lulong; Liu, Yongjian; Lu, Wenbin; Lin, Shengwei; Bian, Jinjun; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a well-known negative regulator for Toll-like receptor signaling, which can regulate immune homeostasis and tolerance in a number of pathological settings. However, the mechanism for IRAK-M regulation at transcriptional level remains largely unknown. In this study, a 1.4kb upstream sequence starting from the major IRAK-M transcriptional start site was cloned into luciferase reporter vector pGL3-basic to construct the full-length IRAK-M promoter. Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the full-length and the deletion mutants of IRAK-M were transfected into 293T and A549 cells, and their relative luciferase activity was measured. The results demonstrated that activator protein 1(AP-1) cis-element plays a crucial role in IRAK-M constitutive gene transcription. Silencing of c-Fos and/or c-Jun expression suppressed the IRAK-M promoter activity as well as its mRNA and protein expressions. As a specific inhibitor for AP-1 activation, SP600125 also significantly suppressed the basal transcriptional activity of IRAK-M, the binding activity of c-Fos/c-Jun with IRAK-M promoter, and IRAK-M protein expression. Taken together, the result of this study highlights the importance of AP-1 in IRAK-M transcription, which offers more information on the role of IRAK-M in infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  15. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bol John F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA. An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3 plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress

  16. Large-scale transcriptome data reveals transcriptional activity of fission yeast LTR retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2010-01-01

    transcriptional activity from Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. LTR retrotransposons are normally flanked by two LTR sequences. However, the majority of LTR sequences in S. pombe exist as solitary LTRs, i.e. as single terminal repeat sequences not flanking a retrotransposon. Transcriptional activity...... of transcriptional activity are observed from both strands of solitary LTR sequences. Transcriptome data collected during meiosis suggests that transcription of solitary LTRs is correlated with the transcription of nearby protein-coding genes. CONCLUSIONS: Presumably, the host organism negatively regulates...... proliferation of LTR retrotransposons. The finding of considerable transcriptional activity of retrotransposons suggests that part of this regulation is likely to take place at a posttranscriptional level. Alternatively, the transcriptional activity may signify a hitherto unrecognized activity level...

  17. Peptides derived from specific interaction sites of the fibroblast growth factor 2 - FGF receptor complexes induce receptor activation and signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfè, Valentina; Kochoyan, Artur; Bock, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    , promoting survival of cerebellar granule neurons induced to undergo apoptosis. Our results suggest that canofins mirror the effect of specific interaction sites in FGF2 for FGFR. Thus, canofins are valuable pharmacological tools to study the functional roles of specific molecular interactions of FGF2...... by canofins, indicating that canofins are partial FGFR agonists. Furthermore, canofins were demonstrated to induce neuronal differentiation determined by neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule neurons, and this effect was dependent on FGFR activation. Additionally, canofins acted as neuroprotectants...

  18. Activation of the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway through covalent modification of the 2-alkenal group of aliphatic electrophiles in Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yumi; Mizokawa, Mai; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2014-11-12

    Phytochemicals able to activate the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were isolated from an extract of Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum) leaves by preparative octadecyl silica column chromatography. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the isolated components after derivatization with 2-diphenylacetyl-1,3-inandione-1-hydrazone and experiments with HepG2 cells revealed that (E)-2-alkenals with different carbon numbers play a role in Nrf2 activation in these cells. Such Nrf2 activation appears to be attributable to S-alkylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), the negative regulator for Nrf2, as determined by a biotin-PEAC5-maleimide assay. Interestingly, (E)-2-butenal caused Keap1 modification and Nrf2 activation, whereas butanal did not. These results suggest that (E)-2-alkenals with an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety, which is a common substituent in phytochemicals isolated from C. sativum leaves, activate the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway associated with cellular protection.

  19. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2, and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades.

  20. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Tang, Hongju; Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades.

  1. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Activating Transcription Factor 5-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Mariko; Ogura, Tae; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Nakano, Haruo; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the CREB/ATF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors. We previously reported that ATF5-deficient (ATF5(-/-)) mice demonstrated abnormal olfactory bulb development due to impaired interneuron supply. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice were less aggressive than ATF5(+/+) mice. Although ATF5 is widely expressed in the brain, and involved in the regulation of proliferation and development of neurons, the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain remains unknown. Our objective was to investigate the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain. We performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis using ATF5(-/-) mice and wild type littermates. ATF5(-/-) mice exhibited abnormal locomotor activity in the open field test. They also exhibited abnormal anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark transition test and open field test. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice displayed reduced social interaction in the Crawley's social interaction test and increased pain sensitivity in the hot plate test compared with wild type. Finally, behavioral flexibility was reduced in the T-maze test in ATF5(-/-) mice compared with wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that ATF5(-/-) mice display disturbances of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in several brain regions. These results indicate that ATF5 deficiency elicits abnormal behaviors and the disturbance of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The behavioral abnormalities of ATF5(-/-) mice may be due to the disturbance of monoamine levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that ATF5(-/-) mice may be a unique animal model of some psychiatric disorders.

  2. Omeprazole Induces NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Independent Mechanisms: Role of the Transcription Factor Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2–Related Factor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptionally induces phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1) and phase II (NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) detoxifying enzymes. The effects of the classical and nonclassical AhR ligands on phase I and II enzymes are well studied in human hepatocytes. Additionally, we observed that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole (OM), transcriptionally induces CYP1A1 in the human adenocarcinoma cell line, H441 cells via AhR. Whether OM activates AhR and induces the phase II enzyme, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in fetal primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will induce NQO1 in HPMEC via the AhR. The concentrations of OM used in our experiments did not result in cytotoxicity. OM activated AhR as evident by increased CYP1A1 mRNA expression. However, contrary to our hypothesis, OM increased NQO1 mRNA and protein via an AhR-independent mechanism as AhR knockdown failed to abrogate OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. Interestingly, OM activated Nrf2 as evident by increased phosphoNrf2 (S40) expression in OM-treated compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown abrogated OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OM induces NQO1 via AhR-independent, but Nrf2-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26441083

  3. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-re...... transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation....

  4. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S Scholes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation domains (ADs are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators.

  5. Large-scale transcriptome data reveals transcriptional activity of fission yeast LTR retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retrotransposons are transposable elements that proliferate within eukaryotic genomes through a process involving reverse transcription. The numbers of retrotransposons within genomes and differences between closely related species may yield insight into the evolutionary history...... of transcriptional activity are observed from both strands of solitary LTR sequences. Transcriptome data collected during meiosis suggests that transcription of solitary LTRs is correlated with the transcription of nearby protein-coding genes. CONCLUSIONS: Presumably, the host organism negatively regulates...

  6. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  7. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  8. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-11-11

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances the basal rate of protein synthesis by increasing active eukaryotic elongation factor 2 levels and promoting translation elongation in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Mihoko; Ishizuka, Yuta; Kakiya, Naomasa; Inamura, Naoko; Namba, Hisaaki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-25

    The constitutive and activity-dependent components of protein synthesis are both critical for neural function. Although the mechanisms controlling extracellularly induced protein synthesis are becoming clear, less is understood about the molecular networks that regulate the basal translation rate. Here we describe the effects of chronic treatment with various neurotrophic factors and cytokines on the basal rate of protein synthesis in primary cortical neurons. Among the examined factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showed the strongest effect. The rate of protein synthesis increased in the cortical tissues of BDNF transgenic mice, whereas it decreased in BDNF knock-out mice. BDNF specifically increased the level of the active, unphosphorylated form of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). The levels of active eEF2 increased and decreased in BDNF transgenic and BDNF knock-out mice, respectively. BDNF decreased kinase activity and increased phosphatase activity against eEF2 in vitro. Additionally, BDNF shortened the ribosomal transit time, an index of translation elongation. In agreement with these results, overexpression of eEF2 enhanced protein synthesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the increased level of active eEF2 induced by chronic BDNF stimulation enhances translational elongation processes and increases the total rate of protein synthesis in neurons.

  10. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  11. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. Enterovirus type 71 2A protease functions as a transcriptional activator in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Meng-Jiun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 2A protease exhibited strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells. The transcriptional activity of 2A protease was independent of its protease activity. EV71 2A protease retained its transcriptional activity after truncation of 40 amino acids at the N-terminus but lost this activity after truncation of 60 amino acids at the N-terminus or deletion of 20 amino acids at the C-terminus. Thus, the acidic domain at the C-terminus of this protein is essential for its transcriptional activity. Indeed, deletion of amino acids from 146 to 149 (EAME in this acidic domain lost the transcriptional activity of EV71 2A protein though still retained its protease activity. EV71 2A protease was detected both in the cytoplasm and nucleus using confocal microscopy analysis. Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease also exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. As expected, an acidic domain in the C-terminus of Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease was also identified. Truncation of this acidic domain resulted in the loss of transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this acidic region of poliovirus 2A protease is critical for viral RNA replication. The transcriptional activity of the EV71 or Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease should play a role in viral replication and/or pathogenesis.

  13. SIRT1 is a transcriptional enhancer of the glucocorticoid receptor acting independently to its deacetylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Iben, James R; Coon, Steven L; Kino, Tomoshige

    2017-09-18

    Glucocorticoids have strong effects on diverse human activities through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase and promotes longevity by influencing intermediary metabolism and other regulatory activities including mitochondrial function. In this study, we examined the effects of SIRT1 on GR-mediated transcriptional activity. We found that SIRT1 enhanced GR-induced transcriptional activity on endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid-responsive genes, whereas knockdown of SIRT1 attenuated it. This effect of SIRT1 was independent to its deacetylase activity, as the SIRT1 mutant defective in this activity (H363Y) enhanced GR transcriptional activity, and the compounds inhibiting or activating the SIRT1 deacetylase activity did not influence it. RNA-seq analysis revealed that SIRT1 knockdown influenced ∼30% of the glucocorticoid-responsive transcriptome for most of which it acted as an enhancer for positive/negative effects of this hormone. SIRT1 physically interacted with GR, and was attracted to GR-bound glucocorticoid response elements in a glucocorticoid-dependent fashion. SIRT1 cooperatively activated GR transcriptional activity with the PPARγ coactivator-1α also in its deacetylase activity-independent fashion. Thus, SIRT1 is a novel transcriptional enhancer of GR-induced transcriptional activity possibly by functioning as a scaffold for the transcriptional complex formed on GR. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  15. Spi-1/PU.1 activates transcription through clustered DNA occupancy in erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridinger-Saison, Maya; Boeva, Valentina; Rimmelé, Pauline; Kulakovskiy, Ivan; Gallais, Isabelle; Levavasseur, Benjamin; Paccard, Caroline; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Morlé, François; Nicolas, Alain; Hupé, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Guillouf, Christel

    2012-10-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by deregulation of transcriptional networks that control the lineage specificity of gene expression. The aberrant overexpression of the Spi-1/PU.1 transcription factor leads to erythroleukemia. To determine how Spi-1 mechanistically influences the transcriptional program, we combined a ChIP-seq analysis with transcriptional profiling in cells from an erythroleukemic mouse model. We show that Spi-1 displays a selective DNA-binding that does not often cause transcriptional modulation. We report that Spi-1 controls transcriptional activation and repression partially through distinct Spi-1 recruitment to chromatin. We revealed several parameters impacting on Spi-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Gene activation is facilitated by Spi-1 occupancy close to transcriptional starting site of genes devoid of CGIs. Moreover, in those regions Spi-1 acts by binding to multiple motifs tightly clustered and with similar orientation. Finally, in contrast to the myeloid and lymphoid B cells in which Spi-1 exerts a physiological activity, in the erythroleukemic cells, lineage-specific cooperating factors do not play a prevalent role in Spi-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Thus, our work describes a new mechanism of gene activation through clustered site occupancy of Spi-1 particularly relevant in regard to the strong expression of Spi-1 in the erythroleukemic cells.

  16. A novel pathway links oxidative stress to loss of insulin growth factor-2 (IGF2 imprinting through NF-κB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yang

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is the allele-specific expression of a gene based on parental origin. Loss of imprinting(LOI of Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2 during aging is important in tumorigenesis, yet the regulatory mechanisms driving this event are largely unknown. In this study oxidative stress, measured by increased NF-κB activity, induces LOI in both cancerous and noncancerous human prostate cells. Decreased expression of the enhancer-blocking element CCCTC-binding factor(CTCF results in reduced binding of CTCF to the H19-ICR (imprint control region, a major factor in the allelic silencing of IGF2. This ICR then develops increased DNA methylation. Assays identify a recruitment of the canonical pathway proteins NF-κB p65 and p50 to the CTCF promoter associated with the co-repressor HDAC1 explaining gene repression. An IκBα super-repressor blocks oxidative stress-induced activation of NF-κB and IGF2 imprinting is maintained. In vivo experiments using IκBα mutant mice with continuous NF-κB activation demonstrate increased IGF2 LOI further confirming a central role for canonical NF-κB signaling. We conclude CTCF plays a central role in mediating the effects of NF-κB activation that result in altered imprinting both in vitro and in vivo. This novel finding connects inflammation found in aging prostate tissues with the altered epigenetic landscape.

  17. Attenuation of β-Amyloid-Induced Oxidative Cell Death by Sulforaphane via Activation of NF-E2-Related Factor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-amyloid peptide (Aβ, a major component of senile plaques, plays important roles in neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. An array of in vitro and in vivo data indicates that Aβ-induced neuronal death is mediated by oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to investigate effects of sulforaphane (SUL, an isothiocyanate in cruciferous vegetables, on Aβ-induced oxidative cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. Cells treated with Aβ25–35 exhibited decreased cell viability and underwent apoptosis as determined by MTT assay and TUNEL, respectively. Aβ25–35-induced cytotoxicity and apoptotic characteristics such as activation of c-JNK, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, altered expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, and DNA fragmentation were effectively attenuated by SUL pretreatment. The antiapoptotic activity of SUL seemed to be mediated by inhibition of intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative damages. SUL exerted antioxidant potential by upregulating expression of antioxidant enzymes including γ-glutamylcysteine ligase, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase-1, and heme oxygenase-1 via activation of NF-E2-related factor 2(Nrf2. The protective effect of SUL against Aβ25–35-induced apoptotic cell death was abolished by siRNA of Nrf2. Taken together, the results suggest that pharmacologic activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway by SUL might be a practical prevention and/or protective treatment for the management of AD.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  19. Preparation of cell lines for single-cell analysis of transcriptional activation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Imaging molecularly defined regions of chromatin in single living cells during transcriptional activation has the potential to provide new insight into gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a method for isolating cell lines with multi-copy arrays of reporter transgenes, which can be used for real-time high-resolution imaging of transcriptional activation dynamics in single cells.

  20. A modified reverse one-hybrid screen identifies transcriptional activation in Phyochrome-Interacting Factor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptional activation domains (TAD) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput...

  1. Wnt-induced transcriptional activation is exclusively mediated by TCF/LEF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijers, Jurian; Mokry, Michal; Hatzis, Pantelis; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Active canonical Wnt signaling results in recruitment of β-catenin to DNA by TCF/LEF family members, leading to transcriptional activation of TCF target genes. However, additional transcription factors have been suggested to recruit β-catenin and tether it to DNA. Here, we describe the genome-wide p

  2. Glucagon and Insulin Cooperatively Stimulate Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Transcription by Increasing the Expression of Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, Kimberly M; Meares, Gordon P; Hillgartner, F Bradley

    2017-03-31

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon cooperatively interacts with insulin to stimulate hepatic FGF21 gene expression. Here we investigated the mechanism by which glucagon and insulin increased FGF21 gene transcription in primary hepatocyte cultures. Transfection analyses demonstrated that glucagon plus insulin induction of FGF21 transcription was conferred by two activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) binding sites in the FGF21 gene. Glucagon plus insulin stimulated a 5-fold increase in ATF4 protein abundance, and knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to increase FGF21 expression. In hepatocytes incubated in the presence of insulin, treatment with a PKA-selective agonist mimicked the ability of glucagon to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Inhibition of PKA, PI3K, Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Additional analyses demonstrated that chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) induced a 6-fold increase in ATF4 expression and that knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of CDCA to increase FGF21 gene expression. CDCA increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α, and inhibition of eIF2α signaling activity suppressed CDCA regulation of ATF4 and FGF21 expression. These results demonstrate that glucagon plus insulin increases FGF21 transcription by stimulating ATF4 expression and that activation of cAMP/PKA and PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 mediates the effect of glucagon plus insulin on ATF4 expression. These results also demonstrate that CDCA regulation of FGF21 transcription is mediated at least partially by an eIF2α-dependent increase in ATF4 expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Transcriptional coactivator CIITA, a functional homolog of TAF1, has kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Katherine C; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-11-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) mediates activated immune responses and its deficiency results in the Type II Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome. CIITA is a transcriptional co-activator that regulates γ-interferon-activated transcription of MHC class I and class II genes. It is also a functional homolog of TAF1, a component of the general transcription factor complex TFIID. TAF1 and CIITA both possess intrinsic acetyltransferase (AT) activity that is required for transcription initiation. In response to induction by γ-interferon, CIITA and it's AT activity bypass the requirement for TAF1 AT activity. TAF1 also has kinase activity that is essential for its function. However, no similar activity has been identified for CIITA thus far. Here we report that CIITA, like TAF1, is a serine-threonine kinase. Its substrate specificity parallels, but does not duplicate, that of TAF1 in phosphorylating the TFIID component TAF7, the RAP74 subunit of the general transcription factor TFIIF and histone H2B. Like TAF1, CIITA autophosphorylates, affecting its interaction with TAF7. Additionally, CIITA phosphorylates histone H2B at Ser36, a target of TAF1 that is required for transcription during cell cycle progression and stress response. However, unlike TAF1, CIITA also phosphorylates all the other histones. The identification of this novel kinase activity of CIITA further clarifies its role as a functional homolog of TAF1 which may operate during stress and γ-IFN activated MHC gene transcription.

  4. MicroRNAs in the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2)-regulated Gtl2-Dio3 Noncoding RNA Locus Promote Cardiomyocyte Proliferation by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amanda L; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-09-18

    Understanding cell cycle regulation in postmitotic cardiomyocytes may lead to new therapeutic approaches to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. We have demonstrated previously that microRNAs encoded by the Gtl2-Dio3 noncoding RNA locus function downstream of the MEF2A transcription factor in skeletal muscle regeneration. We have also reported expression of these miRNAs in the heart. Here we investigated the role of two Gtl2-Dio3 miRNAs, miR-410 and miR-495, in cardiac muscle. Overexpression of miR-410 and miR-495 robustly stimulated cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Interestingly, unlike our findings in skeletal muscle, these miRNAs did not modulate the activity of the WNT signaling pathway. Instead, these miRNAs targeted Cited2, a coactivator required for proper cardiac development. Consistent with miR-410 and miR-495 overexpression, siRNA knockdown of Cited2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in robust proliferation. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of Cdkn1c/p57/Kip2, a cell cycle inhibitor, and increased expression of VEGFA, a growth factor with proliferation-promoting effects. Therefore, miR-410 and miR-495 are among a growing number of miRNAs that have the ability to potently stimulate neonatal cardiomyocyte proliferation.

  5. Computational inference of replication and transcription activator regulator activity in herpesvirus from gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Recchia, A; Wit, E; Vinciotti, V; Kellam, P

    2008-01-01

    One of the main aims of system biology is to understand the structure and dynamics of genomic systems. A computational approach, facilitated by new technologies for high-throughput quantitative experimental data, is put forward to investigate the regulatory system of dynamic interaction among genes in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus network after induction of lytic replication. A reconstruction of transcription factor activity and gene-regulatory kinetics using data from a time-course...

  6. SUMOylation of the KRAB zinc-finger transcription factor PARIS/ZNF746 regulates its transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Tamotsu, E-mail: nishida@gene.mie-u.ac.jp; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2016-05-13

    Parkin-interacting substrate (PARIS), a member of the family of Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc-finger transcription factors, is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin. PARIS represses the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that PARIS can be SUMOylated, and its SUMOylation plays a role in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT y (PIASy) was identified as an interacting protein of PARIS and shown to enhance its SUMOylation. PIASy repressed PGC-1a promoter activity, and this effect was attenuated by PARIS in a manner dependent on its SUMOylation status. Co-expression of SUMO-1 with PIASy completely repressed PGC-1a promoter activity independently of PARIS expression. PARIS-mediated PGC-1a promoter repression depended on the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC), whereas PIASy repressed the PGC-1a promoter in an HDAC-independent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PARIS and PIASy modulate PGC-1a gene transcription through distinct molecular mechanisms. -- Highlights: •PARIS can be SUMOylated in vivo and in vitro. •SUMOylation of PARIS functions in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. •PIASy interacts with PARIS and enhances its SUMOylation. •PIASy influences PARIS-mediated repression of PGC-1a promoter activity.

  7. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  8. O-GlcNAc modification of Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors negatively regulates their transcriptional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Changhoon; Lim, Kihong

    2015-11-13

    The addition of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on serine or threonine modifies a myriad of proteins and regulates their function, stability and localization. O-GlcNAc modification is common among chromosome-associated proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting its extensive involvement in gene expression regulation. In this study, we demonstrate the O-GlcNAc status of the Sp family members of transcription factors and the functional impact on their transcriptional activities. We highlight the presence of O-GlcNAc residues in Sp3 and Sp4, but not Sp2, as demonstrated by their enrichment in GlcNAc positive protein fractions and by detection of O-GlcNAc residues on Sp3 and Sp4 co-expressed in Escherichia coli together with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) using an O-GlcNAc-specific antibody. Deletion mutants of Sp3 and Sp4 indicate that the majority of O-GlcNAc sites reside in their N-terminal transactivation domain. Overall, using reporter gene assays and co-immunoprecipitations, we demonstrate a functional inhibitory role of O-GlcNAc modifications in Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Thereby, our study strengthens the current notion that O-GlcNAc modification is an important regulator of protein interactome.

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor 2-induced apoptosis involves survivin expression, protein kinase Cα activation and subcellular translocation of Smac in human small cell lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Xiao; Kuansong Wang; Jianhua Zhou; Huiqiu Cao; Zhenghao Deng; Yongbin Hu; Xiahui Qu; Jifang Wen

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) inhibits apoptosis in the human small cell lung cancer cell line H446 subjected to serum starvation,apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, caspase-3 activity, and DNA fragmentation.Survivin expression induced by FGF-2 and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) translocation was detected by subcellular fractionation and Western blot analysis. In addition, FGF-2-induced release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm was analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.FGF-2 reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation and up-regulated survivin expression in H446 cells in a dosedependent and time-dependent manner, and inhibited caspase-3 activity. FGF-2 also inhibited the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm induced by serum starvation and increased PKCα translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane. In addition, PKC inhibitor inhibited the expression of survivin. FGF-2 up-regulates the expression of survivin protein in H446 cells and blocks the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. PKCα regulated FGF-2-induced survivin expression. Thus, survivin, Smac,and PKCα might play important roles in the inhibition of apoptosis by FGF-2 in human small cell lung cancer cells.

  10. The Effect of Preoperative Melatonin on Nuclear Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Activation in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghayegh Haghjooy Javanmard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, oxidative stress occurs. Finding an effective way to improveantioxidant response is important in CABG surgery. It has been shown that patients with coronary heart disease have a low Melatonin production rate. The present study aimed to investigate the effects ofMelatoninon nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2(Nrf2 activity in patients undergoing CABG surgery. Thirty volunteers undergoing CABG were randomized to receive 10 mg oral Melatonin (Melatonin group, or placebo (placebo group, before sleeping for 1 month before surgery. The activatedNrf2 was measured twice by DNA-based ELISA method in the nuclear extract of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients before aortic clumps and 45 minutes after CABG operation. Melatonin administration was associated with a significantincrease in both plasma levels of Melatonin and Nrf2 concentration in Melatonin group compared to placebo group, respectively ( pmol/L, versus pmol/L, , . The findings of the present study provide preliminary data suggesting that Melatoninmay play a significant role in the potentiation of the antioxidant defense and attenuate cellular damages resulting from CABG surgery via theNrf2 pathway.

  11. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  12. pilS loci in Neisseria gonorrhoeae are transcriptionally active

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Masters, Thao L.; Wachter, Shaun; Mason, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Piliation is an important virulence determinant for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. PilE polypeptide is the major protein subunit in the pilus organelle and engages in extensive antigenic variation due to recombination between pilE and a pilS locus. pilS were so-named as they are believed to be transcriptionally silent, in contrast to the pilE locus. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a small, pil-specific RNA species. Through using a series of pilE deletion mutants, we show by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis (qRT-PCR), that these smaller RNA species are not derived from the primary pilE transcript following some processing events, but rather, arose through transcription of the pilS loci. Small transcriptome analysis, in conjunction with analysis of pilS recombinants, identified both sense and anti-sense RNAs originating from most, but not all, of the pilS gene copies. Focusing on the MS11 pilS6 locus, we identified by site-directed mutagenesis a sense promoter located immediately upstream of pilS6 copy 2, as well as an anti-sense promoter immediately downstream of pilS6 copy 1. Whole transcriptome analysis also revealed the presence of pil-specific sRNA in both gonococci and meningococci. Overall, this study reveals an added layer of complexity to the pilE/pilS recombination scheme by demonstrating pil-specific transcription within genes that were previously thought to be transcriptionally silent. PMID:25701734

  13. Suppressing Akt phosphorylation and activating Fas by safrole oxide inhibited angiogenesis and induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Miao, Junying; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli; Yin, Deling

    2006-01-01

    At present, vascular endothelial cell (VEC) apoptosis induced by deprivation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and serum has been well studied. But how to trigger VEC apoptosis in the presence of FGF-2 and serum is not well known. To address this question, in this study, the effects of safrole oxide on angiogenesis and VEC growth stimulated by FGF-2 were investigated. The results showed that safrole oxide inhibited angiogenesis and induced VEC apoptosis in the presence of FGF-2 and serum. To understand the possible mechanism of safrole oxide acting, we first examined the phosphorylation of Akt and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS); secondly, we analyzed the expressions and distributions of Fas and P53; then we measured the activity of phosphatidylcholine specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the VECs treated with and without safrole oxide. The results showed that this small molecule obviously suppressed Akt phosphorylation and the activity of NOS, and promoted the expressions of Fas and P53 markedly. Simultaneously, Fas protein clumped on cell membrane, instead of homogenously distributed. The activity of PC-PLC was not changed obviously. The data suggested that safrole oxide effectively inhibited angiogenesis and triggered VEC apoptosis in the presence of FGF-2 and serum, and it might perform its functions by suppressing Akt/NOS signal pathway, upregulating the expressions of Fas and P53 and modifying the distributing pattern of Fas in VEC. This finding provided a powerful chemical probe for promoting VEC apoptosis during angiogenesis stimulated by FGF-2.

  14. Regulation of selected genome loci using de novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-type transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Robert; Römer, Patrick; Boch, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2010-12-14

    Proteins that can be tailored to bind desired DNA sequences are key tools for molecular biology. Previous studies suggested that DNA-binding specificity of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from the bacterial genus Xanthomonas is defined by repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) of tandem-arranged 34/35-amino acid repeat units. We have studied chimeras of two TALEs differing in RVDs and non-RVDs and found that, in contrast to the critical contributions by RVDs, non-RVDs had no major effect on the DNA-binding specificity of the chimeras. This finding suggests that one needs only to modify the RVDs to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) to activate transcription of user-defined target genes. We used the scaffold of the TALE AvrBs3 and changed its RVDs to match either the tomato Bs4, the Arabidopsis EGL3, or the Arabidopsis KNAT1 promoter. All three dTALEs transcriptionally activated the desired promoters in a sequence-specific manner as mutations within the targeted DNA sequences abolished promoter activation. This study is unique in showing that chromosomal loci can be targeted specifically by dTALEs. We also engineered two AvrBs3 derivatives with four additional repeat units activating specifically either the pepper Bs3 or UPA20 promoter. Because AvrBs3 activates both promoters, our data show that addition of repeat units facilitates TALE-specificity fine-tuning. Finally, we demonstrate that the RVD NK mediates specific interaction with G nucleotides that thus far could not be targeted specifically by any known RVD type. In summary, our data demonstrate that the TALE scaffold can be tailored to target user-defined DNA sequences in whole genomes.

  15. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  16. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  17. Distinct DNA-based epigenetic switches trigger transcriptional activation of silent genes in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Ganesh N; Taniguchi, Junichi; Junetha, Syed; Sato, Shinsuke; Han, Le; Saha, Abhijit; AnandhaKumar, Chandran; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Vaijayanthi, Thangavel; Taylor, Rhys D; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-24

    The influential role of the epigenome in orchestrating genome-wide transcriptional activation instigates the demand for the artificial genetic switches with distinct DNA sequence recognition. Recently, we developed a novel class of epigenetically active small molecules called SAHA-PIPs by conjugating selective DNA binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. Screening studies revealed that certain SAHA-PIPs trigger targeted transcriptional activation of pluripotency and germ cell genes in mouse and human fibroblasts, respectively. Through microarray studies and functional analysis, here we demonstrate for the first time the remarkable ability of thirty-two different SAHA-PIPs to trigger the transcriptional activation of exclusive clusters of genes and noncoding RNAs. QRT-PCR validated the microarray data, and some SAHA-PIPs activated therapeutically significant genes like KSR2. Based on the aforementioned results, we propose the potential use of SAHA-PIPs as reagents capable of targeted transcriptional activation.

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 gene G2964A polymorphism and inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, B; Crusius, J.B.A.; Wu, J; Zwiers, A.; Bodegraven, van A.A.; Pena, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is a key transcription factor involved in interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13-mediated Th2 response. The STAT6 gene is located on chromosome 12q13.3-14.1 (IBD2 region) and is therefore a positional and functional candidate gene for study in infla

  19. Polymorphisms in SREBF1 and SREBF2, two antipsychotic-activated transcription factors controlling cellular lipogenesis, are associated with schizophrenia in German and Scandinavian samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hellard, S; Mühleisen, T W; Djurovic, S

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have reported structural brain abnormalities, decreased myelination and oligodendrocyte dysfunction in schizophrenia. In the central nervous system, glia-derived de novo synthesized cholesterol is essential for both myelination and synaptogenesis. Previously, we demonstrated...... in glial cell lines that antipsychotic drugs induce the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acids biosynthesis through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors, encoded by the sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1......) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2) genes. Considering the importance of these factors in the lipid biosynthesis and their possible involvement in antipsychotic drug effects, we hypothesized that genetic variants of SREBF1 and/or SREBF2 could affect schizophrenia...

  20. Osterix represses adipogenesis by negatively regulating PPARγ transcriptional activity

    OpenAIRE

    Younho Han; Chae Yul Kim; Heesun Cheong; Kwang Youl Lee

    2016-01-01

    Osterix is a novel bone-related transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, and bone maturation. Because a reciprocal relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, we hypothesized that Osterix might have a role in adipogenesis. Ablation of Osterix enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas overexpression suppressed this process and inhibited the expression of adipogenic markers including CCAAT/enhancer-...

  1. Myeloid differentiation factor-2 interacts with Lyn kinase and is tyrosine phosphorylated following lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Pearl; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Brikos, Constantinos; Rentsendorj, Altan; Town, Terrence; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-10-15

    Stimulation with LPS induces tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins involved in the TLR signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2) is also tyrosine phosphorylated following LPS stimulation. LPS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of MD-2 is specific; it is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, as well as by an inhibitor of endocytosis, cytochalasin D, suggesting that MD-2 phosphorylation occurs during trafficking of MD-2 and not on the cell surface. Furthermore, we identified two possible phospho-accepting tyrosine residues at positions 22 and 131. Mutant proteins in which these tyrosines were changed to phenylalanine had reduced phosphorylation and significantly diminished ability to activate NF-κB in response to LPS. In addition, MD-2 coprecipitated and colocalized with Lyn kinase, most likely in the endoplasmic reticulum. A Lyn-binding peptide inhibitor abolished MD-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that Lyn is a likely candidate to be the kinase required for MD-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our study demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of MD-2 is important for signaling following exposure to LPS and underscores the importance of this event in mediating an efficient and prompt immune response.

  2. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasim, Vivi, E-mail: vivikasim78@gmail.com [The Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia [The Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [The Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); The 111 Project Laboratory of Biomechanics and Tissue Repair, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Miyagishi, Makoto [Molecular Composite Medicine Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Wu, Shourong, E-mail: shourongwu@hotmail.com [The Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); The 111 Project Laboratory of Biomechanics and Tissue Repair, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  3. Caspase-2 is essential for c-Jun transcriptional activation and Bim induction in neuron death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ying Y.; Ribe, Elena M.; Pero, Maria Elena; Moskalenko, Marina; Iqbal, Zarah; Marks, Lianna J.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Troy, Carol M.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Neuronal apoptotic death generally requires de novo transcription, and activation of the transcription factor c-Jun has been shown to be necessary in multiple neuronal death paradigms. Caspase-2 has been implicated in death of neuronal and non-neuronal cells, but its relationship to transcriptional activation has not been clearly elucidated. Here, using two different neuronal apoptotic paradigms, β-amyloid treatment and NGF withdrawal, we examined the hierarchical role of caspase-2 activation in the transcriptional control of neuron death. Both paradigms induce rapid activation of caspase-2 as well as activation of the transcription factor c-Jun and subsequent induction of the pro-apoptotic BH-3 only protein Bim. Caspase-2 activation is dependent on the adaptor protein RAIDD, and both caspase-2 and RAIDD are required for c-Jun activation and Bim induction. Our work, thus, shows that rapid caspase-2 activation is essential for c-Jun activation and Bim induction in neurons subjected to apoptotic stimuli. This places caspase-2 at an apical position in the apoptotic cascade and demonstrates for the first time that caspase-2 can regulate transcription. PMID:23815625

  4. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2’s activation in transgenic mice fed with high dosage of fish oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mariani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Some fatty acids, such as CLA (conjugated linoleic acid and n-3 fatty acids modulate immune and inflammatory response in ruminants and monogastrics; their supplementation alters fatty acids profile of meat and milk, enhancing their nutritional quality. However, it is still unclear if their addition causes oxidative damage to animals. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 plays an important role in cellular defenses against oxidative stress, indeed it produces a rapid induction of its target genes involved in antioxidant response. The aim of the project is to investigate the activation of Nrf2 in luciferase reporter mice fed different amount of n-3 PUFA in the diet (7,5% lard, 7,5% tuna oil, 20 % lard and 20%tuna oil. Forty-eight reporter mice are divided into three groups: male, intact female and ovariectomized female. Each group is split in four subgroups fed different diets. Oxidative status will be studied monitoring Nrf2’s activation with in vivo bioluminescent imaging. The inflammatory and immune response will be assessed using calprotectin and lactoferrin levels in faecal samples that are non-invasive techniques. The trial is still in progress: on the 62nd day, animals will be sacrificed after a challenge in order to measure the different effects of diets and +/- oestrogen on stress response. Finally, the post mortem analysis will be carried on extract organs. Data obtained will be analysed using statistical procedures and results will improve the knowledge about interaction between omega-3 fatty acids and animals’ oxidative status.

  5. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  6. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  7. Double-Stranded-RNA-Activated Protein Kinase PKR Enhances Transcriptional Activation by Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in inducing G1 arrest and apoptosis following DNA damage. The double-stranded-RNA-activated protein PKR is a serine/threonine interferon (IFN)-inducible kinase which plays an important role in regulation of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Since a cross talk between IFN-inducible proteins and p53 had already been established, we investigated whether and how p53 function was modulated by PKR. We analyzed p53 function in...

  8. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Alexander R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  9. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  10. Two distinct domains of Flo8 activator mediates its role in transcriptional activation and the physical interaction with Mss11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Sung Bae; Kang, Hyen Sam; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, TaeSoo

    2014-06-27

    Flo8 is a transcriptional activator essential for the inducible expression of a set of target genes such as STA1, FLO11, and FLO1 encoding an extracellular glucoamylase and two cell surface proteins, respectively. However, the molecular mechanism of Flo8-mediated transcriptional activation remains largely elusive. By generating serial deletion constructs, we revealed here that a novel transcriptional activation domain on its extreme C-terminal region plays a crucial role in activating transcription. On the other hand, the N-terminal LisH motif of Flo8 appears to be required for its physical interaction with another transcriptional activator, Mss11, for their cooperative transcriptional regulation of the shared targets. Additionally, GST pull-down experiments uncovered that Flo8 and Mss11 can directly form either a heterodimer or a homodimer capable of binding to DNA, and we also showed that this formed complex of two activators interacts functionally and physically with the Swi/Snf complex. Collectively, our findings provide valuable clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of Flo8-mediated transcriptional control of multiple targets.

  11. Gene expression profiling of aging reveals activation of a p53-mediated transcriptional program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weindruch Richard

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging has been associated with widespread changes at the gene expression level in multiple mammalian tissues. We have used high density oligonucleotide arrays and novel statistical methods to identify specific transcriptional classes that may uncover biological processes that play a central role in mammalian aging. Results We identified 712 transcripts that are differentially expressed in young (5 month old and old (25-month old mouse skeletal muscle. Caloric restriction (CR completely or partially reversed 87% of the changes in expression. Examination of individual genes revealed a transcriptional profile indicative of increased p53 activity in the older muscle. To determine whether the increase in p53 activity is associated with transcriptional activation of apoptotic targets, we performed RT-PCR on four well known mediators of p53-induced apoptosis: puma, noxa, tnfrsf10b and bok. Expression levels for these proapoptotic genes increased significantly with age (P +/- and GPX4+/- mice, suggesting that oxidative stress does not induce the expression of these genes. Western blot analysis confirmed that protein levels for both p21 and GADD45a, two established transcriptional targets of p53, were higher in the older muscle tissue. Conclusion These observations support a role for p53-mediated transcriptional program in mammalian aging and suggest that mechanisms other than reactive oxygen species are involved in the age-related transcriptional activation of p53 targets.

  12. Transcriptional activation of plant defense genes by fungal elicitor, wounding, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, M A; Lamb, C J

    1987-01-01

    Activation of plant defense genes was investigated by analysis of transcripts completed in vitro by isolated nuclei. Elicitor treatment of suspension-cultured bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cells caused marked transient stimulation of transcription of genes encoding apoproteins of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGP) and the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS), concomitant with the onset of rapid accumulation of the respective mRNAs and hence expression of the phytoalexin (PAL, CHS), lignin (PAL), and HRGP defense responses. While there was a lag of 2 h prior to stimulation of HRGP gene transcription, induction of the transcription of PAL and CHS genes occurred within 5 min of elicitor treatment. Induction of transcription of PAL, CHS, and HRGP genes was also observed in wounded hypocotyls and in infected hypocotyls during race-cultivar-specific interactions with the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose. Transcriptional activation occurred not only in directly infected tissue but also in distant, hitherto uninfected tissue, indicating intercellular transmission of an endogenous signal for defense gene activation. It is concluded that transcriptional activation of defense genes characteristically underlies induction of the corresponding defense responses and expression of disease resistance.

  13. Transcriptional activation of Hedgehog pathway components in aggressive haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling-Keim, Danielle S; Wanie, Lynn; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Grantzow, Rainer; Kappler, Roland

    2017-10-01

    Infantile hemangioma is a vascular neoplasm and is one of the most common tumors diagnosed in young children. Although most hemangiomas are harmless and involute spontaneously, some show severe progression, leading to serious complications, such as high-output cardiac failure, ulcerations, compression of the trachea or deprivation amblyopia, depending on their size and localization. However, the pathogenesis and cause of hemangioma are largely unknown to date. The goal of this study was to identify markers that could predict hemangiomas with aggressive growth and severe progression that would benefit from early intervention. By using a PCR-based screening approach, we first confirmed that previously known markers of hemangioma, namely FGF2 and GLUT1, are highly expressed in hemangioma. Nevertheless, these genes did not show any differential expression between severely progressing tumors and mild tumors. However, transcriptional upregulation of several Hedgehog signalling components, comprising the ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), the transcription factor GLI2 and its target gene FOXA2 were detected in extremely aggressive hemangioma specimens during the proliferation phase. Notably, GLI2 was even overexpressed in involuting hemangiomas if they showed an aggressive growth pattern. In conclusion, our data suggest that overexpression of the Hedgehog components SHH, GLI2 and FOXA2 might be used as markers of an aggressive hemangioma that would benefit from too early intervention, while FGF2 and GLUT1 are more general markers of hemangiomas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  15. Conversion of the Vibrio fischeri Transcriptional Activator, LuxR, to a Repressor

    OpenAIRE

    Egland, Kristi A.; Greenberg, E. P.

    2000-01-01

    The Vibrio fischeri luminescence (lux) operon is regulated by a quorum-sensing system that involves the transcriptional activator (LuxR) and an acyl-homoserine lactone signal. Transcriptional activation requires the presence of a 20-base inverted repeat termed the lux box at a position centered 42.5 bases upstream of the transcriptional start of the lux operon. LuxR has proven difficult to study in vitro. A truncated form of LuxR has been purified, and together with ς70 RNA polymerase it can ...

  16. Interplay between SIRT1 and hepatitis B virus X protein in the activation of viral transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian-Jun; Kong, Ka-Yiu Edwin; Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Cheng, Yun; Zhou, Jie; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Yuen, Man-Fung; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is organized into a minichromosome known as covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), which serves as the template for all viral transcripts. SIRT1 is an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase which activates HBV transcription by promoting the activity of cellular transcription factors and coactivators. How SIRT1 and viral transactivator X protein (HBx) might affect each other remains to be clarified. In this study we show synergy and mutual dependence between SIRT1 and HBx in the activation of HBV transcription. All human sirtuins SIRT1 through SIRT7 activated HBV gene expression. The steady-state levels of SIRT1 protein were elevated in HBV-infected liver tissues and HBV-replicating hepatoma cells. SIRT1 interacted with HBx and potentiated HBx transcriptional activity on precore promoter and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) likely through a deacetylase-independent mechanism, leading to more robust production of cccDNA, pregenomic RNA and surface antigen. SIRT1 and HBx proteins were more abundant when both were expressed. SIRT1 promoted the recruitment of HBx as well as cellular transcriptional factors and coactivators such as PGC-1α and FXRα to cccDNA. Depletion of SIRT1 suppressed HBx recruitment. On the other hand, SIRT1 recruitment to cccDNA was compromised when HBx was deficient. Whereas pharmaceutical agonists of SIRT1 such as resveratrol activated HBV transcription, small-molecule inhibitors of SIRT1 including sirtinol and Ex527 exhibited anti-HBV activity. Taken together, our findings revealed not only the interplay between SIRT1 and HBx in the activation of HBV transcription but also new strategies and compounds for developing antivirals against HBV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Global identification and characterization of transcriptionally active regions in the rice genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Genome tiling microarray studies have consistently documented rich transcriptional activity beyond the annotated genes. However, systematic characterization and transcriptional profiling of the putative novel transcripts on the genome scale are still lacking. We report here the identification of 25,352 and 27,744 transcriptionally active regions (TARs not encoded by annotated exons in the rice (Oryza. sativa subspecies japonica and indica, respectively. The non-exonic TARs account for approximately two thirds of the total TARs detected by tiling arrays and represent transcripts likely conserved between japonica and indica. Transcription of 21,018 (83% japonica non-exonic TARs was verified through expression profiling in 10 tissue types using a re-array in which annotated genes and TARs were each represented by five independent probes. Subsequent analyses indicate that about 80% of the japonica TARs that were not assigned to annotated exons can be assigned to various putatively functional or structural elements of the rice genome, including splice variants, uncharacterized portions of incompletely annotated genes, antisense transcripts, duplicated gene fragments, and potential non-coding RNAs. These results provide a systematic characterization of non-exonic transcripts in rice and thus expand the current view of the complexity and dynamics of the rice transcriptome.

  18. Master regulator for chondrogenesis, Sox9, regulates transcriptional activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer BBF2H7/CREB3L2 in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Kenta; Saito, Atsushi; Kido, Miori; Kanemoto, Soshi; Asada, Rie; Takai, Tomoko; Cui, Min; Cui, Xiang; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2014-05-16

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transducer, box B-binding factor 2 human homolog on chromosome 7 (BBF2H7), is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transmembrane transcription factor. This molecule is activated in response to ER stress during chondrogenesis. The activated BBF2H7 accelerates cartilage matrix protein secretion through the up-regulation of Sec23a, which is responsible for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus and is a target of BBF2H7. In the present study, we elucidated the mechanisms of the transcriptional activation of Bbf2h7 in chondrocytes. The transcription of Bbf2h7 is regulated by Sex determining region Y-related high-mobility group box 9 (Sox9), a critical factor for chondrocyte differentiation that facilitates the expression of one of the major cartilage matrix proteins Type II collagen (Col2), through binding to the Sox DNA-binding motif in the Bbf2h7 promoter. BBF2H7 is activated as a transcription factor in response to physiological ER stress caused by abundant synthesis of cartilage matrix proteins, and consequently regulates the secretion of cartilage matrix proteins. Taken together, our findings demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms of Sox9 for controlling the secretion of cartilage matrix proteins through the activation of BBF2H7-Sec23a signaling during chondrogenesis.

  19. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  20. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  1. Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3 and the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Norval Anderson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been recognised for over a century that the ability of axons to regenerate in peripheral nerves is fundamentally greater than that of axons in the brain, spinal cord or optic nerves [early literature was reviewed in (Ramon y Cajal, 1928]. One factor that contributes to the successful regeneration of the axons in peripheral nerves is the complex cell body response the neurons show to axotomy. That transcription factors must play an important role in enabling neurons to regrow their axons is implicit to the observation that several hundred genes are regulated in neurons during axonal regeneration (Costigan et al., 2002; Boeshore et al., 2004. In addition, similarly large numbers of genes are regulated in the non-neuronal cells present in injured peripheral nerves [especially Schwann cells (Barrette et al., 2010] and CNS tissue. Of the transcription factors that regulate these changes in gene expression, the function of c-jun is best understood but ATF-3 (also known as LRF-1, LRG-21, CRG-5 and TI-241 is also upregulated in most of the neurons (Fig. 1 and Schwann cells that express c-jun. Indeed, ATF-3 has become a standard marker for neurons axotomised by peripheral nerve injury (Tsuzuki et al., 2001; Yamanaka et al., 2005; Yano et al., 2008; Linda et al., 2011 and its expression by injured neurons is closely correlated with a regenerative response. None the less, surprisingly little is known about the functions of ATF3 in neurons or glia within the injured nervous system, especially when compared with those of its potential binding partner, c-Jun.

  2. An activator of transcription regulates phage TP901-1 late gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Lone; Pedersen, Margit; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    to activate transcription of the promoter. Several lactococcal bacteriophages encode ORF29 homologous proteins, indicating that late transcription may be controlled by a similar mechanism in these phages. With the identification of this novel regulator, our results suggest that within the P335 group...... bp contains both the promoter and the region necessary for activation by ORF29. The transcriptional start site of the promoter was identified by primer extension to position 13073 on the TP901-1 genome, thus located 87 bp downstream of orf29 in a 580-bp intergenic region between orf29 and orf30....... Furthermore, the region located -85 to -61 bp upstream of the start site was shown to be necessary for promoter activity. During infection, the transcript arising from the late promoter is fully induced at 40 min postinfection, and our results suggest that a certain level of ORF29 must he reached in order...

  3. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  4. The effect of ex vivo CDDO-Me activation on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway in white blood cells from patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Sanjeev; Zheng, Laura; Navas-Acien, Ana; Fuchs, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) has been shown to protect against experimental sepsis in mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in ex vivo white blood cells from healthy subjects by upregulating cellular antioxidant genes. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that ex vivo methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) activates NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes in white blood cells from patients with septic shock and protects against LPS-induced inflammation and reactive oxidative species production. Peripheral blood was collected from 18 patients with septic shock who were being treated in medical and surgical intensive care units. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression of NRF2 target genes (NQO1, HO-1, GCLM, and FTL) and IL-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, and neutrophils after CDDO-Me treatment alone or after subsequent LPS exposure. Superoxide anion (O2) was measured to assess the effect of CDDO-Me pretreatment on subsequent LPS exposure. Treatment with CDDO-Me increased the gene expression of NQO1 (P = 0.04) and decreased the expression of HO-1 (P = 0.03) in PBMCs from patients with septic shock. Purified monocytes exhibited significant increases in the expression of NQO1 (P = 0.01) and GCLM (P = 0.003) after CDDO-Me treatment. Levels of other NRF2 target genes (HO-1 and FTL) remained similar to those of vehicle-treated cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a trend toward increased IL-6 gene expression after CDDO-Me treatment, whereas purified monocytes showed a trend toward decreased IL-6. There was no discernible trend in the IL-6 expression subsequent to LPS treatment in either vehicle-treated or CDDO-Me-treated PBMCs and monocytes. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly increased O2 production in PBMCs (P = 0.04). Although CDDO-Me pretreatment significantly attenuated O2 production to subsequent LPS exposure (P = 0.03), the

  5. Control of Transcriptional Fidelity by Active Center Tuning as Derived from RNA Polymerase Endonuclease Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3′-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg2+ ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg2+ is present. This Mg2+ is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg2+ to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg2+ thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg2+ and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000–4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity. PMID:23283976

  6. DNA Topoisomerases maintain promoters in a state competent for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Madsen Pedersen

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence, and enrichment of a nucleosome at a critical position in the promoter region, in line with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. Single-gene studies with a range of genes belonging to this group demonstrate that topoisomerases play an important role during activation of these genes. Subsequent in-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation.

  7. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated activation by transcription- and topoisomerase I-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Olivier; Redon, Christophe E; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Smith, Susan; Solier, Stéphanie; Douarre, Céline; Conti, Chiara; Nakamura, Asako J; Das, Benu B; Nicolas, Estelle; Kohn, Kurt W; Bonner, William M; Pommier, Yves

    2009-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA damage response (DDR). As neurons have high rates of transcription that require topoisomerase I (TOP1), we investigated whether TOP1 cleavage complexes (TOP1cc)-which are potent transcription-blocking lesions-also produce transcription-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with ATM activation. We show the induction of DSBs and DDR activation in post-mitotic primary neurons and lymphocytes treated with camptothecin, with the induction of nuclear DDR foci containing activated ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX), activated CHK2 (checkpoint kinase 2), MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1). The DSB-ATM-DDR pathway was suppressed by inhibiting transcription and gamma-H2AX signals were reduced by RNase H1 transfection, which removes transcription-mediated R-loops. Thus, we propose that Top1cc produce transcription arrests with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM in post-mitotic cells.

  8. Argininosuccinate Synthetase 1 Loss in Invasive Bladder Cancer Regulates Survival through General Control Nonderepressible 2 Kinase-Mediated Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Activity and Is Targetable by Pegylated Arginine Deiminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Divya; Gupta, Sounak; Hau, Andrew M; Nakashima, Kazufumi; Leivo, Mariah Z; Searles, Stephen C; Elson, Paul; Bomalaski, John S; Casteel, Darren E; Boss, Gerry R; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-12-09

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), a key enzyme for arginine synthesis, occurs in many cancers, making cells dependent on extracellular arginine and targetable by the arginine-degrading enzyme pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20). We evaluated ASS1 expression and effects of ASS1 loss in bladder cancer which, despite affecting >70,000 people in the United States annually, has limited therapies. ASS1 loss was identified in conventional and micropapillary urothelial carcinoma, small cell, and squamous cell carcinoma subtypes of invasive bladder cancer, as well as in T24, J82, and UM-UC-3 but not in 5637, RT112, and RT4 cell lines. ASS1-deficient cells showed preferential sensitivity to ADI-PEG 20, evidenced by decreased colony formation, reduced cell viability, and increased sub-G1 fractions. ADI-PEG 20 induced general control nonderepressible 2-dependent eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation and activating transcription factor 4 and C/EBP homologous protein up-regulation, associated with caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy. These effects were ablated with selective siRNA silencing of these proteins. ASS1 overexpression in UM-UC-3 or ASS1 silencing in RT112 cells reversed these effects. ADI-PEG 20 treatment of mice bearing contralateral flank UM-UC-3 and RT112 xenografts selectively arrested tumor growth in UM-UC-3 xenografts, which had reduced tumor size, reduced Ki-67, and increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining. This suggests that ASS1 loss occurs in invasive bladder cancer and is targetable by ADI-PEG 20.

  9. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  10. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its endpoint. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca2](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)–induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Cstk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Cstk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Cstk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. PMID:25800988

  11. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    -repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated...

  12. In Vivo Transcriptional Activation Using CRISPR/Cas9 in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuailiang; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Ni, Xiaochun; Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    A number of approaches for Cas9-mediated transcriptional activation have recently been developed, allowing target genes to be overexpressed from their endogenous genomic loci. However, these approaches have thus far been limited to cell culture, and this technique has not been demonstrated in vivo in any animal. The technique involving the fewest separate components, and therefore the most amenable to in vivo applications, is the dCas9-VPR system, where a nuclease-dead Cas9 is fused to a highly active chimeric activator domain. In this study, we characterize the dCas9-VPR system in Drosophila cells and in vivo. We show that this system can be used in cell culture to upregulate a range of target genes, singly and in multiplex, and that a single guide RNA upstream of the transcription start site can activate high levels of target transcription. We observe marked heterogeneity in guide RNA efficacy for any given gene, and we confirm that transcription is inhibited by guide RNAs binding downstream of the transcription start site. To demonstrate one application of this technique in cells, we used dCas9-VPR to identify target genes for Twist and Snail, two highly conserved transcription factors that cooperate during Drosophila mesoderm development. In addition, we simultaneously activated both Twist and Snail to identify synergistic responses to this physiologically relevant combination. Finally, we show that dCas9-VPR can activate target genes and cause dominant phenotypes in vivo, providing the first demonstration of dCas9 activation in a multicellular animal. Transcriptional activation using dCas9-VPR thus offers a simple and broadly applicable technique for a variety of overexpression studies.

  13. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Bialek

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs, act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR, for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  14. Inhibition of the TEF/TEAD transcription factor activity by nuclear calcium and distinct kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Andrade, V A; Andrade, S J; Pusl, T; Ortega, J M; Goes, A M; Leite, M F

    2003-02-07

    Transcription enhancer factor (TEF/TEAD) is a family of four transcription factors that share a common TEA-DNA binding domain and are involved in similar cellular functions, such as cell differentiation and proliferation. All adult tissues express at least one of the four TEAD genes, so this family of transcription factors may be of widespread importance, yet little is known about their regulation. Here we examine the factors that regulate TEAD activity in CHO cells. RT-PCR indicated the presence of TEAD-1, TEAD-3, and both isoforms of TEAD-4, but not TEAD-2. Quantitative measurements showed that TEAD-4 is most abundant, followed by TEAD-3, then TEAD-1. We examined the relative effects of nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) on TEAD activity, since TEAD proteins are localized to the nucleus and since free Ca(2+) within the nucleus selectively regulates transcription in some systems. Chelation of nuclear but not cytosolic Ca(2+) increased TEAD activity two times above control. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) also increased TEAD activity, while cAMP decreased TEAD activity, and protein kinase C had no effect. Together, these results show that nuclear Ca(2+), MAPK, and cAMP each negatively regulate the activity of the TEAD transcription factor.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the redD transcriptional activator gene accounts for growth-phase-dependent production of the antibiotic undecylprodigiosin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takano, E.; Gramajo, H.C.; Strauch, E.; White, J.; Bibb, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of redD, the activator gene required for production of the red-pigmented antibiotic undecylprodigiosin by Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), showed a dramatic increase during the transition from exponential to stationary phase. The increase in redD expression was followed by transcription

  16. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  17. Assessment of Anaerobic Toluene Biodegradation Activity by bssA Transcript/Gene Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Christina N.; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Johnson, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes associated with toluene degradation were profiled across a groundwater contaminant plume under nitrate-reducing conditions and were detected in significant numbers throughout the plume. However, differences between groundwater and core sediment samples suggested that microbial transport, rather than local activity, was the underlying cause of the high copy numbers within the downgradient plume. Both gene transcript and reactant concentrations were consistent with this hypothesis. Expression of bssA genes from denitrifying toluene degraders was induced by toluene but only in the presence of nitrate, and transcript abundance dropped rapidly following the removal of either toluene or nitrate. The drop in bssA transcripts following the removal of toluene could be described by an exponential decay function with a half-life on the order of 1 h. Interestingly, bssA transcripts never disappeared completely but were always detected at some level if either inducer was present. Therefore, the detection of transcripts alone may not be sufficient evidence for contaminant degradation. To avoid mistakenly associating basal-level gene expression with actively degrading microbial populations, an integrated approach using the ratio of functional gene transcripts to gene copies is recommended. This approach minimizes the impact of microbial transport on activity assessment and allows reliable assessments of microbial activity to be obtained from water samples. PMID:23811506

  18. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ching-Chuan [Antai Medical Care Cooperation Antai Tian-Sheng Memorial Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien, E-mail: thh@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  19. DNA double-strand breaks and ATM activation by transcription-blocking DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Olivier; Nakamura, Asako J; Redon, Christophe E; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-15

    A taxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response. We recently showed that transcription-blocking topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (TOP1cc) produce DSBs related to R-loop formation and activate ATM in post-mitotic neurons and lymphocytes. Here we discuss how TOP1cc can produce transcription arrest with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM, as well as data suggesting that those transcription-dependent DSBs tend to form at the IgH locus and at specific genomic sites. We also address the potential roles of ATM in response to transcription-blocking TOP1cc.

  20. Proximal genomic localization of STAT1 binding and regulated transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Gordon K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT proteins are key regulators of gene expression in response to the interferon (IFN family of anti-viral and anti-microbial cytokines. We have examined the genomic relationship between STAT1 binding and regulated transcription using multiple tiling microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-chip experiments from public repositories. Results In response to IFN-γ, STAT1 bound proximally to regions of the genome that exhibit regulated transcriptional activity. This finding was consistent between different tiling microarray platforms, and between different measures of transcriptional activity, including differential binding of RNA polymerase II, and differential mRNA transcription. Re-analysis of tiling microarray data from a recent study of IFN-γ-induced STAT1 ChIP-chip and mRNA expression revealed that STAT1 binding is tightly associated with localized mRNA transcription in response to IFN-γ. Close relationships were also apparent between STAT1 binding, STAT2 binding, and mRNA transcription in response to IFN-α. Furthermore, we found that sites of STAT1 binding within the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE region are precisely correlated with sites of either enhanced or diminished binding by the RNA polymerase II complex. Conclusion Together, our results indicate that STAT1 binds proximally to regions of the genome that exhibit regulated transcriptional activity. This finding establishes a generalized basis for the positioning of STAT1 binding sites within the genome, and supports a role for STAT1 in the direct recruitment of the RNA polymerase II complex to the promoters of IFN-γ-responsive genes.

  1. Full p53 transcriptional activation potential is dispensable for tumor suppression in diverse lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dadi; Brady, Colleen A; Johnson, Thomas M; Lee, Eunice Y; Park, Eunice J; Scott, Matthew P; Attardi, Laura D

    2011-10-11

    Over half of all human cancers, of a wide variety of types, sustain mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Although p53 limits tumorigenesis through the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, its molecular mechanism of action in tumor suppression has been elusive. The best-characterized p53 activity in vitro is as a transcriptional activator, but the identification of numerous additional p53 biochemical activities in vitro has made it unclear which mechanism accounts for tumor suppression. Here, we assess the importance of transcriptional activation for p53 tumor suppression function in vivo in several tissues, using a knock-in mouse strain expressing a p53 mutant compromised for transcriptional activation, p53(25,26). p53(25,26) is severely impaired for the transactivation of numerous classical p53 target genes, including p21, Noxa, and Puma, but it retains the ability to activate a small subset of p53 target genes, including Bax. Surprisingly, p53(25,26) can nonetheless suppress tumor growth in cancers derived from the epithelial, mesenchymal, central nervous system, and lymphoid lineages. Therefore, full transactivation of most p53 target genes is dispensable for p53 tumor suppressor function in a range of tissue types. In contrast, a transcriptional activation mutant that is completely defective for transactivation, p53(25,26,53,54), fails to suppress tumor development. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional activation is indeed broadly critical for p53 tumor suppressor function, although this requirement reflects the limited transcriptional activity observed with p53(25,26) rather than robust transactivation of a full complement of p53 target genes.

  2. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  3. DnaA-stimulated transcriptional activation of oriλ: Escherichia coli RNA polymerase β subunit as a transcriptional activator contact site

    OpenAIRE

    Szalewska-Palasz, Agnieszka; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Blaszczak, Adam; Taylor, Karol; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    1998-01-01

    We present evidence that Escherichia coli RNA polymerase β subunit may be a transcriptional activator contact site. Stimulation of the activity of the pR promoter by DnaA protein is necessary for replication of plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ. We found that DnaA activates the pR promoter in vitro. Particular mutations in the rpoB gene were able to suppress negative effects that certain dnaA mutations had on the replication of λ plasmids; this suppression was allele-specific. When a pote...

  4. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kwasniewska

    Full Text Available In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley by maleic hydrazide (MH cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment.

  5. DNA topoisomerase II activity in nonreplicating, transcriptionally inactive, chicken late spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Mezquita, C

    1989-06-01

    To study a possible differential involvement of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases in the functional and structural changes that chromatin undergoes during spermatogenesis, we have determined both enzymatic activities in chicken testis cell nuclei at successive stages of differentiation. Whereas DNA topoisomerase I varies in parallel with transcriptional activity, DNA topoisomerase II was present in both replicating, transcriptionally active chicken testis cells and nonreplicating, transcriptionally inactive late spermatids. The presence of DNA topoisomerase II activity in late spermatids and, in addition, the relative increment of drug-induced topo-II-mediated DNA cleavage detected in these cells, suggest that DNA topoisomerase II might modulate the topology of DNA during the marked changes that chromatin structure undergoes in the nucleohistone-nucleoprotamine transition at the end of the spermiogenesis and could be involved in the final organization of DNA within the nucleus of the male gamete.

  6. Design, Assembly, and Characterization of TALE-Based Transcriptional Activators and Repressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Pratiksha I; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are modular DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a variety of effector domains to regulate the epigenome. Nucleotide recognition by TALE monomers follows a simple cipher, making this a powerful and versatile method to activate or repress gene expression. Described here are methods to design, assemble, and test TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) for control of endogenous gene expression. In this protocol, TALE arrays are constructed by Golden Gate cloning and tested for activity by transfection and quantitative RT-PCR. These methods for engineering TALE-TFs are useful for studies in reverse genetics and genomics, synthetic biology, and gene therapy.

  7. Activity-dependent transport of the transcriptional coactivator CRTC1 from synapse to nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Toh Hean; Uzgil, Besim; Lin, Peter; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Martin, Kelsey C

    2012-07-01

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, such as those underlying long-term memory, require transcription. Activity-dependent transport of synaptically localized transcriptional regulators provides a direct means of coupling synaptic stimulation with changes in transcription. The CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1), which is required for long-term hippocampal plasticity, binds CREB to potently promote transcription. We show that CRTC1 localizes to synapses in silenced hippocampal neurons but translocates to the nucleus in response to localized synaptic stimulation. Regulated nuclear translocation occurs only in excitatory neurons and requires calcium influx and calcineurin activation. CRTC1 is controlled in a dual fashion with activity regulating CRTC1 nuclear translocation and cAMP modulating its persistence in the nucleus. Neuronal activity triggers a complex change in CRTC1 phosphorylation, suggesting that CRTC1 may link specific types of stimuli to specific changes in gene expression. Together, our results indicate that synapse-to-nuclear transport of CRTC1 dynamically informs the nucleus about synaptic activity.

  8. Transcriptional Activity of Human Endogenous Retroviruses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Balestrieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs have been implicated in human physiology and in human pathology. A better knowledge of the retroviral transcriptional activity in the general population and during the life span would greatly help the debate on its pathologic potential. The transcriptional activity of four HERV families (H, K, W, and E was assessed, by qualitative and quantitative PCR, in PBMCs from 261 individuals aged from 1 to 80 years. Our results show that HERV-H, HERV-K, and HERV-W, but not HERV-E, are transcriptionally active in the test population already in the early childhood. In addition, the transcriptional levels of HERV-H, HERV-K, and HERV-W change significantly during the life span, albeit with distinct patterns. Our results, reinforce the hypothesis of a physiological correlation between HERVs activity and the different stages of life in humans. Studies aiming at identifying the factors, which are responsible for these changes during the individual’s life, are still needed. Although the observed phenomena are presumably subjected to great variability, the basal transcriptional activity of each individual, also depending on the different ages of life, must be carefully considered in all the studies involving HERVs as causative agents of disease.

  9. Poised transcription factories prime silent uPA gene prior to activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Ferrai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The position of genes in the interphase nucleus and their association with functional landmarks correlate with active and/or silent states of expression. Gene activation can induce chromatin looping from chromosome territories (CTs and is thought to require de novo association with transcription factories. We identify two types of factory: "poised transcription factories," containing RNA polymerase II phosphorylated on Ser5, but not Ser2, residues, which differ from "active factories" associated with phosphorylation on both residues. Using the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA gene as a model system, we find that this inducible gene is predominantly associated with poised (S5p(+S2p(- factories prior to activation and localized at the CT interior. Shortly after induction, the uPA locus is found associated with active (S5p(+S2p(+ factories and loops out from its CT. However, the levels of gene association with poised or active transcription factories, before and after activation, are independent of locus positioning relative to its CT. RNA-FISH analyses show that, after activation, the uPA gene is transcribed with the same frequency at each CT position. Unexpectedly, prior to activation, the uPA loci internal to the CT are seldom transcriptionally active, while the smaller number of uPA loci found outside their CT are transcribed as frequently as after induction. The association of inducible genes with poised transcription factories prior to activation is likely to contribute to the rapid and robust induction of gene expression in response to external stimuli, whereas gene positioning at the CT interior may be important to reinforce silencing mechanisms prior to induction.

  10. Weak estrogenic transcriptional activities of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignard, Elise; Lapenna, Silvia; Bremer, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    In 2011, the European Commission has restricted the use of Bisphenol A in plastic infant feeding bottles. In a response to this restriction, Bisphenol S is now often used as a component of plastic substitutes for the production of babybottles. One of the major concerns leading to the restriction of Bisphenol A was its weak estrogenic activity. By using two highly standardised transactivation assays, we could demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S is of a comparable potency. Furthermore, some insights about the structure-activity relationships of these two chemicals and their metabolites could be gained from in silico predictions of their relative estrogen receptor-binding affinities and their liver phase-I biotransformation.

  11. A New Microsphere-Based Immunoassay for Measuring the Activity of Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chueh-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are several traditional and well-developed methods for analyzing the activity of transcription factors, such as EMSA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reporter gene activity assays. All of these methods have their own distinct disadvantages, but none can analyze the changes in transcription factors in the few cells that are cultured in the wells of 96-well titer plates. Thus, a new microsphere-based immunoassay to measure the activity of transcription factors (MIA-TF was developed. In MIA-TF, NeutrAvidin-labeled microspheres were used as the solid phase to capture biotin-labeled double-strand DNA fragments which contain certain transcription factor binding elements. The activity of transcription factors was detected by immunoassay using a transcription factor-specific antibody to monitor the binding with the DNA probe. Next, analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The targets hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were applied and detected in this MIA-TF method; the results that we obtained demonstrated that this method could be used to monitor the changes of NF-κB or HIF within 50 or 100 ng of nuclear extract. Furthermore, MIA-TF could detect the changes in NF-κB or HIF in cells that were cultured in wells of a 96-well plate without purification of the nuclear protein, an important consideration for applying this method to high-throughput assays in the future. The development of MIA-TF would support further progress in clinical analysis and drug screening systems. Overall, MIA-TF is a method with high potential to detect the activity of transcription factors.

  12. Expression and Activation of STAT Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-08

    clinicians. J~, 273: 577-585, 1995. 183 Hundertmark 5, Buhler H, Rudolf M, Weitzel HK, Ragosch V: Inhibition of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase...activated protein kinase through a Jakl-dependent pathway. Mol. Cell. Bioi., 17:3833-40, 1997. Stewart JF, Rubens RO, King RJ, Minton MJ, Steiner R

  13. An aromatic residue switch in enhancer-dependent bacterial RNA polymerase controls transcription intermediate complex activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Simone C.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Buck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the open promoter complex (RPo) in which the melted DNA containing the transcription start site is located at the RNA polymerase (RNAP) catalytic centre is an obligatory step in the transcription of DNA into RNA catalyzed by RNAP. In the RPo, an extensive network of interactions is established between DNA, RNAP and the σ-factor and the formation of functional RPo occurs via a series of transcriptional intermediates (collectively ‘RPi’). A single tryptophan is ideally positioned to directly engage with the flipped out base of the non-template strand at the +1 site. Evidence suggests that this tryptophan (i) is involved in either forward translocation or DNA scrunching and (ii) in σ54-regulated promoters limits the transcription activity of at least one intermediate complex (RPi) before the formation of a fully functional RPo. Limiting RPi activity may be important in preventing the premature synthesis of abortive transcripts, suggesting its involvement in a general mechanism driving the RPi to RPo transition for transcription initiation. PMID:23609536

  14. Histone Acetylation Influences the Activity of Sox9-related Transcriptional Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furumatsu,Takayuki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocyte differentiation is the fundamental process in skeletal development. From the mesenchymal condensation of chondroprogenitors to the hypertrophic maturation of chondrocytes, chondrogenesis is sequentially regulated by cross-talk among transcription factors, growth factors, and chromatin structure. The master transcription factor Sry-type HMG box (Sox 9 has an essential role in the expression of chondrogenic genes through the association with Sox9-binding sites on its target genes. Several transcription factors and coactivators, such as Scleraxis/E47 and p300, cooperatively modulate the Sox9-dependent transcription by interacting with Sox9. The Sox9-related transcriptional apparatus activates its target gene expression through p300-mediated histone acetylation on chromatin. The transforming growth factor (TGF-β superfamily also plays a key role in chondrocyte differentiation. The TGF-β-regulated Smad3/4 complex activates Sox9-dependent transcription on chromatin by associating with Sox9 itself, and by recruiting p300 onto Sox9. These findings suggest that the epigenetic status including histone modification and chromatin structure, directly influences Sox9-regulated chondrocyte differentiation. In this article, we review the regulators of Sox9 expression itself, modulators of posttranslational Sox9 function, and Sox9-associating factors in the Sox9-dependent epigenetic regulation during chondrogenesis.

  15. FBXO3 Protein Promotes Ubiquitylation and Transcriptional Activity of AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Zumer, Kristina; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor which is expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells. It directs the expression of otherwise tissue-specific antigens, which leads to the elimination of autoreactive T cells during development. AIRE is modified post-translationally by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In this report we connected these modifications. AIRE, which is phosphorylated on two specific residues near its N terminus, then binds to the F-box protein 3 (FBXO3) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In turn, this SCFFBXO3 (SKP1-CUL1-F box) complex ubiquitylates AIRE, increases its binding to the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), and potentiates its transcriptional activity. Because P-TEFb is required for the transition from initiation to elongation of transcription, this interaction ensures proper expression of AIRE-responsive tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. PMID:27365398

  16. FBXO3 Protein Promotes Ubiquitylation and Transcriptional Activity of AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Zumer, Kristina; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2016-08-19

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor which is expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells. It directs the expression of otherwise tissue-specific antigens, which leads to the elimination of autoreactive T cells during development. AIRE is modified post-translationally by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In this report we connected these modifications. AIRE, which is phosphorylated on two specific residues near its N terminus, then binds to the F-box protein 3 (FBXO3) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In turn, this SCF(FBXO3) (SKP1-CUL1-F box) complex ubiquitylates AIRE, increases its binding to the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), and potentiates its transcriptional activity. Because P-TEFb is required for the transition from initiation to elongation of transcription, this interaction ensures proper expression of AIRE-responsive tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  18. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19755.001 PMID:27685353

  19. The JmjC domain of Gis1 is dispensable for transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Neiman, Aaron M; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2010-11-01

    Yeast Gis1 protein functions as a transcription factor after nutrient limitation and oxidative stress. In this report, we show that Gis1 also regulates the induction of several genes involved in spore wall synthesis during sporulation. Gis1 contains a JmjC domain near its N-terminus. In many proteins, JmjC domains provide histone demethylase activity. Whether the JmjC domain of Gis1 contributes to its transcriptional activation is still unknown. Here, we show that gis1 point mutations that abolish Fe (II) and α-ketoglutarate binding, known cofactors in other JmjC proteins, are still able to induce transcription normally during glucose starvation and sporulation. Even the deletion of the entire JmjC domain does not affect transcriptional activation by Gis1. Moreover, the JmjC domain is not required for the toxicity associated with Gis1 overexpression. The data demonstrate that the JmjC domain is dispensable for transcriptional activation by Gis1 during nutrient stress and sporulation.

  20. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  1. Npw38, a novel nuclear protein possessing a WW domain capable of activating basal transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, A; Saeki, M; Kato, S

    1999-05-01

    We have found a novel cDNA encoding a 265 amino acid protein possessing a WW domain in our full-length cDNA bank. The WW domain was sandwiched between an acidic region and an acidic-basic amino acid repetitive region. In vitro transcription/translation of the cDNA produced a 38 kDa product that was also found in the cell lysate by western blot analysis. Thus this protein is named the nuclear protein containing a WW domain with a molecular mass of 38 kDa, Npw38. Immunofluorescence studies and expression of a fusion protein to a green fluorescent protein revealed that this protein is localized in the nucleus. Npw38 was shown to be capable of binding to a poly(rG) resin. Interestingly, the WW domain of Npw38 was found to function as a transcriptional activator in CHO cells using the GAL4 DNA-binding fusion system. Furthermore, the WW domains of human YAP and Pin1 were demonstrated to have a similar transcription-promoting activity. Combined mutation of the conserved first and second Trp residues and a hydrophobic triplet of TyrTyrTrp in the WW domain of Npw38 abolished the transcription-promoting activity, but single mutations of these sites did not. These results suggest that some WW domains potentially possess transcription-promoting activity in mammalian cells.

  2. Elk3 from hamster--a ternary complex factor with strong transcriptional repressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortoe, Gertrud Malene; Weilguny, Dietmar; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    Elk3 belongs to the Ets family of transcription factors, which are regulated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway. In the absence of Ras, this protein is a strong inhibitor of transcription and may be directly involved in regulation of growth by downregulating the transcription of genes that are activated during entry into G1. We have isolated the Cricetulus griseus Elk3 gene from the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line and investigated the transcriptional potential of this factor. Transient transfections revealed that, in addition to its regulation of the c-fos promoter, Elk3 from CHO cells seems to inhibit other promoters controlling expression of proteins involved in G1/S phase progression; Cyclin D1 and DHFR. As has been described for the Elk3 homologs Net (Mouse) and Sap-2 (Human), the results of the present study further indicate that hamster Elk3 is a target of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway, and cotransfections with constitutively active H-ras relieves its negative transcriptional activity. No cells stably expressing exogenous Elk3 could be obtained, possibly due to an unspecified toxic or growth retarding effect. These findings support a possible role for Elk3 in growth regulation and reveal a high degree of homology for this protein across species.

  3. Non-Canonical EZH2 Transcriptionally Activates RelB in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Cortney L.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is the methyltransferase component of the polycomb repressive complex (PRC2) which represses gene transcription via histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 23 (H3K27me3). EZH2 activity has been linked with oncogenesis where it is thought to block expression of certain tumor suppressors. Relative to a role in cancer, EZH2 functions to promote self-renewal and has been shown to be important for the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) phenotype in breast cancer. Recently a non-canonical role for EZH2 has been identified where it promotes transcriptional activation of certain genes. Here we show that EZH2, through a methyltransferase-independent mechanism, promotes the transcriptional activation of the non-canonical NF-κB subunit RelB to drive self-renewal and the TIC phenotype of triple-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:27764181

  4. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K

    2016-01-11

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis.

  5. Identification of HTF (HER2 transcription factor) as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor and contribution of the HTF binding site to ERBB2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernimmen, Douglas; Begon, Dominique; Salvador, Christophe; Gofflot, Stéphanie; Grooteclaes, Madeleine; Winkler, Rosita

    2003-02-15

    The ERBB2 gene is overexpressed in 30% of human breast cancers and this is correlated with poor prognosis. Overexpression of the ERBB2 gene is due to increased transcription and gene amplification. Our previous studies have identified a new cis element in the ERBB2 promoter which is involved in the gene's overexpression. This cis element, located 501 bp upstream from the main ERBB2 transcription initiation site, binds a transcription factor called HTF (HER2 transcription factor). We report here the identification of HTF as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor. The new cis element is bound by AP-2 with high affinity, compared with a previously described AP-2 binding site located 284 bp downstream. Co-transfection of an AP-2alpha expression vector with a reporter vector containing the newly identified AP-2 binding site in front of a minimal ERBB2 promoter induced a dose-dependent increase in transcriptional activity. We examined the contribution of the new AP-2 binding site to ERBB2 overexpression. For this purpose we abolished the new and/or the previously described AP-2 binding sequence by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the two functional AP-2 sites in the first 700 bp of the ERBB2 promoter co-operate to achieve maximal transcriptional activity.

  6. Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway by Inorganic Arsenic in Human Hepatocytes and the Role of Transcriptional Repressor Bach1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE- luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1 from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals.

  7. NACK is an integral component of the Notch transcriptional activation complex and is critical for development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kelly L; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Ranganathan, Prathibha; Zhu, Xiaoxia; DaSilva, Thiago; Liu, Wei; Ratti, Francesca; Demarest, Renee M; Tzimas, Cristos; Rice, Meghan; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Dahmane, Nadia; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    The Notch signaling pathway governs many distinct cellular processes by regulating transcriptional programs. The transcriptional response initiated by Notch is highly cell context dependent, indicating that multiple factors influence Notch target gene selection and activity. However, the mechanism by which Notch drives target gene transcription is not well understood. Herein, we identify and characterize a novel Notch-interacting protein, Notch activation complex kinase (NACK), which acts as a Notch transcriptional coactivator. We show that NACK associates with the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA, mediates Notch transcriptional activity, and is required for Notch-mediated tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that Notch1 and NACK are coexpressed during mouse development and that homozygous loss of NACK is embryonic lethal. Finally, we show that NACK is also a Notch target gene, establishing a feed-forward loop. Thus, our data indicate that NACK is a key component of the Notch transcriptional complex and is an essential regulator of Notch-mediated tumorigenesis and development.

  8. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  9. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  10. Nucleophosmin contributes to the transcriptional activation function of the Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik-Soni, Natasha; Frappier, Lori

    2014-02-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 protein plays important roles in latent infection, including transcriptional activation of EBV latency genes by binding to the family-of-repeats (FR) element. Through a proteomic approach, we previously identified an interaction between EBNA1 and the histone chaperone nucleophosmin. Here we show that the EBNA1-nucleophosmin interaction is direct and requires the Gly-Arg-rich sequences that contribute to transactivation. Additionally, nucleophosmin is recruited by EBNA1 to the FR element and is required for EBNA1-mediated transcriptional activation.

  11. Molecular Determinants for PspA-Mediated Repression of the AAA Transcriptional Activator PspF

    OpenAIRE

    Elderkin, Sarah; Bordes, Patricia; Jones, Susan; Rappas, Mathieu; Buck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli phage shock protein system (pspABCDE operon and pspG gene) is induced by numerous stresses related to the membrane integrity state. Transcription of the psp genes requires the RNA polymerase containing the σ54 subunit and the AAA transcriptional activator PspF. PspF belongs to an atypical class of σ54 AAA activators in that it lacks an N-terminal regulatory domain and is instead negatively regulated by another regulatory protein, PspA. PspA therefore represses its own exp...

  12. PEA3/ETV4-related transcription factors coupled with active ERK signalling are associated with poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keld, R

    2011-06-28

    Background: Transcription factors often play important roles in tumourigenesis. Members of the PEA3 subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors fulfil such a role and have been associated with tumour metastasis in several different cancers. Moreover, the activity of the PEA3 subfamily transcription factors is potentiated by Ras-ERK pathway signalling, which is itself often deregulated in tumour cells.\\r\

  13. Regulation of U6 Promoter Activity by Transcriptional Interference in Viral Vector-Based RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linghu Nie; Meghna Das Thakur; Yumei Wang; Qin Su; Yongliang Zhao; Yunfeng Feng

    2010-01-01

    The direct negative impact of the transcriptional activity of one component on the second one in c/s is referred to as transcriptional interference (TI).U6 is a type Ⅲ RNA polymerase Ⅲ promoter commonly used for driving small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression in vector-based RNAi.In the design and construction of viral vectors,multiple transcription units may be arranged in close proximity in a space-limited vector.Determining if U6 promoter activity can be affected by TI is critical for the expression of target shRNA in gene therapy or loss-of-function studies.In this research,we designed and implemented a modified retroviral system where shRNA and exogenous gene expressions were driven by two independent transcriptional units.We arranged U6 promoter driving.shRNA expression and UbiC promoter in two promoter arrangements.In primary macrophages,we found U6 promoter activity was inhibited by UbiC promoter when in the divergent arrangement but not in tandem.In contrast,PKG promoter had no such negative impact.Instead of enhancing U6 promoter activity,CMV enhancer had significant negative impact on U6 promoter activity in the presence of UbiC promoter.Our results indicate that U6 promoter activity can be affected by TI in a proximal promoter-specific and arrangement-dependent manner.

  14. O-GlcNAc transferase regulates transcriptional activity of human Oct4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Sandii; Lim, Jae-Min; Vaidyanathan, Krithika; Wells, Lance

    2017-10-01

    O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a single sugar modification found on many different classes of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Addition of this modification, by the enzyme O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), is dynamic and inducible. One major class of proteins modified by O-GlcNAc is transcription factors. O-GlcNAc regulates transcription factor properties through a variety of different mechanisms including localization, stability and transcriptional activation. Maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency requires tight regulation of several key transcription factors, many of which are modified by O-GlcNAc. Octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4) is one of the key transcription factors required for pluripotency of ES cells and more recently, the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The action of Oct4 is modulated by the addition of several post-translational modifications, including O-GlcNAc. Previous studies in mice found a single site of O-GlcNAc addition responsible for transcriptional regulation. This study was designed to determine if this mechanism is conserved in humans. We mapped 10 novel sites of O-GlcNAc attachment on human Oct4, and confirmed a role for OGT in transcriptional activation of Oct4 at a site distinct from that found in mouse that allows distinction between different Oct4 target promoters. Additionally, we uncovered a potential new role for OGT that does not include its catalytic function. These results confirm that human Oct4 activity is being regulated by OGT by a mechanism that is distinct from mouse Oct4. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients.

  16. Cisplatin induces cytotoxicity through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and activating transcription factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Germain, Carly; Niknejad, Nima; Ma, Laurie; Garbuio, Kyla; Hai, Tsonwin; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2010-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying the proapoptotic effect of the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, are largely undefined. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cisplatin cytotoxicity may uncover strategies to enhance the efficacy of this important therapeutic agent. This study evaluates the role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a mediator of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Cytotoxic doses of cisplatin and carboplatin treatments consistently induced ATF3 expression in five tumor-derived cell lines. Characterization of this induction revealed a p53, BRCA1, and integrated stress response-independent mechanism, all previously implicated in stress-mediated ATF3 induction. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway involvement in ATF3 induction by cisplatin revealed a MAPK-dependent mechanism. Cisplatin treatment combined with specific inhibitors to each MAPK pathway (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38) resulted in decreased ATF3 induction at the protein level. MAPK pathway inhibition led to decreased ATF3 messenger RNA expression and reduced cytotoxic effects of cisplatin as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay. In A549 lung carcinoma cells, targeting ATF3 with specific small hairpin RNA also attenuated the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. Similarly, ATF3-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were shown to be less sensitive to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity compared with ATF3+/+ MEFs. This study identifies cisplatin as a MAPK pathway-dependent inducer of ATF3, whose expression influences cisplatin's cytotoxic effects.

  17. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain.

  18. Negative Correlation between the Diffusion Coefficient and Transcriptional Activity of the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuni, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Horio, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2017-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor, which interacts with DNA and other cofactors to regulate gene transcription. Binding to other partners in the cell nucleus alters the diffusion properties of GR. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) was applied to quantitatively characterize the diffusion properties of EGFP labeled human GR (EGFP-hGR) and its mutants in the cell nucleus. RICS is an image correlation technique that evaluates the spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient as a diffusion map. Interestingly, we observed that the averaged diffusion coefficient of EGFP-hGR strongly and negatively correlated with its transcriptional activities in comparison to that of EGFP-hGR wild type and mutants with various transcriptional activities. This result suggests that the decreasing of the diffusion coefficient of hGR was reflected in the high-affinity binding to DNA. Moreover, the hyper-phosphorylation of hGR can enhance the transcriptional activity by reduction of the interaction between the hGR and the nuclear corepressors.

  19. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)]in vitroandin vivoand that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  20. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosner, Judah L [NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH; Martin, Robert G [NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH

    2009-01-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  1. PEA3activates CXCL12transcription in MCF-7breast cancer cells%PEA3 activates CXCL12 transcription in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li; CHEN Bo-bin; LI Jun-jie; JIN Wei; SHAO Zhi-min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the activity of PEA3 ( polyomavirus enhancer activator 3 ) on CXCL12 (Chemokine CXC motif ligand 12) transcription and to reveal the role of PEA3 involved in CXCL12-mediated metastasis and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Methods Methods such as cell transfection, ChIP assay (chromatin immunoprecipitation ), and siRNA (small interfering RNA) were applied to demonstrate and confirm the interaction between PEA3 and CXCL12. Results Over-expression of PEA3 could increase the CXCL12 mRNA level and the CXCL12 promoter activity in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ChIP assay demonstrated that PEA3 could bind to the CXCL12 promoter in the cells transfected with PEA3 expression vector. PEA3 siRNA decreased CXCL12 promoter activity and the binding of PEA3 to the CXCL12 promoter in MCF-7 cells. Conclusions PEA3 could activate CXCL12 promoter transcription. It may be a potential mechanism of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis regarding of PEA3 and CXCL12.

  2. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-05-13

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu(98)-Leu(115)). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser(62) Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser(10) In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu98–Leu115). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser62. Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser10. In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. PMID:27002159

  4. PGE2 modulates the transcriptional activity of ERRa in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhaochen; Du, Xiaoling; Zhang, Ju; Yang, Kuo; Miao, Lin; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Linlin; Klocker, Helmut; Shi, Jiandang

    2014-12-01

    The regulation of the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor-related receptor a (ERRa) has not yet been clearly documented. Aromatase is a direct target gene of ERRa, and we previously reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased the expression of ERRa in the prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1, which ultimately promoted estradiol production by enhancing aromatase gene transcription. Here, we show that PGE2 also affects aromatase expression by regulating ERRa transcriptional activity in prostate stromal cells. When the cells were cultured in serum-free medium, the expression of aromatase was not proportional to the ERRa protein level, if no other stimulation occurred, indicating the absence of a factor that activates ERRa. PGE2 could upregulate aromatase and ERRa response element (ERRE)-reporter expression and also enhance ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear localization. PGE2 functions through the PGE2 receptors (EP) 2 and EP4, which couple to adenylate cyclase. The activation of adenylate cyclase with Forskolin mimicked the PGE2-mediated enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and ERRa target gene expression. Experiments using specific signaling pathway inhibitors showed that both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK are involved in ERRa activation, and the PI3K inhibitor was shown to abolish ERK activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 is a modulator of ERRa transcriptional activity. Furthermore, PGE2 activates the EP2/EP4-cAMP-PI3K-ERK signaling pathway, which enhanced ERRa transcriptional potentiality by increasing ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, subsequently promoting the expression of its target genes, such as aromatase.

  5. β-Catenin-independent activation of TCF1/LEF1 in human hematopoietic tumor cells through interaction with ATF2 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Grumolato

    Full Text Available The role of Wnt signaling in embryonic development and stem cell maintenance is well established and aberrations leading to the constitutive up-regulation of this pathway are frequent in several types of human cancers. Upon ligand-mediated activation, Wnt receptors promote the stabilization of β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF family of transcription factors to regulate the expression of Wnt target genes. When not bound to β-catenin, the TCF/LEF proteins are believed to act as transcriptional repressors. Using a specific lentiviral reporter, we identified hematopoietic tumor cells displaying constitutive TCF/LEF transcriptional activation in the absence of β-catenin stabilization. Suppression of TCF/LEF activity in these cells mediated by an inducible dominant-negative TCF4 (DN-TCF4 inhibited both cell growth and the expression of Wnt target genes. Further, expression of TCF1 and LEF1, but not TCF4, stimulated TCF/LEF reporter activity in certain human cell lines independently of β-catenin. By a complementary approach in vivo, TCF1 mutants, which lacked the ability to bind to β-catenin, induced Xenopus embryo axis duplication, a hallmark of Wnt activation, and the expression of the Wnt target gene Xnr3. Through generation of different TCF1-TCF4 fusion proteins, we identified three distinct TCF1 domains that participate in the β-catenin-independent activity of this transcription factor. TCF1 and LEF1 physically interacted and functionally synergized with members of the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2 family of transcription factors. Moreover, knockdown of ATF2 expression in lymphoma cells phenocopied the inhibitory effects of DN-TCF4 on the expression of target genes associated with the Wnt pathway and on cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that, through interaction with ATF2 factors, TCF1/LEF1 promote the growth of hematopoietic malignancies in the

  6. Plants contain a novel multi-member class of heat shock factors without transcriptional activator potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Verner, E; Yuan, C X; Scharf, K D; Englich, G; Gurley, W B

    2000-07-01

    Based on phylogeny of DNA-binding domains and the organization of hydrophobic repeats, two families of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) exist in plants. Class A HSFs are involved in the activation of the heat shock response, but the role of class B HSFs is not clear. When transcriptional activities of full-length HSFs were monitored in tobacco protoplasts, no class B HSFs from soybean or Arabidopsis showed activity under control or heat stress conditions. Additional assays confirmed the finding that the class B HSFs lacked the capacity to activate transcription. Fusion of a heterologous activation domain from human HSF1 (AD2) to the C-terminus of GmHSFB1-34 gave no evidence of synergistic enhancement of AD2 activity, which would be expected if weak activation domains were present. Furthermore, activity of AtHSFB1-4 (class B) was not rescued by coexpression with AtHSFA4-21 (class A) indicating that the class A HSF was not able to provide a missing function required for class B activity. The transcriptional activation potential of Arabidopsis AtHSFA4-21 was mapped primarily to a 39 amino acid fragment in the C-terminus enriched in bulky hydrophobic and acidic residues. Deletion mutagenesis of the C-terminal activator regions of tomato and Arabidopsis HSFs indicated that these plant HSFs lack heat-inducible regulatory regions analogous to those of mammalian HSF1. These findings suggest that heat shock regulation in plants may differ from metazoans by partitioning negative and positive functional domains onto separate HSF proteins. Class A HSFs are primarily responsible for stress-inducible activation of heat shock genes whereas some of the inert class B HSFs may be specialized for repression, or down-regulation, of the heat shock response.

  7. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation.

  8. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  9. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezich, Catherine L; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I; Youle, Richard J

    2015-08-03

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy.

  10. Role of SIRT1 and FOXO factors in eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ning; Strand, Susanne; Schlufter, Frank; Siuda, Daniel; Reifenberg, Gisela; Kleinert, Hartmut; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2013-08-01

    Many of the cardiovascular protective effects of resveratrol are attributable to an enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been shown to enhance eNOS gene expression as well as eNOS enzymatic activity. The aim of the present study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms of eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol. Treatment of human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells with resveratrol led to a concentration-dependent upregulation of eNOS expression. In luciferase reporter gene assay, resveratrol enhanced the activity of human eNOS promoter fragments (3500, 1600, 633 and 263bp in length, respectively), indicating that the proximal promoter region is required for resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation. Knockdown of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) by siRNA prevented the upregulation of eNOS mRNA and protein by resveratrol. Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are established downstream targets of SIRT1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of FOXO1 and FOXO3a abolished the effect of resveratrol on eNOS expression, indicating the involvement of these factors. Resveratrol treatment enhanced the expression of FOXO1 and FOXO3a in EA.hy 926 cells. Reporter gene assay using promoter containing forkhead response elements showed increased FOXO factor activity by resveratrol. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the enhanced binding of nuclear proteins to the eNOS promoter regions by resveratrol could be blocked by antibodies against FOXO1 and FOXO3a. In conclusion, resveratrol enhances the expression and activity of FOXO transcription factors. The SIRT1/FOXO factor axis is involved in resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation.

  11. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated.

  12. Resveratrol inhibits growth of orthotopic pancreatic tumors through activation of FOXO transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjit K Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXO play a direct role in cellular proliferation, oxidative stress response, and tumorigenesis. The objectives of this study were to examine whether FOXOs regulate antitumor activities of resveratrol in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with resveratrol. Cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis and cell cycle were measured by XTT, soft agar, TUNEL and flow cytometry assays, respectively. FOXO nuclear translocation, DNA binding and transcriptional activities were measured by fluorescence technique, gelshift and luciferase assay, respectively. Mice were orthotopically implanted with PANC1 cells and orally gavaged with resveratrol. The components of PI3K and ERK pathways, FOXOs and their target gene expressions were measured by the Western blot analysis. Resveratrol inhibited cell viability and colony formations, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Hs766T, and AsPC-1. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest by up-regulating the expression of p21/CIP1, p27/KIP1 and inhibiting the expression of cyclin D1. Resveratrol induced apoptosis by up-regulating Bim and activating caspase-3. Resveratrol inhibited phosphorylation of FOXOs, and enhanced their nuclear translocation, FOXO-DNA binding and transcriptional activities. The inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways induced FOXO transcriptional activity and apoptosis. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO genes abrogated resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Finally, resveratrol-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, PI3K, AKT, FOXO1 and FOXO3a, and induction of apoptosis and FOXO target genes. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that inhibition of ERK and AKT pathways act together to activate FOXO

  13. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  14. Exercise attenuates the fasting-induced transcriptional activation of metabolic genes in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A L; Neufer, P D

    2000-06-01

    Fasting elicits a progressive increase in lipid metabolism within skeletal muscle. To determine the effects of fasting on the transcriptional regulation of genes important for metabolic control in skeletal muscle composed of different fiber types, nuclei from control and fasted (24 and 72 h) rats were subjected to nuclear run-on analysis using an RT-PCR-based technique. Fasting increased (P < 0.05) transcription rate of the muscle-specific uncoupling protein-3 gene (UCP3) 14.3- to 21.1-fold in white gastrocnemius (WG; fast-twitch glycolytic) and 5.5- to 7.5-fold in red gastrocnemius (RG; fast-twitch oxidative) and plantaris (PL; mixed) muscles. No change occurred in soleus (slow-twitch oxidative) muscle. Fasting also increased transcription rate of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) genes 1.7- to 3.7-fold in WG, RG, and PL muscles. Transcription rate responses were similar after 24 and 72 h of fasting. Surprisingly, increasing metabolic demand during the initial 8 h of starvation (two 2-h bouts of treadmill running) attenuated the 24-h fasting-induced transcriptional activation of UCP3, LPL, CPT I, and LCAD in RG and PL muscles, suggesting the presence of opposing regulatory mechanisms. These data demonstrate that fasting elicits a fiber type-specific coordinate increase in the transcription rate of several genes involved in and/or required for lipid metabolism and indicate that exercise may attenuate the fasting-induced transcriptional activation of specific metabolic genes.

  15. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, Jessica; Bertoncini, Stefania; Aloisi, Iris; Cristini, Agnese; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Forcato, Mattia; Sordet, Olivier; Capranico, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc) stabilized by camptothecin (CPT) have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs) levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop) in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  16. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Marinello

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc stabilized by camptothecin (CPT have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  17. Transcriptional activation of human CDCA8 gene regulated by transcription factor NF-Y in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Miao, Cong-Xiu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Lv-Jun; Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Di; Chen, Lian-Sheng; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2015-09-11

    The cell division cycle associated 8 (CDCA8) gene plays an important role in mitosis. Overexpression of CDCA8 was reported in some human cancers and is required for cancer growth and progression. We found CDCA8 expression was also high in human ES cells (hESCs) but dropped significantly upon hESC differentiation. However, the regulation of CDCA8 expression has not yet been studied. Here, we characterized the CDCA8 promoter and identified its cis-elements and transcription factors. Three transcription start sites were identified. Reporter gene assays revealed that the CDCA8 promoter was activated in hESCs and cancer cell lines. The promoter drove the reporter expression specifically to pluripotent cells during early mouse embryo development and to tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that CDCA8 is transcriptionally activated in hESCs and cancer cells. Mechanistically, two key activation elements, bound by transcription factor NF-Y and CREB1, respectively, were identified in the CDCA8 basic promoter by mutation analyses and electrophoretic motility shift assays. NF-Y binding is positively correlated with promoter activities in different cell types. Interestingly, the NF-YA subunit, binding to the promoter, is primarily a short isoform in hESCs and a long isoform in cancer cells, indicating a different activation mechanism of the CDCA8 transcription between hESCs and cancer cells. Finally, enhanced CDCA8 promoter activities by NF-Y overexpression and reduced CDCA8 transcription by NF-Y knockdown further verified that NF-Y is a positive regulator of CDCA8 transcription. Our study unearths the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CDCA8 expression in hESCs and cancer cells, which provides a better understanding of its biological functions.

  18. An Efficient Method to Identify Conditionally Activated Transcription Factors and their Corresponding Signal Transduction Pathway Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Hu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A signal transduction pathway (STP is a cascade composed of a series of signal transferring steps, which often activate one or more transcription factors (TFs to control the transcription of target genes. Understanding signaling pathways is important to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Many condition-annotated pathways have been deposited in public databases. However, condition-annotated pathways are far from complete, considering the large number of possible conditions. Computational methods to assist in the identification of conditionally activated pathways are greatly needed. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to identify conditionally activated pathway segments starting from the identification of conditionally activated TFs, by incorporating protein-DNA binding data, gene expression data and protein interaction data. Applying our methods on several microarray datasets, we have discovered many significantly activated TFs and their corresponding pathway segments, which are supported by evidence in the literature.

  19. Co-dependent Activators Direct Myoblast Specific MyoD Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G.; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Tjian, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight co-dependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a pre-initiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD down-regulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription. PMID:18854138

  20. Distinct structural features of TFAM drive mitochondrial DNA packaging versus transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huu B; Lovely, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Rob; Chan, David C

    2014-01-01

    TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) is a DNA-binding protein that activates transcription at the two major promoters of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)--the light strand promoter (LSP) and the heavy strand promoter 1 (HSP1). Equally important, it coats and packages the mitochondrial genome. TFAM has been shown to impose a U-turn on LSP DNA; however, whether this distortion is relevant at other sites is unknown. Here we present crystal structures of TFAM bound to HSP1 and to nonspecific DNA. In both, TFAM similarly distorts the DNA into a U-turn. Yet, TFAM binds to HSP1 in the opposite orientation from LSP explaining why transcription from LSP requires DNA bending, whereas transcription at HSP1 does not. Moreover, the crystal structures reveal dimerization of DNA-bound TFAM. This dimerization is dispensable for DNA bending and transcriptional activation but is important in DNA compaction. We propose that TFAM dimerization enhances mitochondrial DNA compaction by promoting looping of the DNA.

  1. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific transcripts or membrane integrity-would overcome bias introduced by cultivation and reduces the time span of analysis from initiation to read out. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between transcriptional activity, membrane integrity and cultivation-based viability in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Results We present microbiological, cytological and molecular analyses of the physiological response to lethal heat stress under accurately defined conditions through systematic sampling of bacteria from a single culture exposed to gradually increasing temperatures. We identified a coherent transcriptional program including known heat shock responses as well as the rapid expression of a small number of sporulation and competence genes, the latter only known to be active in the stationary growth phase. Conclusion The observed coordinated gene expression continued even after cell death, in other words after all bacteria permanently lost their ability to reproduce. Transcription of a very limited number of genes correlated with cell viability under the applied killing regime. The transcripts of the expressed genes in living bacteria – but silent in dead bacteria-include those of essential genes encoding chaperones of the protein folding machinery and can serve as molecular biomarkers for bacterial cell viability.

  2. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase3 beta phosphorylates serine 33 of p53 and activates p53's transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Brendan D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress, oncogene expression and during senescence, p53 transcriptionally activates genes involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. p53 activation is regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation of the N-terminal transactivation domain. Here, we have examined how Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3, a protein kinase involved in tumorigenesis, differentiation and apoptosis, phosphorylates and regulates p53. Results The 2 isoforms of GSK3, GSK3α and GSK3β, phosphorylate the sequence Ser-X-X-X-Ser(P when the C-terminal serine residue is already phosphorylated. Several p53 kinases were examined for their ability to create GSK3 phosphorylation sites on the p53 protein. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of serine 37 of p53 by DNA-PK creates a site for GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 33 in vitro. GSK3α did not phosphorylate p53 under any condition. GSK3β increased the transcriptional activity of the p53 protein in vivo. Mutation of either serine 33 or serine 37 of p53 to alanine blocked the ability of GSK3β to regulate p53 transcriptional activity. GSK3β is therefore able to regulate p53 function in vivo. p53's transcriptional activity is commonly increased by DNA damage. However, GSK3β kinase activity was inhibited in response to DNA damage, suggesting that GSK3β regulation of p53 is not involved in the p53-DNA damage response. Conclusions GSK3β can regulate p53's transcriptional activity by phosphorylating serine 33. However, GSK3β does not appear to be part of the p53-DNA damage response pathway. Instead, GSK3β may provide the link between p53 and non-DNA damage mechanisms for p53 activation.

  4. Versatility of cooperative transcriptional activation: a thermodynamical modeling analysis for greater-than-additive and less-than-additive effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till D Frank

    Full Text Available We derive a statistical model of transcriptional activation using equilibrium thermodynamics of chemical reactions. We examine to what extent this statistical model predicts synergy effects of cooperative activation of gene expression. We determine parameter domains in which greater-than-additive and less-than-additive effects are predicted for cooperative regulation by two activators. We show that the statistical approach can be used to identify different causes of synergistic greater-than-additive effects: nonlinearities of the thermostatistical transcriptional machinery and three-body interactions between RNA polymerase and two activators. In particular, our model-based analysis suggests that at low transcription factor concentrations cooperative activation cannot yield synergistic greater-than-additive effects, i.e., DNA transcription can only exhibit less-than-additive effects. Accordingly, transcriptional activity turns from synergistic greater-than-additive responses at relatively high transcription factor concentrations into less-than-additive responses at relatively low concentrations. In addition, two types of re-entrant phenomena are predicted. First, our analysis predicts that under particular circumstances transcriptional activity will feature a sequence of less-than-additive, greater-than-additive, and eventually less-than-additive effects when for fixed activator concentrations the regulatory impact of activators on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter increases from weak, to moderate, to strong. Second, for appropriate promoter conditions when activator concentrations are increased then the aforementioned re-entrant sequence of less-than-additive, greater-than-additive, and less-than-additive effects is predicted as well. Finally, our model-based analysis suggests that even for weak activators that individually induce only negligible increases in promoter activity, promoter activity can exhibit greater

  5. Exploiting Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Technology for the Identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF2 Antagonists Endowed with Antiangiogenic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Presta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation, is implicated in various physiological/pathological conditions, including embryonic development, inflammation and tumor growth. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2 is a heparin-binding angiogenic growth factor involved in various physiopathological processes, including tumor neovascularization. Accordingly, FGF2 is considered a target for antiangiogenic therapies. Thus, numerous natural/synthetic compounds have been tested for their capacity to bind and sequester FGF2 in the extracellular environment preventing its interaction with cellular receptors. We have exploited surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique in search for antiangiogenic FGF2 binders/antagonists. In this review we will summarize our experience in SPR-based angiogenesis research, with the aim to validate SPR as a first line screening for the identification of antiangiogenic compounds.

  6. Activation of transcriptional activity of HSE by a novel mouse zinc finger protein ZNFD specifically expressed in testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengqin; Wang, Weiping; Lei, Chen; Liu, Qingmei; Qiu, Hao; Muraleedharan, Vinaydhar; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Hongxia; Huang, Zhongkai; Xu, Weian; Li, Bichun; Wang, Minghua

    2012-04-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) that contain multiple cysteine and/or histidine residues perform important roles in various cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The Cys-Cys-His-His (C(2)H(2)) type of ZFPs are the well-defined members of this super family and are the largest and most complex proteins in eukaryotic genomes. In this study, we identified a novel C(2)H(2) type of zinc finger gene ZNFD from mice which has a 1,002 bp open reading frame and encodes a protein with 333 amino acid residues. The predicted 37.4 kDa protein contains a C(2)H(2) zinc finger domain. ZNFD gene is located on chromosome 18qD1. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ZNFD gene was specifically expressed in mouse testis but not in other tissues. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that ZNFD was localized in the nucleus. Reporter gene assays showed that overexpression of ZNFD in the COS7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of heat shock element (HSE). Overall, these results suggest that ZNFD is a member of the zinc finger transcription factor family and it participates in the transcriptional regulation of HSE. Many heat shock proteins regulated by HSE are involved in testicular development. Therefore, our results suggest that ZNFD may probably participate in the development of mouse testis and function as a transcription activator in HSE-mediated gene expression and signaling pathways.

  7. Activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator through MEKK1-induced phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Yeung-Tung; Ching, Yick-Pang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2008-11-01

    CREB is a prototypic bZIP transcription factor and a master regulator of glucose metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Transducers of regulated CREB activity (TORCs) are essential transcriptional coactivators of CREB and an important point of regulation on which various signals converge. In this study, we report on the activation of TORC1 through MEKK1-mediated phosphorylation. MEKK1 potently activated TORC1, and this activation was independent of downstream effectors MEK1/MEK2, ERK2, JNK, p38, protein kinase A, and calcineurin. MEKK1 induced phosphorylation of TORC1 both in vivo and in vitro. Expression of the catalytic domain of MEKK1 alone in cultured mammalian cells sufficiently caused phosphorylation and subsequent activation of TORC1. MEKK1 physically interacted with TORC1 and stimulated its nuclear translocation. An activation domain responsive to MEKK1 stimulation was mapped to amino acids 431-650 of TORC1. As a physiological activator of CREB, interleukin 1alpha triggered MEKK1-dependent phosphorylation of TORC1 and its consequent recruitment to the cAMP response elements in the interleukin 8 promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism for regulated activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator and CREB signaling.

  8. Effect of nitrate on activities and transcript levels of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yun; FAN Xiao-Rong; SUN Shu-Bin; XU Guo-Hua; HU Jiang; SHEN Qi-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to compare the effect of NO-3 on the activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS),and the transcript levels of two NR genes,OsNia1 and OsNia2,two cytceolic GS1 genes,OsGln1;1 and OsGln1;2,and one plastid GS2 gene OsGln2,in two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars Nanguang (NG) and Yunjing (YJ).Both cultivars achieved greater biomass and higher total N concentration when grown in a mixed N supply than in sole NH+ nutrition.Supply of NO-3 increased NR activity in both leaves and roots.Expression of both NR genes was also substantially enhanced and transcript levels of OsNia2 were significantly higher than those of OsNia1.NO-3 also caused an increase in GS activity,but had a complex effect on the expression of the three GS genes.In roots,the OsGln1;1 transcript increased,but OsGln1;2 decreased.In leaves,NO-3 had no effect on the GS1 expression,but the transcript for OsGln2 increased both in the leaves and roots of rice with a mixed supply of N.These results suggested that the increase in GS activity might be a result of the complicated regulation of the various GS genes.In addition,the NO-3 induced increase of biomass,NR activity,GS activity,and the transcript levels of NR and GS genes were proportionally higher in NG than in YJ,indicating a stronger response of NG to NO-3 nutrition than YJ.

  9. Altered association of transcriptionally active DNA with the nuclear-matrix after heat shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakkers, RJ; Brunsting, JF; Filon, AR; Kampinga, HH; Konings, AWT; Mullenders, LHF

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Exposure of human cells to heat leads to denaturation and aggregation of proteins. Within the nucleus, it has been suggested that protein aggregation is linked to the: selective inhibition by hyperthermia of nucleotide excision repair in transcriptionally active genes. Tn this study it was

  10. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-01

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator...

  12. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...

  13. Analysis of the transcriptional networks underpinning the activation of murine macrophages by inflammatory mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark W.; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Amit, Ido; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Tom C.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages respond to the TLR4 agonist LPS with a sequential transcriptional cascade controlled by a complex regulatory network of signaling pathways and transcription factors. At least two distinct pathways are currently known to be engaged by TLR4 and are distinguished by their dependence on the adaptor molecule MyD88. We have used gene expression microarrays to define the effects of each of three variables—LPS dose, LPS versus IFN-β and -γ, and genetic background—on the transcriptional response of mouse BMDMs. Analysis of correlation networks generated from the data has identified subnetworks or modules within the macrophage transcriptional network that are activated selectively by these variables. We have identified mouse strain-specific signatures, including a module enriched for SLE susceptibility candidates. In the modules of genes unique to different treatments, we found a module of genes induced by type-I IFN but not by LPS treatment, suggesting another layer of complexity in the LPS-TLR4 signaling feedback control. We also observe that the activation of the complement system, in common with the known activation of MHC class 2 genes, is reliant on IFN-γ signaling. Taken together, these data further highlight the exquisite nature of the regulatory systems that control macrophage activation, their likely relevance to disease resistance/susceptibility, and the appropriate response of these cells to proinflammatory stimuli. PMID:24721704

  14. IscR regulates RNase LS activity by repressing rnlA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Miki, Kumiko; Koga, Mitsunori; Katayama, Natsu; Morimoto, Wakako; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yonesaki, Tetsuro

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease LS was originally identified as a potential antagonist of bacteriophage T4. When the T4 dmd gene is defective, RNase LS cleaves T4 mRNAs and antagonizes T4 reproduction. This RNase also plays an important role in RNA metabolisms in E. coli. rnlA is an essential gene for RNase LS activity, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene remains to be elucidated. An Fe-S cluster protein, IscR, acts as a transcription factor and controls the expression of genes that are necessary for Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Here, we report that overexpression of IscR suppressed RNase LS activity, causing the loss of antagonist activity against phage T4. This suppressive effect did not require the ligation of Fe-S cluster into IscR. beta-Galactosidase reporter assays showed that transcription from an rnlA promoter increased in iscR-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells, and gel-mobility shift assays revealed specific binding of IscR to the rnlA promoter region. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that endogenous rnlA mRNA was reduced by overexpression of IscR and increased by deletion of iscR. From these results, we conclude that IscR negatively regulates transcription of rnlA and represses RNase LS activity.

  15. Alternative Polyadenylation Regulates CELF1/CUGBP1 Target Transcripts Following T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisang, Daniel; Reilly, Cavan; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating gene expression. Transcript 3′ end shortening through changes in polyadenylation site usage occurs following T cell activation, but the consequences of APA on gene expression are poorly understood. We previously showed that GU-rich elements (GREs) found in the 3′ untranslated regions of select transcripts mediate rapid mRNA decay by recruiting the protein CELF1/CUGBP1. Using a global RNA sequencing approach, we found that a network of CELF1 target transcripts involved in cell division underwent preferential 3′ end shortening via APA following T cell activation, resulting in decreased inclusion of CELF1 binding sites and increased transcript expression. We present a model whereby CELF1 regulates APA site selection following T cell activation through reversible binding to nearby GRE sequences. These findings provide insight into the role of APA in controlling cellular proliferation during biological processes such as development, oncogenesis and T cell activation PMID:25123787

  16. A do-it-yourself protocol for simple transcription activator-like effector assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Uhde-Stone Claudia; Gor Nilang; Chin Tiffany; Huang Joseph; Lu Biao

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background TALEs (transcription activator-like effectors) are powerful molecules that have broad applications in genetic and epigenetic manipulations. The simple design of TALEs, coupled with high binding predictability and specificity, is bringing genome engineering power to the standard molecular laboratory. Currently, however, custom TALE assembly is either costly or limited to few research centers, due to complicated assembly protocols, l...

  17. Altered association of transcriptionally active DNA with the nuclear-matrix after heat shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakkers, RJ; Brunsting, JF; Filon, AR; Kampinga, HH; Konings, AWT; Mullenders, LHF

    Purpose: Exposure of human cells to heat leads to denaturation and aggregation of proteins. Within the nucleus, it has been suggested that protein aggregation is linked to the: selective inhibition by hyperthermia of nucleotide excision repair in transcriptionally active genes. Tn this study it was

  18. Modulation of CP2 family transcriptional activity by CRTR-1 and sumoylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah To

    Full Text Available CRTR-1 is a member of the CP2 family of transcription factors. Unlike other members of the family which are widely expressed, CRTR-1 expression shows specific spatio-temporal regulation. Gene targeting demonstrates that CRTR-1 plays a central role in the maturation and function of the salivary glands and the kidney. CRTR-1 has also recently been identified as a component of the complex transcriptional network that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES cells. CRTR-1 was previously shown to be a repressor of transcription. We examine the activity of CRTR-1 in ES and other cells and show that CRTR-1 is generally an activator of transcription and that it modulates the activity of other family members, CP2, NF2d9 and altNF2d9, in a cell specific manner. We also demonstrate that CRTR-1 activity is regulated by sumoylation at a single major site, residue K30. These findings imply that functional redundancy with other family members may mask important roles for CRTR-1 in other tissues, including the blastocyst stage embryo and embryonic stem cells.

  19. Modulation of CP2 family transcriptional activity by CRTR-1 and sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Sarah; Rodda, Stephen J; Rathjen, Peter D; Keough, Rebecca A

    2010-07-22

    CRTR-1 is a member of the CP2 family of transcription factors. Unlike other members of the family which are widely expressed, CRTR-1 expression shows specific spatio-temporal regulation. Gene targeting demonstrates that CRTR-1 plays a central role in the maturation and function of the salivary glands and the kidney. CRTR-1 has also recently been identified as a component of the complex transcriptional network that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. CRTR-1 was previously shown to be a repressor of transcription. We examine the activity of CRTR-1 in ES and other cells and show that CRTR-1 is generally an activator of transcription and that it modulates the activity of other family members, CP2, NF2d9 and altNF2d9, in a cell specific manner. We also demonstrate that CRTR-1 activity is regulated by sumoylation at a single major site, residue K30. These findings imply that functional redundancy with other family members may mask important roles for CRTR-1 in other tissues, including the blastocyst stage embryo and embryonic stem cells.

  20. E2F1-mediated transcriptional inhibition of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziczak, M; Müller, H; Helin, K;

    2001-01-01

    -sensitive retinoblastoma protein (pRB), a shift to a permissive temperature induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In U2OS cells stably expressing an E2F1-estrogen receptor chimeric protein that could be activated by tamoxifen, PAI-1 gene transcription was markedly reduced by tamoxifen even in the presence of cycloheximide...

  1. Analysis of the transcriptional networks underpinning the activation of murine macrophages by inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark W; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Amit, Ido; Hume, David A; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages respond to the TLR4 agonist LPS with a sequential transcriptional cascade controlled by a complex regulatory network of signaling pathways and transcription factors. At least two distinct pathways are currently known to be engaged by TLR4 and are distinguished by their dependence on the adaptor molecule MyD88. We have used gene expression microarrays to define the effects of each of three variables--LPS dose, LPS versus IFN-β and -γ, and genetic background--on the transcriptional response of mouse BMDMs. Analysis of correlation networks generated from the data has identified subnetworks or modules within the macrophage transcriptional network that are activated selectively by these variables. We have identified mouse strain-specific signatures, including a module enriched for SLE susceptibility candidates. In the modules of genes unique to different treatments, we found a module of genes induced by type-I IFN but not by LPS treatment, suggesting another layer of complexity in the LPS-TLR4 signaling feedback control. We also observe that the activation of the complement system, in common with the known activation of MHC class 2 genes, is reliant on IFN-γ signaling. Taken together, these data further highlight the exquisite nature of the regulatory systems that control macrophage activation, their likely relevance to disease resistance/susceptibility, and the appropriate response of these cells to proinflammatory stimuli.

  2. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  3. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Bardet, Anaïs Flore; Roma, Guglielmo; Bergling, Sebastian; Clay, Ieuan; Ruchti, Alexandra; Agarinis, Claudia; Schmelzle, Tobias; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Schübeler, Dirk; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase activates transcription of the UCP3 and HKII genes in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppani, James; Hildebrandt, Audrey L; Sakamoto, Kei; Cameron-Smith, David; Goodyear, Laurie J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently emerged as a key signaling protein in skeletal muscle, coordinating the activation of both glucose and fatty acid metabolism in response to increased cellular energy demand. To determine whether AMPK signaling may also regulate gene transcription in muscle, rats were given a single subcutaneous injection (1 mg/g) of the AMP analog 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR). AICAR injection activated (P < 0.05) AMPK-alpha 2 ( approximately 2.5-fold) and transcription of the uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3, approximately 4-fold) and hexokinase II (HKII, approximately 10-fold) genes in both red and white skeletal muscle. However, AICAR injection also elicited (P < 0.05) an acute drop (60%) in blood glucose and a sustained (2-h) increase in blood lactate, prompting concern regarding the specificity of AICAR on transcription. To maximize AMPK activation in muscle while minimizing potential systemic counterregulatory responses, a single-leg arterial infusion technique was employed in fully conscious rats. Relative to saline-infused controls, single-leg arterial infusion of AICAR (0.125, 0.5, and 2.5 micro g. g(-1). min(-1) for 60 min) induced a dose-dependent increase (2- to 4-fold, P < 0.05) in UCP3 and HKII transcription in both red and white skeletal muscle. Importantly, AICAR infusion activated transcription only in muscle from the infused leg and had no effect on blood glucose or lactate levels. These data provide evidence that AMPK signaling is linked to the transcriptional regulation of select metabolic genes in skeletal muscle.

  5. Interaction with general transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) is required for the suppression of activated transcription by RPB5-mediating protein(RMP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    RMP was reported to regulate transcription via competing with HBx to bind the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and interacting with RPB5 subunit of RNA polymerase Ⅱ as a corepressor of transcription regulator. However, our present research uncovered that RMP also regulates the transcription through interaction with the general transcription factors IIF (TFIIF), which assemble in the preinitiation complex and function in both transcription initiation and elongation. With in vitro pull-down assay and Far-Western analysis, we demonstrated that RMP could bind with bacterially expressed recombinant RAP30 and RAP74of TFIIF subunits. In the immunoprecipitation assay in COS 1 cells cotransfected with FLAG-tagged RMP or its mutants, GST-fused RAP30 and RAP74 were co-immunoprecipitated with RMP in approximately equal molar ratio, which suggests that RAP30 and RAP74 interact with RMP as a TFIIF complex. Interestingly both RAP30 and RAP74 interact with the same domain (D5) of the C-terminal RMP of 118-amino-acid residuals which overlaps with its TFIIB-binding domain. Internal deletion of D5 region of RMP abolished its binding ability with both subunits of TFIIF, while D5 domain alone was sufficient to interact with TFIIF subunits. The result of luciferase assay showed that overexpression of RMP, but not the mutant RMP lacking D5 region, suppressed the transcription activated by Gal-VP16, suggesting that interaction with TFIIF is required for RMP to suppress the activated transcription. The interaction between RMP and TFIIF may be an additional passway for RMP to regulate the transcription, or alternatively TFIIF may cooperate with RPB5 and TFIIB for the corepressor function of RMP.

  6. Cloning and Transcriptional Activity of the Mouse Omi/HtrA2 Gene Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Wu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Ma, Xinliang; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-16

    HtrA serine peptidase 2 (HtrA2), also named Omi, is a pro-apoptotic protein that exhibits dramatic changes in expression levels in a variety of disorders, including ischemia/reperfusion injury, cancer, and neurodegeneration. In our study, Omi/HtrA2 protein levels were high in the heart, brain, kidney and liver, with elevated heart/brain expression in aging mice. A similar expression pattern was observed at the mRNA level, which suggests that the regulation of Omi/HtrA2 is predominately transcriptional. Promoter binding by transcription factors is the main influencing factor of transcription, and to identify specific promoter elements that contribute to the differential expression of mouse Omi/HtrA2, we constructed truncated Omi/HtrA2 promoter/luciferase reporter vectors and analyzed their relative luciferase activity; it was greatest in the promoter regions at -1205~-838 bp and -146~+93 bp, with the -838~-649 bp region exhibiting negative regulatory activity. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the Omi/HtrA2 gene promoter contains a CpG island at -709~+37 bp, and eight heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) sites, two Sp1 transcription factor (SP1)sites, one activator protein (AP) site, seven p53 sites, and four YY1 transcription factor(YY1) sites were predicted in the core areas. Furthermore, we found that p53 and HSF1 specifically binds to the Omi/HtrA2 promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. These results provide a foundation for understanding Omi/HtrA2 regulatory mechanisms, which could further understanding of HtrA-associated diseases.

  7. Transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} requires activation of both protein kinase A and Akt during adipocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-pil [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Eun Kyoung [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung Woon [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Elevated cAMP activates both PKA and Epac. {yields} PKA activates CREB transcriptional factor and Epac activates PI3K/Akt pathway via Rap1. {yields} Akt modulates PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in concert with CREB. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is required for the conversion of pre-adipocytes. However, the mechanism underlying activation of PPAR-{gamma} is unclear. Here we showed that cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt is essential for the transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}. Hormonal induction of adipogenesis was blocked by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H89), and by a Rap1 inhibitor (GGTI-298). Transcriptional activity of PPAR-{gamma} was markedly enhanced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not insulin and dexamethasone. In addition, IBMX-induced PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity was blocked by PI3K/Akt, PKA, or Rap1 inhibitors. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) which is a specific agonist for exchanger protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) significantly induced the activation of Akt. Furthermore, knock-down of Akt1 markedly attenuated PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity. These results indicate that both PKA and Akt signaling pathways are required for transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}, suggesting post-translational activation of PPAR-{gamma} might be critical step for adipogenic gene expression.

  8. Elk3 from hamster-a ternary complex factor with strong transcriptional repressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G.M.; Weilguny, D.; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    the transcription of genes that are activated during entry into G1. We have isolated the Cricetulus griseus Elk3 gene from the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line and investigated the transcriptional potential of this factor. Transient transfections revealed that, in addition to its regulation of the c......-fos promoter, Elk3 from CHO cells seems to inhibit other promoters controlling expression of proteins involved in G1/S phase progression; Cyclin D1 and DHFR. As has been described for the Elk3 homologs Net (Mouse) and Sap-2 (Human), the results of the present study further indicate that hamster Elk3...

  9. High resolution analysis of the human transcriptome: detection of extensive alternative splicing independent of transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouet Fabien

    2009-10-01

    transcriptional activity, indicating that the controls for transcript generation and transcription are distinct, and require novel tools in order to detect changes in specific transcript quantity. Our results demonstrate that the SpliceArray™ design will provide researchers with a robust platform to detect and quantify specific changes not only in overall gene expression, but also at the individual transcript level.

  10. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  11. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  12. A central region of Gli2 regulates its localization to the primary cilium and transcriptional activity

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Nicole; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) proteins depends on the primary cilium. In response to Hh signals, the transcriptional activator of the pathway, Gli2, accumulates at the ciliary tip, raising the possibility that ciliary localization is important for Gli2 activation. To test this hypothesis, we used the Floxin system to create knock-in Gli2 alleles in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to allow methodical testing of which domains and residues are essential for the ciliary localization of G...

  13. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P.; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Althoug...

  14. Regulating retrotransposon activity through the use of alternative transcription start sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Jenna; Steglich, Babett; Smialowska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    a new mechanism of retrotransposon regulation through transcription start site (TSS) selection by altered nucleosome occupancy. We show that Fun30 chromatin remodelers cooperate to maintain a high level of nucleosome occupancy at retrotransposon-flanking long terminal repeat (LTR) elements......Retrotransposons, the ancestors of retroviruses, have the potential for gene disruption and genomic takeover if not kept in check. Paradoxically, although host cells repress these elements by multiple mechanisms, they are transcribed and are even activated under stress conditions. Here, we describe....... This enforces the use of a downstream TSS and the production of a truncated RNA incapable of reverse transcription and retrotransposition. However, in stressed cells, nucleosome occupancy at LTR elements is reduced, and the TSS shifts to allow for productive transcription. We propose that controlled...

  15. The transcriptional regulator Aire binds to and activates super-enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Kushagra; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2017-03-01

    Aire is a transcription factor that controls T cell tolerance by inducing the expression of a large repertoire of genes specifically in thymic stromal cells. It interacts with scores of protein partners of diverse functional classes. We found that Aire and some of its partners, notably those implicated in the DNA-damage response, preferentially localized to and activated long chromatin stretches that were overloaded with transcriptional regulators, known as super-enhancers. We also identified topoisomerase 1 as a cardinal Aire partner that colocalized on super-enhancers and was required for the interaction of Aire with all of its other associates. We propose a model that entails looping of super-enhancers to efficiently deliver Aire-containing complexes to local and distal transcriptional start sites.

  16. Calmodulin-binding transcription activators and perspectives for applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Du, Liqun; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, a novel family of calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) has been reported in various species. The CAMTAs share a conserved domain organization, with a CG-1 DNA-binding domain, a transcription factor immunoglobulin domain, several ankyrin repeats, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a varying number of IQ motifs. CAMTAs participate in transcriptional regulation by recognizing and binding to a specific cis-element: (G/A/C)CGCG(C/G/T). Plants suffer from the environmental challenges, including abiotic and biotic stresses. Investigations in various plant species indicate a broad range of CAMTA functions involved in developmental regulation, environmental stress response, and hormone cross talk. In this review, we focus on the expression patterns and biological functions of CAMTAs to explore their probable applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, the identification and phylogenetic analysis of CAMTAs in crops could open new perspectives for enhancing stress tolerance, which could lead to improved crop production.

  17. Regulation and function of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-Rong; Qi; Zeng-Ming; Yang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3(STAT3), a member of the STAT family, is a key regulator of many physiological and pathological processes. Significant progress has been made in understanding the transcriptional control, posttranslational modification, cellular localization and functional regulation of STAT3. STAT3 can translocate into the nucleus and bind to specific promoter sequences, thereby exerting transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have shown that STAT3 can also translocate into mitochondria, participating in aerobic respiration and apoptosis. In addition, STAT3 plays an important role in inflammation and tumorigenesis by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Conditional knockout mouse models make it possible to study the physiological function of STAT3 in specific tissues and organs. This review summarizes the latest advances in the understanding of the expression, regulation and function of STAT3 in physiological and tumorigenic processes.

  18. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  19. A transcription activator-like effector (TALE) induction system mediated by proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Matthew F; Politz, Mark C; Johnson, Charles B; Markley, Andrew L; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Simple and predictable trans-acting regulatory tools are needed in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to build complex genetic circuits and optimize the levels of native and heterologous gene products. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are bacterial virulence factors that have recently gained traction in biotechnology applications owing to their customizable DNA-binding specificity. In this work we expanded the versatility of these transcription factors to create an inducible TALE system by inserting tobacco-etch virus (TEV) protease recognition sites into the TALE backbone. The resulting engineered TALEs maintain transcriptional repression of their target genes in Escherichia coli, but are degraded after induction of the TEV protease, thereby promoting expression of the previously repressed target gene of interest. This TALE-TEV technology enables both repression and induction of plasmid or chromosomal target genes in a manner analogous to traditional repressor proteins but with the added flexibility of being operator-agnostic.

  20. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation.

  1. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription.

  2. Yap5 is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that regulates vacuolar iron storage in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-02-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3' untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Delta strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation.

  3. Yap5 Is an Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Activator That Regulates Vacuolar Iron Storage in Yeast▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3′ untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Δ strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation. PMID:18070921

  4. Activation of the SMU.1882 transcription by CovR in Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chong

    Full Text Available In Streptococcus mutans, the global response regulator CovR plays an important role in biofilm formation, stress-tolerance response, and caries production. We have previously shown that CovR acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to the upstream promoter regions of its target genes. Here, we report that in vivo, CovR activates the transcription of SMU.1882, which encodes a small peptide containing a double-glycine motif. We also show that SMU.1882 is transcriptionally linked to comA that encodes a putative ABC transporter protein. Several genes from man gene clusters that encode mannose phosphotranferase system flank SMU.1882 -comA genes. Genomic comparison with other streptococci indicates that SMU.1882 is uniquely present in S. mutans, while the man operon is conserved among all streptococci, suggesting that a genetic rearrangement might have taken place at this locus. With the use of a transcriptional reporter system and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrated the transcriptional regulation of SMU.1882 by CovR. In vitro gel shift and DNase I foot-printing analyses with purified CovR suggest that CovR binds to a large region surrounding the -10 region of the P(1882. Using this information and comparing with other CovR regulated promoters, we have developed a putative consensus binding sequence for CovR. Although CovR binds to P(1882, in vitro experiments using purified S. mutans RpoD, E. coli RNA polymerase, and CovR did not activate transcription from this promoter. Thus, we speculate that in vivo, CovR may interfere with the binding of a repressor or requires a cofactor.

  5. Genome-scale transcriptional activation by an engineered CRISPR-Cas9 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Silvana; Brigham, Mark D; Trevino, Alexandro E; Joung, Julia; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Barcena, Clea; Hsu, Patrick D; Habib, Naomi; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-29

    Systematic interrogation of gene function requires the ability to perturb gene expression in a robust and generalizable manner. Here we describe structure-guided engineering of a CRISPR-Cas9 complex to mediate efficient transcriptional activation at endogenous genomic loci. We used these engineered Cas9 activation complexes to investigate single-guide RNA (sgRNA) targeting rules for effective transcriptional activation, to demonstrate multiplexed activation of ten genes simultaneously, and to upregulate long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) transcripts. We also synthesized a library consisting of 70,290 guides targeting all human RefSeq coding isoforms to screen for genes that, upon activation, confer resistance to a BRAF inhibitor. The top hits included genes previously shown to be able to confer resistance, and novel candidates were validated using individual sgRNA and complementary DNA overexpression. A gene expression signature based on the top screening hits correlated with markers of BRAF inhibitor resistance in cell lines and patient-derived samples. These results collectively demonstrate the potential of Cas9-based activators as a powerful genetic perturbation technology.

  6. PARP1 orchestrates variant histone exchange in signal-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Amanda; Yang, Shen-Hsi; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    Transcriptional activation is accompanied by multiple molecular events that remodel the local chromatin environment in promoter regions. These molecular events are often orchestrated in response to the activation of signalling pathways, as exemplified by the response of immediate early genes such as FOS to ERK MAP kinase signalling. Here, we demonstrate that inducible NFI recruitment permits PARP1 binding to the FOS promoter by a mutually reinforcing loop. PARP1 and its poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity are required for maintaining FOS activation kinetics. We also show that the histone variant H2A.Z associates with the FOS promoter and acts in a transcription-suppressive manner. However, in response to ERK pathway signalling, H2A.Z is replaced by H2A; PARP1 activity is required to promote this exchange. Thus, our work has revealed an additional facet of PARP1 function in promoting dynamic remodelling of promoter-associated nucleosomes to allow transcriptional activation in response to cellular signalling.

  7. A central region of Gli2 regulates its localization to the primary cilium and transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nicole; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2014-04-01

    Signaling through vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) proteins depends on the primary cilium. In response to Hh signals, the transcriptional activator of the pathway, Gli2, accumulates at the ciliary tip, raising the possibility that ciliary localization is important for Gli2 activation. To test this hypothesis, we used the Floxin system to create knock-in Gli2 alleles in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to allow methodical testing of which domains and residues are essential for the ciliary localization of Gli2. The Gli2 zinc fingers, transcriptional activation domain, repressor domain, phosphorylation cluster and a Sufu binding motif were each dispensable for ciliary localization. Mutating residues that are required for Gli2 sumoylation and nuclear trafficking also did not abrogate ciliary localization. By contrast, several other domains restricted Gli2 nuclear localization, and a central region, distinct from previously characterized domains, was required for ciliary localization. In addition to an inability to localize to cilia, Gli2 lacking this central domain was unable to activate target genes. Thus, our systematic analysis in ESCs reveals that distinct regions of Gli2 regulate its nuclear and ciliary localization. The identification of a domain essential for both ciliary localization and transcriptional activity suggests that ciliary localization of Gli2 is required for its activation.

  8. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-02-18

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE.

  9. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response.

  10. Model of Transcriptional Activation By MarA in Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E.; Markowitz, David A.; Rosner, Judah L.; Martin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model of transcriptional activation by MarA in Escherichia coli, and used the model to analyze measurements of MarA-dependent activity of the marRAB, sodA, and micF promoters in mar-rob- cells. The model rationalizes an unexpected poor correlation between the mid-point of in vivo promoter activity profiles and in vitro equilibrium constants for MarA binding to promoter sequences. Analysis of the promoter activity data using the model yielded the following predictions regarding activation mechanisms: (1) MarA activation of the marRAB, sodA, and micF promoters involves a net acceleration of the kinetics of transitions after RNA polymerase binding, up to and including promoter escape and message elongation; (2) RNA polymerase binds to these promoters with nearly unit occupancy in the absence of MarA, making recruitment of polymerase an insignificant factor in activation of these promoters; and (3) instead of recruitment, activation of the micF promoter might involve a repulsion of polymerase combined with a large acceleration of the kinetics of polymerase activity. These predictions are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. A lack of recruitment in transcriptional activation represents an exception to the textbook description of activation of bacterial sigma-70 promoters. However, use of accelerated polymerase kinetics instead of recruitment might confer a competitive advantage to E. coli by decreasing latency in gene regulation.

  11. Copper is required for cobalt-induced transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liying; Ding, Xueqin; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Y James

    2012-08-01

    Cobalt inhibits prolyl hydroxylases, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and a concomitant increase in the transcriptional activity of HIF-1. Therefore, cobalt has been under development as a drug for activating HIF-1 under some disease conditions. However, it has been shown that ischemic conditions resulted in the loss of copper, and the activation of HIF-1 would not occur unless copper was supplemented. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that copper is also required for the cobalt activation of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to treatment with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) at concentrations above 25 μM for 2 h resulted in an accumulation of HIF-1α, which was determined by Western blot analysis, and an increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for mRNA levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis for protein levels. The copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 25 μM did not significantly affect the accumulation of HIF-1α but blocked increases in VEGF mRNA and protein levels, an effect that could be reversed by the addition of 25 μM copper sulfate (CuSO(4)). In addition, gene silencing of the copper chaperone for Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase blocked VEGF expression with little effect on cobalt-induced HIF-1α accumulation. The present study thus demonstrates that copper was required for cobalt-activated transcriptional activity of HIF-1, although copper did not affect cobalt-induced accumulation of HIF-1α in the cells.

  12. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression.

  13. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition activate transcription via transient release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2012-10-19

    By phosphorylating elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is the critical kinase for transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of eukaryotic genes. It exists in inactive small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) and active (free P-TEFb) complexes in cells. The P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of cellular activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Free P-TEFb, which is required for growth, can be recruited to RNA polymerase II via transcription factors, BRD4, or the super elongation complex (SEC). UV light, various signaling cascades, transcriptional blockade, or compounds such as hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and other histone deacetylase inhibitors lead to a rapid release of free P-TEFb, followed by its reassembly into the 7SK snRNP. As a consequence, transcription of HEXIM1, a critical 7SK snRNP subunit, and HIV is induced. In this study, we found that a bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1, which inhibits BRD4 by blocking its association with chromatin, also leads to the rapid release of free P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP. Indeed, JQ1 transiently increased levels of free P-TEFb and BRD4·P-TEFb and SEC·P-TEFb complexes in cells. As a consequence, the levels of HEXIM1 and HIV proteins rose. Importantly, the knockdown of ELL2, a subunit of the SEC, blocked the ability of JQ1 to increase HIV transcription. Finally, the effects of JQ1 and HMBA or SAHA on the P-TEFb equilibrium were cooperative. We conclude that HMBA, SAHA, and JQ1 affect transcription elongation by a similar and convergent mechanism.

  14. Cisplatin Induces Cytotoxicity through the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways ana Activating Transcription Factor 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly St. Germain

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the proapoptotic effect of the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, are largely undefined. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cisplatin cytotoxicity may uncover strategies to enhance the efficacy of this important therapeutic agent. This study evaluates the role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 as a mediator of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Cytotoxic doses of cisplatin and carboplatin treatments consistently induced ATF3 expression in five tumor-derived cell lines. Characterization of this induction revealed a p53, BRCA1, and integrated stress response-independent mechanism, all previously implicated in stress-mediated ATF3 induction. Analysis of mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK pathway involvement in ATF3 induction by cisplatin revealed a MAPK-dependent mechanism. Cisplatin treatment combined with specific inhibitors to each MAPK pathway (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellularsignal-regulated kinase, and p38 resulted in decreasedATF3 induction at the protein level. MAPK pathway inhibition led to decreased ATF3 messenger RNA expression and reduced cytotoxic effects of cisplatin as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-ylF2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay. In A549 lung carcinoma cells, targeting ATF3 with specific small hairpin RNA also attenuated the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. Similarly, ATF3-/murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were shown to be less sensitive to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity compared with ATF3+/+ MEFs. This study identifies cisplatin as a MAPK pathway-dependent inducer of ATF3, whose expression influences cisplatin’s cytotoxic effects.

  15. Resveratrol induces growth arrest and apoptosis through activation of FOXO transcription factors in prostate cancer cells.

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    Qinghe Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol, a naturally occurring phytopolyphenol compound, has attracted extensive interest in recent years because of its diverse pharmacological characteristics. Although resveratrol possesses chemopreventive properties against several cancers, the molecular mechanisms by which it inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis have not been clearly understood. The present study was carried out to examine whether PI3K/AKT/FOXO pathway mediates the biological effects of resveratrol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resveratrol inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Resveratrol, PI3K inhibitors (LY294002 and Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor alone slightly induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. These inhibitors further enhanced the apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol. Overexpression of wild-type PTEN slightly induced apoptosis. Wild type PTEN and PTEN-G129E enhanced resveratrol-induced apoptosis, whereas PTEN-G129R had no effect on proapoptotic effects of resveratrol. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol was enhanced by dominant negative AKT, and inhibited by wild-type AKT and constitutively active AKT. Resveratrol has no effect on the expression of FKHR, FKHRL1 and AFX genes. The inhibition of FOXO phosphorylation by resveratrol resulted in its nuclear translocation, DNA binding and transcriptional activity. The inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway induced FOXO transcriptional activity resulting in induction of Bim, TRAIL, p27/KIP1, DR4 and DR5, and inhibition of cyclin D1. Similarly, resveratrol-induced FOXO transcriptional activity was further enhanced when activation of PI3K/AKT pathway was blocked. Over-expression of phosphorylation deficient mutants of FOXO proteins (FOXO1-TM, FOXO3A-TM and FOXO4-TM induced FOXO transcriptional activity, which was further enhanced by resveratrol. Inhibition of FOXO transcription factors by shRNA blocked resveratrol-induced upregulation of Bim, TRAIL, DR4, DR5, p27/KIP1 and

  16. Association of signaling transducers and activators of transcription 1 and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Xu, Wang-Dong; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Fang, Xin-Yu; Liu, Yan-Yan; Ni, Jing; Qiu, Li-Juan; Hui, Peng; Cen, Han; Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex autoimmune disease which involves various facets of the immune system. Signaling transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) belongs to the family of STAT transcription factors that mediate various biological responses. Recently, studies in both experimental animal models of lupus and patients with SLE have revealed expression and activation of STAT1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis of SLE. Moreover, increased production of interferons (IFNs) and aberrant activation of IFNs signaling, which is mechanistically linked to increased level of STAT1, are crucial for the development of SLE. Therefore, we will focus on the association of STAT1 and SLE based on recent understandings to render more information about the mechanisms of STAT1 might perform in. Hopefully, the information obtained will lead to a better understanding of the development and pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, as well as its clinical implications and therapeutic potential.

  17. Direct observation of frequency modulated transcription in single cells using light activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel R; Fritzsch, Christoph; Sun, Liang; Meng, Xiuhau; Lawrence, David S; Singer, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single steroid-responsive gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00750.001 PMID:24069527

  18. Functional domains of the transcriptional activator NUC-1 in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S

    1993-08-25

    The NUC-1 regulatory protein directly controls the transcription of these genes and how the activity enzymes in Neurospora crassa. To understand how NUC-1 regulates the transcription of these genes and how the activity of NUC-1 is modulated by other regulatory proteins, two putative functional domains of NUC-1 were analysed: the DNA-binding domain and the regulatory domain. The DNA-binding activity of NUC-1 has not been directly demonstrated; however, results of deletion analysis, sequence analysis of the nuc-1 mutant alleles, and strong sequence similarity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO4 protein strongly suggest that the basic helix-loop-helix motif of NUC-1 forms a DNA-binding domain. Deletion and mutant analyses revealed that 39 amino acid (aa) residues (aa 463 to 501), or fewer, of NUC-1 are interacting with the negative regulatory factor(s), the PREG and/or PGOV proteins.

  19. Activation of the Escherichia coli marA/soxS/rob regulon in response to transcriptional activator concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert G; Bartlett, Emily S; Rosner, Judah L; Wall, Michael E

    2008-07-04

    The paralogous transcriptional activators MarA, SoxS, and Rob activate a common set of promoters, the marA/soxS/rob regulon of Escherichia coli, by binding a cognate site (marbox) upstream of each promoter. The extent of activation varies from one promoter to another and is only poorly correlated with the in vitro affinity of the activator for the specific marbox. Here, we examine the dependence of promoter activation on the level of activator in vivo by manipulating the steady-state concentrations of MarA and SoxS in Lon protease mutants and by measuring promoter activation using lacZ transcriptional fusions. We found that: (i) the MarA concentrations needed for half-maximal stimulation varied by at least 19-fold among the 10 promoters tested; (ii) most marboxes were not saturated when there were 24,000 molecules of MarA per cell; (iii) the correlation between the MarA concentration needed for half-maximal promoter activity in vivo and marbox binding affinity in vitro was poor; and (iv) the two activators differed in their promoter activation profiles. The marRAB and sodA promoters could both be saturated by MarA and SoxS in vivo. However, saturation by MarA resulted in greater marRAB and lesser sodA transcription than did saturation by SoxS, implying that the two activators interact with RNA polymerase in different ways at the different promoters. Thus, the concentration and nature of activator determine which regulon promoters are activated, as well as the extent of their activation.

  20. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  1. Transcriptional activation capacity of the novel PLAG family of zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Hensen, K; Meyen, E; Van de Ven, W J

    1998-09-04

    We have isolated and characterized two novel cDNAs encoding C2H2 zinc finger proteins showing high sequence homology to PLAG1, a protein ectopically activated by promoter swapping or promoter substitution in pleomorphic adenomas with chromosomal abnormalities at chromosome 8q12. PLAG1 and the two new PLAG1 family members (PLAGL1 and PLAGL2) constitute a novel subfamily of zinc finger proteins that recognize DNA and/or RNA. To examine the potential of the three human proteins to modulate transcription, we constructed several PLAG/GAL4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins and measured their ability to activate transcription of a reporter gene construct in different mammalian cell lines and in yeast. Although the carboxyl-terminal part of PLAGL1 shows strong overall transcriptional activity in mesenchymal (COS-1) and epithelial cells (293), both PLAG1 and PLAGL2 transactivate in mesenchymal cells only if depleted from a repressing region. This effect is less profound in epithelial cells. These data suggest that the activation in pleomorphic adenomas of PLAG1 most likely results in uncontrolled activation of downstream target genes.

  2. Impaired transcriptional activity of Nrf2 in age-related myocardial oxidative stress is reversible by moderate exercise training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellamuthu S Gounder

    Full Text Available Aging promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS in cardiomyocytes, which leads to contractile dysfunction and cardiac abnormalities. These changes may contribute to increased cardiovascular disease in the elderly. Inducible antioxidant pathways are regulated by nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2 through antioxidant response cis-elements (AREs and are impaired in the aging heart. Whereas acute exercise stress (AES activates Nrf2 signaling and promotes myocardial antioxidant function in young mice (~2 months, aging mouse (>23 months hearts exhibit significant oxidative stress as compared to those of the young. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-dependent regulation of Nrf2-antioxidant mechanisms and redox homeostasis in mouse hearts and the impact of exercise. Old mice were highly susceptible to oxidative stress following high endurance exercise stress (EES, but demonstrated increased adaptive redox homeostasis after moderate exercise training (MET; 10m/min, for 45 min/day for ~6 weeks. Following EES, transcription and protein levels for most of the ARE-antioxidants were increased in young mice but their induction was blunted in aging mice. In contrast, 6-weeks of chronic MET promoted nuclear levels of Nrf2 along with its target antioxidants in the aging heart to near normal levels as seen in young mice. These observations suggest that enhancing Nrf2 function and endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms by MET, may combat age-induced ROS/RNS and protect the myocardium from oxidative stress diseases.

  3. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  4. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  5. Identification of Sp1 as a Transcription Activator to Regulate Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a metabolic hormone with multiple beneficial effects on lipid and glucose homeostasis. Previous study demonstrated that FGF21 might be one of the Sp1 target genes. However, the transcriptional role of Sp1 on FGF21 in adipose tissue and liver has not been reported. In this study, we found that the proximal promoter of mouse FGF21 is located between −63 and −20 containing two putative Sp1-binding sites. Sp1 is a mammalian transcription factor involved in the regulation of many genes during physiological and pathological processes. Our study showed that overexpression of Sp1 or suppressing Sp1 expression resulted in increased or reduced FGF21 promoter activity, respectively. Mutation analysis demonstrated that the Sp1-binding site located between −46 and −38 plays a primary role in transcription of FGF21. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that Sp1 specifically bound to this region. Furthermore, the binding activity of Sp1 was significantly increased in adipose tissues of HFD-induced obese mouse and liver of DEN-treated mouse. Thus, our results demonstrate that Sp1 positively regulates the basal transcription of FGF21 in the liver and adipose tissue and contributes to the obesity-induced FGF21 upregulation in mouse adipose tissue and hepatic FGF21 upregulation in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. Wnt-induced transcriptional activation is exclusively mediated by TCF/LEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuijers, Jurian; Mokry, Michal; Hatzis, Pantelis; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-13

    Active canonical Wnt signaling results in recruitment of β-catenin to DNA by TCF/LEF family members, leading to transcriptional activation of TCF target genes. However, additional transcription factors have been suggested to recruit β-catenin and tether it to DNA. Here, we describe the genome-wide pattern of β-catenin DNA binding in murine intestinal epithelium, Wnt-responsive colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and HEK293 embryonic kidney cells. We identify two classes of β-catenin binding sites. The first class represents the majority of the DNA-bound β-catenin and co-localizes with TCF4, the prominent TCF/LEF family member in these cells. The second class consists of β-catenin binding sites that co-localize with a minimal amount of TCF4. The latter consists of lower affinity β-catenin binding events, does not drive transcription and often does not contain a consensus TCF binding motif. Surprisingly, a dominant-negative form of TCF4 abrogates the β-catenin/DNA interaction of both classes of binding sites, implying that the second class comprises low affinity TCF-DNA complexes. Our results indicate that β-catenin is tethered to chromatin overwhelmingly through the TCF/LEF transcription factors in these three systems.

  7. Differential expression of two activating transcription factor 5 isoforms in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; La Rosa, Cristina; Forte, Stefano; Calabrese, Giovanna; Colarossi, Cristina; Aiello, Eleonora; Salluzzo, Salvatore; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the activating transcription/cAMP response element-binding protein family of basic leucine zipper proteins that plays an important role in cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The ATF5 gene generates two transcripts: ATF5 isoform 1 and ATF5 isoform 2. A number of studies indicate that ATF5 could be an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in several tumor types; however, so far, the role of ATF5 has not been investigated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Methods Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immuno-histochemical staining were used to study ATF5 mRNA and protein expression in PTC. Results We report here that ATF5 is expressed more in PTC tissue than in normal thyroid tissue. Furthermore, this is the first study that describes the presence of both ATF5 isoforms in PTC. Conclusion These findings could provide potential applications in PTC cancer treatment.

  8. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C; Morgan, Chase J; Sacks, David B

    2016-09-09

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C.; Morgan, Chase J.

    2016-01-01

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. PMID:27440047

  10. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1α gene in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1α transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1α was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1α in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α, and calcineurin Aα and Aβ mRNA were elevated (≈2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1α transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1α may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise. PMID:12563009

  11. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1alpha gene in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-02-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1alpha transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1alpha was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1alpha in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha, and calcineurin Aalpha and Abeta mRNA were elevated (approximately 2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1alpha transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1alpha may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise.

  12. A co-activator of nitrogen-regulated transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussi-Boudekou, S; André, B

    1999-02-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Gln3p and Nil1p of the GATA family play a determinant role in expression of genes that are subject to nitrogen catabolite repression. Here we report the isolation of a new yeast mutant, gan1-1, exhibiting dramatically decreased NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The GAN1 gene was cloned and found to encode a 488-amino-acid polypeptide bearing no typical DNA binding domain. Gan1p is required for full expression of GLN1, GDH2 and also other nitrogen utilization genes, including GAP1, PUT4, MEP2 and GDH1. The extent to which Gan1p is required, however, varies according to the gene and to the nitrogen source available. We show that Gan1p is in fact involved in Gln3p- and Nil1p-dependent transcription. In the case of Gln3p-dependent transcription, the degree to which Gan1p is required appears to be gene specific. The contribution of Gan1p to gene expression is also influenced by the nitrogen status of the cell. We found that GAN1 is identical to ADA1, which encodes a component of the ADA/GCN5 co-activator complex. Ada1/Gan1p thus represents the first reported case of an accessory protein (a co-activator) linking the GATA-binding proteins Gln3p and Nil1p, mediating nitrogen-regulated transcription, to the basal transcription machinery.

  13. Activation of Transcription Factor MEF2D by Bis(3)-cognitin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons and Ameliorates Parkinsonian Motor Defects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L.; Walker, Douglas I.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP+-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP+-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP+-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22891246

  14. Activation of transcription factor MEF2D by bis(3)-cognitin protects dopaminergic neurons and ameliorates Parkinsonian motor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L; Walker, Douglas I; Pennell, Kurt D; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-10-05

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP(+)-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP(+)-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo.

  15. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  16. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  17. O-GlcNAc modification of PPAR{gamma} reduces its transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Suena; Park, Sang Yoon [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Roth, Juergen [Department of Integrated OMICS for Biomedical Science, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoe Suk, E-mail: hoeskim@snu.ac.kr [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won, E-mail: chojw311@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Integrated OMICS for Biomedical Science, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that PPAR{gamma} is modified by O-GlcNAc in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Thr54 of PPAR{gamma}1 is the major O-GlcNAc site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transcriptional activity of PPAR{gamma}1 was decreased on treatment with the OGA inhibitor. -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a key regulator of adipogenesis and is important for the homeostasis of the adipose tissue. The {beta}-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, a posttranslational modification on various nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, is involved in the regulation of protein function. Here, we report that PPAR{gamma} is modified by O-GlcNAc in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mass spectrometric analysis and mutant studies revealed that the threonine 54 of the N-terminal AF-1 domain of PPAR{gamma} is the major O-GlcNAc site. Transcriptional activity of wild type PPAR{gamma} was decreased 30% by treatment with the specific O-GlcNAcase (OGA) inhibitor, but the T54A mutant of PPAR{gamma} did not respond to inhibitor treatment. In 3T3-L1 cells, an increase in O-GlcNAc modification by OGA inhibitor reduced PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity and terminal adipocyte differentiation. Our results suggest that the O-GlcNAc state of PPAR{gamma} influences its transcriptional activity and is involved in adipocyte differentiation.

  18. Effects of a methanolic fraction of soybean seeds on the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Carrara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effects of soy isoflavones may be mediated by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR, the present study investigated whether the methanolic fractions obtained from soybean seeds (E1 and soybean seed coats with hypocotyls (E2 could influence PPARα, PPARγ and PPARβ/δ transcriptional activity. The isoflavones from E1 and E2 were quantified by HPLC analysis. E1 and E2 were rich in isoflavones (daidzin, glycitin, genistin, malonyldaidzin, malonylglycitin, malonylgenistin, daidzein, glycitein, and genistein. Moreover, E1 and E2 showed no evidence of genetically modified material containing the gene CP4 EPSPS. To investigate PPAR transcriptional activity, human promonocytic U-937 cells were treated with E1 and E2 (200, 400, 800, and 1600 µg/mL, positive controls or vehicle. Data are reported as fold-activation of the luciferase reporter driven by the PPAR-responsive element. Dose-response analysis revealed that E1 and E2 induced the transcriptional activity of PPARα (P < 0.001, with activation comparable to that obtained with 0.1 mM bezafibrate (positive control at 1600 µg/mL (4-fold and 800 µg/mL (9-fold, respectively. In addition, dose-response analysis revealed that E1 and E2 activated PPARβ/δ (P < 0.05, and the activation at 800 µg/mL (4- and 9-fold, respectively was comparable to that of 0.1 mM bezafibrate (positive control. However, no effect on PPARγ was observed. Activation of PPARα is consistent with the lipid-lowering activity of soy isoflavones in vivo, but further studies are needed to determine the physiological significance of PPARβ/δ activation.

  19. Differential transcriptional activation of select metabolic genes in response to variations in exercise intensity and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Audrey L; Pilegaard, Henriette; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-11-01

    Cellular adaptations to endurance training are influenced by the intensity and duration of exercise. To examine the impact of exercise intensity and duration on the acute transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in red (RG) and white (WG) gastrocnemius muscle, rats completed either low-intensity [ approximately 50% maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max)] treadmill exercise (LIE) for 45 min, LIE for 180 min, or high-intensity ( approximately 75% VO2 max) exercise (HIE) for 45 min. LIE for 45 min activated (P 30-fold) and HKII transcription (>25-fold). In WG, extending LIE for 180 min induced a much greater and prolonged (through 2- to 4-h recovery) activation of PDK4, UCP3 (both >200-fold), and HO-1 (>10-fold). HIE elicited a similar pattern of gene activation to LIE in both RG and WG, with the exception that HIE triggered >10-fold activation of HO-1 in WG. These data provide evidence that both the intensity and the duration of exercise affect the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in muscle in a fiber type-specific manner, possibly reflecting the relative stress imposed by the exercise bout.

  20. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L; Williams, LaKeisha G; Winfield, Leyte L

    2014-08-08

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules upregulate ERβ activity while down regulating that of ERα.

  1. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid-treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients.

  2. p55PIK Transcriptionally Activated by MZF1 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available p55PIK, regulatory subunit of class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression by interaction with tumor repressor retinoblastoma (Rb protein. A recent study showed that Rb protein can localize to the mitochondria in proliferative cells. Aberrant p55PIK expression may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. To reveal the mechanisms of p55PIK transcriptional regulation, the p55PIK promoter characteristics were analyzed. The data show that myeloid zinc finger 1, MZF1, is necessary for p55PIK gene transcription activation. ChIP (Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay shows that MZF1 binds to the cis-element “TGGGGA” in p55PIK promoter. In MZF1 overexpressed cells, the promoter activity, expression of p55PIK, and cell proliferation rate were observed to be significantly enhanced. Whereas in MZF1-silenced cells, the promoter activity and expression of p55PIK and cell proliferation level was statistically decreased. In CRC tissues, MZF1 and p55PIK mRNA expression were increased (P=0.046, P=0.047, resp.. A strong positive correlation (Rs=0.94 between MZF1 and p55PIK mRNA expression was observed. Taken together, we concluded that p55PIK is transcriptionally activated by MZF1, resulting in increased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells.

  3. A Non-Symmetric Reconstruction Technique for Transcriptionally-Active Viral Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amina; Varano, A Cameron; Demmert, Andrew C; Melanson, Linda A; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2015-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which RNA viruses coordinate their transcriptional activities are not fully understood. For rotavirus, an important pediatric gastroenteric pathogen, transcription occurs within a double-layered particle that encloses the viral genome. To date, there remains very little structural information available for actively-transcribing rotavirus double-layered particles, which could provide new insights for antiviral development. To improve our vision of these viral assemblies, we developed a new combinatorial strategy that utilizes currently available high-resolution image processing tools. First, we employed a 3D classification routine that allowed us to sort transcriptionally-active rotavirus assemblies on the basis of their internal density. Next, we implemented an additional 3D refinement procedure using the most active class of DLPs. For comparison, the refined structures were computed in parallel by (1) enforcing icosahedral symmetry, and by (2) using no symmetry operators. Comparing the resulting structures, we were able to visualize the continuum that exists between viral capsid proteins and the viral RNA for the first time.

  4. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  5. A light- and calcium-gated transcription factor for imaging and manipulating activated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Wildes, Craig P; Pattarabanjird, Tanyaporn; Sanchez, Mateo I; Glober, Gordon F; Matthews, Gillian A; Tye, Kay M; Ting, Alice Y

    2017-09-01

    Activity remodels neurons, altering their molecular, structural, and electrical characteristics. To enable the selective characterization and manipulation of these neurons, we present FLARE, an engineered transcription factor that drives expression of fluorescent proteins, opsins, and other genetically encoded tools only in the subset of neurons that experienced activity during a user-defined time window. FLARE senses the coincidence of elevated cytosolic calcium and externally applied blue light, which together produce translocation of a membrane-anchored transcription factor to the nucleus to drive expression of any transgene. In cultured rat neurons, FLARE gives a light-to-dark signal ratio of 120 and a high- to low-calcium signal ratio of 10 after 10 min of stimulation. Opsin expression permitted functional manipulation of FLARE-marked neurons. In adult mice, FLARE also gave light- and motor-activity-dependent transcription in the cortex. Due to its modular design, minute-scale temporal resolution, and minimal dark-state leak, FLARE should be useful for the study of activity-dependent processes in neurons and other cells that signal with calcium.

  6. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  7. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  8. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  9. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  10. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  11. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  12. Gyrase-dependent stabilization of pSC101 plasmid inheritance by transcriptionally active promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, S L; Miller, C A; Cohen, S N

    1991-09-01

    The pSC101 plasmid encodes a cis-acting genetic locus termed par that ensures the stable inheritance of plasmids in a population of dividing cells. In the absence of selection, par-defective plasmids are lost rapidly from the bacterial population. We report here that the stability of par-deleted pSC101 derivatives is restored by introducing certain adventitious bacterial promoters onto the plasmid. Stabilization requires active transcription from the inserted promoter and is affected by the site and orientation of the insertion, the length of the nascent transcript and DNA gyrase activity. While a promotor-associated overall increase in negative superhelicity of plasmid DNA was observed, stabilized inheritance appeared to be dependent on localized rather than generalized supercoiling. Our demonstration that promoter-induced DNA supercoiling can mimic the effects of the pSC101 par locus provides evidence that the previously reported superhelicity-generating effects of par are intrinsic to its function.

  13. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  14. Wavelet-based detection of transcriptional activity on a novel Staphylococcus aureus tiling microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segura Víctor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density oligonucleotide microarray is an appropriate technology for genomic analysis, and is particulary useful in the generation of transcriptional maps, ChIP-on-chip studies and re-sequencing of the genome.Transcriptome analysis of tiling microarray data facilitates the discovery of novel transcripts and the assessment of differential expression in diverse experimental conditions. Although new technologies such as next-generation sequencing have appeared, microarrays might still be useful for the study of small genomes or for the analysis of genomic regions with custom microarrays due to their lower price and good accuracy in expression quantification. Results Here, we propose a novel wavelet-based method, named ZCL (zero-crossing lines, for the combined denoising and segmentation of tiling signals. The denoising is performed with the classical SUREshrink method and the detection of transcriptionally active regions is based on the computation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT. In particular, the detection of the transitions is implemented as the thresholding of the zero-crossing lines. The algorithm described has been applied to the public Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset and it has been compared with two well-known algorithms: pseudo-median sliding window (PMSW and the structural change model (SCM. As a proof-of-principle, we applied the ZCL algorithm to the analysis of the custom tiling microarray hybridization results of a S. aureus mutant deficient in the sigma B transcription factor. The challenge was to identify those transcripts whose expression decreases in the absence of sigma B. Conclusions The proposed method archives the best performance in terms of positive predictive value (PPV while its sensitivity is similar to the other algorithms used for the comparison. The computation time needed to process the transcriptional signals is low as compared with model-based methods and in the same range to those

  15. 24. The transcription factors and the relevant signaling pathways activated by low concentration MNNG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Aims: To explore the transcription factors and related signal transduction pathways activated in the alkylating agents N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanindine (MNNG) exposed cells which may involved in the mechanism of MNNG induced changes of gene expression, especially the elevation of DNA polymerase β expression and also the consequence of JNK kinase activation which were reported previously in this lab. Methods: Clontech Mercury pathway profiling system containing 8 different vectors in which a specific response element is located upstream from the SEAP-reporter gene were employed to detect the transcription factor activation in Vero cells treated with 0.2 μmol/L MNNG for 2 hours. Thoroughly, CREB phosphorylation, protein kinase A (PKA) and the cellular cAMP content were also assayed with PhosphoPlus CREB (ser-133) antibody kit, protein kinase assay kit and cAMP RIA kit respectively. Results: Among 8 different response elements, the expression of the reporter gene governed by the transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding protein), AP1 (activator protein 1), NF-κB (nuclear factor κ B) were elevated by 1.3, 1.4 and 1.3 times higber than control respectively. The level of activated CREB by Ser-133 phosphorylation was 2.08 times higher than control in cells treated with MNNG for 60 min, as measured by immunoblotting. The activity of CREB upstream kinase protein kinase A (PKA), which can phosphorylate CREB on ser-133 was also activated, and the activation peaked at 60 min (11.03±2.80 arbitrary units vs 0.86±0.43 of control). Also, cAMP levels were significantly raised after 60-minute-treatment, 1.52 times higher vs those in solvent control. Conclusion: In addition of previously reported JNK activation, we show here that low concentration alkylating agent MNNG can also activate the cAMP-PKA and NF-κB pathway. These in consequence induce the activation of transcription factors APl, CREB and NF-κB, which may related to the MNNG induced changes in

  16. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding reg...

  17. Transcriptional activation of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 by USF1 and Rta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chen-Chia; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-09-01

    During its lytic cycle, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses Rta, a factor encoded by BRLF1 that activates the transcription of viral lytic genes. We found that upstream stimulating factor (USF) binds to E1, one of the five E boxes located at - 79 in the BRLF1 promoter (Rp), to activate BRLF1 transcription. Furthermore, Rta was shown to interact with USF1 in coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-pulldown assays, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy further confirmed that these two proteins colocalize in the nucleus. Rta was also found to bind with the E1 sequence in a biotin-labelled E1 probe, but only in the presence of USF1, suggesting that these two proteins likely form a complex on E1. We subsequently constructed p188mSZ, a reporter plasmid that contained the sequence from - 188 to +5 in Rp, within which the Sp1 site and Zta response element were mutated. In EBV-negative Akata cells cotransfected with p188mSZ and plasmids expressing USF1 and Rta, synergistic activation of Rp transcription was observed. However, after mutating the E1 sequence in p188mSZ, USF1 and Rta were no longer able to transactivate Rp, indicating that Rta autoregulates BRLF1 transcription via its interaction with USF1 on E1. This study showed that pUSF1 transfection after EBV lytic induction in P3HR1 cells increases Rta expression, indicating that USF1 activates Rta expression after the virus enters the lytic cycle. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which USF interacts with Rta to promote viral lytic development, and provide additional insight into the viral-host interactions of EBV.

  18. Improved Somatic Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs)

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Finola E.; Deepak Reyon; Sander, Jeffry D.; Sarah A Martinez; Blackburn, Jessica S; Cyd Khayter; Ramirez, Cherie L.; J Keith Joung; Langenau, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebra...

  19. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This in...

  20. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embr...

  1. Androgen receptor serine 81 phosphorylation mediates chromatin binding and transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoyong; Gulla, Sarah; Cai, Changmeng; Balk, Steven P

    2012-03-01

    Our previous findings indicated that androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation at serine 81 is stimulated by the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In this report, we extended our previous study and confirmed that Ser-81 phosphorylation increases during mitosis, coincident with CDK1 activation. We further showed blocking cell cycle at G(1) or S phase did not disrupt androgen-induced Ser-81 phosphorylation and AR-dependent transcription, consistent with a recent report that AR was phosphorylated at Ser-81 and activated by the transcriptional CDK9. To assess the function of Ser-81 phosphorylation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing endogenous AR, we developed a ligand switch strategy using a ligand-binding domain mutation (W741C) that renders AR responsive to the antagonist bicalutamide. An S81A/W741C double mutant AR stably expressed in PCa cells failed to transactivate the endogenous AR-regulated PSA or TMPRSS2 genes. ChIP showed that the S81A mutation prevented ligand-induced AR recruitment to these genes, and cellular fractionation revealed that the S81A mutation globally abrogated chromatin binding. Conversely, the AR fraction rapidly recruited to chromatin after androgen stimulation was highly enriched for Ser-81 phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of CDK1 and CDK9 decreased AR Ser-81 phosphorylation, chromatin binding, and transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that Ser-81 phosphorylation by CDK9 stabilizes AR chromatin binding for transcription and suggest that CDK1-mediated Ser-81 phosphorylation during mitosis provides a pool of Ser-81 phosphorylation AR that can be readily recruited to chromatin for gene reactivation and may enhance AR activity in PCa.

  2. An upstream activator of transcription coordinately increases the level and epigenetic stability of gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Magis, Wendy; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I. K.

    1996-01-01

    The mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) promoter is activated by the metal response element-binding transcription factor (MTF), which binds metal response elements (MREs) when stimulated with heavy metals. We analyzed eight K562 erythroleukemia cell clones, each carrying a single integrated copy of an mMT-I/β-geo construct, using a system that can independently assess the level of β-geo expression and the rate at which it is silenced. In these clones, basal expression ...

  3. FATS is a transcriptional target of p53 and associated with antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xifeng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Frequent mutations of p53 in human cancers exemplify its crucial role as a tumor suppressor transcription factor, and p21, a transcriptional target of p53, plays a central role in surveillance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Our previous study has shown that FATS stabilize p21 to preserve genome integrity. In this study we identified a novel transcript variant of FATS (GenBank: GQ499374 through screening a cDNA library from mouse testis, which uncovered the promoter region of mouse FATS. Mouse FATS was highly expressed in testis. The p53-responsive elements existed in proximal region of both mouse and human FATS promoters. Functional study indicated that the transcription of FATS gene was activated by p53, whereas such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-RE of FATS promoter. Furthermore, the expression of FATS increased upon DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. FATS expression was silent or downregulated in human cancers, and overexpression of FATS suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo independently of p53. Our results reveal FATS as a p53-regulated gene to monitor genomic stability.

  4. An upstream activator of transcription coordinately increases the level and epigenetic stability of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, Wendy; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I. K.

    1996-01-01

    The mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) promoter is activated by the metal response element-binding transcription factor (MTF), which binds metal response elements (MREs) when stimulated with heavy metals. We analyzed eight K562 erythroleukemia cell clones, each carrying a single integrated copy of an mMT-I/β-geo construct, using a system that can independently assess the level of β-geo expression and the rate at which it is silenced. In these clones, basal expression and rate of silencing vary widely and independently with integration site. This implies that the rates of transcription and of silencing are separate properties determined by interaction of the regulatory elements of the transgene with the site of integration. Induction of the mMT-I promoter with zinc both increases expression level and strongly retards silencing of β-geo expression. At a given integration site, expression level and silencing are affected coordinately by induction. Taken together with earlier studies of distant metal-responsive elements, these results suggest that distance from the promoter may determine whether a factor can increase transcription rate. Stimulation of an MRE can both increase transcription and overcome repressive effects of chromatin; we suggest that these functions are linked. PMID:8943035

  5. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence P. Varodayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces the Vamp2 gene, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 to induce Vamp2 gene expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function.

  6. BPTF is required for c-MYC transcriptional activity and in vivo tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richart, Laia; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, Enrique; Río-Machín, Ana; de Andrés, Mónica P.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Lobo, Víctor J. Sánchez-Arévalo; Real, Francisco X.

    2016-01-01

    c-MYC oncogene is deregulated in most human tumours. Histone marks associated with transcriptionally active genes define high-affinity c-MYC targets. The mechanisms involved in their recognition by c-MYC are unknown. Here we report that c-MYC interacts with BPTF, a core subunit of the NURF chromatin-remodelling complex. BPTF is required for the activation of the full c-MYC transcriptional programme in fibroblasts. BPTF knockdown leads to decreased c-MYC recruitment to DNA and changes in chromatin accessibility. In Bptf-null MEFs, BPTF is necessary for c-MYC-driven proliferation, G1–S progression and replication stress, but not for c-MYC-driven apoptosis. Bioinformatics analyses unveil that BPTF levels correlate positively with c-MYC-driven transcriptional signatures. In vivo, Bptf inactivation in pre-neoplastic pancreatic acinar cells significantly delays tumour development and extends survival. Our findings uncover BPTF as a crucial c-MYC co-factor required for its biological activity and suggest that the BPTF-c-MYC axis is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:26729287

  7. Domain-specific c-Myc ubiquitylation controls c-Myc transcriptional and apoptotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Spears, Erick; Boone, David N.; Li, Zhaoliang; Gregory, Mark A.; Hann, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor c-Myc causes transformation and tumorigenesis, but it can also induce apoptotic cell death. Although tumor suppressors are necessary for c-Myc to induce apoptosis, the pathways and mechanisms are unclear. To further understand how c-Myc switches from an oncogenic protein to an apoptotic protein, we examined the mechanism of p53-independent c-Myc–induced apoptosis. We show that the tumor suppressor protein ARF mediates this switch by inhibiting ubiquitylation of the c-Myc transcriptional domain (TD). Whereas TD ubiquitylation is critical for c-Myc canonical transcriptional activity and transformation, inhibition of ubiquitylation leads to the induction of the noncanonical c-Myc target gene, Egr1, which is essential for efficient c-Myc–induced p53-independent apoptosis. ARF inhibits the interaction of c-Myc with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp2. Overexpression of Skp2, which occurs in many human tumors, inhibits the recruitment of ARF to the Egr1 promoter, leading to inhibition of c-Myc–induced apoptosis. Therapeutic strategies could be developed to activate this intrinsic apoptotic activity of c-Myc to inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:23277542

  8. Presence and transcriptional activity of anaerobic fungi in agricultural biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollhofer, Veronika; Callaghan, Tony M; Griffith, Gareth W; Lebuhn, Michael; Bauer, Johann

    2017-07-01

    Bioaugmentation with anaerobic fungi (AF) is promising for improved biogas generation from lignocelluloses-rich substrates. However, before implementing AF into biogas processes it is necessary to investigate their natural occurrence, community structure and transcriptional activity in agricultural biogas plants. Thus, AF were detected with three specific PCR based methods: (i) Copies of their 18S genes were found in 7 of 10 biogas plants. (ii) Transcripts of a GH5 endoglucanase gene were present at low level in two digesters, indicating transcriptional cellulolytic activity of AF. (iii) Phylogeny of the AF-community was inferred with the 28S gene. A new Piromyces species was isolated from a PCR-positive digester. Evidence for AF was only found in biogas plants operated with high proportions of animal feces. Thus, AF were most likely transferred into digesters with animal derived substrates. Additionally, high process temperatures in combination with long retention times seemed to impede AF survival and activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  10. Solasonine, A Natural Glycoalkaloid Compound, Inhibits Gli-Mediated Transcriptional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacle limiting the efficacy of current Smoothened (Smo inhibitors is the primary and acquired resistance mainly caused by Smo mutations and Gli amplification. In this context, developing Hh inhibitors targeting Gli, the final effector of this signaling pathway, may combat the resistance. In this study we found that solasonine, a natural glycoalkaloid compound, significantly inhibited the hedgehog (Hh pathway activity. Meanwhile, solasonine may obviously inhibit the alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in C3H10T1/2 cells, concomitantly with reductions of the mRNA expression of Gli1 and Ptch1. However, we found that solasonine exhibited no effect on the transcriptional factors activities provoked by TNF-α and PGE2, thus suggesting its selectivity against Hh pathway activity. Furthermore, we identified that solasonine inhibited the Hh pathway activity by acting on its transcriptional factor Gli using a series of complementary data. We also observed that solasonine obviously inhibited the Gli-luciferase activity provoked by ectopic expression of Smo mutants which may cause the resistance to the current Smo inhibitors. Our study suggests that solasonine may significantly inhibit the Hh pathway activity by acting on Gli, therefore indicating the possibility to use solasonine as a lead compound to develop anticancer drugs for combating the resistance of current Smo inhibitors.

  11. Characterization of the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor-type, Z polypeptide 1 (PTPRZ1 by hypoxia inducible factor-2 alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are the principal means by which cells upregulate genes in response to hypoxia and certain other stresses. There are two major HIFs, HIF-1 and HIF-2. We previously found that certain genes are preferentially activated by HIF-2. One was protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor-type, Z polypeptide 1 (PTPRZ1. PTPRZ1 is overexpressed in a number of tumors and has been implicated in glioblastoma pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the preferential activation of PTPRZ1 by HIF-2, we studied the PTPRZ1 promoter in HEK293T cells and Hep3B cells. Through deletion and mutational analysis, we identified the principal hypoxia response element. This element bound to both HIF-1 and HIF-2. We further identified a role for ELK1, an E26 transformation-specific (Ets factor that can bind to HIF-2alpha but not HIF-1alpha, in the HIF-2 responsiveness. Knock-down experiments using siRNA to ELK1 decreased HIF-2 activation by over 50%. Also, a deletion mutation of one of the two Ets binding motifs located near the principal hypoxia response element similarly decreased activation of the PTPRZ1 promoter by HIF-2. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed binding of HIF and ELK1 to the PTPRZ1 promoter region. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results identify HIF-binding and Ets-binding motifs on the PTPRZ1 promoter and provide evidence that preferential activation of PTPRZ1 by HIF-2 results at least in part from cooperative binding of HIF-2 and ELK1 to nearby sites on the PTPRZ1 promoter region. These results may have implications in tumor pathogenesis and in understanding neurobiology, and may help inform the development of novel tumor therapy.

  12. The Transcriptional Repressive Activity of KRAB Zinc Finger Proteins Does Not Correlate with Their Ability to Recruit TRIM28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kristin E.; Shylo, Natalia A.; Alexander, Katherine A.; Churchill, Angela J.; Copperman, Cecilia; García-García, María J.

    2016-01-01

    KRAB domain Zinc finger proteins are one of the most abundant families of transcriptional regulators in higher vertebrates. The prevailing view is that KRAB domain proteins function as potent transcriptional repressors by recruiting TRIM28 and promoting heterochromatin spreading. However, the extent to which all KRAB domain proteins are TRIM28-dependent transcriptional repressors is currently unclear. Our studies on mouse ZFP568 revealed that TRIM28 recruitment by KRAB domain proteins is not sufficient to warrant transcriptional repressive activity. By using luciferase reporter assays and yeast two-hybrid experiments, we tested the ability of ZFP568 and other mouse KRAB domain proteins to repress transcription and bind TRIM28. We found that some mouse KRAB domain proteins are poor transcriptional repressors despite their ability to recruit TRIM28, while others showed strong KRAB-dependent transcriptional repression, but no TRIM28 binding. Together, our results show that the transcriptional repressive activity of KRAB-ZNF proteins does not correlate with their ability to recruit TRIM28, and provide evidence that KRAB domains can regulate transcription in a TRIM28-independent fashion. Our findings challenge the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by KRAB domain proteins to control gene expression and highlight that a high percentage of KRAB domain proteins in the mouse genome differ from the consensus KRAB sequence at amino acid residues that are critical for TRIM28 binding and/or repressive activity. PMID:27658112

  13. In vivo identification of promoter elements and transcription factors mediating activation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase by T{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Lindsey R.; Niesen, Melissa I. [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Jaroszeski, Mark [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Ness, Gene C., E-mail: gness@hsc.usf.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The promoter elements and transcription factors necessary for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) induction of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were investigated by transfecting rat livers with wild type and mutant HMGR promoter-luciferase constructs using in vivo electroporation. Mutations in the sterol response element (SRE), nuclear factor-y (NF-Y) site, and the newly identified upstream transcription factor-2 (USF-2) site essentially abolished the T{sub 3} response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that T{sub 3} treatment caused a 4-fold increase in in vivo binding of USF-2 to the HMGR promoter. Co-transfection of the wild type HMGR promoter with siRNAs to USF-2, SREBP-2, or NF-Y nearly abolished the T{sub 3} induction, as measured by promoter activity. These data provide in vivo evidence for functional roles for USF-2, SREBP-2, and NF-Y in mediating the T{sub 3}-induction of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  14. Molecular genetics of blood-fleshed peach reveals activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis by NAC transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Wang, Huiliang; Gu, Chao; Dare, Andrew P; Espley, Richard V; He, Huaping; Allan, Andrew C; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin pigmentation is an important consumer trait in peach (Prunus persica). In this study, the genetic basis of the blood-flesh trait was investigated using the cultivar Dahongpao, which shows high levels of cyanidin-3-glucoside in the mesocarp. Elevation of anthocyanin levels in the flesh was correlated with the expression of an R2R3 MYB transcription factor, PpMYB10.1. However, PpMYB10.1 did not co-segregate with the blood-flesh trait. The blood-flesh trait was mapped to a 200-kb interval on peach linkage group (LG) 5. Within this interval, a gene encoding a NAC domain transcription factor (TF) was found to be highly up-regulated in blood-fleshed peaches when compared with non-red-fleshed peaches. This NAC TF, designated blood (BL), acts as a heterodimer with PpNAC1 which shows high levels of expression in fruit at late developmental stages. We show that the heterodimer of BL and PpNAC1 can activate the transcription of PpMYB10.1, resulting in anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco. Furthermore, silencing the BL gene reduces anthocyanin pigmentation in blood-fleshed peaches. The transactivation activity of the BL-PpNAC1 heterodimer is repressed by a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like TF, PpSPL1. Low levels of PpMYB10.1 expression in fruit at early developmental stages is probably attributable to lower levels of expression of PpNAC1 plus the presence of high levels of repressors such as PpSPL1. We present a mechanism whereby BL is the key gene for the blood-flesh trait in peach via its activation of PpMYB10.1 in maturing fruit. Partner TFs such as basic helix-loop-helix proteins and NAC1 are required, as is the removal of transcriptional repressors.

  15. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  16. Dry and wet approaches for genome-wide functional annotation of conventional and unconventional transcriptional activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Levati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master gene products that regulate gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli. They interact with DNA in a sequence-specific manner using a variety of DNA-binding domain (DBD modules. This allows to properly position their second domain, called “effector domain”, to directly or indirectly recruit positively or negatively acting co-regulators including chromatin modifiers, thus modulating preinitiation complex formation as well as transcription elongation. At variance with the DBDs, which are comprised of well-defined and easily recognizable DNA binding motifs, effector domains are usually much less conserved and thus considerably more difficult to predict. Also not so easy to identify are the DNA-binding sites of TFs, especially on a genome-wide basis and in the case of overlapping binding regions. Another emerging issue, with many potential regulatory implications, is that of so-called “moonlighting” transcription factors, i.e., proteins with an annotated function unrelated to transcription and lacking any recognizable DBD or effector domain, that play a role in gene regulation as their second job. Starting from bioinformatic and experimental high-throughput tools for an unbiased, genome-wide identification and functional characterization of TFs (especially transcriptional activators, we describe both established (and usually well affordable as well as newly developed platforms for DNA-binding site identification. Selected combinations of these search tools, some of which rely on next-generation sequencing approaches, allow delineating the entire repertoire of TFs and unconventional regulators encoded by the any sequenced genome.

  17. MYRF is a membrane-associated transcription factor that autoproteolytically cleaves to directly activate myelin genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bujalka

    Full Text Available The myelination of axons is a crucial step during vertebrate central nervous system (CNS development, allowing for rapid and energy efficient saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Accordingly, the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, and their expression of myelin genes are under tight transcriptional control. We previously identified a putative transcription factor, Myelin Regulatory Factor (Myrf, as being vital for CNS myelination. Myrf is required for the generation of CNS myelination during development and also for its maintenance in the adult. It has been controversial, however, whether Myrf directly regulates transcription, with reports of a transmembrane domain and lack of nuclear localization. Here we show that Myrf is a membrane-associated transcription factor that undergoes an activating proteolytic cleavage to separate its transmembrane domain-containing C-terminal region from a nuclear-targeted N-terminal region. Unexpectedly, this cleavage event occurs via a protein domain related to the autoproteolytic intramolecular chaperone domain of the bacteriophage tail spike proteins, the first time this domain has been found to play a role in eukaryotic proteins. Using ChIP-Seq we show that the N-terminal cleavage product directly binds the enhancer regions of oligodendrocyte-specific and myelin genes. This binding occurs via a defined DNA-binding consensus sequence and strongly promotes the expression of target genes. These findings identify Myrf as a novel example of a membrane-associated transcription factor and provide a direct molecular mechanism for its regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelination.

  18. The suppression of fibroblast growth factor 2/fibroblast growth factor 4-dependent tumour angiogenesis and growth by the anti-growth factor activity of dextran derivative (CMDB7).

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri-Yarmand, R.; Kourbali, Y; Mabilat, C; Morère, J. F.; Martin, A; Lu, H; Soria, C; Jozefonvicz, J; Crépin, M

    1998-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran (CMDB7) blocks basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)-dependent cell proliferation of a human breast epithelial line (HBL100), suggesting its potential role as a potent antiangiogenic substance. The derived cell line (HH9), which was transformed with the hst/FGF4 gene, has been shown to be highly proliferative in vitro and to induce angiogenic tumours in nude mice. We show here that CMDB7 inhibits the mitogenic activities of t...

  19. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L., E-mail: kominsc@jhmi.edu

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator

  20. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J

    2015-02-03

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Although aberrant activation of Yki orthologs stimulates cardiac hyperplasia in mice, cardiac-specific expression of an activated mutant form of Yki in fruit flies caused cardiac hypertrophy without hyperplasia. Knockdown of Yki caused cardiac dilation without loss of cardiomyocytes and prevented Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In flies, Yki-induced cardiac hypertrophy required the TEA domain-containing transcription factor Scalloped, and, in mammalian cells, expression of mouse Raf(L613V), an activated form of Raf with a Noonan syndrome mutation, increased Yki-induced Scalloped activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Tgi (a Tondu domain-containing Scalloped-binding corepressor) in the fly heart abrogated Yki- or Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, crosstalk between Raf and Yki occurs in the heart and can influence Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors as transcriptional nodal points and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D; Plutzky, Jorge

    2007-01-30

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of key metabolic pathways such as lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, and insulin sensitivity. More recent work implicates all 3 PPAR isotypes (alpha, gamma, and delta, also known as beta or beta/delta) in inflammatory and atherosclerotic pathways. Because these nuclear receptors are activated by extracellular signals and control multiple gene targets, PPARs can be seen as nodes that control multiple inputs and outputs involved in energy balance, providing insight into how metabolism and the vasculature may be integrated. The ongoing clinical use of fibrates, which activate PPARalpha, and thiazolidinediones, which activate PPARgamma, establishes these receptors as viable drug targets, whereas considerable in vitro animal model and human surrogate marker studies suggest that PPAR activation may limit inflammation and atherosclerosis. Together, these various observations have stimulated intense interest in PPARs as therapeutic targets and led to large-scale cardiovascular end-point trials with PPAR agonists. The first of these studies has generated mixed results that require careful review, especially in anticipation of additional clinical trial data and ongoing attempts to develop novel PPAR modulators. Such analysis of the existing PPAR data, the appropriate use of currently approved PPAR agonists, and continued progress in PPAR therapeutics will be predicated on a better understanding of PPAR biology.

  2. ShcA regulates neurite outgrowth stimulated by neural cell adhesion molecule but not by fibroblast growth factor 2: evidence for a distinct fibroblast growth factor receptor response to neural cell adhesion molecule activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Lundfald, Line; Ditlevsen, Dorte K;

    2004-01-01

    by two principal routes of signaling: NCAM/Fyn and NCAM/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), respectively. Previous studies have shown that activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases is a pivotal point of convergence in NCAM signaling, but the mechanisms behind this activation are not clear....... Here, we investigated the involvement of adaptor proteins in NCAM and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-mediated neurite outgrowth in the PC12-E2 cell line. We found that both FGFR substrate-2 and Grb2 play important roles in NCAM as well as in FGF2-stimulated events. In contrast, the docking protein...... ShcA was pivotal to neurite outgrowth induced by NCAM, but not by FGF2, in PC12 cells. Moreover, in rat cerebellar granule neurons, phosphorylation of ShcA was stimulated by an NCAM mimicking peptide, but not by FGF2. This activation was blocked by inhibitors of both FGFR and Fyn, indicating that NCAM...

  3. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lushuai [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Han, Xiao [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaohua [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Niu, Yuanjie [Chawnshang Chang Sex Hormone Research Center, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Ren, Shancheng, E-mail: renshancheng@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Yingli, E-mail: sunyl@big.ac.cn [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  4. Activation of the Ig Iα1 promoter by the transcription factor Ets-1 triggers Ig Iα1-Cα1 germline transcription in epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Xu, San; Jiang, Yiqun; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Hu, Duosha; Li, Wei; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Cao, Ya

    2014-03-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are known to be synthesized and secreted only by B lymphocytes. Class switch recombination (CSR) is a key event that enables B cells to express Igs, and one of the crucial steps for CSR initiation is the germline transcription of Ig genes. Surprisingly, recent studies have demonstrated that the Ig genes are also expressed in some epithelial cancer cells; however, the mechanisms underlying how cancer cells initiate CSR and express Igs are still unknown. In this study, we confirmed that the Ig Iα1 promoter in cancer cell lines was activated by the Ets-1 transcription factor, and the activity of the Ig Iα1 promoter and Ig Iα1-Cα1 germline transcription were attenuated after knockdown of Ets-1 by specific small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Furthermore, the expression of Ets-1 and Igα heavy chain in cancer cells was dose dependently upregulated by TGF-β1. These results indicate that activation of the Ig Iα1 promoter by the transcription factor Ets-1 is a critical pathway and provides a novel mechanism for Ig expression in non-B cell cancers.

  5. Fem1b promotes ubiquitylation and suppresses transcriptional activity of Gli1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, Andrew S; Chen, Yong-Bin; Jackson, Ramon J; Jiang, Jin; Maher, Joseph F

    2013-10-25

    The mammalian Fem1b gene encodes a homolog of FEM-1, a protein in the sex-determination pathway of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Fem1b and FEM-1 proteins each contain a VHL-box motif that mediates their interaction with certain E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. In C. elegans, FEM-1 negatively regulates the transcription factor TRA-1, and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate recognition subunit to target TRA-1 for ubiquitylation. TRA-1 is homologous to the mammalian Gli1 protein, a transcription factor that mediates Hedgehog signaling as well as having Hedgehog-independent functions. Whether the interaction between nematode FEM-1 and TRA-1 proteins is conserved, between corresponding mammalian homologs, has not been reported. Herein, we show that Fem1b interacts with Gli1 within cells, and directly binds Gli1. Fem1b also promotes ubiquitylation of Gli1, suppresses transcriptional activation by Gli1, and attenuates an oncogenic Gli1 autoregulatory loop in cancer cells, all dependent on the VHL-box of Fem1b. These findings have implications for understanding the cellular functions of Fem1b, and the regulation of Gli1 oncoprotein activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ELK3 suppresses angiogenesis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of ETS-1 on MT1-MMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    Ets transcription factors play important roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Knockout of the Ets gene family members in mice resulted in disrupted angiogenesis and malformed vascular systems. In this study, the role and mechanism of ELK3, an Ets factor, in angiogenesis was investigated using ELK3-specific siRNA in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo implantation assay. The suppression of ELK3 expression resulted in the reinforcement of VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs. The in vivo Matrigel plug assay also showed that ELK3 knockdown resulted in increased angiogenesis. Luciferase activity of the MT1-MMP promoter induced by ETS-1 factor was attenuated ELK3 co-transfection. CHIP assay showed the binding of ELK3 on the MT1-MMP promoter. MT1-MMP knockdown in the ELK3 knockdowned cells resulted in the decrease of tube formation suggesting that MT1-MMP transcriptional repression is required for ELK3-mediated anti-angiogenesis effect. Our data also showed that the suppressive effect of ELK3 on the angiogenesis was partly due to the inhibitory effect of ELK3 to the ETS-1 transcriptional activity on the MT1-MMP promoter rather than direct suppression of ELK3 on the target gene, since the expression level of co-repressor Sin3A is low in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that ELK3 plays a negative role of VEGF-induced angiogenesis through indirectly inhibiting ETS-1 function.

  7. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick M Stanley

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  8. Structural Analysis of the Phenol-Responsive Sensory Domain of the Transcription Activator PoxR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vinod Vikas; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Woo, Euijeon

    2016-04-05

    Positive phenol-degradative gene regulator (PoxR) is a σ(54)-dependent AAA+ ATPase transcription activator that regulates the catabolism of phenols. The PoxR sensory domain detects phenols and relays signals for the activation of transcription. Here we report the first structure of the phenol sensory domain bound to phenol and five derivatives. It exists as a tightly intertwined homodimer with a phenol-binding pocket buried inside, placing two C termini on the same side of the dimer. His102 and Trp130 interact with the hydroxyl group of the phenol in a cavity surrounded by rigid hydrophobic residues on one side and a flexible region on the other. Each monomer has a V4R fold with a unique zinc-binding site. A shift at the C-terminal helix suggests that there is a possible conformational change upon ligand binding. The results provide a structural basis of chemical effector binding for transcriptional regulation with broad implications for protein engineering.

  9. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  10. Transcriptional activation of melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein by PPARγ in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Yoon-Jin [Department of Biology, Research Institute for Basic Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Si Young [R and D Center, Amore Pacific Corporation, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Ryong, E-mail: trlee@amorepacific.com [R and D Center, Amore Pacific Corporation, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-729 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biology, Research Institute for Basic Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •MRAP enhanced HSL expression. •ACTH-mediated MRAP reduced glycerol release. •PPARγ induced MRAP expression. •PPARγ bound to the MRAP promoter. -- Abstract: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in rodents decreases lipid accumulation and body weight. Melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R) and MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) are specific receptors for ACTH in adipocytes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways such as adipogenesis and β-oxidation of fatty acids. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MRAP expression during differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Stimulation with ACTH affected lipolysis in murine mature adipocytes via MRAP. Putative peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) was identified in the MRAP promoter region. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we observed binding of PPARγ to the MRAP promoter. The mutagenesis experiments showed that the −1209/−1198 region of the MRAP promoter could function as a PPRE site. These results suggest that PPARγ is required for transcriptional activation of the MRAP gene during adipogenesis, which contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of lipolysis in adipocytes.

  11. Cooperative activation of cardiac transcription through myocardin bridging of paired MEF2 sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Courtney M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Hu, Jianxin [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Thomas, Reuben [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Gainous, T. Blair [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Celona, Barbara [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Sinha, Tanvi [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Dickel, Diane E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Genomics Division; Heidt, Analeah B. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Xu, Shan-Mei [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Bruneau, Benoit G. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Pollard, Katherine S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Pennacchio, Len A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Genomics Division; Black, Brian L. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of

    2017-03-28

    Enhancers frequently contain multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. These homotypic binding sites often exhibit synergy, whereby the transcriptional output from two or more binding sites is greater than the sum of the contributions of the individual binding sites alone. Although this phenomenon is frequently observed, the mechanistic basis for homotypic binding site synergy is poorly understood. Here in this paper, we identify a bona fide cardiac-specific Prkaa2 enhancer that is synergistically activated by homotypic MEF2 binding sites. We show that two MEF2 sites in the enhancer function cooperatively due to bridging of the MEF2C-bound sites by the SAP domain-containing co-activator protein myocardin, and we show that paired sites buffer the enhancer from integration site-dependent effects on transcription in vivo. Paired MEF2 sites are prevalent in cardiac enhancers, suggesting that this might be a common mechanism underlying synergy in the control of cardiac gene expression in vivo.

  12. The role of RNA polymerase I transcription and embryonic genome activation in nucleolar development in bovine preimplantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, F.; Petrovicova, I.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RNA polymerase I (RPI) transcription in nucleolar development during major transcriptional activation (MTA) in cattle. Late eight-cell embryos were cultured in the absence (control group) or presence of actinomycin D (AD) (RPI inhibition......, Ad 0.2 µg/ml; total transcriptional inhibition, AD 2.0 µg/ml). Late four-cell embryos were cultured to late eight-cell stage in 0.2 µg/ml AD (MTA prevention, ADLT (long-term total transcriptional inhibition group). Embryos were processed for autoradiography, transmission electron microscopy...

  13. Identification of transcriptional activators for thienamycin and cephamycin C biosynthetic genes within the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Miriam; Núñez, Luz Elena; Braña, Alfredo F; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Blanco, Gloria

    2008-08-01

    Two regulatory genes, thnI and thnU, were identified in the thienamycin (thn) gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya. ThnI resembles LysR-type transcriptional activators and ThnU belongs to the SARP family of transcriptional activators. Their functional role was established after independent inactivation by gene replacement together with transcriptional analysis involving reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Deletion of thnI abolished thienamycin production showing its involvement in thienamycin biosynthesis. Gene expression analysis applied to the thn gene cluster demonstrated that ThnI is a transcriptional activator essential for thienamycin biosynthesis that regulates the expression of nine genes involved in thienamycin assembly and export (thnH, thnJ, thnK, thnL, thnM, thnN, thnO, thnP and thnQ). Unexpectedly, the thnU disrupted mutant was not affected in thienamycin production but turned out to be essential for cephamycin C biosynthesis. Transcript analysis applied to early and late structural genes for cephamycin C biosynthesis (pcbAB and cmcI), revealed that ThnU is the transcriptional activator of these cephamycin C genes although they are not physically linked to the thn cluster. In addition, it was shown that deletion of thnI has an upregulatory effect on pcbAB and cmcI transcription consistent with a significant increase in cephamycin C biosynthesis in this mutant.

  14. Genetic and physiological activation of osmosensitive gene expression mimics transcriptional signatures of pathogen infection in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Rohlfing

    Full Text Available The soil-dwelling nematode C. elegans is a powerful system for comparative molecular analyses of environmental stress response mechanisms. Infection of worms with bacterial and fungal pathogens causes the activation of well-characterized innate immune transcriptional programs in pathogen-exposed hypodermal and intestinal tissues. However, the pathophysiological events that drive such transcriptional responses are not understood. Here, we show that infection-activated transcriptional responses are, in large part, recapitulated by either physiological or genetic activation of the osmotic stress response. Microarray profiling of wild type worms exposed to non-lethal hypertonicity identified a suite of genes that were also regulated by infection. Expression profiles of five different osmotic stress resistant (osr mutants under isotonic conditions reiterated the wild type transcriptional response to osmotic stress and also showed substantial similarity to infection-induced gene expression under isotonic conditions. Computational, transgenic, and functional approaches revealed that two GATA transcription factors previously implicated in infection-induced transcriptional responses, elt-2 and elt-3, are also essential for coordinated tissue-specific activation of osmosensitive gene expression and promote survival under osmotically stressful conditions. Together, our data suggest infection and osmotic adaptation share previously unappreciated transcriptional similarities which might be controlled via regulation of tissue-specific GATA transcription factors.

  15. Fucose-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of the fcs Operon by FcsR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact of fucose on the transcriptome of S. pneumoniae D39. The expression of various genes and operons, including the fucose uptake PTS and utilization operon (fcs operon) was altered in the presence of fucose. By means of quantitative RT-PCR and β-galactosidase analysis, we demonstrate the role of the transcriptional regulator FcsR, present upstream of the fcs operon, as a transcriptional activator of the fcs operon. We also predict a 19-bp putative FcsR regulatory site (5'-ATTTGAACATTATTCAAGT-3') in the promoter region of the fcs operon. The functionality of this predicted FcsR regulatory site was further confirmed by promoter-truncation experiments, where deletion of half of the FscR regulatory site or full deletion led to the abolition of expression of the fcs operon.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  17. CDPK1, a calcium-dependent protein kinase, regulates transcriptional activator RSG in response to gibberellins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Masaru; Yuasa, Takashi; Takahashi, Yohsuke; Ishida, Sarahmi

    2009-05-01

    The homeostasis of gibberellins (GAs) is maintained by negative-feedback regulation in plant cells. REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH (RSG) is a transcriptional activator with a basic Leu zipper domain suggested to contribute GA feedback regulation by the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding GA biosynthetic enzymes. The 14-3-3 signaling proteins negatively regulate RSG by sequestering it in the cytoplasm in response to GAs. The phosphorylation on Ser-114 of RSG is essential for 14-3-3 binding of RSG; however, the kinase that catalyzes the reaction is unknown. Recently a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was identified as an RSG kinase that promotes 14-3-3 binding of RSG by phosphorylation of the Ser-114 of RSG. Our results suggest that CDPK decodes the Ca(2+) signal produced by GAs and regulates the intracellular localization of RSG in plant cells.

  18. Mercury Detoxification by Bacteria: Simulations of Transcription Activation and Mercury-Carbon Bond Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hao-Bo [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize recent work from our laboratory and provide new perspective on two important aspects of bacterial mercury resistance: the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MerR, and the enzymatic cleavage of the Hg-C bond in methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase, MerB. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of MerR reveal an opening-and-closing dynamics, which may be involved in initiating transcription of mercury resistance genes upon Hg(II) binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on an active-site model of the enzyme reveal how MerB catalyzes the Hg-C bond cleavage using cysteine coordination and acid-base chemistry. These studies provide insight into the detailed mechanisms of microbial gene regulation and defense against mercury toxicity.

  19. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  20. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  1. FOXR2 Interacts with MYC to Promote Its Transcriptional Activities and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available By combining the results of a large-scale proteomic analysis of the human transcription factor interaction network with knowledge databases, we identified FOXR2 as one of the top-ranked candidate proto-oncogenes. Here, we show that FOXR2 forms a stable complex with MYC and MAX and subsequently regulates cell proliferation by promoting MYC’s transcriptional activities. We demonstrate that FOXR2 is highly expressed in several breast, lung, and liver cancer cell lines and related patient tumor samples, while reduction of FOXR2 expression in a xenograft model inhibits tumor growth. These results indicate that FOXR2 acts with MYC to promote cancer cell proliferation, which is a potential tumor-specific target for therapeutic intervention against MYC-driven cancers.

  2. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose

  3. Characterization of human constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1, a RING finger ubiquitin ligase that interacts with Jun transcription factors and modulates their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Elisabetta; Denti, Simona; Catena, Raffaella; Rossetti, Grazisa; Polo, Simona; Gasparian, Sona; Putignano, Stella; Rogge, Lars; Pardi, Ruggero

    2003-05-30

    RING finger proteins have been implicated in many fundamental cellular processes, including the control of gene expression. A key regulator of light-dependent development in Arabidopsis thaliana is the constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (atCOP1), a RING finger protein that plays an essential role in translating light/dark signals into specific changes in gene transcription. atCOP1 binds the basic leucine zipper factor HY5 and suppresses its transcriptional activity through a yet undefined mechanism that results in HY5 degradation in response to darkness. Furthermore, the pleiotropic phenotype of atCOP1 mutants indicates that atCOP1 may be a central regulator of several transcriptional pathways. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the human orthologue of atCOP1. Human COP1 (huCOP1) distributes both to the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and shows a striking degree of sequence conservation with atCOP1, suggesting the possibility of a functional conservation as well. In co-immunoprecipitation assays huCOP1 specifically binds basic leucine zipper factors of the Jun family. As a functional consequence of this interaction, expression of huCOP1 in mammalian cells down-regulates c-Jun-dependent transcription and the expression of the AP-1 target genes, urokinase and matrix metalloproteinase 1. The RING domain of huCOP1 displays ubiquitin ligase activity in an autoubiquitination assay in vitro; however, suppression of AP-1-dependent transcription by huCOP1 occurs in the absence of changes in c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that this inhibitory effect is independent of c-Jun degradation. Our findings indicate that huCOP1 is a novel regulator of AP-1-dependent transcription sharing the important properties of Arabidopsis COP1 in the control of gene expression.

  4. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  5. Genetic variants in ABCA1 promoter affect transcription activity and plasma HDL level in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xiao-yong; Chu, Wei-wei; Shi, Heng-chuan; Yu, Shi-gang; Han, Hai-yin; Gu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-25

    Excess accumulation of cholesterol in plasma may result in coronary artery disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to apolipoproteins, a process necessary for plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. Higher plasma levels of HDL are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies of human disease and animal models had shown that an increased hepatic ABCA1 activity relates to an enhanced plasma HDL level. In this study, we hypothesized that functional mutations in the ABCA1 promoter in pigs may affect gene transcription activity, and consequently the HDL level in plasma. The promoter region of ABCA1 was comparatively scanned by direct sequencing with pool DNA of high- and low-HDL groups (n=30 for each group). Two polymorphisms, c. - 608A>G and c. - 418T>A, were revealed with reverse allele distribution in the two groups. The two polymorphisms were completely linked and formed only G-A or A-T haplotypes when genotyped in a larger population (n=526). Furthermore, we found that the G-A/G-A genotype was associated with higher HDL and ABCA1 mRNA level than A-T/A-T genotype. Luciferase assay also revealed that G-A haplotype promoter had higher activity than A-T haplotype. Single-nucleotide mutant assay showed that c.-418T>A was the causal mutation for ABCA1 transcription activity alteration. Conclusively, we identified two completely linked SNPs in porcine ABCA1 promoter region which have influence on the plasma HDL level by altering ABCA1 gene transcriptional activity.

  6. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  7. Bnip3 Binds and Activates p300: Possible Role in Cardiac Transcription and Myocyte Morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Thompson

    Full Text Available Bnip3 is a hypoxia-regulated member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins that is implicated in apoptosis, programmed necrosis, autophagy and mitophagy. Mitochondria are thought to be the primary targets of Bnip3 although its activities may extend to the ER, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Bnip3 is induced in the heart by ischemia and pressure-overload, and may contribute to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Only mitochondrial-dependent programmed death actions have been described for Bnip3 in the heart. Here we describe a novel activity of Bnip3 in cultured cardiac myocytes and transgenic mice overexpressing Bnip3 in the heart (Bnip3-TG. In cultured myocytes Bnip3 bound and activated the acetyltransferase p300, increased acetylation of histones and the transcription factor GATA4, and conferred p300 and GATA4-sensitive cellular morphological changes. In intact Bnip3-TG hearts Bnip3 also bound p300 and GATA4 and conferred enhanced GATA4 acetylation. Bnip3-TG mice underwent age-dependent ventricular dilation and heart failure that was partially prevented by p300 inhibition with curcumin. The results suggest that Bnip3 regulates cardiac gene expression and perhaps myocyte morphology by activating nuclear p300 acetyltransferase activity and hyperacetylating histones and p300-selective transcription factors.

  8. Liver x receptors regulate the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor: implications for the carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Nader

    Full Text Available GLUCOCORTICOIDS are steroid hormones that strongly influence intermediary carbohydrate metabolism by increasing the transcription rate of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, and suppress the immune system through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. The liver X receptors (LXRs, on the other hand, bind to cholesterol metabolites, heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR, and regulate the cholesterol turnover, the hepatic glucose metabolism by decreasing the expression of G6Pase, and repress a set of inflammatory genes in immune cells. Since the actions of these receptors overlap with each other, we evaluated the crosstalk between the GR- and LXR-mediated signaling systems. Transient transfection-based reporter assays and gene silencing methods using siRNAs for LXRs showed that overexpression/ligand (GW3965 activation of LXRs/RXRs repressed GR-stimulated transactivation of certain glucocorticoid response element (GRE-driven promoters in a gene-specific fashion. Activation of LXRs by GW3965 attenuated dexamethasone-stimulated elevation of circulating glucose in rats. It also suppressed dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase in rats, mice and human hepatoma HepG2 cells, whereas endogenous, unliganded LXRs were required for dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In microarray transcriptomic analysis of rat liver, GW3965 differentially regulated glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional activity of about 15% of endogenous glucocorticoid-responsive genes. To examine the mechanism through which activated LXRs attenuated GR transcriptional activity, we examined LXRα/RXRα binding to GREs. Endogenous LXRα/RXRα bound GREs and inhibited GR binding to these DNA sequences both in in vitro and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, while their recombinant proteins did so on classic or G6Pase GREs in gel mobility shift assays. We propose that

  9. Liver X Receptors Regulate the Transcriptional Activity of the Glucocorticoid Receptor: Implications for the Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nancy; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Wang, Yonghong; Abel, Brent S.; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2012-01-01

    GLUCOCORTICOIDS are steroid hormones that strongly influence intermediary carbohydrate metabolism by increasing the transcription rate of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, and suppress the immune system through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The liver X receptors (LXRs), on the other hand, bind to cholesterol metabolites, heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR), and regulate the cholesterol turnover, the hepatic glucose metabolism by decreasing the expression of G6Pase, and repress a set of inflammatory genes in immune cells. Since the actions of these receptors overlap with each other, we evaluated the crosstalk between the GR- and LXR-mediated signaling systems. Transient transfection-based reporter assays and gene silencing methods using siRNAs for LXRs showed that overexpression/ligand (GW3965) activation of LXRs/RXRs repressed GR-stimulated transactivation of certain glucocorticoid response element (GRE)-driven promoters in a gene-specific fashion. Activation of LXRs by GW3965 attenuated dexamethasone-stimulated elevation of circulating glucose in rats. It also suppressed dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in rats, mice and human hepatoma HepG2 cells, whereas endogenous, unliganded LXRs were required for dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In microarray transcriptomic analysis of rat liver, GW3965 differentially regulated glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional activity of about 15% of endogenous glucocorticoid-responsive genes. To examine the mechanism through which activated LXRs attenuated GR transcriptional activity, we examined LXRα/RXRα binding to GREs. Endogenous LXRα/RXRα bound GREs and inhibited GR binding to these DNA sequences both in in vitro and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, while their recombinant proteins did so on classic or G6Pase GREs in gel mobility shift assays. We propose that administration of

  10. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  11. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  12. SIRT1 deacetylates KLF4 to activate Claudin-5 transcription in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjian; Chen, Junliang; Sun, Lina; Xu, Yong

    2017-09-09

    Malignant cancers are distinguished from more benign forms of cancers by enhanced ability to disseminate. A number of factors aid the migration and invasion of malignant cancer cells. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which greatly facilitates the dissemination of cancer cells, is characterized by the loss of epithelial markers and the acquisition of mesenchymal markers thereby rendering the cells more migratory and invasive. We have previously shown that the class III lysine deacetylase SIRT1 plays a critical role curbing the metastasis of ovarian cancer cells partly by blocking EMT. Here we investigated the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates the transcription of Claudin 5 (CLDN5), an epithelial marker gene, in ovarian cancer cells. SIRT1 activation or over-expression up-regulated CLDN5 expression while SIRT1 inhibition or depletion down-regulated CLDN5 expression. SIRT1 interacted with and deacetylated Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), a known transcriptional activator for CLDN5. Deacetylation by SIRT1 promoted nuclear accumulation of KLF4 and enhanced the binding of KLF4 on the CLDN5 promoter in the nucleus. SIRT1-mediated up-regulation of CLDN5 was abrogated in the absence of KLF4. In accordance, KLF4 depletion by siRNA rendered ovarian cancer cells more migratory and invasive despite of SIRT1 activation or over-expression. In conclusion, our data suggest that SIRT1 activates CLDN5 transcription by deacetylating and potentiating KLF4. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Dissection of TALE-dependent gene activation reveals that they induce transcription cooperatively and in both orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, Jana; Baum, Heidi; Grau, Jan; Stuttman, Johannes; Boch, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject transcription activator-like effector proteins (TALEs) into host cells to specifically induce transcription of plant genes and enhance susceptibility. Although the DNA-binding mode is well-understood it is still ambiguous how TALEs initiate transcription and whether additional promoter elements are needed to support this. To systematically dissect prerequisites for transcriptional initiation the activity of one TALE was compared on different synthetic Bs4 promoter fragments. In addition, a large collection of artificial TALEs spanning the OsSWEET14 promoter was compared. We show that the presence of a TALE alone is not sufficient to initiate transcription suggesting the requirement of additional supporting promoter elements. At the OsSWEET14 promoter TALEs can initiate transcription from various positions, in a synergistic manner of multiple TALEs binding in parallel to the promoter, and even by binding in reverse orientation. TALEs are known to shift the transcriptional start site, but our data show that this shift depends on the individual position of a TALE within a promoter context. Our results implicate that TALEs function like classical enhancer-binding proteins and initiate transcription in both orientations which has consequences for in planta target gene prediction and design of artificial activators. PMID:28301511

  14. Characterization of the regulatory mechanisms of activating transcription factor 3 by hypertrophic stimuli in rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Koivisto

    Full Text Available AIMS: Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 is a stress-activated immediate early gene suggested to have both detrimental and cardioprotective role in the heart. Here we studied the mechanisms of ATF3 activation by hypertrophic stimuli and ATF3 downstream targets in rat cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: When neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to endothelin-1 (ET-1, 100 nM and mechanical stretching in vitro, maximal increase in ATF3 expression occurred at 1 hour. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK by PD98059 decreased ET-1- and stretch-induced increase of ATF3 protein but not ATF3 mRNA levels, whereas protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor H89 attenuated both ATF3 mRNA transcription and protein expression in response to ET-1 and stretch. To characterize further the regulatory mechanisms upstream of ATF3, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was investigated using a gain-of-function approach. Adenoviral overexpression of p38α, but not p38β, increased ATF3 mRNA and protein levels as well as DNA binding activity. To investigate the role of ATF3 in hypertrophic process, we overexpressed ATF3 by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. In vitro, ATF3 gene delivery attenuated the mRNA transcription of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, and enhanced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and Nkx-2.5 DNA binding activities. Reduced PAI-1 expression was also detected in vivo in adult rat heart by direct intramyocardial adenovirus-mediated ATF3 gene delivery. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that ATF3 activation by ET-1 and mechanical stretch is partly mediated through ERK and cAMP-PKA pathways, whereas p38 MAPK pathway is involved in ATF3 activation exclusively through p38α isoform. ATF3 activation caused induction of modulators of the inflammatory response NF-κB and Nkx-2.5, as well as attenuation of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory proteins IL-6 and PAI-1, suggesting cardioprotective role

  15. A WW domain-containing yes-associated protein (YAP) is a novel transcriptional co-activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, R; Chen, L F; Shigesada, K; Murakami, Y; Ito, Y

    1999-05-04

    A protein module called the WW domain recognizes and binds to a short oligopeptide called the PY motif, PPxY, to mediate protein-protein interactions. The PY motif is present in the transcription activation domains of a wide range of transcription factors including c-Jun, AP-2, NF-E2, C/EBPalpha and PEBP2/CBF, suggesting that it plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We show here that mutation of the PY motif in the subregion of the activation domain of the DNA-binding subunit of PEBP2, PEBP2alpha, abolishes its transactivation function. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we demonstrate that Yes-associated protein (YAP) binds to the PY motif of PEBP2alpha through its WW domain. The C-terminal region of YAP fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 showed transactivation as strong as that of GAL4-VP16. Exogenously expressed YAP conferred transcription-stimulating activity on the PY motif fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain as well as to native PEBP2alpha. The osteocalcin promoter was stimulated by exogenous PEBP2alphaA and a dominant negative form of YAP strongly inhibited this activity, suggesting YAP involvement in this promoter activity in vivo. These results indicate that the PY motif is a novel transcription activation domain that functions by recruiting YAP as a strong transcription activator to target genes.

  16. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  17. Transcriptional Activity of Nuclear Factor κB Family Genes in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Gola, Joanna; Mazurek, Urszula; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease of unknown etiology and unclear pathogenesis. Evaluation of the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family genes IκBα, p50, p52, p65, and c-Rel, potentially involved in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling in SSc, was carried out. The study included 19 patients with limited SSc, 11 patients with early SSc, and 10 healthy persons constituting the control group. Real-time QRT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNAs in peripheral blood samples. The patients with early SSc showed a decrease in transcriptional activity of IκBα inhibitor and c-Rel subunit. Transcriptional activity decrease in the other patients with limited SSc included genes encoding c-Rel and p50, subunits of NF-κB factor. Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction by NF-κB takes place at the beginning of SSc and in its fibrosis stage. Associations between clinical variables and NF-κB related gene expression as well as the activation of NF-κB family members in SSc patients should be addressed in future studies. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  18. Gas6/Axl pathway promotes tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Jung; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Yu-Ling; Chung, Ling; Yuan, Ray-Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common fatal cancers worldwide. Other than the sorafenib treatment, no effective systemic therapy has been available thus far. Most targets in molecularly targeted therapy for cancer are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Therefore, identifying activated RTKs in HCC is critical for developing new molecularly targeted therapies. Using a phospho-RTK array, we found that Axl is one of the most frequently activated RTKs in liver cancer cell lines. The knockdown of Axl by RNA interference significantly reduced cell migration and invasion in the HCC cell lines HA22T and Mahlavu. Stimulation of HCC cell lines by Axl ligand growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) enhanced cell migration and invasion. The Gas6/Axl pathway enhanced the expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor Slug, which is essential for the invasion-promoting activity of Axl. Treating HCC cells with the Axl inhibitor bosutinib suppressed Slug expression and decreased the invasiveness of HCC cell lines. These findings indicate that Gas6/Axl regulates tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug.

  19. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  20. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  1. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in thi

  2. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  3. Stathmin regulates mutant p53 stability and transcriptional activity in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Maura; Schiappacassi, Monica; Lovisa, Sara; Dall'Acqua, Alessandra; Bagnoli, Marina; Lovat, Francesca; Libra, Massimo; D'Andrea, Sara; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Militello, Loredana; Napoli, Marco; Giorda, Giorgio; Pivetta, Barbara; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Barbareschi, Mattia; Valeri, Barbara; Canevari, Silvana; Colombatti, Alfonso; Belletti, Barbara; Del Sal, Giannino; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2013-05-01

    Stathmin is a p53-target gene, frequently overexpressed in late stages of human cancer progression. Type II High Grade Epithelial Ovarian Carcinomas (HG-EOC) represents the only clear exception to this observation. Here, we show that stathmin expression is necessary for the survival of HG-EOC cells carrying a p53 mutant (p53(MUT) ) gene. At molecular level, stathmin favours the binding and the phosphorylation of p53(MUT) by DNA-PKCS , eventually modulating p53(MUT) stability and transcriptional activity. Inhibition of stathmin or DNA-PKCS impaired p53(MUT) -dependent transcription of several M phase regulators, resulting in M phase failure and EOC cell death, both in vitro and in vivo. In primary human EOC a strong correlation exists between stathmin, DNA-PKCS , p53(MUT) overexpression and its transcriptional targets, further strengthening the relevance of the new pathway here described. Overall our data support the hypothesis that the expression of stathmin and p53 could be useful for the identification of high risk patients that will benefit from a therapy specifically acting on mitotic cancer cells.

  4. Sumoylation regulates the transcriptional activity of MafA in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunli; Cobb, Melanie H

    2009-01-30

    MafA is a transcriptional regulator expressed primarily in pancreatic beta cells. It binds to the RIPE3b/C1-binding site within the ins gene promoter, which plays a critical role in regulating ins gene expression in response to glucose. Here, we show that MafA is post-translationally modified by the small ubiquitin-related modifiers SUMO-1 and -2. Mutation of a single site in MafA, Lys(32), blocks its sumoylation in beta cells. Incubation of beta cells in low glucose (2 mm) or exposure to hydrogen peroxide increases sumoylation of endogenous MafA. Forced sumoylation of MafA results in reduced transcriptional activity toward the ins gene promoter and increased suppression of the CHOP-10 gene promoter. Sumoylation of MafA has no apparent effect on either its nuclear localization in beta cells or its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. This study suggests that modification of MafA by SUMO modulates gene transcription and thereby beta cell function.

  5. Localizing potentially active post-transcriptional regulations in the Ewing's sarcoma gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyon Bernard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of techniques is now available for analyzing regulatory networks. Nonetheless, most of these techniques fail to interpret large-scale transcriptional data at the post-translational level. Results We address the question of using large-scale transcriptomic observation of a system perturbation to analyze a regulatory network which contained several types of interactions - transcriptional and post-translational. Our method consisted of post-processing the outputs of an open-source tool named BioQuali - an automatic constraint-based analysis mimicking biologist's local reasoning on a large scale. The post-processing relied on differences in the behavior of the transcriptional and post-translational levels in the network. As a case study, we analyzed a network representation of the genes and proteins controlled by an oncogene in the context of Ewing's sarcoma. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint active interactions specific to this cancer. We also identified the parts of the network which were incomplete and should be submitted for further investigation. Conclusions The proposed approach is effective for the qualitative analysis of cancer networks. It allows the integrative use of experimental data of various types in order to identify the specific information that should be considered a priority in the initial - and possibly very large - experimental dataset. Iteratively, new dataset can be introduced into the analysis to improve the network representation and make it more specific.

  6. MTA1, a transcriptional activator of breast cancer amplified sequence 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururaj, Anupama E.; Singh, Rajesh R.; Rayala, Suresh K.; Holm, Caroline; den Hollander, Petra; Zhang, Hao; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Talukder, Amjad H.; Landberg, Goran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2006-01-01

    Here we define a function of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a presumed corepressor of estrogen receptor α (ERα), as a transcriptional activator of Breast Cancer Amplified Sequence 3 (BCAS3), a gene amplified and overexpressed in breast cancers. We identified BCAS3 as a MTA1 chromatin target in a functional genomic screen. MTA1 stimulation of BCAS3 transcription required ERα and involved a functional ERE half-site in BCAS3. Furthermore, we discovered that MTA1 is acetylated on lysine 626, and that this acetylation is necessary for a productive transcriptional recruitment of RNA polymerase II complex to the BCAS3 enhancer sequence. BCAS3 expression was elevated in mammary tumors from MTA1 transgenic mice and 60% of the human breast tumors, and correlated with the coexpression of MTA1 as well as with tumor grade and proliferation of primary breast tumor samples. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized function of MTA1 in stimulating BCAS3 expression and suggest an important role for MTA1-BCAS3 pathway in promoting cancerous phenotypes in breast tumor cells. PMID:16617102

  7. PAX5 is the transcriptional activator of mucolipin-2 (MCOLN2) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez, Jessica A; Cuajungco, Math P

    2015-01-25

    Transient receptor potential mucolipin (TRPML) proteins belong to the TRP superfamily of non-selective cation channels. The TRPML1, -2, and -3 proteins are encoded by Mucolipin (MCOLN)-1, -2 and -3 genes, respectively. TRPML1 has been associated with mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), while no disease phenotype has been linked with TRPML2 or -3 protein. The TRPML proteins share high sequence similarities, form hetero-tetramers, and serve in membrane trafficking, autophagy, and metal homeostasis. Previous studies suggest that TRPML2 serves a role in the immune system; however, the evidence is mostly indirect. We hypothesize that if TRPML2 is involved in immune function its expression would be likely regulated by an immune-associated transcription factor protein. Thus, we set out to identify the core promoter region and the transcription factor responsible for MCOLN2 gene expression. Using dual-luciferase assay and over-expression analyses, we reveal for the first time that B-cell lineage specific activator protein (BSAP), also known as paired box 5 (PAX5), controls MCOLN2 expression. Specifically, heterologous expression of PAX5 in HEK-293 cells significantly increased endogenous MCOLN2 transcript and TRPML2 protein levels, while RNA interference targeting endogenous PAX5 reduced its effect. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the core promoter and PAX5 binding region to be between -79 and -60 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Thus, our findings add to a growing list of evidence for TRPML2's possible involvement in the immune system. The knowledge gained from this study could be used to further characterize the role of TRPML2 in B-cell development and function.

  8. Viral retasking of hBre1/RNF20 to recruit hPaf1 for transcriptional activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Fonseca

    Full Text Available Upon infection, human adenovirus (HAdV must activate the expression of its early genes to reprogram the cellular environment to support virus replication. This activation is orchestrated in large part by the first HAdV gene expressed during infection, early region 1A (E1A. E1A binds and appropriates components of the cellular transcriptional machinery to modulate cellular gene transcription and activate viral early genes transcription. Previously, we identified hBre1/RNF20 as a target for E1A. The interaction between E1A and hBre1 antagonizes the innate antiviral response by blocking H2B monoubiquitination, a chromatin modification necessary for the interferon (IFN response. Here, we describe a second distinct role for the interaction of E1A with hBre1 in transcriptional activation of HAdV early genes. Furthermore, we show that E1A changes the function of hBre1 from a ubiquitin ligase involved in substrate selection to a scaffold which recruits hPaf1 as a means to stimulate transcription and transcription-coupled histone modifications. By using hBre1 to recruit hPaf1, E1A is able to optimally activate viral early transcription and begin the cycle of viral replication. The ability of E1A to target hBre1 to simultaneously repress cellular IFN dependent transcription while activating viral transcription, represents an elegant example of the incredible economy of action accomplished by a viral regulatory protein through a single protein interaction.

  9. Viral retasking of hBre1/RNF20 to recruit hPaf1 for transcriptional activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Fonseca

    Full Text Available Upon infection, human adenovirus (HAdV must activate the expression of its early genes to reprogram the cellular environment to support virus replication. This activation is orchestrated in large part by the first HAdV gene expressed during infection, early region 1A (E1A. E1A binds and appropriates components of the cellular transcriptional machinery to modulate cellular gene transcription and activate viral early genes transcription. Previously, we identified hBre1/RNF20 as a target for E1A. The interaction between E1A and hBre1 antagonizes the innate antiviral response by blocking H2B monoubiquitination, a chromatin modification necessary for the interferon (IFN response. Here, we describe a second distinct role for the interaction of E1A with hBre1 in transcriptional activation of HAdV early genes. Furthermore, we show that E1A changes the function of hBre1 from a ubiquitin ligase involved in substrate selection to a scaffold which recruits hPaf1 as a means to stimulate transcription and transcription-coupled histone modifications. By using hBre1 to recruit hPaf1, E1A is able to optimally activate viral early transcription and begin the cycle of viral replication. The ability of E1A to target hBre1 to simultaneously repress cellular IFN dependent transcription while activating viral transcription, represents an elegant example of the incredible economy of action accomplished by a viral regulatory protein through a single protein interaction.

  10. ReTrOS: a MATLAB toolbox for reconstructing transcriptional activity from gene and protein expression data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giorgos Minas; Hiroshi Momiji; Dafyd J Jenkins; Maria J Costa; David A Rand; Barbel Finkenstadt

    2017-01-01

    ...) provides MATLAB-based implementations of two related methods, namely ReTrOS-Smooth and ReTrOS-Switch, for reconstructing the temporal transcriptional activity profile of a gene from given mRNA...

  11. Analysis of Polygenic Mutants Suggests a Role for Mediator in Regulating Transcriptional Activation Distance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Caitlin T; Hickman, Mark J; Dobi, Krista C; Botstein, David; Winston, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Studies of natural populations of many organisms have shown that traits are often complex, caused by contributions of mutations in multiple genes. In contrast, genetic studies in the laboratory primarily focus on studying the phenotypes caused by mutations in a single gene. However, the single mutation approach may be limited with respect to the breadth and degree of new phenotypes that can be found. We have taken the approach of isolating complex, or polygenic mutants in the lab to study the regulation of transcriptional activation distance in yeast. While most aspects of eukaryotic transcription are conserved from yeast to human, transcriptional activation distance is not. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the upstream activating sequence (UAS) is generally found within 450 base pairs of the transcription start site (TSS) and when the UAS is moved too far away, activation no longer occurs. In contrast, metazoan enhancers can activate from as far as several hundred kilobases from the TSS. Previously, we identified single mutations that allow transcription activation to occur at a greater-than-normal distance from the GAL1 UAS. As the single mutant phenotypes were weak, we have now isolated polygenic mutants that possess strong long-distance phenotypes. By identification of the causative mutations we have accounted for most of the heritability of the phenotype in each strain and have provided evidence that the Mediator coactivator complex plays both positive and negative roles in the regulation of transcription activation distance.

  12. Transcriptional activation of hTERT in breast carcinomas by the Her2-ER81-related pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vageli, Dimitra; Ioannou, Maria G; Koukoulis, George K

    2009-01-01

    Her2 and ER81 (a member of ETS family) have been suggested to cause a synergistic increase in the transcriptional activation of hTERT. Our study aimed to offer further confirmation in clinical material. We determined the mRNA levels of Her2, ER81, and hTERT, by QRT-PCR, in 43 breast carcinomas. In the specimens showing hTERT transcriptional activation, Her2 and ER81 were increased in statistically significant tumor subgroups (61% and 79% correspondingly). The 86% of specimens with both Her2 and ER81 increased expression showed hTERT transcriptional activation. Synchronous transcriptional activation of hTERT, Her2, and ER81 elevated expression was noted in 42% of the samples. In conclusion, we agree with a previous study that Her2 overexpression may increase the hTERT transcriptional activation. Our data indicate that the mechanism may involve Her2-ER81 interaction(s) and that the activation of hTERT could be mainly mediated by transcriptional activation of ER81.

  13. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  14. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    Full Text Available Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR. Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx. MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional

  15. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  16. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  17. TAZ: a novel transcriptional co-activator regulated by interactions with 14-3-3 and PDZ domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, F; Marignani, P A; Sarbassova, D; Yagi, R; Hall, R A; Donowitz, M; Hisaminato, A; Fujiwara, T; Ito, Y; Cantley, L C; Yaffe, M B

    2000-12-15

    The highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed 14-3-3 proteins regulate differentiation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by binding intracellular phosphoproteins involved in signal transduction. By screening in vitro translated cDNA pools for the ability to bind 14-3-3, we identified a novel transcriptional co-activator, TAZ (transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif) as a 14-3-3-binding molecule. TAZ shares homology with Yes-associated protein (YAP), contains a WW domain and functions as a transcriptional co-activator by binding to the PPXY motif present on transcription factors. 14-3-3 binding requires TAZ phosphorylation on a single serine residue, resulting in the inhibition of TAZ transcriptional co-activation through 14-3-3-mediated nuclear export. The C-terminus of TAZ contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that localizes TAZ into discrete nuclear foci and is essential for TAZ-stimulated gene transcription. TAZ uses this same motif to bind the PDZ domain-containing protein NHERF-2, a molecule that tethers plasma membrane ion channels and receptors to cytoskeletal actin. TAZ may link events at the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton to nuclear transcription in a manner that can be regulated by 14-3-3.

  18. Promoter-proximal transcription factor binding is transcriptionally active when coupled with nucleosome repositioning in immediate vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Eckloff, Bruce; Baral, Aradhita; Singh, Ankita; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Akinchan; Alam, Mohammad Parwez; Kundu, Tapas K.; Pandita, Raj; Pandita, Tej K.; Wieben, Eric D.; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have analyzed patterns of transcription, transcription factor (TF) binding or mapped nucleosome occupancy across the genome. These suggest that the three aspects are genetically connected but the cause and effect relationships are still unknown. For example, physiologic TF binding studies involve many TFs, consequently, it is difficult to assign nucleosome reorganization to the binding site occupancy of any particular TF. Therefore, several aspects remain unclear: does TF binding influence nucleosome (re)organizations locally or impact the chromatin landscape at a more global level; are all or only a fraction of TF binding a result of reorganization in nucleosome occupancy and do all TF binding and associated changes in nucleosome occupancy result in altered gene expression? With these in mind, following characterization of two states (before and after induction of a single TF of choice) we determined: (i) genomic binding sites of the TF, (ii) promoter nucleosome occupancy and (iii) transcriptome profiles. Results demonstrated that promoter-proximal TF binding influenced expression of the target gene when it was coupled to nucleosome repositioning at or close to its binding site in most cases. In contrast, only in few cases change in target gene expression was found when TF binding occurred without local nucleosome reorganization. PMID:25081206

  19. A conserved TATA-less proximal promoter drives basal transcription from the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soravia, E; Grebe, A; De Luca, P

    1995-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) focuses at the cell surface the activation of pro-uPA and, hence, the formation of plasmin, thus enhancing directional extracellular proteolysis. To characterize the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control receptor expression, we...... have cloned an uPAR DNA segment containing upstream regulatory sequences from both the human and murine genomes. We report that a proximal promoter, contained within 180 bp from the major transcription start sites of the human uPAR gene, drives basal transcription. This region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes...

  20. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahara, Naotoshi [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Horio, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: horio@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  1. Sequential Recruitment and Combinatorial Assembling of Multiprotein Complexes in Transcriptional Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Vincent; Lee, Chiu Fan; Lei, Jinzhi; Métivier, Raphaël; Glass, Leon

    2006-05-01

    In human cells, estrogenic signals induce cyclical association and dissociation of specific proteins with the DNA in order to activate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. These oscillations can be modeled by assuming a large number of sequential reactions represented by linear kinetics with random kinetic rates. Application of the model to experimental data predicts robust binding sequences in which proteins associate with the DNA at several different phases of the oscillation. Our methods circumvent the need to derive detailed kinetic graphs, and are applicable to other oscillatory biological processes involving a large number of sequential steps.

  2. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  3. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  4. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  5. The Baltic Sea Virome: Diversity and Transcriptional Activity of DNA and RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrow, John P.; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Hoffman, Jeffery M.; Ekman, Martin; Allen, Andrew E.; Bergman, Birgitta; Venter, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data were generated from size-fractionated samples from 11 sites within the Baltic Sea and adjacent marine waters of Kattegat and freshwater Lake Torneträsk in order to investigate the diversity, distribution, and transcriptional activity of virioplankton. Such a transect, spanning a salinity gradient from freshwater to the open sea, facilitated a broad genome-enabled investigation of natural as well as impacted aspects of Baltic Sea viral communities. Taxonomic signatures representative of phages within the widely distributed order Caudovirales were identified with enrichments in lesser-known families such as Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The distribution of phage reported to infect diverse and ubiquitous heterotrophic bacteria (SAR11 clades) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp.) displayed population-level shifts in diversity. Samples from higher-salinity conditions (>14 practical salinity units [PSU]) had increased abundances of viruses for picoeukaryotes, i.e., Ostreococcus. These data, combined with host diversity estimates, suggest viral modulation of diversity on the whole-community scale, as well as in specific prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. RNA libraries revealed single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA viral populations throughout the Baltic Sea, with ssDNA phage highly represented in Lake Torneträsk. Further, our data suggest relatively high transcriptional activity of fish viruses within diverse families known to have broad host ranges, such as Nodoviridae (RNA), Iridoviridae (DNA), and predicted zoonotic viruses that can cause ecological and economic damage as well as impact human health. IMPORTANCE Inferred virus-host relationships, community structures of ubiquitous ecologically relevant groups, and identification of transcriptionally active populations have been achieved with our Baltic Sea study. Further, these data, highlighting the transcriptional activity of viruses, represent one of the more

  6. TERT Promoter Mutations Lead to High Transcriptional Activity under Hypoxia and Temozolomide Treatment and Predict Poor Prognosis in Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Chen; Sheng Han; Lingxuan Meng; Zhonghua Li; Xue Zhang; Anhua Wu

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study explored the effects of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations on transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and temozolomide (TMZ) treatment conditions, and investigated the status and prognostic value of these mutations in gliomas. Methods The effect of TERT promoter mutations on the transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions was investigated in glioma cells using the luciferase assay. TERT promo...

  7. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  8. Modulation of NF-кB transcription factor activation by Molluscum contagiosum virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Struzik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum virus is a human and animal dermatotropic pathogen, which causes a severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. MCV belongs to the Poxviridae family whose members exert immunomodulatory effects on the host antiviral response. Poxviruses interfere with cell signaling pathways that lead to the activation of nuclear factor кB, a pleiotropic transcription factor which is crucial for regulation of the immune response, the cell cycle and apoptosis. In resting cells, NF-κB is present in the cytoplasm, where it is associated with inhibitor κB. Upon stimulation by activators, such as proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial or viral products, the inhibitory protein undergoes phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. NF-κB, in turn, translocates to the nucleus, where it regulates the transcription of various genes that are essential for processes mentioned above. Since poxviruses replicate exclusively in the cell cytoplasm, NF-кB became a good target for poxviral immunomodulation. MCV encodes various proteins which interfere with the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of NF-κB. Ligand inhibitor encoded by MCV, MC54, binds interleukin-18 and inhibits interferon-γ production. Other MCV proteins, MC159 and MC160, belong to intracellular inhibitors of NF-κB and are members of viral FLICE-inhibitory proteins (vFLIPs. MC159 protein encoded by MCV was shown to inhibit apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Such interactions serve immune evasion and are responsible for the persistence of MCV.

  9. Dynamic transcription factor activity and networks during ErbB2 breast oncogenesis and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, M S; Peñalver Bernabé, B; Shin, S; Asztalos, S; Dubbury, S J; Mui, M D; Bellis, A D; Bluver, D; Tonetti, D A; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Broadbelt, L J; Jeruss, J S; Shea, L D

    2014-12-01

    Tissue development and disease progression are multi-stage processes controlled by an evolving set of key regulatory factors, and identifying these factors necessitates a dynamic analysis spanning relevant time scales. Current omics approaches depend on incomplete biological databases to identify critical cellular processes. Herein, we present TRACER (TRanscriptional