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Sample records for activating inhibitory muscarinic

  1. Muscarinic receptors modulate dendrodendritic inhibitory synapses to sculpt glomerular output.

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    Liu, Shaolin; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Wachowiak, Matt; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T

    2015-04-08

    Cholinergic [acetylcholine (ACh)] axons from the basal forebrain innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the initial site of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Both nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed in glomeruli. The activation of nAChRs directly excites both mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs), the two major excitatory neurons that transmit glomerular output. The functional roles of mAChRs in glomerular circuits are unknown. We show that the restricted glomerular application of ACh causes rapid, brief nAChR-mediated excitation of both MTCs and ETCs in the mouse olfactory bulb. This excitation is followed by mAChR-mediated inhibition, which is blocked by GABAA receptor antagonists, indicating the engagement of periglomerular cells (PGCs) and/or short axon cells (SACs), the two major glomerular inhibitory neurons. Indeed, selective activation of glomerular mAChRs, with ionotropic GluRs and nAChRs blocked, increased IPSCs in MTCs and ETCs, indicating that mAChRs recruit glomerular inhibitory circuits. Selective activation of glomerular mAChRs in the presence of tetrodotoxin increased IPSCs in all glomerular neurons, indicating action potential-independent enhancement of GABA release from PGC and/or SAC dendrodendritic synapses. mAChR-mediated enhancement of GABA release also presynaptically suppressed the first synapse of the olfactory system via GABAB receptors on sensory terminals. Together, these results indicate that cholinergic modulation of glomerular circuits is biphasic, involving an initial excitation of MTC/ETCs mediated by nAChRs followed by inhibition mediated directly by mAChRs on PGCs/SACs. This may phasically enhance the sensitivity of glomerular outputs to odorants, an action that is consistent with recent in vivo findings. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355680-13$15.00/0.

  2. Evidence for inhibitory nicotinic and facilitatory muscarinic receptors in cholinergic nerve terminals of the rat urinary bladder.

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    Somogyi, G T; de Groat, W C

    1992-02-01

    Cholinergic prejunctional modulatory receptors on parasympathetic nerves in the rat urinary bladder were studied by measuring 3H-acetylcholine (ACh) release in muscle strips from the bladder body. Electrical field stimulation markedly increased 3H-ACh overflow in strips preloaded with 3H-choline. Oxotremorine (1 microM), an M2 receptor agonist and DMPP (10 microM) a nicotinic (N) receptor agonist decreased the release of ACh (50% and 55% respectively); whereas McN-A 343 (50 microM) an M1 receptor agonist increased the release (33%), indicating the presence of three types of modulatory receptors. The anticholinesterase agent, physostigmine in concentrations of 1, 5 and 25 microM and neostigmine (5 microM) increased ACh release (44-710%). However a low concentration of physostigmine (0.05 microM) decreased release. Pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic antagonist or atropine blocked the increased ACh release in physostigmine-treated strips, but in normal strips pirenzepine did not change release and atropine increased release. McN-A 343 or prolonged application (15 min) of DMPP increased ACh release (376% and 391% respectively) in physostigmine-treated strips. The response to McN-A 343 was blocked by pirenzepine. d-Tubocurarine (DTC), a nicotinic receptor blocker, enhanced ACh release in the presence of physostigmine but proved to be ineffective in normal preparations. These findings suggest that all three cholinergic receptors (M1 facilitatory, N inhibitory and M2 inhibitory) are activated by endogenous ACh in physostigmine treated preparations whereas only M2-inhibitory receptors are activated in normal preparations. It will be important in future studies to determine whether M1 and M2 mechanisms can also be activated under more physiological conditions in the bladder and whether they are present at other cholinergic synapses.

  3. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells

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    Hasebe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na+-activated K+ (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  4. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

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    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  5. Acetylcholine release and inhibitory interneuron activity in hippocampal CA1

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    A. Rory McQuiston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine release in the central nervous system (CNS has an important role in attention, recall and memory formation. One region influenced by acetylcholine is the hippocampus, which receives inputs from the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca complex (MS/DBB. Release of acetylcholine from the MS/DBB can directly affect several elements of the hippocampus including glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, presynaptic terminals, postsynaptic receptors and astrocytes. A significant portion of acetylcholine’s effect likely results from the modulation of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which have crucial roles in controlling excitatory inputs, synaptic integration, rhythmic coordination of principal neurons and outputs in the hippocampus. Acetylcholine affects interneuron function in large part by altering their membrane potential via muscarinic and nicotinic receptor activation. This minireview describes recent data from mouse hippocampus that investigated changes in CA1 interneuron membrane potentials following acetylcholine release. The interneuron subtypes affected, the receptor subtypes activated, and the potential outcome on hippocampal CA1 network function is discussed.

  6. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

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    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  8. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

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    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  9. Comparative Effects of Oral Chlorpyrifos Exposure on Cholinesterase Activity and Muscarinic Receptor Binding in Neonatal and Adult Rat Heart

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    Howard, Marcia D.; Mirajkar, Nikita; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey N.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for inactivating acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses. A number of OP toxicants have also been reported to interact directly with muscarinic receptors, in particular the M2 muscarinic subtype. Parasympathetic innervation to the heart primarily regulates cardiac function by activating M2 receptors in the sinus node, atrial-ventricular node and conducting tissues. Thus, OP insecticides can potentially influence cardiac function in a receptor–mediated manner indirectly by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase and directly by binding to muscarinic M2 receptors. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to the acute toxicity of OP insecticides and age related differences in potency of direct binding to muscarinic receptors by some OP toxicants have been reported. We thus compared the effects of the common OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on functional signs of toxicity and cardiac ChE activity and muscarinic receptor binding in neonatal and adult rats. Dosages were based on acute lethality (i.e., 0.5 and 1 × LD10: neonates, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg; adults, 68 and 136 mg/kg). Dose- and time-related changes in body weight and cholinergic signs of toxicity (involuntary movements) were noted in both age groups. With 1 × LD10, relatively similar maximal reductions in ChE activity (95%) and muscarinic receptor binding (≈ 30%) were noted, but receptor binding reductions appeared earlier in adults and were more prolonged in neonates. In vitro inhibition studies indicated that ChE in neonatal tissues was markedly more sensitive to inhibition by the active metabolite of chlorpyrifos (i.e., chlorpyrifos oxon, CPO) than enzyme in adult tissues (IC50 values: neonates, 17 nM; adults, 200 nM). Chelation of free calcium with EDTA had relatively little effect on in vitro cholinesterase inhibition, suggesting that differential A-esterase activity was not

  10. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

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    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

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    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5......). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M......) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked...

  12. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill.

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    González, Alfredo; Crittenden, Elizabeth L; García, Dana M

    2004-07-13

    In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl) carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  13. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

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    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  14. Adenosine receptors and muscarinic receptors cooperate in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

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    Santafe, M M; Priego, M; Obis, T; Garcia, N; Tomàs, M; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are present in the motor terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction. ARs and the presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) share the functional control of the neuromuscular junction. We analysed their mutual interaction in transmitter release modulation. In electrophysiological experiments with unaltered synaptic transmission (muscles paralysed by blocking the voltage-dependent sodium channel of the muscle cells with μ-conotoxin GIIIB), we found that: (i) a collaborative action between different AR subtypes reduced synaptic depression at a moderate activity level (40 Hz); (ii) at high activity levels (100 Hz), endogenous adenosine production in the synaptic cleft was sufficient to reduce depression through A1 -type receptors (A1 Rs) and A2 A-type receptors (A2 A Rs); (iii) when the non-metabolizable 2-chloroadenosine (CADO) agonist was used, both the quantal content and depression were reduced; (iv) the protective effect of CADO on depression was mediated by A1 Rs, whereas A2 A Rs seemed to modulate A1 Rs; (v) ARs and mAChRs absolutely depended upon each other for the modulation of evoked and spontaneous acetylcholine release in basal conditions and in experimental conditions with CADO stimulation; (vi) the purinergic and muscarinic mechanisms cooperated in the control of depression by sharing a common pathway although the purinergic control was more powerful than the muscarinic control; and (vii) the imbalance of the ARs created by using subtype-selective and non-selective inhibitory and stimulatory agents uncoupled protein kinase C from evoked transmitter release. In summary, ARs (A1 Rs, A2 A Rs) and mAChRs (M1 , M2 ) cooperated in the control of activity-dependent synaptic depression and may share a common protein kinase C pathway. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Muscarinic receptor compensation in hippocampus of alzheimer patients. [Autoradiography

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    Nordberg, A; Larsson, C; Adolfsson, R; Alafuzoff, I; Winblad, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    The activity of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (presynaptic marker) and number of muscarine-like receptor binding sites have been measured in the hippocampus from eight individuals with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and ten controls. A negative correlation (r=0.80; p<0.05) was found between the ChAT activity and the number of muscarine-like receptors in the SDAT group but not in the controls. The findings might indicate an ongoing compensatory receptor mechanism as a response to changes in presynaptic cholinergic activity.

  16. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  17. Effects of selective activation of M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors on object recognition memory performance in rats.

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    Galloway, Claire R; Lebois, Evan P; Shagarabi, Shezza L; Hernandez, Norma A; Manns, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine signaling through muscarinic receptors has been shown to benefit memory performance in some conditions, but pan-muscarinic activation also frequently leads to peripheral side effects. Drug therapies that selectively target M1 or M4 muscarinic receptors could potentially improve memory while minimizing side effects mediated by the other muscarinic receptor subtypes. The ability of three recently developed drugs that selectively activate M1 or M4 receptors to improve recognition memory was tested by giving Long-Evans rats subcutaneous injections of three different doses of the M1 agonist VU0364572, the M1 positive allosteric modulator BQCA or the M4 positive allosteric modulator VU0152100 before performing an object recognition memory task. VU0364572 at 0.1 mg/kg, BQCA at 1.0 mg/kg and VU0152100 at 3.0 and 30.0 mg/kg improved the memory performance of rats that performed poorly at baseline, yet the improvements in memory performance were the most statistically robust for VU0152100 at 3.0 mg/kg. The results suggested that selective M1 and M4 receptor activation each improved memory but that the likelihood of obtaining behavioral efficacy at a given dose might vary between subjects even in healthy groups depending on baseline performance. These results also highlighted the potential of drug therapies that selectively target M1 or M4 receptors to improve memory performance in individuals with impaired memory.

  18. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39 ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.816, year: 2015

  19. Activation of muscarinic receptors protects against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration in vitro and in vivo models.

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    Tan, Pan-Pan; Yuan, Hai-Hong; Zhu, Xu; Cui, Yong-Yao; Li, Hui; Feng, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhou, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist pilocarpine reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) of glaucoma mainly by stimulating ciliary muscle contraction and then increasing aqueous outflow. It is of our great interest to know whether pilocarpine has the additional properties of retinal neuroprotection independent of IOP lowering in vitro and in vivo models. In rat primary retinal cultures, cell viability was measured using an MTT assay and the trypan blue exclusion method, respectively. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified by immunofluorescence and quantified by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, the retinal damage after retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats was evaluated by histopathological study using hematoxylin and eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical study on cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, and ChAT. Pretreatment of pilocarpine attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of primary retinal neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Protection of pilocarpine in both retinal neurons and RGCs was largely abolished by the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine. After ischemia/reperfusion injury in retina, the inner retinal degeneration occurred including ganglion cell layer thinning and neuron lost, and the optic nerve underwent vacuolar changes. These degenerative changes were significantly lessened by topical application of 2% pilocarpine. In addition, the protective effect of pilocarpine on the ischemic rat retina was favorably reflected by downregulating the expression of activated apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 and upregulating the expression of cholinergic cell marker ChAT. Taken together, this highlights pilocarpine through the activation of muscarinic receptors appear to afford significant protection against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration at clinically relevant concentrations. These data also

  20. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  1. Enhanced muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in the corpus striatum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

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    Mathew Jobin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, regulate the activities of central and peripheral functions through interactions with muscarinic receptors. Changes in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. Previous reports from our laboratory on streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats showed down regulation of muscarinic M1 receptors in the brainstem, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and pancreatic islets. In this study, we have investigated the changes of acetylcholine esterase (AChE enzyme activity, total muscarinic and muscarinic M1 receptor binding and gene expression in the corpus striatum of STZ – diabetic rats and the insulin treated diabetic rats. The striatum, a neuronal nucleus intimately involved in motor behaviour, is one of the brain regions with the highest acetylcholine content. ACh has complex and clinically important actions in the striatum that are mediated predominantly by muscarinic receptors. We observed that insulin treatment brought back the decreased maximal velocity (Vmax of acetylcholine esterase in the corpus striatum during diabetes to near control state. In diabetic rats there was a decrease in maximal number (Bmax and affinity (Kd of total muscarinic receptors whereas muscarinic M1 receptors were increased with decrease in affinity in diabetic rats. We observed that, in all cases, the binding parameters were reversed to near control by the treatment of diabetic rats with insulin. Real-time PCR experiment confirmed the increase in muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression and a similar reversal with insulin treatment. These results suggest the diabetes-induced changes of the cholinergic activity in the corpus striatum and the regulatory role of insulin on binding parameters and gene expression of total and muscarinic M1 receptors.

  2. Long-term activation upon brief exposure to xanomleline is unique to M1 and M4 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Šantrůčková

    Full Text Available Xanomeline is an agonist endowed with functional preference for M1/M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. It also exhibits both reversible and wash-resistant binding to and activation of these receptors. So far the mechanisms of xanomeline selectivity remain unknown. To address this question we employed microfluorometric measurements of intracellular calcium levels and radioligand binding to investigate differences in the short- and long-term effects of xanomeline among muscarinic receptors expressed individually in Chinese hamster ovary cells. 1/One-min exposure of cells to xanomeline markedly increased intracellular calcium at hM1 and hM4, and to a lesser extent at hM2 and hM3 muscarinic receptors for more than 1 hour. 2/Unlike the classic agonists carbachol, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine 10-min exposure to xanomeline did not cause internalization of any receptor subtype. 3/Wash-resistant xanomeline selectively prevented further increase in intracellular calcium by carbachol at hM1 and hM4 receptors. 4/After transient activation xanomeline behaved as a long-term antagonist at hM5 receptors. 5/The antagonist N-methylscopolamine (NMS reversibly blocked activation of hM1 through hM4 receptors by xanomeline. 6/NMS prevented formation of xanomeline wash-resistant binding and activation at hM2 and hM4 receptors and slowed them at hM1, hM3 and hM5 receptors. Our results show commonalities of xanomeline reversible and wash-resistant binding and short-time activation among the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. However long-term receptor activation takes place in full only at hM1 and hM4 receptors. Moreover xanomeline displays higher efficacy at hM1 and hM4 receptors in primary phasic intracellular calcium release. These findings suggest the existence of particular activation mechanisms specific to these two receptors.

  3. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  4. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  5. Myotropic Effects of Cholinergic Muscarinic Agonists and Antagonists in the Beetle Tenebrio molitor L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, the cholinergic nervous system plays a crucial role in neuronal regulation of physiological processes. It acts on cells by two types of receptors - nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Both signal transmission pathways also operate in the central and peripheral cholinergic nervous system of insects. In our pharmacological experiments, we studied the effects of two muscarinic agonists (carbachol, pilocarpine) and two muscarinic antagonists (atropine, scopolamine) on the muscle contractile activity of visceral organs in the beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Both antagonists, when injected to haemolymph at concentration 10-5 M, caused delayed and prolonged cardioinhibitory effects on heart contractility in ortho- and antidromic phases of heart activity in T. molitor pupa what was observed as negative chrono- and inotropic effects. Agonist of muscarinic receptors - carbachol evoked opposite effect and increased contraction rate but only in antidromic phase. Pilocarpine, the second agonist induced weak negative chronotropic effects in the antiand orthodromic phases of heart activity. However, neither agonists had an effect on semi-isolated beetle heart in vitro. Only atropine at the highest tested concentrations slightly decreased the frequency of myocardial contractions. These suggest the regulation of heart activity by muscarinic system indirectly. The tested compounds also affected the contractility of the oviduct and hindgut, but the responses of these organs were varied and depended on the concentration of the applied compounds. These pharmacological experiments suggest the possible modulation of insect visceral muscle contractility by the cholinergic nervous system and indirectly indicate the presence of muscarinic receptor(s) in the visceral organs of the beetle T. molitor. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Angiotensin II potentiates adrenergic and muscarinic modulation of guinea pig intracardiac neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girasole, Allison E; Palmer, Christopher P; Corrado, Samantha L; Marie Southerland, E; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Hardwick, Jean C

    2011-11-01

    The intrinsic cardiac plexus represents a major peripheral integration site for neuronal, hormonal, and locally produced neuromodulators controlling efferent neuronal output to the heart. This study examined the interdependence of norepinephrine, muscarinic agonists, and ANG II, to modulate intrinsic cardiac neuronal activity. Intracellular voltage recordings from whole-mount preparations of the guinea pig cardiac plexus were used to determine changes in active and passive electrical properties of individual intrinsic cardiac neurons. Application of either adrenergic or muscarinic agonists induced changes in neuronal resting membrane potentials, decreased afterhyperpolarization duration of single action potentials, and increased neuronal excitability. Adrenergic responses were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium ions, while muscarinic responses were inhibited by application of TEA. The adrenergic responses were heterogeneous, responding to a variety of receptor-specific agonists (phenylephrine, clonidine, dobutamine, and terbutaline), although α-receptor agonists produced the most frequent responses. Application of ANG II alone produced a significant increase in excitability, while application of ANG II in combination with either adrenergic or muscarinic agonists produced a much larger potentiation of excitability. The ANG II-induced modulation of firing was blocked by the angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor inhibitor PD 123319 and was mimicked by the AT(2) receptor agonist CGP-42112A. AT(1) receptor blockade with telmasartin did not alter neuronal responses to ANG II. These data demonstrate that ANG II potentiates both muscarinically and adrenergically mediated activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons, doing so primarily via AT(2) receptor-dependent mechanisms. These neurohumoral interactions may be fundamental to regulation of neuronal excitability within the intrinsic cardiac nervous system.

  7. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  8. 3-(2-Benzofuranyl)quinuclidin-2-ene derivatives: novel muscarinic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvall, G; Sundquist, S; Johansson, G; Glas, G; Nilvebrant, L; Hacksell, U

    1996-08-16

    A series of 26 derivatives of the novel muscarinic antagonist 3-(2-benzofuranyl)quinuclidin-2-ene (1) has been synthesized and evaluated for muscarinic and antimuscarinic properties. The affinity of the compounds was determined by competition experiments in homogenates of cerebral cortex, heart, parotid gland, and urinary bladder from guinea pigs using (-)-[3H]-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate as the radioligand, and the antimuscarinic-potency was determined in a functional assay on isolated guinea pig urinary bladder using carbachol as the agonist. The 5-fluorobenzofuranyl derivative was slightly more potent than 1. The 7-bromo-substituted 8 displayed a 14-fold tissue selectivity ratio for muscarinic receptors in the cortex versus the parotid gland. Comparative molecular field analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed for this series of substituted benzofuranyl derivatives.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS IN GUINEA-PIG UTERUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOODS, HN; WILLIM, KD; BODDEKE, HWGM; ENTZEROTH, M

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the muscarinic receptor present in guinea-pig uterus smooth muscle the affinities of a series of 27 muscarinic receptor antagonists for M1 (rat cortex), M2 (rat heart), M3 (rat submandibular gland), m4 (transfected in CHO cells) and muscarinic binding sites in guinea-pig uterus

  10. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  11. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit [ 3 H]-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M 1 subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M 2 subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M 1 selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function

  12. Population activity structure of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Sean R; Williamson, Ryan C; Snyder, Adam C; Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent; Chase, Steven M; Smith, Matthew A; Yu, Byron M

    2017-01-01

    Many studies use population analysis approaches, such as dimensionality reduction, to characterize the activity of large groups of neurons. To date, these methods have treated each neuron equally, without taking into account whether neurons are excitatory or inhibitory. We studied population activity structure as a function of neuron type by applying factor analysis to spontaneous activity from spiking networks with balanced excitation and inhibition. Throughout the study, we characterized population activity structure by measuring its dimensionality and the percentage of overall activity variance that is shared among neurons. First, by sampling only excitatory or only inhibitory neurons, we found that the activity structures of these two populations in balanced networks are measurably different. We also found that the population activity structure is dependent on the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons sampled. Finally we classified neurons from extracellular recordings in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized macaques as putative excitatory or inhibitory using waveform classification, and found similarities with the neuron type-specific population activity structure of a balanced network with excitatory clustering. These results imply that knowledge of neuron type is important, and allows for stronger statistical tests, when interpreting population activity structure.

  13. Population activity structure of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Bittner

    Full Text Available Many studies use population analysis approaches, such as dimensionality reduction, to characterize the activity of large groups of neurons. To date, these methods have treated each neuron equally, without taking into account whether neurons are excitatory or inhibitory. We studied population activity structure as a function of neuron type by applying factor analysis to spontaneous activity from spiking networks with balanced excitation and inhibition. Throughout the study, we characterized population activity structure by measuring its dimensionality and the percentage of overall activity variance that is shared among neurons. First, by sampling only excitatory or only inhibitory neurons, we found that the activity structures of these two populations in balanced networks are measurably different. We also found that the population activity structure is dependent on the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons sampled. Finally we classified neurons from extracellular recordings in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized macaques as putative excitatory or inhibitory using waveform classification, and found similarities with the neuron type-specific population activity structure of a balanced network with excitatory clustering. These results imply that knowledge of neuron type is important, and allows for stronger statistical tests, when interpreting population activity structure.

  14. Population activity structure of excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Many studies use population analysis approaches, such as dimensionality reduction, to characterize the activity of large groups of neurons. To date, these methods have treated each neuron equally, without taking into account whether neurons are excitatory or inhibitory. We studied population activity structure as a function of neuron type by applying factor analysis to spontaneous activity from spiking networks with balanced excitation and inhibition. Throughout the study, we characterized population activity structure by measuring its dimensionality and the percentage of overall activity variance that is shared among neurons. First, by sampling only excitatory or only inhibitory neurons, we found that the activity structures of these two populations in balanced networks are measurably different. We also found that the population activity structure is dependent on the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons sampled. Finally we classified neurons from extracellular recordings in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized macaques as putative excitatory or inhibitory using waveform classification, and found similarities with the neuron type-specific population activity structure of a balanced network with excitatory clustering. These results imply that knowledge of neuron type is important, and allows for stronger statistical tests, when interpreting population activity structure. PMID:28817581

  15. Alkylating derivative of oxotremorine interacts irreversibly with the muscarinic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlert, F.J.; Jenden, D.J.; Ringdahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    A 2-chloroethylamine derivative of oxotremorine was studied in pharmacological experiments and muscarinic receptor binding assays. The compound, N-[4-(2-chloroethylmethylamino)-2-butynyl]-2-pyrrolidone (BM 123), forms an aziridinium ion in aqueous solution at neutral pH that stimulates contractions of guinea pig ileum with a potency similar to that of oxotremorine. Following the initial stimulation, there is a long lasting period of lack of sensitivity of the guinea pig ileum to muscarinic agonists. BM 123 also produces muscarinic effects in vivo. When homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex were incubated with BM 123 and assayed subsequently in muscarinic receptor binding assays, a loss of binding capacity for the muscarinic antagonist, [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine ([ 3 H]NMS), was noted without a change in affinity. Similar observations were made in [ 3 H]1-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]-QNB) binding assays on the forebrains of mice that had been injected with BM 123 24 hr earlier. The loss in receptor capacity for both [ 3 H]NMS and [ 3 H]-QNB was prevented by atropine treatment. Kinetic studies of the interaction of BM 123 with homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex in vitro showed that the half-time for the loss of [ 3 H]-QNB binding sites increased from 10 to 45 min as the concentration of BM 123 decreased from 10 to 1 μM. In contrast to the aziridinium ion, the parent 2-chloroethylamine compound and the alcoholic hydrolysis product were largely devoid of pharmacological and binding activity

  16. Loss of muscarinic receptors and of stimulated phospholipid labeling in ibotenate-treated hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Frey, K.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of phospholipid labeling by muscarinic agonists has been examined in nerve ending preparations from lesioned hippocampus in order to investigate the synaptic locus of the effect. Unilateral injections of the neurotoxin, ibotenic acid, into the hippocampus resulted in an extensive loss of nerve cells from both the dentate gyrus and hippocampus on the lesioned side and a parallel loss of muscarinic receptors as revealed by [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate autoradiography. Homogenates and nerve ending fractions prepared from the lesioned side of the hippocampus possessed a reduced specific activity (expressed per milligram of protein) of glutamic acid decarboxylase as well as a reduced number of muscarinic receptors compared with the control side. By contrast, choline acetyltransferase activity was either unchanged or slightly increased on the lesioned side. Although there was a reduced yield (25%) of nerve endings from the lesioned side, the specific activity of 32 Pi incorporation into phospholipids in the absence of added carbachol was comparable to that of the control side. There was, however, a marked reduction in the carbachol stimulation of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol labeling in nerve ending fractions obtained from he lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate that the muscarinic receptors present in nerve ending fractions from hippocampus and implicated in stimulated phospholipid turnover are derived from cholinoceptive intrinsic neurons

  17. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  18. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  19. The effects of nicotinic and muscarinic receptor activation on patch-clamped cells in the optic tectum of Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C-J; Debski, E A

    2003-01-01

    Both nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are present in the optic tectum. To begin to understand how the activation of these receptors affects visual activity patterns, we have determined the types of physiological responses induced by their activation. Using tectal brain slices from the leopard frog, we found that application of nicotine (100 microM) evoked long-lasting responses in 60% of patch-clamped tectal cells. Thirty percent of these responses consisted of an increase in spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) and had both a glutamatergic and GABAergic component as determined by the use of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (50 microM) and bicuculline (25 microM), respectively. Remaining response types consisted of an inward membrane current (16%) and an increase in sPSCs combined with an inward membrane current (14%). All responses could be elicited in the presence of tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM). Muscarinic receptor-mediated responses, induced by carbachol (100 microM) application after nicotinic receptor desensitization, produced responses in 70% of tectal cells. In contrast to responses elicited by nicotine, carbachol-induced responses could be evoked multiple times without significant decrement. Responses consisted of either an outward current (57%), a decrease in sPSCs (5%) or an increase in sPSCs, with (almost 6%) or without (almost 3%) an outward current. The response elicited by carbachol was not predicted by the response of the cell to nicotine. Our results suggest that nicotinic receptors are found predominantly at presynaptic locations in the optic tectum while muscarinic receptors are most often present at postsynaptic sites. We conclude that both of these receptor types could substantially modulate visual activity by changing either the input to tectal neurons or the level of their response to that input.

  20. Effects of muscarinic blockade in perirhinal cortex during visual recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Mishkin, Mortimer; Aigner, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    Stimulus recognition in monkeys is severely impaired by destruction or dysfunction of the perirhinal cortex and also by systemic administration of the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor blocker, scopolamine. These two effects are shown here to be linked: Stimulus recognition was found to be significantly impaired after bilateral microinjection of scopolamine directly into the perirhinal cortex, but not after equivalent injections into the laterally adjacent visual area TE or into the dentate gyrus of the overlying hippocampal formation. The results suggest that the formation of stimulus memories depends critically on cholinergic-muscarinic activation of the perirhinal area, providing a new clue to how stimulus representations are stored. PMID:9356507

  1. Enzyme inhibitory activity of selected Philippine plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasotona, Joseph S.; Hernandez, Christine C.

    2015-01-01

    In the Philippines, the number one cause of death are cardiovascular diseases. Diseases linked with inflammation are proliferating. This research aims to identify plant extracts that have potential activity of cholesterol-lowering, anti-hypertension, anti-gout, anti-inflammatory and fat blocker agents. Although there are commercially available drugs to treat the aforementioned illnesses, these medicine have adverse side-effects, aside from the fact that they are expensive. The results of this study will serve as added knowledge to contribute to the development of cheaper, more readily available, and effective alternative medicine. 100 plant extracts from different areas in the Philippines have been tested for potential inhibitory activity against Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA), Lipoxygenase, and Xanthine Oxidase. The plant samples were labeled with codes and distributed to laboratories for blind testing. The effective concentration of the samples tested for Xanthine oxidase is 100 ppm. Samples number 9, 11, 14, 29, 43, 46, and 50 have shown significant inhibitory activity at 78.7%, 78.4%, 70%, 89.2%, 79%, 67.4%, and 67.5% respectively. Samples tested for Lipoxygenase inhibition were set at 33ppm. Samples number 2, 37, 901, 1202, and 1204 have shown significant inhibitory activity at 66, 84.9%, 88.55%, 93.3%, and 84.7% respectively. For HMG-CoA inhibition, the effective concentration of the samples used was 100 ppm. Samples number 1 and 10 showed significant inhibitory activity at 90.1% and 81.8% respectively. (author)

  2. The Effects of Nicotinic and Muscarinic Receptor Activation on Patch-Clamped Cells in the Optic Tectum of Rana Pipiens

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, C.-J.; Debski, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    Both nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are present in the optic tectum. To begin to understand how the activation of these receptors affects visual activity patterns, we have determined the types of physiological responses induced by their activation. Using tectal brain slices from the leopard frog, we found that application of nicotine (100 μM) evoked long-lasting responses in 60% of patch-clamped tectal cells. Thirty percent of these responses consisted of an increase in sponta...

  3. New pharmacological approaches to the cholinergic system: an overview on muscarinic receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Nigel H; Reale, Marcella; Tata, Ada M

    2013-08-01

    The cholinergic system is expressed in neuronal and in non-neuronal tissues. Acetylcholine (ACh), synthesized in and out of the nervous system can locally contribute to modulation of various cell functions (e.g. survival, proliferation). Considering that the cholinergic system and its functions are impaired in a number of disorders, the identification of new pharmacological approaches to regulate cholinergic system components appears of great relevance. The present review focuses on recent pharmacological drugs able to modulate the activity of cholinergic receptors and thereby, cholinergic function, with an emphasis on the muscarinic receptor subtype, and additionally covers the cholinesterases, the main enzymes involved in ACh hydrolysis. The presence and function of muscarinic receptor subtypes both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells has been demonstrated using extensive pharmacological data emerging from studies on transgenic mice. The possible involvement of ACh in different pathologies has been proposed in recent years and is becoming an important area of study. Although the lack of selective muscarinic receptor ligands has for a long time limited the definition of therapeutic treatment based on muscarinic receptors as targets, some muscarinic ligands such as cevimeline (patents US4855290; US5571918) or xanomeline (patent, US5980933) have been developed and used in pre-clinical or in clinical studies for the treatment of nervous system diseases (Alzheimer' and Sjogren's diseases). The present review focuses on the potential implications of muscarinic receptors in different pathologies, including tumors. Moreover, the future use of muscarinic ligands in therapeutic protocols in cancer therapy will be discussed, considering that some muscarinic antagonists currently used in the treatment of genitourinary disease (e.g. darifenacin, patent, US5096890; US6106864) have also been demonstrated to arrest tumor progression in nude mice. The involvement of muscarinic

  4. The Role of Muscarinic Receptors on spasmolytic Activity of Hydroalcohlic Extract of Parsley(petroselinum crispumSeed in Adult Male Rat's Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raede Tavalaee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: because of the side effects of chemical drugs, using plant drugs was considered during recent decades. Based on previous studies, various concentrations of plant extracts can reduce ileum contraction caused by KCl and carbachol. Therefore, in this study, the role of muscarinic receptors in anti-spasmolytic activity of hydroalcohlic extract of parsley(petroselinum crispumseed in adult male rat's ileum was investigated. Materials and Methods: The distal part of Wistar rat’s ileum was separated and its contractions were recorded under 1 gr stretching and 37oC temperature in the bathroom containing the solution of Tyrode by Isotonic method. The ileum tissue was inserted in separately in first group affected by KCl and parsley seed, in the second group affected by KCl and carbachol with concentration 10-2 mg/ml and after that parsley seed, the third group affected by carbachol with concentration 10-2 mg/ml and then the extraction of parsley seed and the fourth group affected by scopolamine with concentration 10-3 M and after that KCl and then the extraction of parsley seed. Results: Non-cumulative concentrations of extract reduced the ileum contraction caused by KCl (60mM in a concentration-dependent form (p<0.001. There was a significant difference between the effect of extract in the presence of carbachol and extract concentration 0.2 mg/ml (p<0.01. There was no significant difference between the effect of extract in the presence of carbachol without stimulating tissue by KCl (60mM with extract concentration 0.2mg/ml (p<0.05. There was no significant difference between the effect of extract in the presence of scopolamine with extract concentration 0.2mg/ml(p<0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that the hydroalcholic of parsley seed extract has a relaxatory effect on rat’s ileum. Carbachol with KCl has a synergistic effect on smooth muscle contraction of the ileum wall and muscarinic receptors do not involve in the

  5. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto; de Valdivia, Ernesto Gonzalez; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M M; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels O; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin R; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2013-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked by the antagonists. A- and B-type mAChRs were also cloned and functionally characterized from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Recently, Haga et al. (Nature 2012, 482: 547-551) published the crystal structure of the human m2 mAChR, revealing 14 amino acid residues forming the binding pocket for QNB. These residues are identical between the human m2 and the D. melanogaster and T. castaneum A-type mAChRs, while many of them are different between the human m2 and the B-type receptors. Using bioinformatics, one orthologue of the A-type and one of the B-type mAChRs could also be found in all other arthropods with a sequenced genome. Protostomes, such as arthropods, and deuterostomes, such as mammals and other vertebrates, belong to two evolutionarily distinct lineages of animal evolution that split about 700 million years ago. We found that animals that originated before this split, such as cnidarians (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs.

  6. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 [11-2-[[2-[diethylaminomethyl]- 1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one], hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of [3H]quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of [3H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated

  7. Changes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors during aging process of primary cultured neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guohuang; Yi Ningyu; Xia Zongqin

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic changes of muscarinic receptor density and its reactivity during aging process in primary cultured neutrons were studied. Muscarinic receptor density was measured by 3 H-QNB binding assay, and muscarinic receptor reactivity was assessed by carbachol stimulation of cGMP formation, the latter was measured by RIA. After 2 weeks' incubation of neonatal rat brain cells, the nutrients began to rupture and the cell bodies shrank markedly showing senescent feature. The muscarinic receptor density reached peak at the 12th day in vitro (12 DIV), but the muscarinic receptor reactivity reached peak at 9 DIV and declined significantly at 12 DIV. The results demonstrated that during aging process of primary cultured neutrons, the decline of muscarinic receptor reactivity is likely prior to the decrease of receptor density

  8. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  9. Intrinsically-generated fluctuating activity in excitatory-inhibitory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, Francesca; Ostojic, Srdjan

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent networks of non-linear units display a variety of dynamical regimes depending on the structure of their synaptic connectivity. A particularly remarkable phenomenon is the appearance of strongly fluctuating, chaotic activity in networks of deterministic, but randomly connected rate units. How this type of intrinsically generated fluctuations appears in more realistic networks of spiking neurons has been a long standing question. To ease the comparison between rate and spiking networks, recent works investigated the dynamical regimes of randomly-connected rate networks with segregated excitatory and inhibitory populations, and firing rates constrained to be positive. These works derived general dynamical mean field (DMF) equations describing the fluctuating dynamics, but solved these equations only in the case of purely inhibitory networks. Using a simplified excitatory-inhibitory architecture in which DMF equations are more easily tractable, here we show that the presence of excitation qualitatively modifies the fluctuating activity compared to purely inhibitory networks. In presence of excitation, intrinsically generated fluctuations induce a strong increase in mean firing rates, a phenomenon that is much weaker in purely inhibitory networks. Excitation moreover induces two different fluctuating regimes: for moderate overall coupling, recurrent inhibition is sufficient to stabilize fluctuations; for strong coupling, firing rates are stabilized solely by the upper bound imposed on activity, even if inhibition is stronger than excitation. These results extend to more general network architectures, and to rate networks receiving noisy inputs mimicking spiking activity. Finally, we show that signatures of the second dynamical regime appear in networks of integrate-and-fire neurons. PMID:28437436

  10. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-02-26

    Feb 26, 2013 ... especially the four bacteria isolates used in this study are present in the epiphgram of both normal and ... Keyword: Albino snail, Archachatina marginata, Inhibitory activity, Epiphgram, Bacteria isolate. Introduction .... evolution.

  11. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  12. New advances in pharmacological approaches to the cholinergic system: an overview on muscarinic receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Nigel H.; Reale, Marcella; Tata, Ada Maria

    2016-01-01

    The cholinergic system is expressed in neuronal and in non-neuronal tissues. Acetylcholine (ACh), synthesized in and out of the nervous system can locally contribute to modulation of various cell functions (e.g. survival, proliferation). Considering that the cholinergic system and its functions are impaired in a number of disorders, the identification of new pharmacological approaches to regulate cholinergic system components appears of great relevance. The present review focuses on recent pharmacological drugs able to modulate the activity of cholinergic receptors and thereby, cholinergic function, with an emphasis on the muscarinic receptor subtype, and additionally covers the cholinesterases, the main enzymes involved in ACh hydrolysis. The presence and function of muscarinic receptor subtypes both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells has been demonstrated using extensive pharmacological data emerging from studies on transgenic mice. The possible involvement of ACh in different pathologies has been proposed in recent years and is becoming an important area of study. Although the lack of selective muscarinic receptor ligands has for a long time limited the definition of therapeutic treatment based on muscarinic receptors as targets, some muscarinic ligands such as cevimeline (patents US4855290; US5571918) or xanomeline (patent, US5980933) have been developed and used in pre-clinical or in clinical studies for the treatment of nervous system diseases (Alzheimer’ and Sjogren’s diseases). The present review focuses on the potential implications of muscarinic receptors in different pathologies, including tumors. Moreover, the future use of muscarinic ligands in therapeutic protocols in cancer therapy will be discussed, considering that some muscarinic antagonists currently used in the treatment of genitourinary disease (e.g. darifenacin, patent, US5096890; US6106864) have also been demonstrated to arrest tumor progression in nude mice. The involvement of muscarinic

  13. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  14. Testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory active constituents of Piper nigrum leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Noriko; Tokunaga, Masashi; Naruto, Shunsuke; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2007-12-01

    Previously we reported that Piper nigrum leaf extract showed a potent stimulation effect on melanogenesis and that (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2) were isolated as active constituents. As a part of our continuous studies on Piper species for the development of cosmetic hair-care agents, testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts obtained from several different parts of six Piper species, namely Piper nigrum, P. methysticum, P. betle, P. kadsura, P. longum, and P. cubeba, were examined. Among them, the extracts of P. nigrum leaf, P. nigrum fruit and P. cubeba fruit showed potent inhibitory activity. Activity-guided fractionation of P. nigrum leaf extract led to the isolation of 1 and 2. Fruits of P. cubeba contain 1 as a major lignan, thus inhibitory activity of the fruit may be attributable to 1. As a result of further assay on other known constituents of the cited Piper species, it was found that piperine, a major alkaloid amide of P. nigrum fruit, showed potent inhibitory activity, thus a part of the inhibitory activity of P. nigrum fruit may depend on piperine. The 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activities of 1 and piperine were found for the first time. In addition, the P. nigrum leaf extract showed in vivo anti-androgenic activity using the hair regrowth assay in testosterone sensitive male C57Black/6CrSlc strain mice.

  15. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Kosentka

    Full Text Available Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades, the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa.

  16. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosentka, Pawel; Sprague, Sarah L; Ryberg, Martin; Gartz, Jochen; May, Amanda L; Campagna, Shawn R; Matheny, P Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades), the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa.

  17. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kassiou, M.; Eu, P.; Katsifis, A.G.; Garra, M.; Power, J.; Najdovski, L.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  18. Decorrelation of Neural-Network Activity by Inhibitory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Correlations in spike-train ensembles can seriously impair the encoding of information by their spatio-temporal structure. An inevitable source of correlation in finite neural networks is common presynaptic input to pairs of neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that spike correlations in recurrent neural networks are considerably smaller than expected based on the amount of shared presynaptic input. Here, we explain this observation by means of a linear network model and simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that inhibitory feedback efficiently suppresses pairwise correlations and, hence, population-rate fluctuations, thereby assigning inhibitory neurons the new role of active decorrelation. We quantify this decorrelation by comparing the responses of the intact recurrent network (feedback system) and systems where the statistics of the feedback channel is perturbed (feedforward system). Manipulations of the feedback statistics can lead to a significant increase in the power and coherence of the population response. In particular, neglecting correlations within the ensemble of feedback channels or between the external stimulus and the feedback amplifies population-rate fluctuations by orders of magnitude. The fluctuation suppression in homogeneous inhibitory networks is explained by a negative feedback loop in the one-dimensional dynamics of the compound activity. Similarly, a change of coordinates exposes an effective negative feedback loop in the compound dynamics of stable excitatory-inhibitory networks. The suppression of input correlations in finite networks is explained by the population averaged correlations in the linear network model: In purely inhibitory networks, shared-input correlations are canceled by negative spike-train correlations. In excitatory-inhibitory networks, spike-train correlations are typically positive. Here, the suppression of input correlations is not a result of the mere existence of correlations between

  19. NK cell activation: distinct stimulatory pathways counterbalancing inhibitory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A B; Wu, J; Phillips, J H; Lanier, L L

    2000-01-01

    A delicate balance between positive and negative signals regulates NK cell effector function. Activation of NK cells may be initiated by the triggering of multiple adhesion or costimulatory molecules, and can be counterbalanced by inhibitory signals induced by receptors for MHC class I. A common pathway of inhibitory signaling is provided by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in the cytoplasmic domains of these receptors which mediate the recruitment of SH2 domain-bearing tyrosine phosphate-1 (SHP-1). In contrast to the extensive progress that has been made regarding the negative regulation of NK cell function, our knowledge of the signals that activate NK cells is still poor. Recent studies of the activating receptor complexes have shed new light on the induction of NK cell effector function. Several NK receptors using novel adaptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and with PI 3-kinase recruiting motifs have been implicated in NK cell stimulation.

  20. Muscarinic M2 receptors directly activate Gq/11 and Gs G-proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 320, č. 2 (2007), s. 607-614 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP305/05/P209; GA ČR GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic * siRNA * G-proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.003, year: 2007

  1. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...

  2. Inhibitory effect of burdock leaves on elastase and tyrosinase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Wu, Hsing-Chen; Chiang, Ni-Na; Lee, Chiu-Fang; Huang, Yu-Syuan; Wang, Hui-Yun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Fu-An

    2017-01-01

    Burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaves generate a considerable amount of waste following burdock root harvest in Taiwan. To increase the use of burdock leaves, the present study investigated the optimal methods for producing burdock leaf extract (BLE) with high antioxidant polyphenolic content, including drying methods and solvent extraction concentration. In addition, the elastase and tyrosinase inhibitory activity of BLE was examined. Burdock leaves were dried by four methods: Shadow drying, oven drying, sun drying and freeze-drying. The extract solution was then subjected to total polyphenol content analysis and the method that produced BLE with the highest amount of total antioxidant components was taken forward for further analysis. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl scavenging, antielastase and antityrosinase activity of the BLE were measured to enable the evaluation of the antioxidant and skin aging-associated enzyme inhibitory activities of BLE. The results indicated that the total polyphenolic content following extraction with ethanol (EtOH) was highest using the freeze-drying method, followed by the oven drying, shadow drying and sun drying methods. BLE yielded a higher polyphenol content and stronger antioxidant activity as the ratio of the aqueous content of the extraction solvent used increased. BLE possesses marked tyrosinase and elastase inhibitory activities, with its antielastase activity notably stronger compared with its antityrosinase activity. These results indicate that the concentration of the extraction solvent was associated with the antioxidant and skin aging-associated enzyme inhibitory activity of BLE. The reactive oxygen species scavenging theory of skin aging may explain the tyrosinase and elastase inhibitory activity of BLE. In conclusion, the optimal method for obtaining BLE with a high antioxidant polyphenolic content was freeze-drying followed by 30–50% EtOH extraction. In addition, the antielastase and antityrosinase activities of the

  3. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with [ 3 H]Pirenzepine and [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M 1 neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M 1 , the cardiac M 2 and the glandular M 3

  4. Histamine release inhibitory activity of Piper nigrum leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Noriko; Naruto, Shunsuke; Inaba, Kazunori; Itoh, Kimihisa; Tokunaga, Masashi; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    Oral administration of a methanolic extract of Piper nigrum leaf (PN-ext, 50, 200 and 500 mg/kg) showed a potent dose-dependent inhibition of dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced cutaneous reaction at 1 h [immediate phase response (IPR)] after and 24 h [late phase response (LPR)] after DNFB challenge in mice which were passively sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. Ear swelling inhibitory effect of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)) on very late phase response (vLPR) in the model mice was significant but weaker than that on IPR. Oral administration of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg for 7 d) inhibited picryl chloride (PC)-induced ear swelling in PC sensitized mice. PN-ext exhibited in vitro inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Two lignans of PN-ext, (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2), were identified as major active principles having histamine release inhibitory activity.

  5. Yuan et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) 11(4):120 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    Conclusions: Izalpinin exhibits inhibitory role of muscarinic receptor-related detrusor contractile activity, and it may be a promising lead ... For the therapy of overactive bladder syndrome, many drugs such as anti-muscarinic agents have exhibited significant clinical benefits ... Figure 1: Chemical structure of izalpinin.

  6. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Haruo; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [ 3 H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [ 3 H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [ 3 H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [ 3 H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected

  7. Fruit Wines Inhibitory Activity Against α-Glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Uros; Grozdanic, Nada; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Pejin, Boris; Nastasijevic, Branislav; Markovic, Bojan; Dordevic, Brizita

    2017-01-01

    Fruit wines are well known for their profound health-promoting properties including both enzyme activations and inhibitions. They may act preventive in regard to diabetes melitus and other chronic diseases. Potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of fruit wines made from blueberry, black chokeberry, blackberry, raspberry and sour cherry was the subject of this study. In order to increase the alcohol content due to enriched extraction of total phenolics, sugar was added in the fruit pomace of the half of the examined fruit wine samples. Compared with acarbose used as a positive control (IC50 = 73.78 µg/mL), all fruit wine samples exhibited higher α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Indeed, blueberry wine samples stood out, both prepared with IC50 = 24.14 µg/mL, lyophilised extract yield 3.23% and without IC50 = 46.39 µg/mL, lyophilised extract yield 2.89% and with addition of sugar before fermentation. Chlorogenic acid predominantly contributed to α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the blueberry, black chokeberry and sour cherry wine samples. However, ellagic acid, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor possessing a planar structure, only slightly affected the activity of the blueberry wine samples, due to the lower concentration. In addition to this, molecular docking study of chlorogenic acid pointed out the importance of binding energy (-8.5 kcal/mol) for the inhibition of the enzyme. In summary, fruit wines made from blueberry should be primarily taken into consideration as a medicinal food targeting diabetes mellitus type 2 in the early stage, if additional studies would confirm their therapeutic potential for the control of postprandial hyperglycemia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles by co-modulating NO/muscarinic signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Keren; Schoknecht, Karl; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon; Soreq, Hermona

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke patients treated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) show improved motor, cognitive and executive functions, but the underlying mechanism(s) are incompletely understood. Here, we report that cerebral arterioles in the rat brain superfused with therapeutically effective doses of the SSRI fluoxetine showed consistent, dose-dependent vasodilatation (by 1.2 to 1.6-fold), suppressible by muscarinic and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) antagonists [atropine, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] but resistant to nicotinic and serotoninergic antagonists (mecamylamine, methylsergide). Fluoxetine administered 10–30 min. following experimental vascular photo-thrombosis increased arterial diameter (1.3–1.6), inducing partial, but lasting reperfusion of the ischaemic brain. In brain endothelial b.End.3 cells, fluoxetine induced rapid muscarinic receptor-dependent increases in intracellular [Ca2+] and promoted albumin- and eNOS-dependent nitric oxide (NO) production and HSP90 interaction. In vitro, fluoxetine suppressed recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE) activity only in the presence of albumin. That fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles suggests co-promotion of endothelial muscarinic and nitric oxide signalling, facilitated by albumin-dependent inhibition of serum AChE. PMID:22697296

  9. Differences in kinetics of xanomeline binding and selectivity of activation of G proteins at M(1) and M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2006), s. 656-666 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : xanomeline * muscarinic receptors * G-protein activation Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.469, year: 2006

  10. Plants from Brazilian Cerrado with potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Monteiro Souza

    Full Text Available The increased amount of melanin leads to skin disorders such as age spots, freckles, melasma and malignant melanoma. Tyrosinase is known to be the key enzyme in melanin production. Plants and their extracts are inexpensive and rich resources of active compounds that can be utilized to inhibit tyrosinase as well as can be used for the treatment of dermatological disorders associated with melanin hyperpigmentation. Using in vitro tyrosinase inhibitory activity assay, extracts from 13 plant species from Brazilian Cerrado were evaluated. The results showed that Pouteria torta and Eugenia dysenterica extracts presented potent in vitro tyrosinase inhibition compared to positive control kojic acid. Ethanol extract of Eugenia dysenterica leaves showed significant (p<0.05 tyrosinase inhibitory activity exhibiting the IC₅₀ value of 11.88 µg/mL, compared to kojic acid (IC₅₀ value of 13.14 µg/mL. Pouteria torta aqueous extract leaves also showed significant inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ value of 30.01 µg/mL. These results indicate that Pouteria torta and Eugenia dysenterica extracts and their isolated constituents are promising agents for skin-whitening or antimelanogenesis formulations.

  11. Muscarinic supersensitivity and impaired receptor desensitization in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainetdinov, R R; Bohn, L M; Walker, J K; Laporte, S A; Macrae, A D; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Premont, R T

    1999-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) is a member of a family of enzymes that phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). To address the physiological importance of GRK5-mediated regulation of GPCRs, mice bearing targeted deletion of the GRK5 gene (GRK5-KO) were generated. GRK5-KO mice exhibited mild spontaneous hypothermia as well as pronounced behavioral supersensitivity upon challenge with the nonselective muscarinic agonist oxotremorine. Classical cholinergic responses such as hypothermia, hypoactivity, tremor, and salivation were enhanced in GRK5-KO animals. The antinociceptive effect of oxotremorine was also potentiated and prolonged. Muscarinic receptors in brains from GRK5-KO mice resisted oxotremorine-induced desensitization, as assessed by oxotremorine-stimulated [5S]GTPgammaS binding. These data demonstrate that elimination of GRK5 results in cholinergic supersensitivity and impaired muscarinic receptor desensitization and suggest that a deficit of GPCR desensitization may be an underlying cause of behavioral supersensitivity.

  12. Pharmacologically relevant receptor binding characteristics and 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity of free Fatty acids contained in saw palmetto extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masayuki; Ito, Yoshihiko; Oyunzul, Luvsandorj; Oki-Fujino, Tomomi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-04-01

    Saw palmetto extract (SPE), used widely for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been shown to bind alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) calcium channel antagonist receptors. Major constituents of SPE are lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid and linoleic acid. The aim of this study was to investigate binding affinities of these fatty acids for pharmacologically relevant (alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP) receptors. The fatty acids inhibited specific [(3)H]prazosin binding in rat brain in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 23.8 to 136 microg/ml, and specific (+)-[(3)H]PN 200-110 binding with IC(50) values of 24.5 to 79.5 microg/ml. Also, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid and linoleic acid inhibited specific [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine ([(3)H]NMS) binding in rat brain with IC(50) values of 56.4 to 169 microg/ml. Palmitic acid had no effect on specific [(3)H]NMS binding. The affinity of oleic acid, myristic acid and linoleic acid for each receptor was greater than the affinity of SPE. Scatchard analysis revealed that oleic acid and lauric acid caused a significant decrease in the maximal number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]prazosin, [(3)H]NMS and (+)-[(3)H]PN 200-110. The results suggest that lauric acid and oleic acid bind noncompetitively to alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP calcium channel antagonist receptors. We developed a novel and convenient method of determining 5alpha-reductase activity using LC/MS. With this method, SPE was shown to inhibit 5alpha-reductase activity in rat liver with an IC(50) of 101 microg/ml. Similarly, all the fatty acids except palmitic acid inhibited 5alpha-reductase activity, with IC(50) values of 42.1 to 67.6 microg/ml. In conclusion, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, and linoleic acid, major constituents of SPE, exerted binding activities of alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP receptors and inhibited 5

  13. HPLC based activity profiling for 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity in Isatis tinctoria leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberthür, C; Jäggi, R; Hamburger, M

    2005-06-01

    In the pursuit of the anti-inflammatory constituents in lipophilic woad extracts, the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory activity was investigated by HPLC-based activity profiling. In a low-resolution profiling, two time windows with peaks of activity were found. The first coincided with tryptanthrin, a known dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-LOX, whereas the major inhibitory fraction was towards the end of the HPLC run. The active fractions were profiled in a peak-resolved manner, and the compounds analyzed by LC-MS, GC and TLC. The activity in the lipophilic fractions of the Isatis extract could be linked to an unsaturated fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid.

  14. Muscarinic responses of gastric parietal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkes, J.M.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.R.; Hersey, S.J.; Sachs, G.

    1991-01-01

    Isolated rabbit gastric glands were used to study the nature of the muscarinic cholinergic responses of parietal cells. Carbachol stimulation of acid secretion, as measured by the accumulation of aminopyrine, was inhibited by the M1 antagonist, pirenzepine, with an IC50 of 13 microM; by the M2 antagonist, 11,2-(diethylamino)methyl-1 piperidinyl acetyl-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido 2,3-b 1,4 benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116), with an IC50 of 110 microM; and by the M1/M3 antagonist, diphenyl-acetoxy-4-methylpiperidinemethiodide, with an IC50 of 35 nM. The three antagonists displayed equivalent IC50 values for the inhibition of carbachol-stimulated production of 14CO2 from radiolabeled glucose, which is a measure of the turnover of the H,K-ATPase, the final step of acid secretion. Intracellular calcium levels were measured in gastric glands loaded with FURA 2. Carbachol was shown to both release calcium from an intracellular pool and to promote calcium entry across the plasma membrane. The calcium entry was inhibitable by 20 microM La3+. The relative potency of the three muscarinic antagonists for inhibition of calcium entry was essentially the same as for inhibition of acid secretion or pump related glucose oxidation. Image analysis of the glands showed the effects of carbachol, and of the antagonists, on intracellular calcium were occurring largely in the parietal cell. The rise in cell calcium due to release of calcium from intracellular stores was inhibited by 4-DAMP with an IC50 of 1.7 nM, suggesting that the release pathway was regulated by a low affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state; Ca entry and acid secretion are regulated by a high affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state, inhibited by higher 4-DAMP concentrations, suggesting that it is the steady-state elevation of Ca that is related to parietal cell function rather than the [Ca]i transient

  15. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using [3H](-)quinuclidinyl benzilate [( 3H]QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. [3H]QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with [3H]pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies

  16. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New polyacetylenes glycoside from Eclipta prostrate with DGAT inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiao; Li, Ban-Ban; Lin, Xin; Jiang, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Le; Li, Hao-Ze; Cui, Long

    2018-06-08

    One new polyacetylene glycoside eprostrata Ⅰ (1), together with seven known compounds (2-8), were isolated from Eclipta prostrata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and physico-chemical analyses. All the isolates were evaluated inhibitory activity on DGAT in an in vitro assay. Compounds 1-8 were found to exhibit inhibitory activity of DGAT1 with IC 50 values ranging from 74.4 ± 1.3 to 101.1 ± 1.1 μM.

  18. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) inhibits ERK phosphorylation by muscarinic receptor modulation in rat pituitary GH3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondo, Agnese; De Mizio, Mariarosaria; Zirpoli, Laura; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Mondola, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) belongs to a family of isoenzymes that are able to dismutate the oxygen superoxide in hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. This enzyme is secreted by many cellular lines and it is also released trough a calcium-dependent depolarization mechanism involving SNARE protein SNAP 25. Using rat pituitary GH3 cells that express muscarinic receptors we found that SOD1 inhibits P-ERK1/2 pathway trough an interaction with muscarinic M1 receptor. This effect is strengthened by oxotremorine, a muscarinic M agonist and partially reverted by pyrenzepine, an antagonist of M1 receptor; moreover this effect is independent from increased intracellular calcium concentration induced by SOD1. Finally, P-ERK1/2 inhibition was accompanied by the reduction of GH3 cell proliferation. These data indicate that SOD1 beside the well studied antioxidant properties can be considered as a neuromodulator able to affect mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat pituitary cells trough a M1 muscarinic receptor

  19. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane...... (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects...

  20. Effect of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera Indica on basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle: role of muscarinic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Noureddini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mango belongs to the Anacardiaceae and the extracts from its stems, leaves, fruit and kernel are reported to affect smooth muscle contractility. We studied the role of cholinergic muscarinic receptors for the effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera indica on the basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, mid-sections (n=24 of the uterine of healthy virgin rats were placed in an organ bath containing carbonated Tyrode’s solution under 1 g tension. The cumulative effects of the aqueous extracts of mango kernel (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20, 200, and 2000 μg/mL or extract vehicle (Tyrode’s solution in the presence or absence of atropine were examined by isometric method using the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle. Results: The cumulative concentrations (0.002-20 µg/ml of mango kernel aqueous extract was significantly decreased the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but the contractile activity was returned to the basal level at the concentrations of 200 and 2000 µg/ml. Atropine (1 µM could not significantly change the effects of cumulative use of extract on the strength and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but it significantly enhanced the contractile frequency at low concentrations. Conclusion: The effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel on the activity of the uterine smooth muscle might not be through cholinergic muscarinic receptors and atropine could enhance the effects of the extract on frequency through other receptors.

  1. M3 muscarinic receptor interaction with phospholipase C beta3 determines its signaling efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, W.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.; Burroughs, M.; Faibis, G.; Malik, S.; Tall, G.G.; Smrcka, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) enzymes are activated by G protein-coupled receptors through receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange on Galphabetagamma heterotrimers containing Gq family G proteins. Here we report evidence for a direct interaction between M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R) and

  2. Antibacterial and glucosyltransferase enzyme inhibitory activity of helmyntostachyszelanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuspradini, H.; Putri, AS; Mitsunaga, T.

    2018-04-01

    Helminthostachyszeylanica is a terrestrial, herbaceous, fern-like plant of southeastern Asia and Australia, commonly known as tunjuk-langit. This kind of plant have a medicinal properties such as treatment of malaria, dysentery and can be eaten with betel in the treatment of whooping cough. To evaluate the scientific basis for the use of the plant, the antimicrobial activities of extracts of the stem and leaves were evaluated. The bacteria used in this study is Streptococcus sobrinus, a species of gram-positive, that may be associated with human dental caries. The dried powdered plant parts were extracted using methanol and 50% aqueous extract and screened for their antibacterial effects of Streptococcus sobrinus using the 96 well-plate microdilution broth method. The inhibitory activities of its related enzyme were also determined. The plant extracts showed variable antibacterial and Glucosyltransferase enzyme inhibitory activity while some extracts could not cause any inhibition. It was shown that 50% ethanolics of Helminthostachyzeylanica stem have a potency as anti dental caries agents.

  3. Characterization of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of fermented milk produced by Lactobacillus helveticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongfu; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Kwok, Lai-yu; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Heping; Menghe, Bilige

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension affects up to 30% of the adult population in most countries. It is a known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke. Owing to the increased health awareness of consumers, the application of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides produced by Lactobacillushelveticus to prevent or control high blood pressure has drawn wide attention. A total of 59 L. helveticus strains were isolated from traditional fermented dairy products and the ACE-inhibitory activity of the fermented milks produced with the isolated microorganisms was assayed. The ACE-inhibitory activity of 38 L. helveticus strains was more than 50%, and 3 strains (IMAU80872, IMAU80852, and IMAU80851) expressing the highest ACE-inhibitory activity were selected for further studies. Particularly, the gastrointestinal protease tolerance and thermostability of the ACE-inhibitory activity in the fermented milks were assessed. Based on these 2 criteria, IMAU80872 was found to be superior over the other 2 strains. Furthermore, IMAU80872 exhibited a high in vitro ACE-inhibitory activity at the following fermentation conditions: fermentation temperature at 40°C, inoculation concentration of 1×10(6) cfu/mL, and fermentation for 18h. Finally, by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we observed changes of the metabolome along the milk fermentation process of IMAU80872. Furthermore, 6 peptides were identified, which might have ACE-inhibitory activity. In conclusion, we identified a novel ACE-inhibitory L. helveticus strain suitable for the production of fermented milk or other functional dairy products. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Activation of multiple G-proteins by muscarinic M1 and M2 receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. S1 (2006), s. 404-404 ISSN 1671-4083. [World Congress of Pharmacology /15./. 02.07.2006-07.07.2006, Beijing] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP305/05/P209; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * multiple G-protein coupling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  5. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, T.H.; Cho, N.J.; De Mello, F.G.; Klein, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed

  6. Biochemical and immunological studies of the Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainer, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors were solubilized from bovine brain membranes with 3[3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]propanesulfonate (CHAPS). A combination of 10 mM CHAPS and 1 M NaCl solubilized 15-40% of the specific receptor binding sites from these membranes. The solubilized receptors displayed high affinity binding of the muscarinic antagonist, [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate with a K/sub D/ = 300 pM. In addition, the solubilized and retained guanyl nucleotide regulation of agonist binding characteristic of membrane bound receptors. Gel filtration experiments showed that solubilized receptors from cortex and cerebellum had different elution profiles. Analysis by sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed that receptors in the lower molecular weight peak sedimented with a coefficient of 5S. Receptors in the larger molecular weight peak sedimented to the bottom of the gradient. Attempts to purify receptors by chromatography on propylbenzilycholine Sepharose were unsuccessful. The technique used to attach the ligand to the solid support, however, was used to synthesize a PrBCM-BSA conjugate and the conjugate used as an antigen in the production of anti-ligand antibodies. Two anti-PrBCM monoclonal antibodies were isolated that recognize muscarinic but not nicotinic cholinergic ligands. The abilities of the antibodies to recognize other muscarinic ligands indicated the antibodies recognized a portion of PrBCM involved in binding to the receptor. Construction of an antibody affinity resin resulted in the purification of this fragment a minimum of 170 fold

  7. Structural Requirements of Alkylglyceryl-l-Ascorbic Acid Derivatives for Melanogenesis Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Norihisa; Katsuyama, Yushi; Yoshioka, Masato; Muraoka, Osamu; Morikawa, Toshio

    2018-04-10

    l-Ascorbic acid has multifunctional benefits on skin aesthetics, including inhibition of melanin production, and is widely used in cosmetics. It, however, has low stability and poor skin penetration. We hypothesize that alkylglyceryl-l-ascorbic acid derivatives, highly stable vitamin C-alkylglycerol conjugates, would have similar anti-melanogenic activity with better stability and penetration. We test 28 alkylglyceryl-l-ascorbic acid derivatives ( 1 - 28 ) on theophylline-stimulated B16 melanoma 4A5 cells to determine if they inhibit melanogenesis and establish any structure-function relationships. Although not the most potent inhibitors, 3- O -(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2- O -hexyl-l-ascorbic acid ( 6 , IC 50 = 81.4 µM) and 2- O -(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-3- O -hexyl-l-ascorbic acid ( 20 , IC 50 = 117 µM) are deemed the best candidate derivatives based on their inhibitory activities and low toxicities. These derivatives are also found to be more stable than l-ascorbic acid and to have favorable characteristics for skin penetration. The following structural requirements for inhibitory activity of alkylglyceryl-l-ascorbic acid derivatives are also determined: (i) alkylation of glyceryl-l-ascorbic acid is essential for inhibitory activity; (ii) the 3- O -alkyl-derivatives ( 2 - 14 ) exhibit stronger inhibitory activity than the corresponding 2- O -alkyl-derivatives ( 16 - 28 ); and (iii) derivatives with longer alkyl chains have stronger inhibitory activities. Mechanistically, our studies suggest that l-ascorbic acid derivatives exert their effects by suppressing the mRNA expression of tyrosinase and tyrosine-related protein-1.

  8. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Cross, R.S.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors

  9. Pre- and postynaptic effects of muscarinic antagonists in the isolated guinea pig ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbinger, H.; Weiler, W.; Wessler, I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied in the guinea-pig ileum whether the presynaptic muscarinic receptors of he cholinergic nerves differ from the postsynaptic muscarinic receptors of tthe longitudinal muscle in their affinities for several muscarinic antagonists. The method of measuring the release of tritium-ACh from the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation in tthe guinea-pig ileum in the absence of a chlinesterase inhibitor is described in which two longitudinal muscle strips were incubated in a 2 ml organ bath with tritium-choline are subsequently superfused with Tyrode solution

  10. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four Medicinal Plant Standardized Extracts and Their Main Constituents for the Prevention of ... levels in galactosemic condition by using reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) was determined.

  11. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860 ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Muscarinic receptor M4 positive allosteric modulators attenuate central effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Camilla; Weikop, Pia; Dencker, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cocaine addiction is a chronic brain disease affecting neurotransmission. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic signaling in the reward system, and muscarinic receptor stimulation can block direct reinforcing effects of cocaine. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... that specific muscarinic M4receptor stimulation can attenuate the discriminative stimulus effects and conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine, measures believed to predict the ability of cocaine and cocaine-associated cues to elicit relapse to drug taking. METHODS: We tested the M4-selective positive...

  13. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects ...

  14. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maibritt B Andersen

    Full Text Available Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Tyrosinase inhibitory components from Aloe vera and their antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Yang, Seo Young; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kwon, Sun Jung; Cho, In Sook; Jeong, Min Hee; Ho Kim, Young; Choi, Gug Seoun

    2017-12-01

    A new compound, 9-dihydroxyl-2'-O-(Z)-cinnamoyl-7-methoxy-aloesin (1), and eight known compounds (2-9) were isolated from Aloe vera. Their structures were elucidated using 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra. Compound 9 exhibited reversible competitive inhibitory activity against the enzyme tyrosinase, with an IC 50 value of 9.8 ± 0.9 µM. A molecular simulation revealed that compound 9 interacts via hydrogen bonding with residues His244, Thr261, and Val283 of tyrosinase. Additionally, compounds 3 and 7 were shown by half-leaf assays to exhibit inhibitory activity towards Pepper mild mottle virus.

  16. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-01-01

    Muscarinic M1/M4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (SD) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those...

  17. Two new lignans from Saururus chinensis and their DGAT inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Tuo, Zhen-Dong; Qi, Shi-Zhou; Xing, Shan-Shan; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Chen, Jian-Guang; Cui, Long

    2015-03-01

    Two new lignans were isolated from Saururus chinensis, along with eight known compounds. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and physico-chemical analyses. All the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against DGAT1 and DGAT2. Among them, compounds 2, 3, 5 and 7 were found to exhibit selective inhibitory activity on DGAT1 with IC50 values ranging from 44.3±1.5 to 87.5±1.3μM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasonic extraction of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica and their antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Peng; Yang, Xiaoman; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Sun, Huili; Chen, Deke; Pan, Jianyu

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, ultrasonic extraction technique (UET) is used to improve the yield of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica (LJPs). And their antioxidative as well as glycosidase inhibitory activities are investigated. Box-Behnken design (BBD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to optimize ultrasonic extraction for polysaccharides. The optimized conditions are obtained as extraction time at 54 min, ultrasonic power at 1050 W, extraction temperature at 80°C and ratio of material to solvent at 1:50 (g mL-1). Under these optimal ultrasonic extraction conditions, an actual experimental yield (5.75% ± 0.3%) is close to the predicted result (5.67%) with no significant difference ( P > 0.05). Vitro antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities tests indicate that the crude polysaccharides (LJP) and two major ethanol precipitated fractions (LJP1 and LJP2) are in a concentration-dependent manner. LJP2 (30%-60% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) possesses the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and moderate scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (66.09% ± 2.19%, 3.0 mg mL-1). Also, the inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (59.08% ± 3.79%, 5.0 mg mL-1) is close to that of acarbose (63.99% ± 3.27%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP1 (30% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) exhibits the strongest scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (99.80% ± 0.00%, 3.0 mg mL-1) and moderate α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (47.76% ± 1.92%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP shows the most remarkable DPPH scavenging activity (66.20% ± 0.11%, 5.0 mg mL-1) but weakest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (37.77% ± 1.30%, 5.0 mg mL-1). However, all these LJPs exert weak inhibitory effects against α-amylase. These results show that UET is an effective method for extracting bioactive polysaccharides from seaweed materials. LJP1 and LJP2 can be developed as a potential ingredient in hypoglycemic agents or functional food for the management of

  19. The cartilage protein melanoma inhibitory activity contributes to inflammatory arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, Nataliya; Härle, Peter; Cantaert, Tineke; van Tok, Melissa; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M.; Bosserhoff, Anja; Baeten, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) is a small chondrocyte-specific protein with unknown function. MIA knockout mice (MIA(-/-)) have a normal phenotype with minor microarchitectural alterations of cartilage. Our previous study demonstrated that immunodominant epitopes of MIA are actively presented in

  20. Effect of aging on airway remodeling and muscarinic receptors in a murine acute asthma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang JY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Young Kang, Sook Young Lee, Chin Kook Rhee, Seung Joon Kim, Soon Seog Kwon, Young Kyoon KimDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaBackground and objectives: The influence of aging on the development of asthma has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate age-related airway responses involving lung histology and expression of muscarinic receptors in a murine model of acute asthma. Methods: Female BALB/c mice at the ages of 6 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA for 1 month (n = 8–12 per group. We analyzed inflammatory cells and T-helper (Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and parameters of airway remodeling and expression of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue. Results: Among the OVA groups, total cell and eosinophil numbers in BAL fluid were significantly higher in the older (6-, 9-, and 12-month-old mice than in the young (6-week-old mice. Interleukin (IL 4 (IL-4 concentration increased, but IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations showed a decreased tendency, with age. IL-17 concentration tended to increase with age, which did not reach statistical significance. periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining area, peribronchial collagen deposition, and area of α-smooth muscle staining were significantly higher in the 6-month older OVA group than in the young OVA group. The expression of the M3 and M2 muscarinic receptors tended to increase and decrease, respectively, with age. Conclusion: The aged mice showed an active and unique pattern not only on airway inflammation, but also on airway remodeling and expression of the muscarinic receptors during the development of acute asthma compared with the young mice. These findings suggest that the aging process affects the pathogenesis of acute asthma and age-specific approach might be more appropriate for better asthma control in a clinical practice.Keywords: aging, asthma

  1. Evaluating the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of three Centaurea species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hajimehdipoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors such as oxidative stress and reduced acetylcholine level have been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology and recently there has been a trend towards natural product research to find potential sources of antioxidants and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in the plants kingdom. Centaurea is a genus with about 500 species world wild, many of them have shown to possess biologic activity; Centaurea albonites, C. aucheri and C. pseudoscabiosa are three species which little investigation has been carried out about their biological properties. In the present study, the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the above mentioned species have been evaluated. The ability of the total extract and methanol fraction of the plants to scavenge free radicals has been assessed through DPPH radical scavenging assay, and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory property has been evaluated by Ellman method. The total extract of all species exhibited moderate antioxidant activity whereas the extracts of C. pseudoscabiosa showed the strongest antioxidant property; its total extract also demonstrated the highest acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity among the evaluated samples (19.2% inhibition. The results suggest the species as potential sources of natural antioxidants which could be focused in future studies of Alzheimer’s disease.

  2. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  3. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in porcine detrusor: comparison with humans and regulation by bladder augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goepel, M.; Gronewald, A.; Krege, S.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of porcine and human bladder detrusor were compared in radioligand binding studies using [3H]quinuclidinylbenzylate as the radioligand. The receptor affinity for the radioligand and the density of muscarinic receptors was similar in male and

  4. New Biflavonoids with α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activities from Boesenbergia rotunda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutputsorn Chatsumpun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Roots of Boesenbergia rotunda (L. Mansf. are prominent ingredients in the cuisine of several Asian countries, including Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, and China. An extract prepared from the roots of this plant showed strong inhibitory activity against enzymes α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase and was subjected to chromatographic separation to identify the active components. Three new biflavonoids of the flavanone-chalcone type (9, 12, and 13 were isolated, along with 12 known compounds. Among the 15 isolates, the three new compounds showed stronger inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase than the drug acarbose but displayed lower pancreatic lipase inhibitory effect than the drug orlistat. The results indicated the potential of B. rotunda roots as a functional food for controlling after-meal blood glucose levels.

  5. Improvement of ACE inhibitory activity of casein hydrolysate by Maillard reaction with xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xu; Meng, Jun; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The Maillard reaction is widely used to improve the functional properties or biological activities of food. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the Maillard reaction on angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity in a casein hydrolysate-xylose system. Two-step hydrolysis was used to prepare casein ACE inhibitory peptides. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were prepared by heating hydrolyzed casein with xylose at pH 8.0, 110 °C for up to 16 h. The results showed that the content of free amino group decreased (P Maillard reaction (P reaction in the MRPs. The study shows that the Maillard reaction under appropriate conditions can improve the ACE inhibitory activity of casein hydrolysate effectively. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Inhibitory Activity of (+-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  7. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  8. New Indole Alkaloids from the Bark of Rauvolfia Reflexa and their Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Fadaeinasab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rauvolfia reflexa is a member of the Apocynaceae family. Plants from the Apocynaceae family have been traditionally used in the treatment of age-related brain disorders Methods and Results: Two new indole alkaloids, rauvolfine C (1 and 3-methyl-10,11-dimethoxy-6-methoxycarbonyl-β-carboline (2, along with five known, macusine B (3, vinorine (4, undulifoline (5, isoresrpiline (6 and rescinnamine (7 were isolated from the bark of Rauvolfia reflexa. Cholinesterase inhibitory assay and molecular docking were performed to get insight of the inhibitory activity and molecular interactions of the compounds. The compounds showed good to moderate cholinesterase inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 8.06 to 73.23 µM. Compound 7 was found to be the most potent inhibitor of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. Compounds 1, 2, 5 and 6 were found to be selective towards BChE, while compounds 3, 4 and 7 were dual inhibitors, having almost equal inhibitory activity on both AChE and BChE. Molecular docking revealed that compounds 6 and 7 interacted differently on AChE and BChE, by means of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. In AChE, the indole moiety of both compounds interacted with the residues lining the peripheral anionic site, whereas in BChE, their methoxy groups are primarily responsible for the strong inhibitory activity via interactions with residues at the active site of the enzyme. Conclusion: Two new and five known indole alkaloids were isolated from R. reflexa. Among the compounds, 7 and 6 showed the most potent and promising cholinesterase inhibitory activity, worthy for further investigations.

  9. New Indole Alkaloids from the Bark of Rauvolfia Reflexa and their Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Basiri, Alireza; Kia, Yalda; Karimian, Hamed; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2015-01-01

    Rauvolfia reflexa is a member of the Apocynaceae family. Plants from the Apocynaceae family have been traditionally used in the treatment of age-related brain disorders Methods and Results: Two new indole alkaloids, rauvolfine C (1) and 3-methyl-10,11-dimethoxy-6-methoxycarbonyl-β-carboline (2), along with five known, macusine B (3), vinorine (4), undulifoline (5), isoresrpiline (6) and rescinnamine (7) were isolated from the bark of Rauvolfia reflexa. Cholinesterase inhibitory assay and molecular docking were performed to get insight of the inhibitory activity and molecular interactions of the compounds. The compounds showed good to moderate cholinesterase inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 8.06 to 73.23 µM. Compound 7 was found to be the most potent inhibitor of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Compounds 1, 2, 5 and 6 were found to be selective towards BChE, while compounds 3, 4 and 7 were dual inhibitors, having almost equal inhibitory activity on both AChE and BChE. Molecular docking revealed that compounds 6 and 7 interacted differently on AChE and BChE, by means of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. In AChE, the indole moiety of both compounds interacted with the residues lining the peripheral anionic site, whereas in BChE, their methoxy groups are primarily responsible for the strong inhibitory activity via interactions with residues at the active site of the enzyme. Two new and five known indole alkaloids were isolated from R. reflexa. Among the compounds, 7 and 6 showed the most potent and promising cholinesterase inhibitory activity, worthy for further investigations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. [Chemical Constituents from Leaves of Hibiscus syriacus and Their α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Ji, Xiao-ying; Xu, Fei; Li, Qian-rong; Yin, Hao

    2015-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Hibiscus syriacus leaves and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Column chromatography including macroporous resins, silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 were used for the isolation and purification of all compounds. Spectroscopic methods including physical and chemical properties, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR were used for the identification of structures. Their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were detected by a 96-well microplate. 15 compounds were isolated and identified as β-sitosterol(1), β-daucostero (2), β-amyrin (3), oleanolic acid (4), stigmast-4-en-3-one (5), friedelin (6), syriacusin A (7), kaempferol (8), isovitexin (9), vitexin (10), apigenin (11), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (12), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (13), vitexin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (14) and rutin (15). All the compounds are isolated from the leaves of Hibiscus syriacus for the first time. Taking acarbose as positive control, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of 15 compounds were evaluated. Compounds 7 and 9 have shown strong α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 of 39.03 ± 0.38 and 32.12 ± 0.62 mg/L, inhibition ratio of 94.95% and 97.15%, respectively.

  11. Non-Neuronal Functions of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter whose effects are mediated by two classes of receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ion channels, whereas the muscarinic receptors belong to the large family of G protein coupled seven transmembrane helix receptors. Beyond its function in neuronal systems, it has become evident that acetylcholine also plays an important role in non-neuronal cells such as epithelial and immune cells. Furthermore, many cell types in the periphery are capable of synthesizing acetylcholine and express at least some of the receptors. In this review, we summarize the non-neuronal functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, especially those of the M2 muscarinic receptor in epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of signaling by the M2 receptor but also the cellular trafficking and ARF6 mediated endocytosis of this receptor, which play an important role in the regulation of signaling events. In addition, we provide an overview of the M2 receptor in human pathological conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  12. Discrimination and Nitric Oxide Inhibitory Activity Correlation of Ajwa Dates from Different Grades and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Ashikin Abdul-Hamid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at examining the variations in the metabolite constituents of the different Ajwa grades and farm origins. It is also targeted at establishing the correlations between the metabolite contents and the grades and further to the nitric oxide (NO inhibitory activity. Identification of the metabolites was generated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy metabolomics analyses utilizing multivariate methods. The NO inhibitory activity was determined using a Griess assay. Multivariate data analysis, for both supervised and unsupervised approaches, showed clusters among different grades of Ajwa dates obtained from different farms. The compounds that contribute towards the observed separation between Ajwa samples were suggested to be phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and phenylalanine. Ajwa dates were shown to have different metabolite compositions and exhibited a wide range of NO inhibitory activity. It is also revealed that Ajwa Grade 1 from the al-Aliah farm exhibited more than 90% NO inhibitory activity compared to the other grades and origins. Phenolic compounds were among the compounds that played a role towards the greater capacity of NO inhibitory activity shown by Ajwa Grade 1 from the al-Aliah farm.

  13. Muscarinic and alpha 1-adrenergic receptor binding characteristics of saw palmetto extract in rat lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mayumi; Oki, Tomomi; Sugiyama, Tomomi; Umegaki, Keizo; Uchida, Shinya; Yamada, Shizuo

    2007-06-01

    To elucidate the in vitro and ex vivo effects of saw palmetto extract (SPE) on autonomic receptors in the rat lower urinary tract. The in vitro binding affinities for alpha 1-adrenergic, muscarinic, and purinergic receptors in the rat prostate and bladder were measured by radioligand binding assays. Rats received vehicle or SPE (0.6 to 60 mg/kg/day) orally for 4 weeks, and alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor binding in tissues of these rats were measured. Saw palmetto extract inhibited specific binding of [3H]prazosin and [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride (NMS) but not alpha, beta-methylene adenosine triphosphate [2,8-(3)H]tetrasodium salt in the rat prostate and bladder. The binding activity of SPE for muscarinic receptors was four times greater than that for alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Scatchard analysis revealed that SPE significantly reduced the maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) for each radioligand in the prostate and bladder under in vitro condition. Repeated oral administration of SPE to rats brought about significant alteration in Bmax for prostatic [3H]prazosin binding and for bladder [3H]NMS binding. Such alteration by SPE was selective to the receptors in the lower urinary tract. Saw palmetto extract exerts significant binding activity on autonomic receptors in the lower urinary tract under in vitro and in vivo conditions.

  14. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  15. Curtailing effect of awakening on visual responses of cortical neurons by cholinergic activation of inhibitory circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Rui; Safari, Mir-Shahram; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kimura, Rie; Ebina, Teppei; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Sohya, Kazuhiro; Tsumoto, Tadaharu

    2014-07-23

    Visual responsiveness of cortical neurons changes depending on the brain state. Neural circuit mechanism underlying this change is unclear. By applying the method of in vivo two-photon functional calcium imaging to transgenic rats in which GABAergic neurons express fluorescent protein, we analyzed changes in visual response properties of cortical neurons when animals became awakened from anesthesia. In the awake state, the magnitude and reliability of visual responses of GABAergic neurons increased whereas the decay of responses of excitatory neurons became faster. To test whether the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic projection is involved in these changes, we analyzed effects of electrical and optogenetic activation of BF on visual responses of mouse cortical neurons with in vivo imaging and whole-cell recordings. Electrical BF stimulation in anesthetized animals induced the same direction of changes in visual responses of both groups of neurons as awakening. Optogenetic activation increased the frequency of visually evoked action potentials in GABAergic neurons but induced the delayed hyperpolarization that ceased the late generation of action potentials in excitatory neurons. Pharmacological analysis in slice preparations revealed that photoactivation-induced depolarization of layer 1 GABAergic neurons was blocked by a nicotinic receptor antagonist, whereas non-fast-spiking layer 2/3 GABAergic neurons was blocked only by the application of both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor antagonists. These results suggest that the effect of awakening is mediated mainly through nicotinic activation of layer 1 GABAergic neurons and mixed nicotinic/muscarinic activation of layer 2/3 non-fast-spiking GABAergic neurons, which together curtails the visual responses of excitatory neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410122-12$15.00/0.

  16. Antioxidant activity, acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory potential of Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum extracts

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    Elena Neagu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study several investigations and tests were performed to determine the antioxidant activity and the acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory potential of Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum aqueous extracts (10% mass and ethanolic extracts (10% mass and 70% ethanol, respectively. Moreover, for each type of the prepared extracts of P. officinalis and of C. umbellatum the content in the biologically active compounds – polyphenols, flavones and proanthocyanidins was determined. The antioxidant activity was assessed using two methods, namely the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay and reducing power assay. The analyzed plant extracts showed a high acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory activity in the range of 72.24–94.24% (at the highest used dose – 3 mg/mL, 66.96% and 94.03% (at 3 mg/mL, respectively correlated with a high DPPH radical inhibition – 70.29–84.9% (at 3 mg/mL. These medicinal plants could provide a potential natural source of bioactive compounds and could be beneficial to the human health, especially in the neurodegenerative disorders and as sources of natural antioxidants in food industry. Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, Tyrosinase inhibitory activity, Antioxidant activity, Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum

  17. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus...... for cocaine addiction....

  18. SELECTIVITY PROFILE OF SOME RECENT MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS IN BOVINE AND GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA AND HEART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; HAMSTRA, JJ; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The functional affinities of some recently developed subtype-selective muscarinic antagonists towards bovine tracheal smooth muscle muscarinic M(3) receptors were established and compared to binding affinities for bovine cardiac M(2) and functional affinities for guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle

  19. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

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    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  20. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise...... combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition....

  1. Medicinal Plants and Their Inhibitory Activities against Pancreatic Lipase: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefehalsadat Seyedan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is recognized as a major life style disorder especially in developing countries and it is prevailing at an alarming speed in new world countries due to fast food intake, industrialization, and reduction of physical activity. Furthermore, it is associated with a vast number of chronic diseases and disabilities. To date, relatively effective drugs, from either natural or synthetic sources, are generally associated with serious side effects, often leading to cessation of clinical trials or even withdrawal from the market. In order to find new compounds which are more effective or with less adverse effects compared to orlistat, the drug that has been approved for obesity, new compounds isolated from natural products are being identified and screened for antiobesity effects, in particular, for their pancreatic lipase inhibitory effect. Pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity has been extensively used for the determination of potential efficacy of natural products as antiobesity agents. In attempts to identify natural products for overcoming obesity, more researches have been focused on the identification of newer pancreatic lipase inhibitors with less unpleasant adverse effects. In this review, we consider the potential role of plants that have been investigated for their pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity.

  2. Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in dementia of Alzheimer, Parkinson and Lewy body types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E K; Smith, C J; Court, J A; Perry, R H

    1990-01-01

    Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptor binding were measured in post mortem human brain tissue, using low (nM) concentrations of (3H)-nicotine to detect predominately the high affinity nicotinic site and (3H)-N-methylscopolamine in the presence and absence of 3 x 10(-4) M carbachol to measure both the low and high affinity agonist subtypes of the muscarinic receptor group. Consistent with most previous reports, the nicotinic but not muscarinic binding was reduced in the different forms of dementia associated with cortical cholinergic deficits, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and Down's syndrome (over 50 years). Analysis of (3H)-nicotine binding displaced by a range of carbachol concentrations (10(-9)-10(-3) M) indicated 2 binding sites for nicotine and that the high affinity rather than low affinity site was reduced in Alzheimer's disease. In all 3 cortical areas investigated (temporal, parietal and occipital) there were increases in the low affinity muscarinic site in Parkinson's disease and SDLT but not Alzheimer's disease or middle-aged Down's syndrome. This observation raised the question of whether the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (evident in the latter but not former 2 disorders) is incompatible with denervation-induced muscarinic supersensitivity in cholinoceptive neurons which include cortical pyramids generally affeted by tangle formation.

  3. Decreased ipsilateral [123I]iododexetimide binding to cortical muscarinic receptors in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knol, Remco J.J.; Bruin, Kora de; Opmeer, Brent; Voorn, Pieter; Jonker, Allert J.; Eck-Smit, Berthe L.F. van; Booij, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dysfunction of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system is present in Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease related dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, and is thought to contribute to cognitive deficits in these patients. In vivo imaging of the cholinergic system in these diseases may be of value to monitor central cholinergic disturbances and to select cases in which treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors could be beneficial. The muscarinic receptor tracer [ 123 I]iododexetimide, predominantly reflecting M 1 receptor binding, may be an appropriate tool for imaging of the cholinergic system by means of SPECT. In this study, we used [ 123 I]iododexetimide to study the effects of a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion (an animal model of Parkinson’s disease) on the muscarinic receptor availability in the rat brain. Methods: Rats (n = 5) were injected in vivo at 10–13 days after a confirmed unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Muscarinic receptor availability was measured bilaterally in multiple brain areas on storage phosphor images by region of interest analysis. Results: Autoradiography revealed a consistent and statistically significant lower [ 123 I]iododexetimide binding in all examined neocortical areas on the ipsilateral side of the lesion as compared to the contralateral side. In hippocampal and subcortical areas, such asymmetry was not detected. Conclusions: This study suggests that evaluation of muscarinic receptor availability in dopamine depleted brains using [ 123 I]iododexetimide is feasible. We conclude that 6-hydroxydopamine lesions induce a decrease of neocortical muscarinic receptor availability. We hypothesize that this arises from down regulation of muscarinic postsynaptic M 1 receptors due to hyperactivation of the cortical cholinergic system in response to dopamine depletion. Advances in knowledge: In rats, dopamine depletion provokes a decrease in neocortical muscarinic receptor availability, which is evaluable by [ 123 I

  4. Evaluation of phenolic profile, enzyme inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of Nigella sativa L. seed extracts

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    Anela Topcagic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Black cumin (Nigella sativa L. [N.sativa] seed extracts demonstrated numerous beneficial biological effects including, among others, antidiabetic, anticancer, immunomodulatory, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antioxidant activity. To better understand the phytochemical composition of N. sativa seeds, methanol seed extracts were analyzed for phenolic acid and flavonoid content. Furthermore, we tested N. sativa methanol, n-hexane, and aqueous seed extracts for their inhibitory activity against butyrylcholinesterase (BChE and catalase (CAT as well as for antimicrobial activity against several bacterial and a yeast strains. The phenolic content of N. sativa was analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS. The inhibition of BChE was assessed by modified Ellman’s method, and the inhibition of CAT was determined by monitoring hydrogen peroxide consumption. The extracts were tested against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli using the agar diffusion method. The UHPLC-MS/MS method allowed the identification and quantification of 23 phenolic compounds within 15 minutes. The major components found in N. sativa seed extract were sinapinic acid (7.22 ± 0.73 µg/mg as a phenolic acid and kaempferol (11.74 ± 0.92 µg/mg as a flavonoid. All extracts showed inhibitory activity against BChE, with methanol seed extract demonstrating the highest inhibitory activity (inhibitory concentration 50% [IC50] 79.11 ± 6.06 µg/ml. The methanol seed extract also showed strong inhibitory activity against CAT with an IC50 value of 6.61 ± 0.27 µg/ml. Finally, the methanol extract exhibited considerable inhibitory activity against the tested microbial strains. Overall, this is the first study to investigate the ability of black cumin seed extracts to inhibit CAT. Our results indicate that N. sativa seed can be considered as an effective inhibitor

  5. SPET imaging of central muscarinic receptors with (R,R)[123I]-I-QNB: methodological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norbury, R.; Travis, M.J.; Erlandsson, K.; Waddington, W.; Owens, J.; Ell, P.J.; Murphy, D.G.

    2004-01-01

    Investigations on the effect of normal healthy ageing on the muscarinic system have shown conflicting results. Also, in vivo determination of muscarinic receptor binding has been hampered by a lack of subtype selective ligands and differences in methods used for quantification of receptor densities. Recent in vitro and in vivo work with the muscarinic antagonist (R,R)-I-QNB indicates this ligand has selectivity for m 1 and m 4 muscarinic receptor subtypes. Therefore, we used (R,R)[ 123 I]-I-QNB and single photon emission tomography to study brain m 1 and m 4 muscarinic receptors in 25 healthy female subjects (11 younger subjects, age range 26-32 years and 14 older subjects, age range 57-82 years). Our aims were to ascertain the viability of tracer administration and imaging within the same day, and to evaluate whether normalization to whole brain, compared to normalization to cerebellum, could alter the clinical interpretation of results. Images were analyzed using the simplified reference tissue model and by two ratio methods: normalization to whole brain and normalization to cerebellum. Significant correlations were observed between kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum, but not to whole brain. Both the kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum showed age-related reductions in muscarinic binding in frontal, orbitofrontal, and parietal regions. Normalization to whole brain, however, failed to detect age-related changes in any region. Here we show that, for this radiotracer, normalizing to a region of negligible specific binding (cerebellum) significantly improves sensitivity when compared to global normalization

  6. Effects of incentives, age, and behavior on brain activation during inhibitory control: A longitudinal fMRI study

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    David J. Paulsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated changes in brain function supporting inhibitory control under age-controlled incentivized conditions, separating age- and performance-related activation in an accelerated longitudinal design including 10- to 22-year-olds. Better inhibitory control correlated with striatal activation during neutral trials, while Age X Behavior interactions in the striatum indicated that in the absence of extrinsic incentives, younger subjects with greater reward circuitry activation successfully engage in greater inhibitory control. Age was negatively correlated with ventral amygdala activation during Loss trials, suggesting that amygdala function more strongly mediates bottom-up processing earlier in development when controlling the negative aspects of incentives to support inhibitory control. Together, these results indicate that with development, reward-modulated cognitive control may be supported by incentive processing transitions in the amygdala, and from facilitative to obstructive striatal function during inhibitory control.

  7. Activation of muscarinic receptors by a hydroalcoholic extract of Dicksonia sellowiana Presl. HooK (Dicksoniaceae) induces vascular relaxation and hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Crestani, Sandra; Lapa, Fernanda R; Miguel, Obdúlio G; Marques, Maria C A; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo; Santos, Adair R S

    2009-01-01

    Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook is a native plant from the Central and South Americas that contain high levels of polyphenols, antioxidant compounds involved in protection against inflammation, cancer and cardiovascular risk. A phytomedicinal preparation obtained from aerial parts of D. sellowiana is currently under clinical evaluation in Brazil against asthma, and has been associated with several other beneficial effects. This study demonstrates that a hydroalcoholic extract obtained from D. sellowiana leaves (HEDS) fully relax, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine. Moreover, administration of HEDS (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.v.) in anaesthetized rats resulted in a strong but reversible hypotension. Aortic relaxation induced by HEDS was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. In addition, this effect was partially inhibited by indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and KT 5730 (a PKA inhibitor). The potassium channels blockade by either tetraethylammonium or charybdotoxin also resulted in a potent inhibition of HEDS-induced aortic relaxation, whereas apamine only slightly reduced it. In addition HEDS-induced relaxation was unchanged by 4-amynopiridine and glibenclamide. The selective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine counteracted both aortic relaxation and blood pressure reduction generated by HEDS. Experiments using HPLC revealed the presence of high amounts of phenolic compounds in this extract. Taken together, our results reveal that the D. sellowiana possess substances with both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of HEDS involves activation of muscarinic receptors, stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway and opening of calcium-activated potassium channels.

  8. M1 muscarinic receptor facilitates cognitive function by interplay with AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Ge, Yan-Hui; Xiong, Cai-Hong; Tang, Ling; Yan, Ying-Hui; Law, Ping-Yee; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2018-03-06

    M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1 mAChRs) are the most abundant muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus and have been shown to have procognitive effects. AMPA receptors (AMPARs), an important subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are key components in neurocognitive networks. However, the role of AMPARs in procognitive effects of M1 mAChRs and how M1 mAChRs affect the function of AMPARs remain poorly understood. Here, we found that basal expression of GluA1, a subunit of AMPARs, and its phosphorylation at Ser845 were maintained by M1 mAChR activity. Activation of M1 mAChRs promoted membrane insertion of GluA1, especially to postsynaptic densities. Impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory by antagonism of M1 mAChRs paralleled the reduction of GluA1 expression, and improvement of learning and memory by activation of M1 mAChRs was accompanied by the synaptic insertion of GluA1 and its increased phosphorylation at Ser845. Furthermore, abrogation of phosphorylation of Ser845 residue of GluA1 ablated M1 mAChR-mediated improvement of learning and memory. Taken together, these results show a functional correlation of M1 mAChRs and GluA1 and the essential role of GluA1 in M1 mAChR-mediated cognitive improvement.-Zhao, L.-X., Ge, Y.-H., Xiong, C.-H., Tang, L., Yan, Y.-H., Law, P.-Y., Qiu, Y., Chen, H.-Z. M1 muscarinic receptor facilitates cognitive function by interplay with AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit.

  9. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 μM, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. 45 Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated 45 Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 μM) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant

  10. Decrease in the number of rat brain dopamine and muscarinic receptors after chronic alcohol intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syvaelahti, E.K.G.; Hietala, J.; Roeyttae, M.; Groenroos, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 32 weeks' alcohol treatment on the number and affinity of dopamine and muscarinic receptor sites in rat striatum were measured using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzilate ( 3 H-QNB) as radioligans. The number of dopamine receptor sites was 38 per cent and the number of muscarinic receptor sites 36 per cent lower in the alcohol group than in control rats. The differences in receptor affinities were less marked. In conclusion, a long-term alcohol intake with rather moderate doses seems to induce a pronounced down-regulation in dopamine and muscarinic receptor systems in rat striatum. (author)

  11. The binding of [3H]AF-DX 384 to rat ileal smooth muscle muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entzeroth, M.; Mayer, N.

    1991-01-01

    The tritiated cardioselective muscarinic antagonist AF-DX 384 (5,11-dihydro-11-[2-[-(8-dipropylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl-ethyl-amino-carbonyl]-6H-pyrido [2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was used to label muscarinic receptors in the rat ileum. Saturation binding to membrane suspensions revealed a high affinity binding site with a Kd of 9.2 nM. The maximal number of binding sites labeled in this tissue (Bmax) is 237 fmol/mg protein. The association and dissociation kinetics were well represented by single exponential reactions, and the dissociation constant obtained from the ratio of rate constants was in agreement with that derived from saturation experiments. Specific binding was inhibited by muscarinic antagonists with a rank order of potencies of atropine (pKi: 8.80) greater than 4-DAMP (pKi: 8.23) = AF-DX 384 (pKi: 8.20) greater than AF-DX 116 (pKi: 7.09) = hexahydro-sila-difenidol (pKi: 6.97) greater than pirenzepine (pKi: 6.49) and is consistent with the interaction of [3H]AF-DX 384 with muscarinic receptors of the M2 subtype. It can be concluded that [3H]AF-DX 384 can be used to selectively label M2 muscarinic receptors in heterogeneous receptor populations

  12. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  13. Activation of muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptors by curcumin to increase contractility in urinary bladder isolated from Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tse-Chou; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Kakizawa, Nozomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2010-04-05

    Curcumin is an active principle contained in rhizome of Curcuma longa, and it has been recently mentioned to show affinity to muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptors (M(1)-mAChR). In the present study, we found that curcumin caused a concentration-dependent increase of muscle tone in urinary bladder isolated from Wistar rats. This action was inhibited by pirenzepine at concentration enough to block M(1)-mAChR. In radioligand-binding assay, specific binding of [(3)H]-oxotremorine (OXO-M) in the rat bladder homogenates was also displaced by curcumin in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of inhibitors for PLC-PKC pathway, either U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) or chelerythrine (protein kinase C inhibitor), curcumin-stimulated contraction in urinary bladder was markedly reduced. In conclusion, the obtained results suggest that curcumin can activate M(1)-mAChR at concentrations lower than to scavenge free radicals to increase of muscle tone in urinary bladder through PLC-PKC pathway.

  14. Free Radical Scavenging and Alpha/Beta-glucosidases Inhibitory Activities of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L. Peel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Widowati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM is associated with oxidative reaction and hyperglycemic condition. Human body has an antioxidant defense system toward free radical, but overproduction of free radical causing imbalance condition between the free radical and the antioxidant defense in the body that lead to several diseases, including DM. Glucosidase is an enzyme that hydrolize carbohydrates causing increase of blood glucose level, so by inhibiting this enzyme blood glucose level in plasma could be effectively decreased. Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L. peel has been reported to have many potential roles, such as antioxidant and anti-glycemia. Therefore our current study was conducted to evaluate possible effectivity of Rambutan peel to scavenge free radical and to inhibit α- and β-glucosidases. METHODS: Rambutan peel extraction (RPE was performed based on maceration method. Geraniin was used as control. For antioxidant study, 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging test was performed. For glucosidase inhibitory activity study,  α- and β-glucosidases inhibitory activity tests were performed. Results were analyzed for median of Inhibitory Concentration (IC50. RESULTS: The scavenging activity of RPE was comparable with Geraniin. Meanwhile, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of RPE was higher than the one of Geraniin. The α-glucosidase-inhibitory-activity IC50 of RPE and Geraniin were 0.106±0.080 μg/ml and 16.12±0.29 μg/ml, respectively. The β-glucosidase inhibitory activity of RPE was also higher than the one of Geraniin. The β-glucosidase-inhibitory-activity IC50 of RPE and Geraniin were 7.02±0.99 μg/ml and 19.81±0.66 μg/ml, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Since RPE showed comparable free radical scavenging activity with Geraniin and higher α- and β-glucosidases inhibitory activities than Geraniin, RPE could be suggested as a promising antioxidant and antiglycemic agent.  KEYWORDS

  15. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira R. Segura-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%. Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides’ inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and <1 kDa fractions were selected for further fractionation by gel filtration chromatography. ACE inhibitory activity (% ranged from 22.66 to 45.96% with the 5–10 kDa ultrafiltered fraction and from 36.91 to 55.83% with the <1 kDa ultrafiltered fraction. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was observed in F2 ( μg/mL from the 5–10 kDa fraction and F1 ( μg/mL from the <1 kDa fraction. ACE inhibitory fractions from Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry.

  16. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na+ channel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na + channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) [G-protein(s)]. These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of [ 3 H] acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of [ 3 H]batrachotoxin to Na + channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced 22 Na + uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na + channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na + channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na + channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na + channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues

  17. Chemometric profile, antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activity of Camel's foot creeper leaves (Bauhinia vahlii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pritipadma; Dash, Priyanka; Ghosh, Goutam

    2018-03-01

    The present study is the first effort to a comprehensive evaluation of antityrosinase activity and chemometric analysis of Bauhinia vahlii. The experimental results revealed that the methanol extract of Bauhinia vahlii (BVM) possesses higher polyphenolic compounds and total antioxidant activity than those reported elsewhere for other more conventionally and geographically different varieties. The BVM contain saturated fatty acids such as hexadecanoic acid (10.15%), octadecanoic acid (1.97%), oleic acid (0.61%) and cis-vaccenic acid (2.43%) along with vitamin E (12.71%), α-amyrin (9.84%), methyl salicylate (2.39%) and β-sitosterol (17.35%), which were mainly responsible for antioxidant as well as tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Tyrosinase inhibitory activity of this extract was comparable to that of Kojic acid. These findings suggested that the B. vahlii leaves could be exploited as potential source of natural antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory agent, as well.

  18. Inhibitory activity of a water-soluble morin derivative on phosphatase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... E-mail: taipinghe@163.com. Tel: 86- ... anthraquinone compounds from Rubia akane show inhibitory activity on .... incubation of the cells at 37°C for 24 h, the phase contrast images ... inverted microscope (Olympus IX50).

  19. Lactobacillus crispatus dominant vaginal microbiome is associated with inhibitory activity of female genital tract secretions against Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeny P Ghartey

    Full Text Available Female genital tract secretions inhibit E. coli ex vivo and the activity may prevent colonization and provide a biomarker of a healthy microbiome. We hypothesized that high E. coli inhibitory activity would be associated with a Lactobacillus crispatus and/or jensenii dominant microbiome and differ from that of women with low inhibitory activity.Vaginal swab cell pellets from 20 samples previously obtained in a cross-sectional study of near-term pregnant and non-pregnant healthy women were selected based on having high (>90% inhibition or low (<20% inhibition anti-E. coli activity. The V6 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Filtered culture supernatants from Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners, and Gardnerella vaginalis were also assayed for E. coli inhibitory activity.Sixteen samples (10 with high and 6 with low activity yielded evaluable microbiome data. There was no difference in the predominant microbiome species in pregnant compared to non-pregnant women (n = 8 each. However, there were significant differences between women with high compared to low E. coli inhibitory activity. High activity was associated with a predominance of L. crispatus (p<0.007 and culture supernatants from L. crispatus exhibited greater E. coli inhibitory activity compared to supernatants obtained from L. iners or G. vaginalis. Notably, the E. coli inhibitory activity varied among different strains of L. crispatus.Microbiome communities with abundant L. crispatus likely contribute to the E. coli inhibitory activity of vaginal secretions and efforts to promote this environment may prevent E. coli colonization and related sequelae including preterm birth.

  20. Jojoba seed meal proteins associated with proteolytic and protease inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Madan K; Peri, Irena; Smirnoff, Patricia; Birk, Yehudith; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi

    2002-09-25

    The jojoba, Simmondsia chinensis, is a characteristic desert plant native to the Sonoran desert. The jojoba meal after oil extraction is rich in protein. The major jojoba proteins were albumins (79%) and globulins (21%), which have similar amino acid compositions and also showed a labile thrombin-inhibitory activity. SDS-PAGE showed two major proteins at 50 kDa and 25 kDa both in the albumins and in the globulins. The 25 kDa protein has trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitory activities. In vitro digestibility of the globulins and albumins resembled that of casein and soybean protein concentrates and was increased after heat treatment. The increased digestibility achieved by boiling may be attributed to inactivation of the protease inhibitors and denaturation of proteins.

  1. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Darewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes. Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50% of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  2. In vivo hypotensive effect and in vitro inhibitory activity of some Cyperaceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lacerda Lopes Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1820, French naturalist August Saint Hillaire, during a visit in Espírito Santo (ES, a state in southeastern Brazil, reported a popular use of Cyperaceae species as antidote to snake bites. The plant may even have a hypotensive effect, though it was never properly researched. The in vitro inhibitory of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE activity of eigth ethanolic extracts of Cyperaceae was evaluated by colorimetric assay. Total phenolic and flavonoids were determined using colorimetric assay. The hypotensive effect of the active specie (Rhychonospora exaltata, ERE and the in vivo ACE assay was measured in vivo using male Wistar Kyoto (ERE, 0.01-100mg/kg, with acetylcholine (ACh as positive control (5 µg/kg, i.v.. The evaluation of ACE in vivo inhibitory effect was performed comparing the mean arterial pressure before and after ERE (10 mg/kg in animals which received injection of angiotensin I (ANG I; 0,03, 03 and 300 µg/kg, i.v.. Captopril (30 mg/kg was used as positive control. Bulbostylis capillaris (86.89 ± 15.20% and ERE (74.89 ± 11.95%, ERE were considered active in the in vitro ACE inhibition assay, at 100 µg/mL concentration. ACh lead to a hypotensive effect before and after ERE's curve (-40±5% and -41±3%. ERE showed a dose-dependent hypotensive effect and a in vivo ACE inhibitory effect. Cyperaceae species showed an inhibitory activity of ACE, in vitro, as well as high content of total phenolic and flavonoids. ERE exhibited an inhibitory effect on both in vitro and in vivo ACE. The selection of species used in popular medicine as antidotes, along with the in vitro assay of ACE inhibition, might be a biomonitoring method for the screening of new medicinal plants with hypotensive properties.

  3. Neurofeedback Training Effects on Inhibitory Brain Activation in ADHD: A Matter of Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Sarah; Wolf, Isabella; Holz, Nathalie; Boecker-Schlier, Regina; Adamo, Nicoletta; Holtmann, Martin; Ruf, Matthias; Banaschewski, Tobias; Hohmann, Sarah; Brandeis, Daniel

    2018-05-15

    Neurofeedback training (NF) is a promising non-pharmacological treatment for ADHD that has been associated with improvement of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related symptoms as well as changes in electrophysiological measures. However, the functional localization of neural changes following NF compared to an active control condition, and of successful learning during training (considered to be the critical mechanism for improvement), remains largely unstudied. Children with ADHD (N=16, mean age: 11.81, SD: 1.47) were randomly assigned to either slow cortical potential (SCP, n=8) based NF or biofeedback control training (electromyogram feedback, n=8) and performed a combined Flanker/NoGo task pre- and post-training. Effects of NF, compared to the active control, and of learning in transfer trials (approximating successful transfer to everyday life) were examined with respect to clinical outcome and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) changes during inhibitory control. After 20 sessions of training, children in the NF group presented reduced ADHD symptoms and increased activation in areas associated with inhibitory control compared to baseline. Subjects who were successful learners (n=9) also showed increased activation in an extensive inhibitory network irrespective of the type of training. Activation increased in an extensive inhibitory network following NF training, and following successful learning through NF and control biofeedback. Although this study was only powered to detect large effects and clearly requires replication in larger samples, the results suggest a crucial role for learning effects in biofeedback trainings. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  5. The M3 muscarinic receptor is required for optimal adaptive immunity to helminth and bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Darby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity is regulated by cholinergic signalling through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We show here that signalling through the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R plays an important role in adaptive immunity to both Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, as M3R-/- mice were impaired in their ability to resolve infection with either pathogen. CD4 T cell activation and cytokine production were reduced in M3R-/- mice. Immunity to secondary infection with N. brasiliensis was severely impaired, with reduced cytokine responses in M3R-/- mice accompanied by lower numbers of mucus-producing goblet cells and alternatively activated macrophages in the lungs. Ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation of cells from intact BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis and S. typhimurium with muscarinic agonists resulted in enhanced production of IL-13 and IFN-γ respectively, which was blocked by an M3R-selective antagonist. Our data therefore indicate that cholinergic signalling via the M3R is essential for optimal Th1 and Th2 adaptive immunity to infection.

  6. Role of membrane cholesterol in differential sensitivity of muscarinic receptor subtypes to persistently bound xanomeline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 133, May 1 (2018), s. 129-144 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-16182S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * membrane cholesterol * xanomeline * receptor activation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  7. Agonist and antagonist binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors: influence of aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwitz, D.; Egozi, Y.; Henis, Y.I.; Kloog, Y.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in six brain regions in mature and old rats of both sexes by employing direct binding of [ 3 H]-antagonist as well as of the labeled natural neurotransmitter, [ 3 H]-acetylcholine [( 3 H]-AcCh). In addition, age-related factors were evaluated in the modulation processes involved in agonist binding. The results indicate that as the rat ages the density of the muscarinic receptors is altered differently in the various brain regions: it is decreased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory bulb of both male and female rats, but is increased (58%) in the brain stem of senescent males while no significant change is observed for females. The use of the highly sensitive technique measuring direct binding of [ 3 H]-AcCh facilitated the separate detection of age-related changes in the two classes (high- and low-affinity) of muscarinic agonist binding sites. In old female rats the density of high-affinity [ 3 H]-AcCh binding sites was preserved in all tissues studied, indicating that the decreases in muscarinic receptor density observed with [ 3 H]-antagonist represent a loss of low-affinity agonist binding sites. In contrast, [ 3 H]-AcCh binding is decreased in the hypothalamus and increased in the brain stem of old male rats. These data imply sexual dimorphism of the aging process in central cholinergic mechanisms

  8. Tyrosinase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activities of Silk Cocoons and Mulberry Leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongphasuk, Jarunee; Thongphasuk, Piyanuch

    2005-10-01

    Silk cocoons and mulberry leaves have been used in the field of medicines, cosmetics, and foods. The objective of this study is to determine the antioxidant activities of silk cocoons and mulberry leaves using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and to determine tyrosinase inhibitory activities using dihydroxyphenylalanine. The water and ethanol extracts from silk cocoons (Nang Noi, U B1, and Lao) and mulberry leaves showed antioxidants and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. However, the extracts from all samples at 1,000 μg/reaction mixture inhibited tyrosinase in the range of 12.28-45.98%, which was much lower than the standard whitening agent kojic acid (IC50 0.45 μg/reaction mixture). The results from TLC showed that the ethanol extracts from the 3 species of cocoons contained flavonoids, but only the extract from Nang Noi contained carotenoid. In addition, the separation destroyed the fraction with high antioxidant activity. Therefore, the disadvantage of the extract separation is increased cost and decreased antioxidant activities

  9. Tyrosinase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activities of Silk Cocoons and Mulberry Leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongphasuk, Jarunee [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Thongphasuk, Piyanuch [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Rangsit University, Pathumthani (Thailand)

    2005-10-15

    Silk cocoons and mulberry leaves have been used in the field of medicines, cosmetics, and foods. The objective of this study is to determine the antioxidant activities of silk cocoons and mulberry leaves using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and to determine tyrosinase inhibitory activities using dihydroxyphenylalanine. The water and ethanol extracts from silk cocoons (Nang Noi, U B1, and Lao) and mulberry leaves showed antioxidants and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. However, the extracts from all samples at 1,000 {mu}g/reaction mixture inhibited tyrosinase in the range of 12.28-45.98%, which was much lower than the standard whitening agent kojic acid (IC50 0.45 {mu}g/reaction mixture). The results from TLC showed that the ethanol extracts from the 3 species of cocoons contained flavonoids, but only the extract from Nang Noi contained carotenoid. In addition, the separation destroyed the fraction with high antioxidant activity. Therefore, the disadvantage of the extract separation is increased cost and decreased antioxidant activities.

  10. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands to assess...... the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  11. Absolute Configurations and NO Inhibitory Activities of Terpenoids from Curcuma longa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Ji, Feifei; Kang, Jing; Wang, Hao; Li, Shen; Jin, Da-Qing; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Hongwei; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2015-06-24

    Curcuma longa L., belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, is a perennial herb and has been used as a spice and a pigment in the food industry. In the ongoing search for inhibitory reagents of NO production and survey of the chemical composition of natural vegetable foods, the chemical constituents of C. longa used as spice were investigated. This investigation resulted in the isolation of 2 new terpenoids and 14 known analogues. Their structures were established on the basis of the extensive analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data, and the absolute configurations of 1-4 were elucidated by comparison of the calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among them, compound 1 is a rare norditerpene with an ent-labdane skeleton, and 2 is a skeletally novel sesquiterpene having an eight-membered ring. All of the compounds were found to possess NO inhibitory activities in murine microglial BV-2 cells. The discovery of two new compounds in this chemical investigation further disclosed the chemical composition of C. longa used a food spice, and the bioassay implied that the natural food spice C. longa, containing terpenoids with NO inhibitory activities, may be potentially promotive to human health.

  12. Pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertí, Elena; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Wang, Xuanyu

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats, which harbor a mutation in the c-kit gene that affects development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). In Ws/Ws rats, the density of KIT-positive cells was markedly...... as indirect innervation via ICC. In summary, loss of ICC markedly affects pacemaker and motor activities of the rat colon. Inhibitory innervation is largely maintained but nitrergic innervation is reduced possibly related to the loss of ICC-mediated relaxation....

  13. Effects of Different Working Modes of Ultrasound on Structural Characteristics of Zein and ACE Inhibitory Activity of Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound was used as a new technology to pretreat protein prior to proteolysis to improve enzymolysis efficiency. The effects of different working modes of ultrasound on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates and the structural characteristics of zein were investigated. The solubility, surface hydrophobicity (H0, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectra, intrinsic fluorescence spectra, and circular dichroism (CD spectra of zein pretreated with ultrasound were determined. All ultrasound pretreatments significantly improved the ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates (p<0.05. The highest ACE inhibitory activity, representing an increase of 99.21% over the control, was obtained with dual sweeping frequency ultrasound of 33±2 and 68±2 kHz. The effects of single sweeping frequency and dual fixed frequency ultrasound were stronger than those of single fixed frequency ultrasound for improving the ACE inhibitory activity of zein. Structural changes in zein were induced by ultrasound, as confirmed by changes in the solubility, H0, UV-Vis spectra, intrinsic fluorescence spectra, and CD spectra of zein, and these were consistent with the corresponding ACE inhibitory activities of zein hydrolysates. Thus, ultrasound working mode and frequency have significant effects on the structure of zein and the ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates.

  14. 2-Aryl benzimidazoles: Synthesis, In vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity, and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Akande Akinsola; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Salar, Uzma; Aboaba, Sherifat Adeyinka; Kanwal; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Fatima, Itrat; Taha, Mohammad; Wadood, Abdul; Mohammad, Jahidul Isalm; Khan, Huma; Perveen, Shahnaz

    2018-04-25

    Despite of many diverse biological activities exhibited by benzimidazole scaffold, it is rarely explored for the α-amylase inhibitory activity. For that purpose, 2-aryl benzimidazole derivatives 1-45 were synthesized and screened for in vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity. Structures of all synthetic compounds were deduced by various spectroscopic techniques. All compounds revealed inhibition potential with IC 50 values of 1.48 ± 0.38-2.99 ± 0.14 μM, when compared to the standard acarbose (IC 50  = 1.46 ± 0.26 μM). Limited SAR suggested that the variation in the inhibitory activities of the compounds are the result of different substitutions on aryl ring. In order to rationalize the binding interactions of most active compounds with the active site of α-amylase enzyme, in silico study was conducted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Discrete Fourier Transform-Based Multivariate Image Analysis: Application to Modeling of Aromatase Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barigye, Stephen J; Freitas, Matheus P; Ausina, Priscila; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Castillo-Garit, Juan A

    2018-02-12

    We recently generalized the formerly alignment-dependent multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationships (MIA-QSAR) method through the application of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), allowing for its application to noncongruent and structurally diverse chemical compound data sets. Here we report the first practical application of this method in the screening of molecular entities of therapeutic interest, with human aromatase inhibitory activity as the case study. We developed an ensemble classification model based on the two-dimensional (2D) DFT MIA-QSAR descriptors, with which we screened the NCI Diversity Set V (1593 compounds) and obtained 34 chemical compounds with possible aromatase inhibitory activity. These compounds were docked into the aromatase active site, and the 10 most promising compounds were selected for in vitro experimental validation. Of these compounds, 7419 (nonsteroidal) and 89 201 (steroidal) demonstrated satisfactory antiproliferative and aromatase inhibitory activities. The obtained results suggest that the 2D-DFT MIA-QSAR method may be useful in ligand-based virtual screening of new molecular entities of therapeutic utility.

  16. Muscarinic excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons contributes to the severity of pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; DeCan, Evan; Stoll, Kurt; Marceau, Eric; Deisseroth, Karl; Lawrence, J. Josh

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective A common rodent model in epilepsy research employs the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist pilocarpine, yet the mechanisms underlying the induction of pilocarpine-induced seizures (PISs) remain unclear. Global M1 mAChR (M1R) knockout mice are resistant to PISs, implying that M1R activation disrupts excitation/inhibition balance. Parvalbumin-positive (PV) inhibitory neurons express M1 mAChRs, participate in cholinergically-induced oscillations, and can enter a state of depolarization block (DB) during epileptiform activity. Here, we test the hypothesis that pilocarpine activation of M1Rs expressed on PV cells contributes to PISs. Methods CA1 PV cells in PV-CRE mice were visualized with a floxed YFP or hM3Dq-mCherry adeno-associated virus, or by crossing PV-CRE mice with the RosaYFP reporter line. To eliminate M1Rs from PV cells, we generated PV-M1KO mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. Action potential (AP) frequency was monitored during application of pilocarpine (200 µM). In behavioral experiments, locomotion and seizure symptoms were recorded in WT or PV-M1KO mice during PISs. Results Pilocarpine significantly increased AP frequency in CA1 PV cells into the gamma range. In the continued presence of pilocarpine, a subset (5/7) of PV cells progressed to DB, which was mimicked by hM3Dq activation of Gq-receptor signaling. Pilocarpine-induced depolarization, AP firing at gamma frequency, and progression to DB were prevented in CA1 PV cells of PV-M1KO mice. Finally, compared to WT mice, PV-M1KO mice were associated with reduced severity of PISs. Significance Pilocarpine can directly depolarize PV+ cells via M1R activation but a subset of these cells progress to DB. Our electrophysiological and behavioral results suggest that this mechanism is active during PISs, contributing to a collapse of PV-mediated GABAergic inhibition, dysregulation of excitation/inhibition balance, and increased susceptibility to PISs. PMID:25495999

  17. Inhibitory activity of tryptanthrin on prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danz, Henning; Stoyanova, Stefka; Thomet, Olivier A R; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Dannhardt, Gerd; Ulbrich, Holger; Hamburger, Matthias

    2002-10-01

    The indolo[2,1- b]quinazoline alkaloid tryptanthrin has previously been identified as the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory principle in the extract ZE550 prepared from the medicinal plant Isatis tinctoria (Brassicaceae). We here investigated the potential inhibitory activity of tryptanthrin and ZE550 on COX-2, COX-1 in cellular and cell-free systems. A certain degree of selectivity towards COX-2 was observed when COX-1-dependent formation of thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) in HEL cells and COX-2-dependent formation of 6-ketoprostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-keto-PGF(1alpha)) in Mono Mac 6 and RAW 264.7 cells were compared. Preferential inhibition of COX-2 by two orders of magnitude was found in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) activated bovine aortic coronary endothelial cells (BAECs). Assays with purified COX isoenzymes from sheep confirmed the high selectivity towards COX-2. The leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) release from calcium ionophore-stimulated human granulocytes (neutrophils) was used as a model to determine 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity. Tryptanthrin and the extract ZE550 inhibited LTB(4) release in a dose dependent manner and with a potency comparable to that of the clinically used 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton.

  18. B16-BL6 melanoma cells release inhibitory factor(s) of active pump activity in isolated lymph vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, K; Mizuno, R; Ohhashi, T

    2001-12-01

    We investigated whether supernatant cultured with melanoma cell lines B16-BL6 and K1735 or the Lewis lung carcinoma cell line (LLC) can regulate lymphatic pump activity with bioassay preparations isolated from murine iliac lymph vessels. B16-BL6 and LLC supernatants caused significant dilation of lymph microvessels with cessation of pump activity. B16-BL6 supernatant produced dose-related cessation of lymphatic pump activity. There was no significant tachyphylaxis in the supernatant-mediated inhibitory response of lymphatic pump activity. Pretreatment with 3 x 10(-5) M N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 10(-7) M or 10(-6) M glibenclamide and 5 x 10(-4) M 5-hydroxydecanoic acid caused significant reduction of supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Simultaneous treatment with 10(-3) M L-arginine and 3 x 10(-5) M L-NAME significantly lessened L-NAME-induced inhibition of the supernatant-mediated response, suggesting that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Chemical treatment dialyzed substances of B16-BL6 cells may release nonpeptide substance(s) of <1,000 MW, resulting in significant cessation of lymphatic pump activity via production and release of endogenous NO and activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

  19. Diverse models for the prediction of CDK4 inhibitory activity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    employed for development of models for the prediction of CDK4 inhibitory activity using a dataset comprising of 52 analogues of ... index; molecular connectivity index; connective eccentricity topochemical index. 1. ... 80% of human cancers.

  20. 2-(2-Pyridyl) Benzimidazole Analogs and their beta-Glucuronidase Inhibitory Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamil, A.; Noureen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of 2-(2-Pyridyl) benzimidazole analogs 1-11 have been carried out and evaluated for in vitro beta-glucuronidase inhibitory potential. The compounds 4 (IC/sub 50/ = 4.06 ± 0.34 meuM), 5 (IC/sub 50/ = 09.63 ± 0.81 meuM), 1 (IC/sub 50/ = 19.66 ± 0.44 meuM), 7 (IC/sub 50/ = 24.75 ± 0.25 meuM), 6 (IC/sub 50/ = 26.30 ± 1.37 meuM), and 3 (IC/sub 50/ = 32.11 ± 0.89 meuM), showed beta-glucuronidase inhibitory activity superior to the standard D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone, with (IC/sub 50/ = 48.4 ± 1.25 meuM). Based on structure-activity relationship, we discover a new class of potent beta-glucuronidase inhibitors. (author)

  1. Antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of ginger root (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Bui Thanh; Thu, Dang Kim; Thu, Nguyen Thi Kim; Hai, Nguyen Thanh

    2017-05-04

    Background Zingiber officinale Roscoe has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of neurological disorder. This study aimed to investigate the phenolic contents, antioxidant, acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) inhibitory activities of different fraction of Z. officinale root grown in Vietnam. Methods The roots of Z. officinale are extracted with ethanol 96 % and fractionated with n-hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and butanol (BuOH) solvents. These fractions evaluated the antioxidant activity by 1,1-Diphenyl -2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and AChE inhibitory activity by Ellman's colorimetric method. Results Our data showed that the total phenolic content of EtOAc fraction was highest equivalents to 35.2±1.4 mg quercetin/g of fraction. Our data also demonstrated that EtOAc fraction had the strongest antioxidant activity with IC50 was 8.89±1.37 µg/mL and AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 22.85±2.37 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner, followed by BuOH fraction and the n-hexane fraction is the weakest. Detailed kinetic analysis indicated that EtOAc fraction was mixed inhibition type with Ki (representing the affinity of the enzyme and inhibitor) was 30.61±1.43 µg/mL. Conclusions Our results suggest that the EtOAc fraction of Z. officinale may be a promising source of AChE inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorlidah Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC. Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI. Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%, Schizophyllum commune (27.6%, and Hericium erinaceus (17.7% showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC50 = 50 μg/mL. Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents.

  3. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Siti Marjiana; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Lau, Beng Fye

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC50 = 50 μg/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents. PMID:21716693

  4. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Ghanbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8% after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH (56.00% and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC (59.00% methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions.

  5. The detection of the non-M2 muscarinic receptor subtype in the rat heart atria and ventricles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mysliveček, J.; Klein, M.; Nováková, M.; Říčný, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 378, č. 1 (2008), s. 103-116 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * muscarinic receptors * PLC activity Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.830, year: 2008

  6. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory activity of dimeric dihydrochalcone glycosides from flowers of Helichrysum arenarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Toshio; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Akaki, Junji; Kakihara, Namiko; Kuramoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Yurie; Hayakawa, Takao; Muraoka, Osamu; Wang, Li-Bo; Wu, Li-Jun; Nakamura, Seikou; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-10-01

    A methanol extract of everlasting flowers of Helichrysum arenarium L. Moench (Asteraceae) was found to inhibit the increase in blood glucose elevation in sucrose-loaded mice at 500 mg/kg p.o. The methanol extract also inhibited the enzymatic activity against dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, IC50 = 41.2 μg/ml), but did not show intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. From the extract, three new dimeric dihydrochalcone glycosides, arenariumosides V-VII (2-4), were isolated, and the stereostructures were elucidated based on their spectroscopic properties and chemical evidence. Of the constituents, several flavonoid constituents, including 2-4, were isolated, and these isolated constituents were investigated for their DPP-IV inhibitory effects. Among them, chalconaringenin 2'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (16, IC50 = 23.1 μM) and aureusidin 6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (35, 24.3 μM) showed relatively strong inhibitory activities.

  7. Role of muscarinic receptor antagonists in urgency and nocturia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the most established form of treatment for OAB, but until recently their effectiveness was only confirmed for symptoms

  8. Associations of Physical Activity, Sports Participation and Active Commuting on Mathematic Performance and Inhibitory Control in Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domazet, Sidsel L; Tarp, Jakob; Huang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine objectively measured physical activity level, organized sports participation and active commuting to school in relation to mathematic performance and inhibitory control in adolescents. METHODS: The design was cross-sectional. A convenient sample of 869 sixth and seventh gra...

  9. COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC RECEPTORS IN CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS OF THE SUPRACHIASMATIC REGION IN YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM; Schröder, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the SCN region were demonstrated and analyzed, employing monoclonal antibodies to purified muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor proteins. A near-total colocalization of the two acetylcholine receptor subclasses in

  10. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  11. CA1 Pyramidal Cell Theta-Burst Firing Triggers Endocannabinoid-Mediated Long-Term Depression at Both Somatic and Dendritic Inhibitory Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younts, Thomas J.; Chevaleyre, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are retrograde lipid messengers that, by targeting presynaptic type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), mediate short- and long-term synaptic depression of neurotransmitter release throughout the brain. Short-term depression is typically triggered by postsynaptic, depolarization-induced calcium rises, whereas long-term depression is induced by synaptic activation of Gq/11 protein-coupled receptors. Here we report that a physiologically relevant pattern of postsynaptic activity, in the form of theta-burst firing (TBF) of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, can trigger long-term depression of inhibitory transmission (iLTD) in rat hippocampal slices. Paired recordings between CA1 interneurons and pyramidal cells, followed by post hoc morphological reconstructions of the interneurons' axon, revealed that somatic and dendritic inhibitory synaptic inputs equally expressed TBF-induced iLTD. Simultaneous recordings from neighboring pyramidal cells demonstrated that eCB signaling triggered by TBF was highly restricted to only a single, active cell. Furthermore, pairing submaximal endogenous activation of metabotropic glutamate or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with submaximal TBF unmasked associative iLTD. Although CB1Rs are also expressed at Schaffer-collateral excitatory terminals, long-term plasticity under various recording conditions was spared at these synapses. Consistent with this observation, TBF also shifted the balance of excitation and inhibition in favor of excitatory throughput, thereby altering information flow through the CA1 circuit. Given the near ubiquity of burst-firing activity patterns and CB1R expression in the brain, the properties described here may be a general means by which neurons fine tune the strength of their inputs in a cell-wide and cell-specific manner. PMID:23966696

  12. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S; Kanui, Titus I; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1-5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies with [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in the formalin test. Administration of 50 mg/kg VU0152100 resulted in a non-significant tendency towards antinociception. The antinociceptive effects were reversed by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. Binding studies indicated presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with a radioligand affinity comparable to that reported in mice. In conclusion, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are present in the naked mole-rat and contribute to antinociception in the naked mole-rat.

  13. Inhibitory coupling between inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro-da-Silva Alfredo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Local inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn play an important role in the control of excitability at the segmental level and thus determine how nociceptive information is relayed to higher structures. Regulation of inhibitory interneuron activity may therefore have critical consequences on pain perception. Indeed, disinhibition of dorsal horn neuronal networks disrupts the balance between excitation and inhibition and is believed to be a key mechanism underlying different forms of pain hypersensitivity and chronic pain states. In this context, studying the source and the synaptic properties of the inhibitory inputs that the inhibitory interneurons receive is important in order to predict the impact of drug action at the network level. To address this, we studied inhibitory synaptic transmission in lamina II inhibitory interneurons identified under visual guidance in spinal slices taken from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of the GAD promoter. The majority of these cells fired tonically to a long depolarizing current pulse. Monosynaptically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs in these cells were mediated by both GABAA and glycine receptors. Consistent with this, both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated miniature IPSCs were recorded in all of the cells. These inhibitory inputs originated at least in part from local lamina II interneurons as verified by simultaneous recordings from pairs of EGFP+ cells. These synapses appeared to have low release probability and displayed potentiation and asynchronous release upon repeated activation. In summary, we report on a previously unexamined component of the dorsal horn circuitry that likely constitutes an essential element of the fine tuning of nociception.

  14. Antioxidant and lipase inhibitory activities and essential oil composition of pomegranate peel extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrich, Fatma; Cher, Slim; Gargouri, Youssef Talel; Adel, Sayari

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil, antioxidant and pancreatic lipase inhibitory activities of various solvent extracts obtained from pomegranate peelTunisian cultivar was evaluated. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine the composition of the PP essential oil. Nine-teen components were identified and the main compounds were the camphor (60.32%) and the benzaldehyde (20.98%). The phenolic and flavonoids content varied from 0 to 290.10 mg Gallic acid equivalent and from 5.2 to 20.43 mg catechin equivalent/g dried extract. The antioxidant activity of various solvent extracts from pomegranate peel was also investigated using various in vitro assays as the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical method, β-carotene bleaching and reducing power assays.Methanol and ethanol extracts showed the most potent antioxidant activity in all assays tested followed by water and acetone extracts. The inhibitory effect of the pomegranate peelextracts on porcine pancreatic lipase was evaluated and the results showed that ethanol and methanol extracts markedly reduced lipase activity. Generally, the highestlipase activity inhibitory (100%) was observed at a concentration of 1 mg/ml after 30 min of incubation. LC-MS analysis of ethanol extract showed the presence of four components which are cholorogenic acid, mannogalloylhexoside, gallic acid and ellagic acid. Our findings demonstrate that the ethanol extract from pomegranate peel might be a good candidate for furtherinvestigations of new bioactive substances.

  15. The inhibitory effect of Curcuma longa extract on telomerase activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... curcumin, could have important effect on treatment of lung cancer. Curcumin ... study inhibitory effect of C. longa total extract on telomerase in A549 lung cancer cell line as in vitro model of ..... If A > 2× (OD of negative control), then, telomerase activity ... radiation, chemotherapy, laser therapy, photodynamic.

  16. Self-reported Physical Activity Predicts Pain Inhibitory and Facilitatory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Riley, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests regular physical activity can reduce chronic pain symptoms. Dysfunction of endogenous facilitatory and inhibitory systems has been implicated in multiple chronic pain conditions. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between levels of physical activity and descending pain modulatory function. Purpose This study’s purpose was to determine whether self-reported levels of physical activity in healthy adults predicted 1) pain sensitivity to heat and cold stimuli, 2) pain facilitatory function as tested by temporal summation of pain (TS), and 3) pain inhibitory function as tested by conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and offset analgesia. Methods Forty-eight healthy adults (age range 18–76) completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the following pain tests: heat pain thresholds (HPT), heat pain suprathresholds, cold pressor pain (CPP), temporal summation of heat pain, conditioned pain modulation, and offset analgesia. The IPAQ measured levels of walking, moderate, vigorous and total physical activity over the past seven days. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to determine the relationship between each pain test and self-reported levels of physical activity, while controlling for age, sex and psychological variables. Results Self-reported total and vigorous physical activity predicted TS and CPM (p’s pain and greater CPM. The IPAQ measures did not predict any of the other pain measures. Conclusion Thus, these results suggest that healthy older and younger adults who self-report greater levels of vigorous and total physical activity exhibit enhanced descending pain modulatory function. Improved descending pain modulation may be a mechanism through which exercise reduces or prevents chronic pain symptoms. PMID:23899890

  17. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV antigen expression in lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Yih Yih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against the expression of three EBV antigens, latent membrane protein (LMP1, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA1 and Z Epstein-Barr reactivation activator (ZEBRA were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The observation that the methanol extracts and their fractions from Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus and Spirulina platensis exhibited inhibitory activity against EBV proteins in three Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines at concentrations as low as 20 μg/ml suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds against EBV.

  18. An Anti-Nicotinic Cognitive Challenge Model using Mecamylamine in Comparison with the Anti-Muscarinic Cognitive Challenge using Scopolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baakman, A. C.; Alvarez-jimenez, R.; Rissmann, R.; Klaassen, E. S.; Stevens, J.; Goulooze, S. C.; Burger, J.; Swart, E. L.; Van Gerven, J. M. A.; Groeneveld, G. J.

    Aims The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine is often used for proof-of-pharmacology studies with pro-cognitive compounds. From a pharmacological point of view, it would seem more rational to use a nicotinic rather than a muscarinic anticholinergic challenge to prove

  19. The effects of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis on the expression and binding of muscarinic receptors in cerebral cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Antony; Peeyush, Kumar T; Naijil, George; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Jes, Paul; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2011-01-25

    Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Both hypo and hyperglycemia contributes to neuronal functional deficit. In the present study, effect of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on muscarinic receptor binding, cholinergic enzymes; AChE, ChAT expression and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of experimental rats were analysed. Total muscarinic, muscarinic M(1) receptor showed a significant decrease and muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype showed a significant increased binding in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control. Real-Time PCR analysis of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptor subtypes confirmed the receptor binding studies. Immunohistochemistry of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptors using specific antibodies were also carried out. AChE and GLUT3 expression up regulated and ChAT expression down regulated in hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control rats. Our results showed that hypo/hyperglycemia caused impaired glucose transport in neuronal cells as shown by altered expression of GLUT3. Increased AChE and decreased ChAT expression is suggested to alter cortical acetylcholine metabolism in experimental rats along with altered muscarinic receptor binding in hypo/hyperglycemic rats, impair cholinergic transmission, which subsequently lead to cholinergic dysfunction thereby causing learning and memory deficits. We observed a prominent cholinergic functional disturbance in hypoglycemic condition than in hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia exacerbated the neurochemical changes in cerebral cortex induced by hyperglycemia. These findings have implications for both therapy and identification of causes contributing to neuronal dysfunction in diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity in tobacco particulate matter: Are harman and norharman the only physiologically relevant inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Penelope; Grounds, Peter; Brennan, Katharine A

    2017-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibition is significant in smokers, but it is still unclear how the inhibition that is seen in the brains and bodies of smokers is brought about. Our aim was to test the contribution of the harman and norharman in tobacco smoke to MAO-A inhibition from tobacco smoke preparations, as part of a re-examination of harman and norharman as the cause of the inhibition of MAO-A inhibition in the brain. Tobacco smoke particulate matter and cigarette smoke particulate matter were prepared and the amounts of harman and norharman measured. The results were compared with the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity. At a nicotine concentration of 0.6μM (a "physiological" concentration in blood) the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity measured in these samples was sufficient to inhibit the enzyme by approximately 10%. Of this inhibitory activity, only a small proportion of the total was found to be due to harman and norharman. These results show that harman and norharman provide only a moderate contribution to the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity of tobacco smoke, perhaps under 10%. This suggests that other inhibitors (either known or unknown) may be more significant contributors to total inhibitory activity than has yet been established, and deserve closer examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibitory effect of vanillin on cellulase activity in hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Wan, Yinhua

    2014-09-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic material produces a wide variety of inhibitory compounds, which strongly inhibit the following enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Vanillin is a kind of phenolics derived from degradation of lignin. The effect of vanillin on cellulase activity for the hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated in detail. The results clearly showed that vanillin can reversibly and non-competitively inhibit the cellulase activity at appropriate concentrations and the value of IC50 was estimated to be 30 g/L. The inhibition kinetics of cellulase by vanillin was studied using HCH-1 model and inhibition constants were determined. Moreover, investigation of three compounds with similar structure of vanillin on cellulase activity demonstrated that aldehyde group and phenolic hydroxyl groups of vanillin had inhibitory effect on cellulase. These results provide valuable and detailed information for understanding the inhibition of lignin derived phenolics on cellulase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Discovery of novel quaternary ammonium derivatives of (3R)-quinuclidinyl amides as potent and long acting muscarinic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Maria; Buil, María Antonia; Fernández, Maria Dolors; Tort, Laia; Monleón, Juan Manuel; Casals, Gaspar; Ferrer, Manuel; Castro, Jordi; Gavaldà, Amadeu; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Ramos, Israel; Vilella, Dolors; Huerta, Josep Maria; Espinosa, Sònia; Hernández, Begoña; Segarra, Victor; Córdoba, Mònica

    2015-04-15

    Novel quaternary ammonium derivatives of (3R)-quinuclidinyl amides have been identified as potent M3 muscarinic antagonists with a long duration of action in an in vivo model of bronchoconstriction. The synthesis, structure-activity relationships and biological evaluation of this series of compounds are reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of steeping temperature on antioxidant and inhibitory activities of green tea extracts against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and intestinal glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyuan; Ai, Zeyi; Qu, Fengfeng; Chen, Yuqiong; Ni, Dejiang

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of steeping temperature on the biological activities of green tea, including the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity, α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activities, and glucose uptake inhibitory activity in Caco-2 cells. Results showed that, with increasing extraction temperature, the polyphenol content increased, which contributed to enhance antioxidant activity and inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase and α-amylase. Green tea steeped at 100°C showed the highest DPPH radical-scavenging activity and inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities with EC 50 or IC 50 values of 6.15μg/mL, 0.09mg/mL, and 6.31mg/mL, respectively. However, the inhibitory potential on glucose uptake did not show an upward trend with increasing extraction temperature. Green tea steeped at 60°C had significantly stronger glucose uptake inhibitory activity (ptea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MAO-A inhibitory activity of quercetin from Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lasse; Rasmussen, Hasse Bonde; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: This study investigated MAO-A inhibitory activity of methanol extract of Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull., which traditionally has been used as a nerve calming remedy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A methanolic extract of Calluna vulgaris was partitioned against heptane, ethyl acetate...

  5. Inhibitory activity and conformational transition of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, A.J.; Huber, R.; Degryse, E.; Speck, D.; Bischoff, Rainer

    1991-01-01

    Several variants of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) were investigated by spectroscopic methods and characterized according to their inhibitory activity. Replacement of Thr345 (P14) with Arg in alpha 1-PI containing an Arg residue in position 358 (yielding [Thr345----Arg,

  6. Evaluation of Apoptotic and Growth Inhibitory Activity of Phloretin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results show that the inhibitory activity of phloretin in BGC823 gastric cancer cells was mediated by induction of apoptosis ... anti-proliferative effects of phloretin was dose-dependent and inhibited the growth of BGC823 gastric cancer cells by 73 % at 30 μM; .... weeks at 37 °C in 5 % CO2 in humidified incubator.

  7. Relationships between the structure of wheat gluten and ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysate: stepwise multiple linear regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ma, Haile; Wang, Bei; Qu, Wenjuan; Wali, Asif; Zhou, Cunshan

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound pretreatment of wheat gluten (WG) before enzymolysis can improve the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates by alerting the structure of substrate proteins. Establishment of a relationship between the structure of WG and ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates to judge the end point of the ultrasonic pretreatment is vital. The results of stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) showed that the contents of free sulfhydryl, α-helix, disulfide bond, surface hydrophobicity and random coil were significantly correlated to ACE Inhibitory activity of the hydrolysate, with the standard partial regression coefficients were 3.729, -0.676, -0.252, 0.022 and 0.156, respectively. The R(2) of this model was 0.970. External validation showed that the stepwise MLR model could well predict the ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysate based on the content of free sulfhydryl, α-helix, disulfide bond, surface hydrophobicity and random coil of WG before hydrolysis. A stepwise multiple linear regression model describing the quantitative relationships between the structure of WG and the ACE Inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates was established. This model can be used to predict the endpoint of the ultrasonic pretreatment. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Lipid-Based Diets Improve Muscarinic Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus of Transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janíčková, Helena; Rudajev, Vladimír; Dolejší, Eva; Koivisto, H.; Jakubík, Jan; Tanila, H.; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2015), s. 923-931 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : G-protein activation * hippocampus * muscarinic neurotransmission * nutrition * omega-3 fatty acids * stigmasterol Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.145, year: 2015

  9. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. ( 3 H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate (( 3 H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of ( 3 H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells

  10. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues...... are described, as well as the implied structures of these functional domains....

  11. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M3 Mutation Causes Urinary Bladder Disease and a Prune-Belly-like Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Thiele, Holger; Mir, Sevgi; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sozeri, Betül; Reutter, Heiko; Draaken, Markus; Ludwig, Michael; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Stuart, Helen M; Ranjzad, Parisa; Hanley, Neil A; Jennings, Rachel; Newman, William G; Wilcox, Duncan T; Thiel, Uwe; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Beetz, Rolf; Hoyer, Peter F; Konrad, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Nürnberg, Peter; Woolf, Adrian S

    2011-11-11

    Urinary bladder malformations associated with bladder outlet obstruction are a frequent cause of progressive renal failure in children. We here describe a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) (1q41-q44) homozygous frameshift mutation in familial congenital bladder malformation associated with a prune-belly-like syndrome, defining an isolated gene defect underlying this sometimes devastating disease. CHRM3 encodes the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which we show is present in developing renal epithelia and bladder muscle. These observations may imply that M3 has a role beyond its known contribution to detrusor contractions. This Mendelian disease caused by a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mutation strikingly phenocopies Chrm3 null mutant mice. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antitubercular activity and inhibitory effect on Epstein-Barr virus activation of sterols and polyisoprenepolyols from an edible mushroom, Hypsizigus marmoreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akihisa, Toshihiro; Franzblau, Scott Gary; Tokuda, Harukuni; Tagata, Masaaki; Ukiya, Motohiko; Matsuzawa, Tsunetomo; Metori, Koichi; Kimura, Yumiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Yasukawa, Ken

    2005-06-01

    Seven sterols (1-7) and eight polyisoprenepolyols (8-15), isolated from the non-saponifiable lipid fraction of the dichloromethane extract of an edible mushroom, Hypsizigus marmoreus (Buna-shimeji), were tested for their antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA). Six sterols (2-7) and two polyisoprenepolyols (8, 12) showed a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in the range of 1-51 microg/ml, while the others (1, 9-11, 13-15) were inactive (MIC>128 microg/ml). The seven sterols (1-7) and three polyisoprenepolyols (8, 10, 12) were further evaluated for their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells. Sterols 6 and 7 showed potent inhibitory effects while preserving the high viability of Raji cells.

  13. Lanostane triterpenes from the mushroom Ganoderma resinaceum and their inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian-Qiang; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Wang, Shen-Fei; Wang, Ying; Li, Shao-Ping

    2018-05-01

    Eighteen previously undescribed lanostane triterpenes and thirty known analogues were obtained from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma resinaceum. Resinacein C was isolated from a natural source for the first time. The structures of all the above compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparisons of their spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, in an in vitro assay, Resinacein C, ganoderic acid Y, lucialdehyde C, 7-oxo-ganoderic acid Z 3 , 7-oxo-ganoderic acid Z, and lucidadiol showed strong inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase compared with the positive control drug acarbose. The structure-activity relationships of ganoderma triterpenes on α-glucosidase inhibition showed that the C-24/C-25 double bond is necessary for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Moreover, the carboxylic acid group at C-26 and the hydroxy group at C-15 play important roles in enhancing inhibitory effects of these triterpenes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Pet measurements of postsynaptic muscarinic and beta adrenergic receptors in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    1991-01-01

    There is ample evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that changes in β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor density can be associated with such cardiac diseases as congestive heart failure, myocardial ischemia and infarction, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, or thyroid-induced muscle disease. Changes in B-adrenergic density also have been shown in the denervated transplanted heart. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or post mortem. Recent developments of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) techniques and of radioligands suitable for cardiac receptor binding studies in vivo have made possible both the imaging and the measurement of receptor density. From these studies, important information is now available concerning physiologic and pathologic conditions, as well as alterations induced by treatment. For the investigation of myocardial B-adrenergic receptors we have used [ 11 C] CGP 12177, a potent hydrophilic antagonist of the 3-adrenergic receptor. The quantification of myocardial muscarinic receptors in vivo has been obtained with [ 11 C] MQNB, a nonmetabolized hydrophilic antagonist of the muscarinic receptor. Receptor density and affinity have been measured by a kinetic, nonequilibrium approach in an experimental protocol that provides sufficient data to determine values for all parameters from a single experiment

  15. Synthesis of chiral pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazine sulfonamides with tyrosinase and urease inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzych, Mariusz; Tarasiuk, Paweł; Kotwica-Mojzych, Katarzyna; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Nicewicz, Michał; Fornal, Emilia

    2017-12-01

    A new series of sulfonamide derivatives of pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazine with chiral amino group has been synthesized and characterized. The compounds were tested for their tyrosinase and urease inhibitory activity. Evaluation of prepared derivatives demonstrated that compounds (8b) and (8j) are most potent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors whereas all of the obtained compounds showed higher urease inhibitory activity than the standard thiourea. The compounds (8a), (8f) and (8i) exhibited excellent enzyme inhibitory activity with IC 50 0.037, 0.044 and 0.042 μM, respectively, while IC 50 of thiourea is 20.9 μM.

  16. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM 3 H-flunitrazepam ( 3 H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on 3 H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; 3 H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas 3 H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites

  17. Muscarinic receptor antagonists for overactive bladder treatment: does one fit all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Lambertus P. W.; Mulder, Wilhelmina M. C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review evidence and regulatory dosing recommendations for muscarinic receptor antagonists used in the treatment of overactive bladder symptom complex (darifenacin, fesoterodine oxybutynin propiverine solifenacin tolterodine trospium) in special patient populations. Recent

  18. The pharmacological rationale for combining muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway and bladder disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dale, Philippa R.; Cernecka, Hana; Schmidt, Martina; Dowling, Mark R.; Charlton, Steven J.; Pieper, Michael P.; Michel, Martin C.

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists are used in the treatment of obstructive airway disease and overactive bladder syndrome. Here we review the pharmacological rationale for their combination. Muscarinic receptors and beta-adrenoceptors are physiological antagonists for

  19. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    substituted for cocaine and enhanced its discriminative stimulus. Conversely, muscarinic agonists blunted cocaine discrimination and abolished cocaine self-administration with varying effects on food-maintained behavior. Specifically, increasing selectivity for the M(1) subtype (oxotremorine ...'s abuse-related effects, whereas non-M(1)/M(4) receptors probably contribute to undesirable effects of muscarinic stimulation. These data provide the first demonstration of anticocaine effects of systemically applied, M(1) receptor agonists and suggest the possibility of a new approach to pharmacotherapy...

  20. Alkaloids from the leaves of Uncaria rhynchophylla and their inhibitory activity on NO production in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dan; Ma, Bin; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu; Zhang, Lijia; Liu, Suiku; Wu, Lijun; Kano, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-01

    Two new isomeric alkaloids, 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid B (1) and 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid (2), were isolated from the CHCl3 extract of the leaves of Uncaria rhynchophylla, together with four known rhynchophylline-type alkaloids, corynoxeine (3), isocorynoxeine (4), rhynchophylline (5), and isorhynchophylline (6), and an indole alkaloid glucoside, vincoside lactam (7). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including UV, IR, HREIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, and CD experiments. The activity assay showed that compounds 3-6, with a C-16 carboxylic ester group, and 7 exhibited inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO release in primary cultured rat cortical microglia (IC 50: 13.7-19.0 microM). However, only weak inhibitory activity was observed for compounds 1 and 2, with a C-16 carboxylic acid group (IC 50: >100 microM).

  1. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorie, D.K.; Rusch, N.J.; Shepherd, J.T.; Vanhoutte, P.M.; Tyce, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with [/sub 3/H]norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors

  2. Antioxidant, ACE-Inhibitory and antibacterial activities of Kluyveromyces marxianus protein hydrolysates and their peptide fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta Mirzaeia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been evidence that proteins are potentially excellent source of antioxidants, antihypertensive and antimicrobial peptides, and that enzymatic hydrolysis is an effective method to release these peptides from protein molecules. The functional properties of protein hydrolysates depends on the protein substrate, the specificity of the enzymes, the conditions used during proteolysis, degree of hydrolysis, and the nature of peptides released including molecular weight, amino acid composition, and hydrophobicity. Context and purpose of this study: The biomass of Kluyveromyces marxianus was considered as a source of ACE inhibitory, antioxidant and antimicrobial peptides. Results: Autolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis were completed respectively, after 96 h and 5 h. Overall, trypsin (18.52% DH and chymotrypsin (21.59% DH treatments were successful in releasing antioxidant and ACE inhibitory peptides. Autolysate sample (39.51% DH demonstrated poor antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity compared to trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysates. The chymotrypsin 3-5 kDa (301.6±22.81 μM TE/mg protein and trypsin < 3 kDa (280.16±39.16 μM TE/mg protein permeate peptide fractions showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity. The trypsin <3 kDa permeate peptide fraction showed the highest ABTS radical scavenging (1691.1±48.68 μM TE/mg protein and ACE inhibitory (IC50=0.03±0.001 mg/mL activities. The fraction (MW=5-10 kD obtained after autolysis treatment showed antibacterial activity against St. aureus and Lis. monocytogenes in well diffusion screening. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value was 13.3 mg/mLagainst St. aureus and Lis. monocytogenes calculated by turbidimetric assay and it showed bactericidal activity against St. aureus at 21.3 mg/mL protein concentration. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study reveal that K. marxianus proteins contain specific peptides in their sequences which can be released by

  3. Chemical Composition and Enzymes Inhibitory, Brine Shrimp Larvae Toxicity, Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Caloplaca biatorina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Valadbeigi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background This study evaluated the brine shrimp larvae toxicity and enzymes inhibitory especially anti-diabetic potential of Caloplaca biatorina via in vitro inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase using the methanol extracts. Also aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase enzymes inhibitory, cytotoxicity, and antioxidant activities of the species were determined. Methods In this experimental study, different concentrations of the extracts (0.2, 5.0, 1 and 1.5 mg/mL were incubated with enzyme substrate solution and the percentage of enzyme inhibitory activity and IC50 was calculated. Folin- Ciocalteu reagent and aluminium chloride colorimetric methods were used to estimate total phenolic and flavonoid content of extracts. The toxicity of the extract was assessed using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined. High-performance liquid chromatography and Thin-layer chromatography analysis were evaluated. The data were analyzed by SPSS V.21 software. Results Parietin, Emodin, 1,8-Dihydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl-6- methoxy-9.10-anthracenedione and Rhein were identified. The extract showed strong α-glucosidase, aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities with IC50 value of 17.12, 40.09 and 11.02 µg/mL respectively. Also methanol extract displayed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging and brine shrimp toxicity (IC50 = 91.11 properties. Conclusions The result obtained suggests that the C. biatorina extract can be classified as non-toxic. Also, it revealed the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of the lichen.

  4. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Disturbances in central dopaminergic neurotransmission are believed to be centrally involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Central dopaminergic and cholinergic systems interact and the cholinergic muscarinic agonist xanomeline has shown antipsychotic effects in clinical studies. Preclinic...

  5. Bistability Analysis of Excitatory-Inhibitory Neural Networks in Limited-Sustained-Activity Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Yun; Wu Liang; Wu Dan; Zhu Shiqun

    2011-01-01

    Bistable behavior of neuronal complex networks is investigated in the limited-sustained-activity regime when the network is composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The standard stability analysis is performed on the two metastable states separately. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show consistently that the difference between time scales of excitatory and inhibitory populations can influence the dynamical behaviors of the neuronal networks dramatically, leading to the transition from bistable behaviors with memory effects to the collapse of bistable behaviors. These results may suggest one possible neuronal information processing by only tuning time scales. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. In vitro inhibitory activities of the extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro inhibitory activities of the extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (family malvaceae) on selected cytochrome p450 isoforms. SS Johnson, FT Oyelola, T Ari, H Juho. Abstract. Literature is scanty on the interaction potential of Hibiscus sabdariffa L., plant extract with other drugs and the affected targets. This study was ...

  7. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    (EPS) at therapeutically relevant doses. In the present study, we examined whether the xanomeline-induced functional dopamine antagonism found in rodent studies could also be observed in nonhuman primates. In addition, we studied whether the lack of EPS observed in rodents also applies to primates......Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects...

  8. Perirhinal Cortex Muscarinic Receptor Blockade Impairs Taste Recognition Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Ranier; De la Cruz, Vanesa; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of perirhinal cortical cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission for taste recognition memory and learned taste aversion was assessed by microinfusions of muscarinic (scopolamine), NMDA (AP-5), and AMPA (NBQX) receptor antagonists. Infusions of scopolamine, but not AP5 or NBQX, prevented the consolidation of taste recognition…

  9. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-01-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [ 3 H]PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner

  10. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; impaired vs normal left ventricular function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van den Heuvel; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); G.L. Bartels; M. van der Ent (Martin); W.J. Remme (Willem)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown.

  11. Inhibitory effect of rhubarb on intestinal α-glucosidase activity in type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the inhibitory effect of rhubarb on α-glucosidase activity in the small intestine of rats with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Type 1 diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneally injecting 30 male SD rats with 1 % streptozocin (STZ). Rats with fasting blood glucose > 11 mmol/L (24) were used for the ...

  12. A Subtype of Inhibitory Interneuron with Intrinsic Persistent Activity in Human and Monkey Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in understanding the neural basis of human cognitive functions is to identify neuronal types in the neocortex. In this study, we performed whole-cell recording from human cortical slices and found a distinct subpopulation of neurons with intrinsic persistent activity that could be triggered by single action potentials (APs but terminated by bursts of APs. This persistent activity was associated with a depolarizing plateau potential induced by the activation of a persistent Na+ current. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that these neurons were inhibitory interneurons. This type of neuron was found in different cortical regions, including temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal cortices in human and also in frontal and temporal lobes of nonhuman primate but not in rat cortical tissues, suggesting that it could be unique to primates. The characteristic persistent activity in these inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the regulation of pyramidal cell activity and participate in cortical processing.

  13. Activation of muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptors by curcumin to increase glucose uptake into skeletal muscle isolated from Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tse-Chou; Lin, Chian-Shiung; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Li-Jen; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2009-11-20

    Curcumin, an active principle contained in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has been mentioned to show merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we found that curcumin caused a concentration-dependent increase of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle isolated from Wistar rats. This action was inhibited by pirenzepine at concentration enough to block muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptor (M(1)-mAChR). In radioligand binding assay, the binding of [(3)H]-pirenzepine was also displaced by curcumin in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of inhibitors for PLC-PI3K pathway, either U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) or LY294002 (phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor), curcumin-stimulated glucose uptake into skeletal muscle was markedly reduced. In Western blotting analysis, the membrane protein level of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) increased by curcumin was also reversed by blockade of M(1)-mAChR or PLC-PI3K pathway in a same manner. In conclusion, the obtained results suggest that curcumin can activate M(1)-mAChR at concentrations lower than to scavenge free radicals for increase of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle through PLC-PI3-kinase pathway.

  14. Membrane cholesterol content influences binding properties of muscarinic M2 receptors and differentially impacts activation of second messenger pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 606, 1-3 (2009), s. 50-60 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:National Institutes of Health(US) NS25743; EC(XE) LipiDiDiet Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic * cholesterol * receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2009

  15. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  16. Prediction of consensus binding mode geometries for related chemical series of positive allosteric modulators of adenosine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkal, Leon A; Rajkowski, Kyle Z; Armen, Roger S

    2017-06-05

    Following insights from recent crystal structures of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, binding modes of Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs) were predicted under the assumption that PAMs should bind to the extracellular surface of the active state. A series of well-characterized PAMs for adenosine (A 1 R, A 2A R, A 3 R) and muscarinic acetylcholine (M 1 R, M 5 R) receptors were modeled using both rigid and flexible receptor CHARMM-based molecular docking. Studies of adenosine receptors investigated the molecular basis of the probe-dependence of PAM activity by modeling in complex with specific agonist radioligands. Consensus binding modes map common pharmacophore features of several chemical series to specific binding interactions. These models provide a rationalization of how PAM binding slows agonist radioligand dissociation kinetics. M 1 R PAMs were predicted to bind in the analogous M 2 R PAM LY2119620 binding site. The M 5 R NAM (ML-375) was predicted to bind in the PAM (ML-380) binding site with a unique induced-fit receptor conformation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Blocking muscarinic receptors in the olfactory bulb impairs performance on an olfactory short term memory task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha eDevore

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic inputs to cortical processing networks have long been associated with attentional and top-down processing. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that cholinergic inputs to the main olfactory bulb (OB can modulate both neural and behavioral odor discrimination. Previous experiments from our laboratory and others demonstrate that blockade of nicotinic receptors directly impairs olfactory discrimination, whereas blockade of muscarinic receptors only measurably impairs olfactory perception when task demands are made more challenging, such as when very low-concentration odors are used or rats are required to maintain sensory memory over long durations. To further investigate the role of muscarinic signaling in the OB, we developed an olfactory delayed match-to-sample task using a digging-based behavioral paradigm. We find that rats are able to maintain robust short-term odor memory for tens to hundreds of seconds. To investigate the role of muscarinic signaling in task performance, we bilaterally infused scopolamine into the OB. We find that high dosages of scopolamine (38 mM impair performance on the task across all delays tested, including the baseline condition with no delay, whereas lower dosages (7.6 mM and 22.8 mM had no measureable effects. These results indicate that general execution of the match-to-sample task, even with no delay, is at least partially dependent on muscarinic signaling in the OB.

  18. Blocking muscarinic receptors in the olfactory bulb impairs performance on an olfactory short-term memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, Sasha; Manella, Laura C; Linster, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs to cortical processing networks have long been associated with attentional and top-down processing. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that cholinergic inputs to the main olfactory bulb (OB) can modulate both neural and behavioral odor discrimination. Previous experiments from our laboratory and others demonstrate that blockade of nicotinic receptors directly impairs olfactory discrimination, whereas blockade of muscarinic receptors only measurably impairs olfactory perception when task demands are made more challenging, such as when very low-concentration odors are used or rats are required to maintain sensory memory over long durations. To further investigate the role of muscarinic signaling in the OB, we developed an olfactory delayed match-to-sample task using a digging-based behavioral paradigm. We find that rats are able to maintain robust short-term odor memory for 10-100 s. To investigate the role of muscarinic signaling in task performance, we bilaterally infused scopolamine into the OB. We find that high dosages of scopolamine (38 mM) impair performance on the task across all delays tested, including the baseline condition with no delay, whereas lower dosages (7.6 mM and 22.8 mM) had no measureable effects. These results indicate that general execution of the match-to-sample task, even with no delay, is at least partially dependent on muscarinic signaling in the OB.

  19. Muscarinic receptor blockade in ventral hippocampus and prelimbic cortex impairs memory for socially transmitted food preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Márquez, Anna; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2009-05-01

    Acetylcholine is involved in learning and memory and, particularly, in olfactory tasks, but reports on its specific role in consolidation processes are somewhat controversial. The present experiment sought to determine the effects of blocking muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) and the prelimbic cortex (PLC) on the consolidation of social transmission of food preference, an odor-guided relational task that depends on such brain areas. Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally infused with scopolamine (20 microg/site) immediately after social training and showed impairment, relative to vehicle-injected controls, in the expression of the task measured 24 h after learning. Results indicated that scopolamine in the PLC completely abolished memory, suggesting that muscarinic transmission in this cortical region is crucial for consolidation of recent socially acquired information. Muscarinic receptors in the vHPC contribute in some way to task consolidation, as the rats injected with scopolamine in the vHPC showed significantly lower trained food preference than control rats, but higher than both chance level and that of the PLC-injected rats. Behavioral measures such as social interaction, motivation to eat, neophobia, or exploration did not differ between rats infused with scopolamine or vehicle. Such data suggest a possible differential role of muscarinic receptors in the PLC and the vHPC in the initial consolidation of a naturalistic form of nonspatial relational memory. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Molecular Descriptors Family on Vertex Cutting: Relationships between Acelazolamide Structures and their Inhibitory Activity

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    Sorana D. BOLBOACĂ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the relationship between the structural information of acetazolamides and their inhibitory activity on carbonic anhydrase II. Material and Method: A sample of previously reported acetazolamides was studied. A pool of descriptors was calculated based on matrix representation and vertex cut in order to be included in the multiple linear regression analysis. The best performing model in terms of goodness-of-fit was analysed in order to assess its validity and reliability. The model was compared with previously reported models using a series of information and prediction criteria besides the Steiger’s Z test. Results: A model with a 99.77% determination coefficient proved to be the best performing model. The obtained model proved to have a less than 5% average of the absolute difference between the observed and the estimated inhibitory activity. The information and prediction criteria showed that the obtained model was better than the previously reported models. This conclusion is also sustained by the results of Steiger’s Z test (7.78; p = 3.66·10-15. Conclusion: The inhibitory activity on carbonic anhydrase II of acetazolamides proved to be of geometric and topologic nature and depended on the compounds’ melting point, relative atomic mass and atomic electronegativity.

  1. Hyperfunction of muscarinic receptor maintains long-term memory in 5-HT4 receptor knock-out mice.

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    Luis Segu

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from dementia of Alzheimer's type express less serotonin 4 receptors (5-HTR(4, but whether an absence of these receptors modifies learning and memory is unexplored. In the spatial version of the Morris water maze, we show that 5-HTR(4 knock-out (KO and wild-type (WT mice performed similarly for spatial learning, short- and long-term retention. Since 5-HTR(4 control mnesic abilities, we tested whether cholinergic system had circumvented the absence of 5-HTR(4. Inactivating muscarinic receptor with scopolamine, at an ineffective dose (0.8 mg/kg to alter memory in WT mice, decreased long-term but not short-term memory of 5-HTR(4 KO mice. Other changes included decreases in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the required enzyme for acetylcholine synthesis, in the septum and the dorsal hippocampus in 5-HTR(4 KO under baseline conditions. Training- and scopolamine-induced increase and decrease, respectively in ChAT activity in the septum in WT mice were not detected in the 5-HTR(4 KO animals. Findings suggest that adaptive changes in cholinergic systems may circumvent the absence of 5-HTR(4 to maintain long-term memory under baseline conditions. In contrast, despite adaptive mechanisms, the absence of 5-HTR(4 aggravates scopolamine-induced memory impairments. The mechanisms whereby 5-HTR(4 mediate a tonic influence on ChAT activity and muscarinic receptors remain to be determined.

  2. Inhibitory Effect and Mechanism of Arctium lappa Extract on NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Koppula, Sushruta; Shim, Do-Wan; In, Eun-Jung; Kwak, Su-Bin; Kim, Myong-Ki; Yu, Sang-Hyeun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Tae-Bong

    2018-01-01

    Arctium lappa (A. lappa) , Compositae, is considered a potential source of nutrition and is used as a traditional medicine in East Asian countries for centuries. Although several studies have shown its biological activities as an anti-inflammatory agent, there have been no reports on A. lappa with regard to regulatory role in inflammasome activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of A. lappa extract (ALE) on NLRP3 inflammasome activation and explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that ALE inhibited IL-1 β secretion from NLRP3 inflammasome activated bone marrow derived macrophages but not that secreted by NLRC4 and AIM2 inflammasomes activation. Mechanistic studies revealed that ALE suppressed the ATPase activity of purified NLRP3 and reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generated during NLRP3 activation. Therefore, the inhibitory effect of ALE on NLRP3 inflammasome might be attributed to its ability to inhibit the NLRP3 ATPase function and attenuated the mROS during inflammasome activation. In addition, ALE significantly reduced the LPS-induced increase of plasma IL-1 β in mouse peritonitis model. These results provide evidence of novel anti-inflammatory mechanisms of A. lappa , which might be used for therapeutic applications in the treatment of NLRP3 inflammasome-associated inflammatory disorders.

  3. Outline of therapeutic interventions with muscarinic receptor-mediated transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Šantrůčková, Eva; Randáková, Alena; Janíčková, Helena; Zimčík, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S177-S189 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cholinergic transmission * muscarinic receptors * therapy * Alzheimer's disease, * schizophrenia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Resveratrol Analogs on Mushroom Tyrosinase Activity

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    Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin pigmentation disorders typically involve an overproduction or uneven distribution of melanin, which results in skin spots. Resveratrol can inhibit tyrosinase, the active enzyme in the synthesis of melanin, but it does not inhibit the synthesis of melanin to an extent that enables its use alone as a skin whitening agent in pharmaceutical formulations, so its use as a coadjuvant in treatment of hyperpigmentation is suggested. Six resveratrol analogs were tested for tyrosinase inhibitory activity in vitro. Among the analogs tested, compound D was the most powerful tyrosinase inhibitor (IC50 = 28.66 µg/mL, two times more active than resveratrol (IC50 = 57.05 µg/mL, followed by the analogs A, E, B, F and C, respectively. This demonstrated that the hydroxylation at C4' on the phenolic ring was the molecular modification with most importance for the observed activity.

  5. Inhibitory effect of flavonoids from citrus plants on Epstein-Barr virus activation and two-stage carcinogenesis of skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Y; Takemura, Y; Ju-ichi, M; Ito, C; Furukawa, H; Kawaii, S; Yano, M; Mou, X Y; Takayasu, J; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    2000-06-01

    To search for possible anti-tumor promoters, thirteen flavones (1-13) obtained from the peel of Citrus plants were examined for their inhibitory effects on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation by a short-term in vitro assay. Of these flavones, 3,5,6,7,8,3',4'-heptamethoxyflavone (HPT) (13) exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the EBV-EA activation induced by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, compound 13 exhibited remarkable inhibitory effects on mouse skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis test.

  6. Influence of thermodynamic parameter in Lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase inhibitory activity as antifungal agents: a QSAR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Lakshmi, Manickavasagam; Arockia Babu, Marianesan; Kaskhedikar, Sathish Gopalrao

    2006-06-01

    A quantitative structure activity relationship, Hansch approach was applied on twenty compounds of chromene derivatives as Lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase inhibitory activity against eight fungal organisms. Various physicochemical descriptors and reported minimum inhibitory concentration values of different fungal organisms were used as independent variables and dependent variable respectively. The best models for eight different fungal organisms were first validated by leave-one-out cross validation procedure. It was revealed that thermodynamic parameters were found to have overall significant correlationship with anti fungal activity and these studies provide an insight to design new molecules.

  7. Effects of Heat, pH, and Gamma Irradiation Treatments on Lipase Inhibitory Activity of Sargassum thunbergii Ethanol Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.H.; Kim, K.B.W.R.; Kim, M.J.; Sunwoo, C.; Jung, S.A.; Kim, H.J.; Jeong, D.H.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, T.W.; Cho, Y.J.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory activity of Sagassum thunbergii (ST) against porcine pancreatic lipase was assessed after heat treatment, pH changes, and gamma irradiation. This analysis revealed that the ST ethanol extract exhibited high lipase inhibitory activity (37.37%) at 5 mg/mL. The ST ethanol extract was treated with heat at 60°C for 10, 30, and 60 min; 80 and 100°C for 10 and 20 min; and 121°C for 15 min, pH (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10) and γ -irradiation (3, 7 and 20 kGy). The lipase inhibitory activity of the ST ethanol extract increased in all heat treatments, especially at 121°C for 15 min (51.55%) compared with the control. With regard to pH stability, the ST ethanol extract showed no significant changes at pH 4 ~ 8, but somewhat decreased inhibitory activity was revealed at pH 2 (26.25%) and 10 (29.93%). On the other hand, the ST ethanol extract was not affected by γ -irradiation treatment conditions used in this study. These results suggest that ST has a potential role as a functional food agent. (author)

  8. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activities of Flavonoids from the Leaves of Ginkgo biloba against Brown Planthopper

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    Xiao Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginkgo biloba is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant which has potent insecticidal activity against brown planthopper. The MeOH extract was tested in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitory assay with IC50 values of 252.1 μg/mL. Two ginkgolides and thirteen flavonoids were isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. It revealed that the 13 isolated flavonoids were found to inhibit AChE with IC50 values ranging from 57.8 to 133.1 μg/mL in the inhibitory assay. AChE was inhibited dose dependently by all tested flavonoids, and compound 6 displayed the highest inhibitory effect against AChE with IC50 values of 57.8 μg/mL.

  9. In vivo and in vitro studies on a muscarinic presynaptic antagonist and postsynaptic agonist: BM-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordstrom, O.; Bartafi, T.; Frieder, B.; Grimm, V.; Ladinsky, H.; Unden, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on in vitro and in vivo studies with compound BM-5 which, at proper dosage, could have great potential since it could enhance cholinergic transmission by being a presynaptic antagonist and postsynaptic agonist. Binding studies are described in which tritium-4-NMPB, a muscarinic antagonist, was displaced by compound BM-5 in membranes from striatum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. The binding data are summarized, which for each brain area involved 86-92 data points evaluated by means of nonlinear regression methods. Compound BM-5 recognized in each brain region a population of high and a population of low affinity binding sites; both of which were labelled with tritium-4-NMPB. It is shown that compound BM-5 causes muscarinic cholinergic agonist-like effects such as redness of the eye, increased motility in the gut, and impairment of locomotor behavior. It also produces muscarinic super-sensitivity upon chronic treatment, and decreases rat striatial ACh content by acute treatment

  10. Inhibitory effect of Sphagnum palustre extract and its bioactive compounds on aromatase activity

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    Hee Jeong Eom

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum palustre (a moss has been traditionally used in Korea for the cure of several diseases such as cardiac pain and stroke. In this research, the inhibitory effect of S. palustre on aromatase (cytochrome P450 19, CYP19 activity was studied. [1β-3H] androstenedione was used as a substrate and incubated with S. palustre extract and recombinant human CYP19 in the presence of NADPH. S. palustre extract inhibited aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value: 36.4 ± 8.1 µg/mL. To elucidate the major compounds responsible for the aromatase inhibitory effects of S. palustre extract, nine compounds were isolated from the extract and tested for their inhibition of aromatase activity. Compounds 1, 6, and 7 displayed aromatase inhibition, while the inhibition by the other compounds was negligible.

  11. Sempervivum davisii: phytochemical composition, antioxidant and lipase-inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Yusuf; Dalar, Abdullah; Konczak, Izabela

    2017-12-01

    Sempervivum davisii Muirhead (Crassulaceae) is a traditional medicinal herb from Eastern Anatolia. To date the composition of phytochemicals and physiological properties of this herb were not subjected to any research. This study identifies compounds in S. davisii hydrophilic extracts and evaluates their potential biological properties. Ethanol-based lyophilized extracts were obtained from aerial parts of plant (10 g of ground dry plant material in 200 mL of acidified aqueous ethanol, shaken for 2 h at 22 °C with supernatant collected and freeze-dried under vacuum). Phytochemical composition was investigated by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, phenolics) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS, volatiles). Phenolic compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Subsequently, antioxidant capacity [ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays] and enzyme inhibitory properties (isolated porcine pancreatic lipase) of the extracts were determined. Polyphenolic compounds were the main constituents of lyophilized extracts, among which kaempferol glycosides and quercetin hexoside dominated. The extracts exhibited potent antioxidant (FRAP values of 1925.2-5973.3 μM Fe 2+ /g DW; ORAC values of 1858.5-4208.7 μM Trolox Eq./g DW) and moderate lipase inhibitory (IC 50 : 11.6-2.96 mg/mL) activities. Volatile compounds (nonanal, dehydroxylinalool oxide isomers, 2-decenal, 2-undecenal, 2,6-di-tetr-butylphenol) were also found. Phenolic compounds with the dominating kaempferol and quercetin derivatives are the sources of potent antioxidant properties of S. davisii hydrophilic extracts. The extracts exhibit moderate inhibitory properties towards isolated pancreatic lipase.

  12. Description of two Enterococcus strains isolated from traditional Peruvian artisanal-produced cheeses with a bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity

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    Aguilar Galvez A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to isolate and to characterize strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity from 27 traditional cheeses artisanal-produced obtained from different Peruvian regions. Twenty Gram+ and catalasenegative strains among 2,277 isolates exhibited bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes CWBIB2232 as target strain. No change in inhibitory activity was observed after organic acid neutralization and treatment with catalase of the cell-free supernatant (CFS. The proteinic nature of the antimicrobial activity was confirmed for the twenty LAB strains by proteolytic digestion of the CFS. Two strains, CWBI-B1431 and CWBI-B1430, with the best antimicrobial activity were selected for further researches. These strains were taxonomically identified by phenotypic and genotypic analyses as Enterococcus mundtii (CWBI-B1431 and Enterococcus faecium (CWBI-B1430. The two strains were sensitive to vancomycin (MIC 2 μg.ml-1 and showed absence of haemolysis.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structures, fluorescence and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, De-Qiang; Yu, Chuan-Ming; You, Jin-Zong; Yang, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhang, Yi-Ping

    2015-11-01

    A series of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives were rationally designed and synthesized in good yields by following a convenient route. All the newly synthesized molecules were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. Eight compounds were structurally determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The fluorescence properties of all the compounds were investigated in dimethyl sulfoxide media. In addition, these newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against commercial enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) by measuring the formation of uric acid from xanthine. Among the compounds synthesized and tested, 3d and 3e were found to be moderate inhibitory activity against commercial XO with IC50 = 72.4 μM and 75.6 μM. The studies gave a new insight in further optimization of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives with excellent fluorescence properties and XO inhibitory activity.

  14. Two Novel Bioactive Peptides from Antarctic Krill with Dual Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Chaohua; Ji, Hongwu

    2017-07-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) are considered useful in managing 2 often associated conditions: diabetes and hypertension. In this study, corolase PP was used to hydrolyze Antarctic krill protein. The hydrolysate (AKH) was isolated by ultrafiltration and purified by size-exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) sequentially. The in vitro inhibitory activities of all AKHs and several fractions obtained against ACE and DPP-IV were assessed. Two peptides, purified with dual-strength inhibitory activity against ACE and DPP-IV, were identified by TOF-MS/MS. Results indicated that not all fractions exhibited dual inhibitory activities of ACE and DPP-IV. The purified peptide Lys-Val-Glu-Pro-Leu-Pro had half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of 0.93±0.05 and 0.73±0.04 mg/mL against ACE and DPP-IV, respectively. The other peptide Pro-Ala-Leu had IC 50 values of 0.64±0.05 and 0.88±0.03 mg/mL against ACE and DPP-IV, respectively. This study firstly reported the sequences of dual bioactive peptides from Antarctic krill proteins, further provided new insights into the bioactive peptides responsible for the ACE and DPP-IV inhibitory activities from the Antarctic krill protein hydrolysate to manage hypertension and diabetes. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  15. Utilisation of rapeseed protein isolates for production of peptides with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-inhibitory activity

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    Vioque, Javier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available ACE activity is related to increased arterial pressure and coronary diseases. A rapeseed protein isolate was hydrolyzed with the protease Alcalase in order to investigate the possible presence of ACE inhibitory peptides in the resulting hydrolysates. Hydrolysis for 30 min yielded a hydrolysate with the highest ACE inhibitory activity. Two fractions of this hydrolysate obtained by Biogel P2 gel filtration chromatography were used for further purification of ACE inhibitory peptides. Three fractions with ACE inhibitory activity were purified by reverse-phase HPLC of Biogel P2 f ractions. This demonstrates that rapeseed protein hydrolysates represent a good source of ACE inhibitory peptides .La actividad de ECA está relacionada con una presión arterial alta y enfermedades cardíacas. Un aislado proteico de colza se hidrolizó con alcalasa para estudiar la posible presencia de péptidos inhibidores de ECA en el hidrolizado. La hidrólisis durante 30 min produjo el hidrolizado con la mayor actividad inhibidora de ECA. Dos fracciones de este hidrolizado, obtenidas por cromatografía de filtración en gel Biogel P2, se usaron para la purificación de péptidos inhibidores de ECA. Tres fracciones con actividad inhibidora de ECA se purificaron mediante HPLC en fase reversa de las fracciones obtenidas mediante Biogel P2. Esto demuestra que los hidrolizados proteicos de colza representan una buena fuente de péptidos inhibidores de ECA.

  16. The frontal lobes and inhibitory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Seiki

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies using traditional tasks of inhibitory functions, such as the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) and the Go/No-Go Task have revealed that the frontal lobe is responsible for several types of inhibitory functions. However, the detailed psychological nature of the inhibitory functions and the precise location of their critical foci within the frontal lobe remain to be investigated. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides spatial and temporal resolution that allowed us to illuminate at least 4 frontal regions involved in inhibitory functions: the dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and rostral parts of the frontal lobe and the presupplementary motor area (preSMA). The ventrolateral part of the frontal lobe in the right hemisphere was activated during response inhibition. The preSMA in the left hemisphere was activated during inhibition of proactive interference immediately after the dimension changes of the WCST. The rostral part of the frontal lobe in the left hemisphere was activated during inhibition long after the dimension changes. The dorsolateral part of the frontal lobe in the left hemisphere was activated at the dimension changes in the first time, but not in the second time. These findings provide clues to our understanding of functional differentiation of inhibitory functions and their localization in the frontal lobe. (author)

  17. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antioxidant, Iron Chelating and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activities of Extracts from Talinum triangulare Leach Stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Oliveira Amorim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the antioxidant activity against the radical species DPPH, the reducing capacity against Fe II ions, and the inhibitory activity on the tyrosinase enzyme of the T. triangulare. Hydromethanolic crude extract provided two fractions after the liquid/liquid partition with chloroform. The Folin-Ciocalteu method determined the total phenolic content of the crude extract (CE and the hydromethanolic fraction (Fraction 1, resulting in a concentration of 0.5853 g/100 g for Fraction 1, and 0.1400 g/100 g for the CE. Taking into account the results of the DPPH, the free radical scavenging capacity was confirmed. The formation of complexes with Fe II ions was evaluated by UV/visible spectrometry; results showed that CE has complexing power similar to the positive control (Gingko biloba extract.The inhibitory capacity of samples against the tyrosinase enzyme was determined by the oxidation of L-DOPA, providing IC50 values of 13.3 μg·mL−1 (CE and 6.6 μg·mL−1 (Fraction 1. The values indicate that Fraction 1 was more active and showed a higher inhibitory power on the tyrosinase enzyme than the ascorbic acid, used as positive control. The hydromethanolic extract of T. triangulare proved to have powerful antioxidant activity and to inhibit the tyrosinase enzyme; its potential is increased after the partition with chloroform.

  19. Identification of diphtheria toxin R domain mutants with enhanced inhibitory activity against HB-EGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Mizushima, Hiroto; Abe, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Ryo; Nakamura, Haruki; Mekada, Eisuke

    2015-05-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), a ligand of EGF receptor, is involved in the growth and malignant progression of cancers. Cross-reacting material 197, CRM197, a non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DT), specifically binds to the EGF-like domain of HB-EGF and inhibits its mitogenic activity, thus CRM197 is currently under evaluation in clinical trials for cancer therapy. To develop more potent DT mutants than CRM197, we screened various mutant proteins of R domain of DT, the binding site for HB-EGF. A variety of R-domain mutant proteins fused with maltose-binding protein were produced and their inhibitory activity was evaluated in vitro. We found four R domain mutants that showed much higher inhibitory activity against HB-EGF than wild-type (WT) R domain. These R domain mutants suppressed HB-EGF-dependent cell proliferation more effectively than WT R domain. Surface plasmon resonance revealed their higher affinity to HB-EGF than WT R domain. CRM197(R460H) carrying the newly identified mutation showed increased cell proliferation inhibitory activity and affinity to HB-EGF. These results suggest that CRM197(R460H) or other recombinant proteins carrying newly identified mutation(s) in the R domain are potential therapeutics targeting HB-EGF. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities of Plebeian herba (Salvia plebeia R. Br.) under different cultivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Kang, Young-Hwa

    2014-03-12

    An adaptation of cultural management to the specific cultural system, as well as crop demand, can further result in the improvement of the quality of horticultural products. Therefore, this study focused on the antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities of Plebeian herba (Salvia plebeia R. Br.) grown in hydroponics in comparison with those of the plant grown in soil. The antioxidant activities of Plebeian herba extract were measured as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging abilities as well as the reducing power by decreasing nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in vitro. Interestingly, by comparison with hydroponics and traditional cultivation, Plebeian herba cultivated in nutrition-based soil improved inhibitory effect on free radicals of DPPH, ABTS, and NO and increased the contents of phenolics such as caffeic acid (1), luteolin-7-glucoside (2), homoplantaginin (3), hispidulin (4), and eupatorin. Free radical scavenging and SOD activity, as well as α-glucosidase inhibitory effect, were higher in Plebeian herba grown in nutrition-based soil than in plants grown in hydroponics and traditional condition.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Thai traditional nootropic remedy and its herbal ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappayuthpijarn, Pimolvan; Itharat, Arunporn; Makchuchit, Sunita

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing every year in accordance with the increasing of elderly population and could pose significant health problems in the future. The use of medicinal plants as an alternative prevention or even for a possible treatment of the AD is, therefore, becoming an interesting research issue. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are well-known drugs commonly used in the treatment of AD. The aim of the present study was to screen for AChE inhibitory activity of the Thai traditional nootropic recipe and its herbal ingredients. The results showed that ethanolic extracts of four out of twenty-five herbs i.e. Stephania pierrei Diels. Kaempfera parviflora Wall. ex Baker, Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng, Piper nigrum L at 0.1 mg/mL showed % AChE inhibition of 89, 64, 59, 50; the IC50 were 6, 21, 29, 30 microg/mL respectively. The other herbs as well as combination of the whole recipe had no synergistic inhibitory effect on AChE activity. However some plants revealed antioxidant activity. More research should have be performed on this local wisdom remedy to verify the uses in scientific term.

  2. The distribution of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo in patients with dementia. A controlled study with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, D.R.; Gibson, R.; Coppola, R.; Jones, D.W.; Molchan, S.; Sunderland, T.; Berman, K.F.; Reba, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist, 123IQNB (3-quinuclidinyl-4-iodobenzilate labeled with iodine 123), was used with single photon emission computed tomography to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in 14 patients with dementia and in 11 healthy controls. High-resolution single photon emission computed tomographic scanning was performed 21 hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 5 mCi of IQNB. In normal subjects, the images of retained ligand showed a consistent regional pattern that correlated with postmortem studies of the relative distribution of muscarinic receptors in the normal human brain, having high radioactivity counts in the basal ganglia, occipital cortex, and insular cortex, low counts in the thalamus, and virtually no counts in the cerebellum. Eight of 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease had obvious focal cortical defects in either frontal or posterior temporal cortex. Both patients with a clinical diagnosis of Pick's disease had obvious frontal and anterior temporal defects. A region of interest statistical analysis of relative regional activity revealed a significant reduction bilaterally in the posterior temporal cortex of the patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with controls. This study demonstrates the practicability of acetylcholine receptor imaging with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography. The data suggest that focal abnormalities in muscarinic binding in vivo may characterize some patients with Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease, but further studies are needed to address questions about partial volume artifacts and receptor quantification

  3. Death and rebirth of neural activity in sparse inhibitory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Garcia, David; Luccioli, Stefano; Olmi, Simona; Torcini, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Inhibition is a key aspect of neural dynamics playing a fundamental role for the emergence of neural rhythms and the implementation of various information coding strategies. Inhibitory populations are present in several brain structures, and the comprehension of their dynamics is strategical for the understanding of neural processing. In this paper, we clarify the mechanisms underlying a general phenomenon present in pulse-coupled heterogeneous inhibitory networks: inhibition can induce not only suppression of neural activity, as expected, but can also promote neural re-activation. In particular, for globally coupled systems, the number of firing neurons monotonically reduces upon increasing the strength of inhibition (neuronal death). However, the random pruning of connections is able to reverse the action of inhibition, i.e. in a random sparse network a sufficiently strong synaptic strength can surprisingly promote, rather than depress, the activity of neurons (neuronal rebirth). Thus, the number of firing neurons reaches a minimum value at some intermediate synaptic strength. We show that this minimum signals a transition from a regime dominated by neurons with a higher firing activity to a phase where all neurons are effectively sub-threshold and their irregular firing is driven by current fluctuations. We explain the origin of the transition by deriving a mean field formulation of the problem able to provide the fraction of active neurons as well as the first two moments of their firing statistics. The introduction of a synaptic time scale does not modify the main aspects of the reported phenomenon. However, for sufficiently slow synapses the transition becomes dramatic, and the system passes from a perfectly regular evolution to irregular bursting dynamics. In this latter regime the model provides predictions consistent with experimental findings for a specific class of neurons, namely the medium spiny neurons in the striatum.

  4. Discovery of aliphatic-chain hydroxamates containing indole derivatives with potent class I histone deacetylase inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shi-Wei; Chen, Liang-Chieh; Yu, Chia-Chun; Liu, Chang-Yi; Lin, Tony Eight; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Wang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yung; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Jan

    2018-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a validated drug target for various diseases. This study combined indole recognition cap with SAHA, an FDA-approved HDAC inhibitor used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). The structure activity relationship of the resulting compounds that inhibited HDAC was disclosed as well. Some compounds exhibited much stronger inhibitory activities than SAHA. We identified two meta-series compounds 6j and 6k with a two-carbon linker had IC 50 values of 3.9 and 4.5 nM for HDAC1, respectively. In contrast, the same oriented compounds with longer carbon chain linkers showed weaker inhibition. The result suggests that the linker chain length greatly contributed to enzyme inhibitory potency. In addition, comparison of enzyme-inhibiting activity between the compounds and SAHA showed that compounds 6j and 6k displayed higher inhibiting activity for class I (HDAC1, -2, -3 and -8). The molecular docking and structure analysis revealed structural differences with the inhibitor cap and metal-binding regions between the HDAC isozymes that affect interactions with the inhibitors and play a key role for selectivity. Further biological evaluation showed multiple cellular effects associated with compounds 6j- and 6k-induced HDAC inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. GABAergic Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Express Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells in the different strata of CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus is examined by way of quantitative immunofluorescent double labeling employing M35, the

  6. Inhibitory Effect and Mechanism of Arctium lappa Extract on NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Kyu Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctium lappa (A. lappa, Compositae, is considered a potential source of nutrition and is used as a traditional medicine in East Asian countries for centuries. Although several studies have shown its biological activities as an anti-inflammatory agent, there have been no reports on A. lappa with regard to regulatory role in inflammasome activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of A. lappa extract (ALE on NLRP3 inflammasome activation and explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that ALE inhibited IL-1β secretion from NLRP3 inflammasome activated bone marrow derived macrophages but not that secreted by NLRC4 and AIM2 inflammasomes activation. Mechanistic studies revealed that ALE suppressed the ATPase activity of purified NLRP3 and reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS generated during NLRP3 activation. Therefore, the inhibitory effect of ALE on NLRP3 inflammasome might be attributed to its ability to inhibit the NLRP3 ATPase function and attenuated the mROS during inflammasome activation. In addition, ALE significantly reduced the LPS-induced increase of plasma IL-1β in mouse peritonitis model. These results provide evidence of novel anti-inflammatory mechanisms of A. lappa, which might be used for therapeutic applications in the treatment of NLRP3 inflammasome-associated inflammatory disorders.

  7. Chemical composition and α-amylase inhibitory activity of the essential oil from Sabina chinensis cv. Kaizuca leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongyu; Fang, Chen; Yang, Jiao; Li, Minjing; Liu, Hengming; Yang, Yi

    2018-03-01

    Sabina chinensis cv. Kaizuca (SCK) is a variant of S. chinensis L. The essential oil from its leaves exhibited α-amylase inhibitory activity in vitro and the IC 50 value was 187.08 ± 0.56 μg/mL. Nineteen compounds were identified from this essential oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The major compounds identified were bornyl acetate (42.6%), elemol (20.5%), β-myrcene (13.7%) and β-linalool (4.0%). In order to study the reason of the α-amylase inhibitory activity of this essential oil, the identified compounds were docked with α-amylase by molecular docking individually. Among these compounds, γ-eudesmol exhibited the lowest binding energy (-6.73 kcal/mol), followed by α-copaen-11-ol (-6.66 kcal/mol), cubedol (-6.39 kcal/mol) and α-acorenol (-6.12 kcal/mol). The results indicated that these compounds were the active ingredients responsible for the α-amylase inhibitory activity of essential oil from SCK.

  8. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  9. Wash-Resistantly Bound Xanomeline Inhibits Acetylcholine Release by Persistent Activation of Presynaptic M2 and M4 Muscarinic Receptors in Rat Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, č. 1 (2007), s. 316-323 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:-(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * xanomeline * muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.003, year: 2007

  10. Izalpinin from fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla with antagonistic activity against the rat bladder contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Tan, Yin-Feng; Xu, Peng; Li, Hailong; Li, Yong-Hui; Chen, Wen-Ya; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Chen, Feng; Huang, Guo-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia oxyphylla (Zingiberaceae), an herbaceous perennial plant, its capsular fruit is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different urinary incontinence symptoms including frequency, urgency and nocturia. These symptoms are similar to the overactive bladder syndrome. In our lab, we found that the 95% ethanol extract of the capsular fruits exhibited significant anti-muscarinic activity. Some constituents in capsular fruits including flavonoids (e.g., izalpinin and tectochrysin), diarylheptanoids (e.g., yakuchinone A and yakuchinone B) and sesquiterpenes (e.g., nootkatone), are regarded as representative chemicals with putative pharmacological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antagonistic actions of izalpinin on carbachol-induced contraction of the rat detrusor muscle. In vitro inhibition of rat detrusor contractile response to carbachol was used to study the functional activity of izalpinin. The isolated detrusor strips of rats were mounted in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs' solution. The cumulative consecutive concentration-response curves to carbachol-evoked contractions in strips of rat bladder were obtained. Carbachol induced concentration-dependent contractions of isolated rat bladder detrusor strips. The vehicle DMSO had no impact on the contraction response. The contraction effects were concentration-dependently antagonized by izalpinin, with a mean EC50 value of 0.35 µM. The corresponding cumulative agonist concentration-response curves shifted right-ward. Izalpinin exhibits inhibitory role of muscarinic receptor-related detrusor contractile activity, and it may be a promising lead compound to treat overactive bladder.

  11. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Murayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH, a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control, a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in “itch-scratch” animal models is under investigation.

  12. Muscarinic receptors mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Gautam, Sudha Silwal; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    This study determined if muscarinic receptors could mediate the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity induced in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats. Ten-week-old female Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rats (n = 12) and Wister Kyoto non-diabetic rats (n = 12) were maintained on a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. Cystometric investigations of the unanesthetized rats were carried out at room temperature (27 ± 2°C) for 20 min. They were intravenously administered imidafenacin (0.3 mg/kg, n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6). After 5 min, the rats were transferred to a low temperature (4 ± 2°C) for 40 min where the cystometry was continued. The rats were then returned to room temperature for the final cystometric measurements. Afterwards, expressions of bladder muscarinic receptor M3 and M2 messenger ribonucleic acids and proteins were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats, imidafenacin did not reduce cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats, just after transfer to a low temperature, the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in imidafenacin-treated rats was reduced compared with vehicle-treated rats. Within the urinary bladders, the ratio of M3 to M2 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was significantly higher than that of the non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. The proportion of muscarinic M3 receptor-positive area within the detrusor in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was also significantly higher than that in non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. Imidafenacin partially inhibits cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. In this animal model, muscarinic M3 receptors partially mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Muscarinic agonists and phorbol esters increase tyrosine phosphorylation of a 40-kilodalton protein in hippocampal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, K.R.; Worley, P.F.; Huganir, R.L.; Baraban, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used the hippocampal slice preparation to investigate the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in brain. After pharmacological treatment of intact slices, proteins were separated by electrophoresis, and levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation were assessed by immunoblotting with specific anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Phorbol esters, activators of the serine- and threonine-phosphorylating enzyme protein kinase C, selectively increase tyrosine phosphorylation of a soluble protein with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 40 kilodaltons. Muscarinic agonists such as carbachol and oxotremorine M that strongly activate the inositol phospholipid system also increase tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein. Neurotransmitter activation of the inositol phospholipid system and protein kinase C appears to trigger a cascade leading to increased tyrosine phosphorylation

  14. Muscarinic supersensibility of anterior pituitary ACTH and beta-endorphin release in major depressive illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risch, S.C.; Gillin, J.C.; Janowsky, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Since numerious physiological systems display muscarinic receptor supersensitivity in major depressive illnesses, the authors have hypothesize that anterior pituitary release of ACTH and beta-Endorphin immunoreactivity may also be muscarinically supersensitive in depression. The studies were conducted under FDA-approved IND and with local human subjects committee approval. Plasma ACTH concentrations were determined as follows: samples were assayed in duplicate using equilibrium radioimmunoassay utilizing a rabbit anti-porcine ACTH antibody. Significance ofchanges in plasma cortisol, ACTH and beta-endorphin immunoreactivity after physostigmine and saline were determined by repeated measures analysis of variance. In all subject groups, physostigmine (relative to placebo) caused significant increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, ACTH, and beta-endorphin immonoreactivity

  15. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone-mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans.

  16. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitory activity of anthraquinone components from Aloe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya Nan; Kim, Jang Hoon; Li, Wei; Jo, A Reum; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-10-15

    Aloe is a short-stemmed succulent herb widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases and as raw material in cosmetics and heath foods. In this study, we isolated and identified two new anthraquinone derivatives, aloinoside C (6) and aloinoside D (7), together with six known compounds from an aqueous dissolved Aloe exudate. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were evaluated. Compounds 1-8 inhibited sEH activity potently, with IC50 values ranging from 4.1±0.6 to 41.1±4.2 μM. A kinetic analysis of compounds 1-8 revealed that the inhibitory actions of compounds 1, 6 and 8 were non-competitive, whereas those of compounds 2-5 and 7 were the mixed-type. Molecular docking increases our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of all compounds. These results demonstrate that compounds 1-8 from Aloe are potential sEH inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Trypsin inhibitory activity of artemisinin and its biotransformed product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahwar, D.; Raza, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Artemisinin (1 ), a sesquiterpene lactone is an important constituent of anti-malarial drugs. In the present study, it was extracted from aerial parts of Artemisia roxburghiana Besser. Biotransformation of artemisinin ( 1 ) was carried out in the culture of Aspergillus niger GC-4 which yielded 5-hydroxy artemisinin (2 ) The structures of 1-2 were confirmed through spectral studies. Both compounds were screened against trypsin using colorimetric method. The biotransformed product 2 showed significant protease inhibitory activity with 53.5 +- 1.6% inhibition and IC/sub 50/ = 0.29 +- 0.02 mM as compared to artemisinin (20.4 +- 0.3% inhibition). (author)

  18. Antibacterial and EGFR-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitory Activities of Polyhydroxylated Xanthones from Garcinia succifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susawat Duangsrisai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2, 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3, 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4, 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5, and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6. All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1, as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4, 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5, and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6 exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2 showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1 and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2 were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively.

  19. Glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound and triterpenoid compound from Agrimonia Pilosa Ledeb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Zhu, Liancai; Tan, Jun; Zhou, Xuemei; Xiao, Ling; Yang, Xian; Wang, Bochu

    2014-01-10

    In Chinese traditional medicine, Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (APL) exhibits great effect on treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), however its mechanism is still unknown. Considering that T2DM are correlated with postprandial hyperglycemia and oxidative stress, we investigated the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and the antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound (FC) and triterpenoid compound (TC) from APL. Entire plants of APL were extracted using 95% ethanol and 50% ethanol successively. The resulting extracts were partitioned and isolated by applying liquid chromatography using silica gel column and Sephadex LH 20 column to give FC and TC. The content of total flavonoids in FC and the content of total triterpenoids in TC were determined by using UV spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis was used to identify and quantify the monomeric compound in FC and TC. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were determined using the chromogenic method with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Antioxidant activities were assessed through three kinds of radical scavenging assays (DPPH radical, ABTS radical and hydroxyl radical) & β-carotene-linoleic acid assay. The results indicate FC is abundant of quercitrin, and hyperoside, and TC is abundant of 1β, 2β, 3β, 19α-tetrahydroxy-12-en-28-oic acid (265.2 mg/g) and corosolic acid (100.9 mg/g). The FC & the TC have strong α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 of 8.72 μg/mL and 3.67 μg/mL, respectively. We find that FC show competitive inhibition against α-glucosidase, while the TC exhibits noncompetitive inhibition. Furthermore, The FC exhibits significant radical scavenging activity with the EC50 values of 7.73 μg/mL, 3.64 μg/mL and 5.90 μg/mL on DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and ABTS radical, respectively. The FC also shows moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activity with the IC50 values of 41.77 μg/mL on inhibiting β-carotene bleaching. These results imply that the FC and the TC could be

  20. Polyphenols isolated from Acacia mearnsii bark with anti-inflammatory and carbolytic enzyme inhibitory activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Jia; GRACE Mary H; ESPOSITO Debora; KOMARNYTSKY Slavko; WANG Fei; LILA Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the polyphenols isolated from Acacia mearnsii bark crude extract (B) and fractions (B1-B7) obtained by high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and evaluate their anti-inflammatory and carbolytic enzymes (α-glucosidase and α-amylase) inhibitory activities.Fractions B4,B5,B6,B7 (total phenolics 850.3,983.0,843.9,and 572.5 mg·g-1,respectively;proanthocyanidins 75.7,90.5,95.0,and 44.8 mg·g-1,respectively) showed significant activities against reactive oxygen species (ROS),nitric oxide (NO) production,and expression of pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7.All the extracts suppressed α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities,two primary enzymes responsible for carbohydrate digestion.A.mearnsii bark samples possessed significantly stronger inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase enzyme (IC50 of 0.4-1.4 tg·mL-1) than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 141.8 μg·mL-1).B6 and B7 (IC5017.6 and 11.7 μg·mL-1,respectively) exhibited α-amylase inhibitory activity as efficacious as acarbose (IC50 15.4 μg·mL-1).Moreover,B extract,at 25 μg·mL-l,significantly decreased the non-mitochondrial oxidative burst that is often associated with inflammatory response in human monocytic macrophages.

  1. Autoradiography of H-3-pirenzepine and H-3-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M-1, M-2, and M-4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valuskova, P.; Farar, V.; Forczek, Sándor; Křížová, I.; Mysliveček, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, FEB 20 (2018), č. článku 124. ISSN 1663-9812 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : 3 h-afdx-384 * 3 H-pirenzepine * 3 h-qnb * Autoradiography * M muscarinic receptor 1 * M muscarinic receptor 2 * M muscarinic receptor 4 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.400, year: 2016

  2. Antioxidant, xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase inhibitory activities and phenolics of Bauhinia rufescens Lam. (Caesalpiniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaoré, M; Lamien, C E; Lamien-Meda, A; Vlase, L; Kiendrebeogo, M; Ionescu, C; Nacoulma, O G

    2012-01-01

    An aqueous acetone extract of the stem with the leaves of Bauhinia rufescens and its fractions were analysed for their antioxidant and enzyme-inhibitory activities, as well as their phytochemical composition. For measurement of the antioxidant activities, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzoline-6-sulphonate) and the ferric-reducing methods were used. The results indicated that the aqueous acetone, its ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions possessed considerable antioxidant activity. Further, the xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase inhibitory assays showed that the n-butanol fraction possessed compounds that can inhibit both these enzymes. In the phytochemical analysis, the ethyl acetate and the n-butanol fractions of the aqueous acetone extract were screened by HPLC-MS for their phenolic content. The results indicated the presence of hyperoside, isoquercitrin, rutin quercetin, quercitrin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids in the non-hydrolysed fractions. In the hydrolysed fractions, kaempferol, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were identified.

  3. Chemical modification, antioxidant and α-amylase inhibitory activities of corn silk polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhan; Chen, Haixia; Tian, Jingge; Wang, Yanwei; Xing, Lisha; Wang, Jia

    2013-10-15

    Water-soluble corn silk polysaccharides (CSPS) were chemically modified to obtain their sulfated, acetylated and carboxymethylated derivatives. Chemical characterization and bioactivities of CSPS and its derivatives were comparatively investigated by chemical methods, gas chromatography, gel filtration chromatography, scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scavenging DPPH free radical assay, scavenging hydroxyl radical assay, ferric reducing power assay, lipid peroxidation inhibition assay and α-amylase activity inhibitory assay, respectively. Among the three derivatives, carboxylmethylated polysaccharide (C-CSPS) demonstrated higher solubility, narrower molecular weight distribution, lower intrinsic viscosity, a hyperbranched conformation, significantly higher antioxidant and α-amylase inhibitory abilities compared with the native polysaccharide and other derivatives. C-CSPS might be used as a novel nutraceutical agent for human consumption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Act in Synergy to Facilitate Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Chen, Helen J.; Corcoran, Kevin A.; Guedea, Anita L.; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Wess, Jurgen; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how episodic memories are formed and retrieved is necessary if we are to treat disorders in which they malfunction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the hippocampus and cortex underlie memory formation, but there is conflicting evidence regarding their role in memory retrieval. Additionally, there is no consensus on…

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL. There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells. The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute.

  6. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... of drug addiction...

  7. New 5-deoxyflavonoids and their inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Phi Hung; Dao, Trong Tuan; Kim, Jayeon

    2011-01-01

    .9 ± 1.6 to 19.2 ± 1.1 μM), while compounds (3, 5, and 9) with 2,2-dimethylpyrano ring showed less inhibitory effect (IC₅₀ 22.6 ± 2.3 to 72.9 ± 9.7 μM). These results suggest that prenyl and methoxy groups may be responsible for the increase on the activity of 5-deoxyflavonoids against PTP1B......, but the presence of 2,2-dimethylpyrano ring on the B ring may be induced the decrease of PTP1B inhibitory activity....

  8. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of lycopodane-type alkaloids from the Icelandic Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldórsdóttir, Elsa Steinunn; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate structures and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of lycopodane-type alkaloids isolated from an Icelandic collection of Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre. Ten alkaloids were isolated, including annotinine, annotine, lycodoline, lycoposerramine M...

  9. In silico docking studies of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of commercially available flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the aldose reductase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like biochanin, butein, esculatin, fisetin and herbacetin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -9.33 kcal/mol to -7.23 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-8.73 kcal/mol. Inhibition constant (144.13 µM to 4.98 µM and intermolecular energy (-11.42 kcal/mol to -7.83 kcal/mol of the flavonoids also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural properties. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  10. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory activities of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains against antibiotic susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, L; Gergova, G; Markovska, R; Yordanov, D; Mitov, I

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. Activity of non-neutralized and non-heat-treated (CFSs1), non-neutralized and heat-treated (CFSs2), pH neutralized, catalase-treated and non-heat-treated (CFSs3), or neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated (CFSs4) CFSs against 18 H. pylori strains (11 of which with antibiotic resistance) was evaluated. All GLB strains produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs), the neutralized CFSs of two GLB strains inhibited >81% of test strains and those of four GLB strains were active against >71% of antibiotic resistant strains. Two H. pylori strains were BLIS resistant. The heating did not reduce the CFS activity. Briefly, all GLB strains evaluated produced heat-stable BLISs, although GLB and H. pylori strain susceptibility patterns exhibited differences. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance activity can be an advantage for the probiotic choice for H. pylori infection control. In this study, anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains was evaluated by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. The GLB strains produced heat-stable bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs) with a strong anti-H. pylori activity and some neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated CFSs inhibited >83% of the test strains. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance production of GLB strains can render them valuable probiotics in the control of H. pylori infection. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Antifeedant, insecticidal and growth inhibitory activities of selected plant oils on black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

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    Alagarmalai Jeyasankar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antifeedant, insecticidal and insect growth inhibitory activities of eucalyptus oil (Eucalyptus globules and gaultheria oil (Gaultheria procumbens L. against black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon. Methods: Antifeedant, insecticidal and growth inhibitory activities of eucalyptus oil and gaultheria oil were tested against black cutworm, A. ipsilon. Results: Significant antifeedant activity was found in eucalyptus oil (96.24% where as the highest insecticidal activity was noticed in gaultheria oil (86.92%. Percentages of deformities were highest on gaultheria oil treated larvae and percentage of adult emergence was deteriorated also by gaultheria oil. Conclusions: These plants oil has potential to serve as an alternative eco-friendly control of insect pest.

  12. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira R.; Peralta-González, Fanny; Castellanos-Ruelas, Arturo; Chel-Guerrero, Luis A.; Betancur-Ancona, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%). Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides' inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry. PMID:24224169

  13. LC-MS guided isolation of diterpenoids from Sapium insigne with α-glucosidase inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, De-Xiu; Geng, Chang-An; Yang, Tong-Hua; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Tian-Ze; Gao, Zhen; Ma, Yun-Bao; Peng, Hua; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2018-04-08

    Ten new (1-10) and ten known (11-20) diterpenoids involving ent-atisane, ent-seco-atisane, ent-kaurane and ent-seco-kaurane types were isolated from Sapium insigne under the guidance of LCMS-IT-TOF analyses. Their structures were characterized by extensive spectroscopic analyses (HRESIMS, UV, IR, 1D and 2D NMR). A putative biosynthetic pathway was proposed for ent-seco-atisane diterpenoids. Their inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase in vitro were tested for the first time. Compound 4 showed moderate inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase with an IC 50 value of 0.34 mM via a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism (K i  = 0.27 mM). The preliminary structure-activity relationships of the ent-atisane diterpenoids inhibiting α-glucosidase were discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of a-glucosidase inhibitory activity from selected Fabaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Pitakbut, Thanet

    2015-09-01

    Nineteen plants from Fabaceae family, which were used in Thai traditional medicine for treatment of diabetes, were determined of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity via enzymatic reaction. In this reaction, α-glucosidase was used as enzyme, which, reacted with the substrate, p-nitrophenol-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG). After that the product, p-nitro phenol (pNP) will be occurred and observed the yellow colour at 405 nm. In this study, acarbose was used as positive standard which, inhibited this enzyme with IC₅₀ as 331 ± 4.73 μg/ml. Caesalpinia pulcherrima leaves showed the highest activity with IC₅₀ as 436.97 ± 9.44 μg/ml. Furthermore, Bauhinia malabarica leaves presented moderately activity with IC₅₀ as 745.08 ± 11.15 μg/ml. However, the other plants showed mild to none activity of α-glucosidase inhibition. Accordingly, this study can support anti-diabetes of these plants in traditional medicine and it will be the database of the biological activity of Fabaceae plant.

  15. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

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    Kentaro Fukunaga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM, a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC, significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors.

  16. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

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    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  17. Voltage sensitivity of M2 muscarinic receptors underlies the delayed rectifier-like activation of ACh-gated K(+) current by choline in feline atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Salazar-Fajardo, Pedro D; Benavides-Haro, Dora E; Rodríguez-Elías, Julio C; Sachse, Frank B; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G

    2013-09-01

    Choline (Ch) is a precursor and metabolite of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). In canine and guinea pig atrial myocytes, Ch was shown to activate an outward K(+) current in a delayed rectifier fashion. This current has been suggested to modulate cardiac electrical activity and to play a role in atrial fibrillation pathophysiology. However, the exact nature and identity of this current has not been convincingly established. We recently described the unique ligand- and voltage-dependent properties of muscarinic activation of ACh-activated K(+) current (IKACh) and showed that, in contrast to ACh, pilocarpine induces a current with delayed rectifier-like properties with membrane depolarization. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Ch activates IKACh in feline atrial myocytes in a voltage-dependent manner similar to pilocarpine. Single-channel recordings, biophysical profiles, specific pharmacological inhibition and computational data indicate that the current activated by Ch is IKACh. Moreover, we show that membrane depolarization increases the potency and efficacy of IKACh activation by Ch and thus gives the appearance of a delayed rectifier activating K(+) current at depolarized potentials. Our findings support the emerging concept that IKACh modulation is both voltage- and ligand-specific and reinforce the importance of these properties in understanding cardiac physiology.

  18. Venoms of South Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Genus: Hypnale cause muscarinic effects in BALB/c mice

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    A Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical, in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest the necrotic, haemorrhagic, pro-coagulant and nephrotoxic effects of South Asian Hump nosed pit vipers, reports on neurotoxic properties are limited to a single in-vitro study. Using BALB/c mice, for the first time, here we demonstrate the signs of envenoming suggestive of possible muscarinic effects of the venoms of all three Hypnale species. Further, we demonstrate that the muscarinic effects are occurred at lower venom doses by H. hypnale venom, compared to H. nepa and H. zara.

  19. Evaluation of the Stability of the Total Antioxidant Capacity, Polyphenol Contents, and Starch Hydrolase Inhibitory Activities of Kombucha Teas Using an In Vitro Model of Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindani I. Watawana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory activity of three different types of Kombucha beverages prepared by three pellicles with different microbial compositions. The fermentation process was carried out for 7 days and the assessments of antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities as well as tea phenolic compounds were carried out. These parameters were also evaluated after subjecting the final fermented samples to gastric and duodenal digestion in an in vitro digestion model. The pH had a statistically significant decrease during the period of fermentation. The total phenolics content and antioxidant activities had increased during the fermentation process as well as when subjected to digestion. The starch hydrolase inhibitory activities also increased in a similar manner during the different phases. The α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities showed statistically significant increases (P<0.05 as the fermentation progressed, while an increase was observed after being subjected to pancreatic and duodenal digestion as well. All three types of tea showed a higher α-amylase inhibitory activity than α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

  20. Biotransformation of isoimperatorin and imperatorin by Glomerella cingulata and beta-secretase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Shinsuke; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformation studies conducted on the furanocoumarins isoimperatorin (1) and imperatorin (3) have revealed that 1 was metabolized by Glomerella cingulata to give the corresponding reduced acid, 6,7-furano-5-prenyloxy hydrocoumaric acid (2), and 3 was transformed by G. cingulata to give the dealkylated metabolite, xanthotoxol (4) in high yields (83% and 81%), respectively. The structures of the new compound 2 have been established on the basis of spectral data. The metabolites 2 and 4 were tested for the beta-secretase (BACE1) inhibitory activity in vitro, and metabolite 2 slightly inhibited the beta-secretase activity with an IC(50) value of 185.6+/-6.8 microM. The metabolite 4 was less potent activity than compounds 1-3. In addition, methyl ester (2Me), methyl ether (2a) and methyl ester and ether (2aMe) of 2 were synthesized, and investigated for the ability to inhibit beta-secretase. Compound 2aMe exhibited the best beta-secretase inhibitory activity at the IC(50) value 16.2+/-1.2 microM and found to be the 2aMe showed competitive mode of inhibition against beta-secretase with K(i) value 11.3+/-2.8 microM. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  2. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca 2+ in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP 4 ), an IP 3 derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP 4 are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP 4 in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in [ 3 H]IP 4 and [ 3 H]IP 3 accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. [ 3 H]IP 4 accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP 3 and IP 4 hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP 4 and calcium homeostasis

  3. Hypotensive and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Eisenia fetida Extract in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the antihypertensive effects of an Eisenia fetida extract (EFE and its possible mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats. Methods. Sixteen-week-old SHR rats and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats were used in this study. Rats were, respectively, given EFE (EFE group, captopril (captopril group, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (normal control group and SHR group for 4 weeks. ACE inhibitory activity of EFE in vitro was determined. The systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were measured using a Rat Tail-Cuff Blood Pressure System. Levels of angiotensin II (Ang II, aldosterone (Ald, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1α in plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay, and serum nitric oxide (NO concentration was measured by Griess reagent systems. Results. EFE had marked ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50 = 2.5 mg/mL. After the 4-week drug management, SHR rats in EFE group and in captopril group had lower SBP and DBP, lower levels of Ang II and Ald, and higher levels of 6-keto-PGF1α and NO than the SHR rats in SHR group. Conclusion. These results indicate that EFE has hypotensive effects in SHR rats and its effects might be associated with its ACE inhibitory activity.

  4. Associations of Physical Activity, Sports Participation and Active Commuting on Mathematic Performance and Inhibitory Control in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Sidsel L; Tarp, Jakob; Huang, Tao; Gejl, Anne Kær; Andersen, Lars Bo; Froberg, Karsten; Bugge, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To examine objectively measured physical activity level, organized sports participation and active commuting to school in relation to mathematic performance and inhibitory control in adolescents. The design was cross-sectional. A convenient sample of 869 sixth and seventh grade students (12-14 years) was invited to participate in the study. A total of 568 students fulfilled the inclusion criteria and comprised the final sample for this study. Mathematic performance was assessed by a customized test and inhibitory control was assessed by a modified Eriksen flanker task. Physical activity was assessed with GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers presented in sex-specific quartiles of mean counts per minute and mean minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Active commuting and sports participation was self-reported. Mixed model regression was applied. Total physical activity level was stratified by bicycling status in order to bypass measurement error subject to the accelerometer. Non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute displayed a higher mathematic score, so did cyclists in the 2nd and 3rd quartile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity relative to the least active quartile. Non-cyclists in the 3rd quartile of counts per minute had an improved reaction time and cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity displayed an improved accuracy, whereas non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute showed an inferior accuracy relative to the least active quartile. Bicycling to school and organized sports participation were positively associated with mathematic performance. Sports participation and bicycling were positively associated with mathematic performance. Results regarding objectively measured physical activity were mixed. Although, no linear nor dose-response relationship was observed there was no indication of a higher activity level impairing the scholastic or cognitive performance.

  5. Associations of Physical Activity, Sports Participation and Active Commuting on Mathematic Performance and Inhibitory Control in Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidsel L Domazet

    Full Text Available To examine objectively measured physical activity level, organized sports participation and active commuting to school in relation to mathematic performance and inhibitory control in adolescents.The design was cross-sectional. A convenient sample of 869 sixth and seventh grade students (12-14 years was invited to participate in the study. A total of 568 students fulfilled the inclusion criteria and comprised the final sample for this study. Mathematic performance was assessed by a customized test and inhibitory control was assessed by a modified Eriksen flanker task. Physical activity was assessed with GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers presented in sex-specific quartiles of mean counts per minute and mean minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Active commuting and sports participation was self-reported. Mixed model regression was applied. Total physical activity level was stratified by bicycling status in order to bypass measurement error subject to the accelerometer.Non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute displayed a higher mathematic score, so did cyclists in the 2nd and 3rd quartile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity relative to the least active quartile. Non-cyclists in the 3rd quartile of counts per minute had an improved reaction time and cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity displayed an improved accuracy, whereas non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute showed an inferior accuracy relative to the least active quartile. Bicycling to school and organized sports participation were positively associated with mathematic performance.Sports participation and bicycling were positively associated with mathematic performance. Results regarding objectively measured physical activity were mixed. Although, no linear nor dose-response relationship was observed there was no indication of a higher activity level impairing the scholastic or cognitive

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Capparis spinosa Extract on Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Activity

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    Mostafa Selfayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose level caused due to deficiency of insulin secretion or insulin function. The inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes such as α-amylase can be an important strategy for decrease postprandial blood glucose level in patients with type II diabetes. Plants contains different chemical constituents with potential for inhibition of α-amylase and hence maybe used as therapeutic. Objectives The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the ethanolic extract of Capparis spinosa on pancreatic α-amylase activities to find out the relevance of the plant in controlling blood sugar. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, root and leaves of C. spinosa were tested for α-amylase inhibition. Different concentrations (1.56, 3.12, 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/mL of extracts were incubated with enzyme substrate solution and the spectrometric method used for measure enzyme activity. Also acarbose was used as the standard inhibitor. Results Both root and leaves extracts showed inhibition of α-amylase (root = 97.31% and leaves = 98.92%. The root and leaves extracts of C. spinosa exhibited appreciable α-amylase inhibitory activity with an IC50 values 5.93 mg/mL and 3.89 mg/mL respectively, when compared with acarbose (IC50 value 0.038 mg/mL. Conclusions This study supports that root and leaves extracts of C. spinosa exhibit considerable α-amylase inhibitory activities. These results could be useful for developing functional foods by combination of plant-based foods for treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Effects of reward and punishment on brain activations associated with inhibitory control in cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijten, Maartje; O'Connor, David A; Rossiter, Sarah; Franken, Ingmar H A; Hester, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Susceptibility to use of addictive substances may result, in part, from a greater preference for an immediate small reward relative to a larger delayed reward or relative insensitivity to punishment. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examined the neural basis of inhibiting an immediately rewarding stimulus to obtain a larger delayed reward in smokers. We also investigated whether punishment could modulate inhibitory control. The Monetary Incentive Go/NoGo (MI-Go/NoGo) task was administered that provided three types of reward outcomes contingent upon inhibitory control performance over rewarding stimuli: inhibition failure was either followed by no monetary reward (neutral condition), a small monetary reward with immediate feedback (reward condition) or immediate monetary punishment (punishment condition). In the reward and punishment conditions, successful inhibitory control resulted in larger delayed rewards. Community sample of smokers in the Melbourne (Australia) area. Nineteen smokers were compared with 17 demographically matched non-smoking controls. Accuracy, reaction times and brain activation associated with the MI-Go/NoGo task. Smokers showed hyperactivation in the right insula (P rewarding stimulus to obtain a larger delayed reward, and during inhibition of neutral stimuli. Group differences in brain activity were not significant in the punishment condition in the right insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, most probably as a result of increased activation in non-smoking controls. Compared with non-smokers, smokers showed increased neural activation when resisting immediately rewarding stimuli and may be less sensitive to punishment as a strategy to increase control over rewarding stimuli. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. College Binge Drinking Associated with Decreased Frontal Activation to Negative Emotional Distractors during Inhibitory Control

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    Julia E. Cohen-Gilbert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transition to college is associated with an increase in heavy episodic alcohol use, or binge drinking, during a time when the prefrontal cortex and prefrontal-limbic circuitry continue to mature. Traits associated with this immaturity, including impulsivity in emotional contexts, may contribute to risky and heavy episodic alcohol consumption. The current study used blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD multiband functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to assess brain activation during a task that required participants to ignore background images with positive, negative, or neutral emotional valence while performing an inhibitory control task (Go-NoGo. Subjects were 23 college freshmen (seven male, 18–20 years who engaged in a range of drinking behavior (past 3 months’ binge episodes range = 0–19, mean = 4.6, total drinks consumed range = 0–104, mean = 32.0. Brain activation on inhibitory trials (NoGo was contrasted between negative and neutral conditions and between positive and neutral conditions using non-parametric testing (5000 permutations and cluster-based thresholding (z = 2.3, p ≤ 0.05 corrected. Results showed that a higher recent incidence of binge drinking was significantly associated with decreased activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, brain regions strongly implicated in executive functioning, during negative relative to neutral inhibitory trials. No significant associations between binge drinking and brain activation were observed for positive relative to neutral images. While task performance was not significantly associated with binge drinking in this sample, subjects with heavier recent binge drinking showed decreased recruitment of executive control regions under negative versus neutral distractor conditions. These findings suggest that in young adults with heavier recent binge drinking, processing of negative emotional

  9. Preliminary phytochemical screening and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Philippine taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebosada, Richemae Grace R.; Librando, Ivy L.

    2017-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the anti-hyperglycemic property in terms of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the various parts (corm, leaf and petiole) of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9. Each of the plant parts were extracted with 95% ethanol and concentrated using a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. The crude extracts were screened for the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides and saponins using Thin Layer Chromatography. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the crude extracts (50 mg/L) were assayed spectrophotometrically using a microplate reader. The results of the phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins in the leaf part while flavonoids and saponins were detected in the petiole and only saponins were present in the corm. The assay showed that the percentage α-glucosidase inhibition of the 50 mg/L ethanolic crude extract of the corm, leaves and petiole of C. esculenta are 68.03, 71.64 and 71.39%, respectively. Statistical analysis shows significant differences in the α-glucosidase inhibition among the various plant parts. It can be concluded that the ethanolic crude extracts of the different parts of C. esculenta (L.) Schott var. PSB-VG #9 exhibited inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase and the presence of phytochemicals like alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins may have contributed greatly to the inhibitory activity of the plant extract and can be further subjected for isolation of the therapeutically active compounds with antidiabetes potency.

  10. Perirhinal Cortex Muscarinic Receptor Blockade Impairs Taste Recognition Memory Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Ranier; De la Cruz, Vanesa; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of perirhinal cortical cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission for taste recognition memory and learned taste aversion was assessed by microinfusions of muscarinic (scopolamine), NMDA (AP-5), and AMPA (NBQX) receptor antagonists. Infusions of scopolamine, but not AP5 or NBQX, prevented the consolidation of taste recognition memory using attenuation of neophobia as an index. In addition, learned taste aversion in both short- and long-term memory tests was exclusively impa...

  11. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  12. Secoiridoids from the stem barks of Fraxinus rhynchophylla with pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong Hoon; Shin, Eunjin; Liu, Qing; Kim, Seon Beom; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase digests dietary fats by hydrolysis, which is a key enzyme for lipid absorption. Therefore, reduction of fat absorption by the inhibition of pancreatic lipase is suggested to be a therapeutic strategy for obesity. From the EtOAc-soluble fraction of the stem barks of Fraxinus rhynchophylla (Oleaceae), four secoiridoids such as ligstroside (1), oleuropein (2), 2"-hydroxyoleuropein (3) and hydroxyframoside B (4) were isolated. The inhibitory activity of these compounds on pancreatic lipase was assessed using porcine pancreatic lipase as an in vitro assay system. Compound 4 showed the strongest inhibition on pancreatic lipase, which followed by compounds 1-3. In addition, compound 4 exerted inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase in a mixed mechanism of competitive and noncompetitive manner. Taken together, F. rhynchophylla and its constituents might be beneficial to obesity.

  13. Flavor Enhancer From Catfish (Clarias batrachus) Bekasam Powder and Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity in Various Dishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Yanesti N.; Murwani, Retno; Agustini, Tri W.

    2018-02-01

    Flavor enhancer is characterized by high glutamic acid content and it can be obtained from fermented food such as Bekasam. Fermented food had inhibitory effect on Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) activity which is advantageous for hypertension. However, such activity was not known to sustain in food system. The aim of this research was to study addition of flavour enhancer from Catfish Bekasam Powder (CBP) in various food systems and to determine the ACE inhibitory (ACEI) activity in the food system. Four food system consisted of carrot, champignon, and chicken meat dishes were boiled in water and added with CBP or MSG. Each food system was added with graded level of CBP (0%; 0.5%; 0.8%; 1.1%; and 1,4%) and for control monosodium glutamate (MSG) was used. ACEI activity in each food system and organoleptic test using multiple comparison differentiation on 15 semi-trained panellists were determined. The results showed that there were fluctuation of ACEI activity in the carrot, champignon, and chicken meat dishes (p=0.017; 0.043; and 0.032). The MSG containing dishes showed the lowest ACEI activity. Addition of graded level of CBP on carrot, champignon, and chicken meat dishes were directly proportional to glutamic acid content but inversely proportional to ACEI activity (pacid content but reduced ACE-inhibitory activity significantly (p<0.05). Comparing CBP to MSG addition in champignon dish revealed that increasing level of CBP increased the flavour preference of the panellists. On the contrary the higher the addition CBP in noodle and chicken meat dishes the worse were the flavour score (p<0.05). It can be concluded that the addition of CBP as flavour enhancer on various dishes can deliver better flavour and ACE-inhibitory activity than the addition of commercial MSG.

  14. Structure-activity relationship of the inhibitory effects of flavonoids on nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Jun; Daikonya, Akihiro; Ohkawara, Mitsuyoshi; Nemoto, Takashi; Noritake, Ryusuke; Takamiya, Tomoko; Kitanaka, Susumu; Iijima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-15

    We isolated flavonoids from herbal specimens from the Tibetan region (Sophora yunnanensis and Rhodiola sacra) that suppress nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ. The isolated flavonoids carry symmetric substitutions in the B ring (R 3' =R 5' ). We analyzed the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the inhibitory activity by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) using this series of flavonoids. Use of flavonoids with symmetrical substitutions in the B ring made it simpler to align molecules because it was not necessary to consider a huge number of combinations due to the B-ring conformation. The CoMFA model, whose cross-validated q 2 value was 0.705, suggested the existence of a hydroxy group at the 5-position, the choice of the A/C-ring scaffold (chromane or chromene) and electrostatic field around the B ring are important for NO inhibitory activity. Flavonoids synthesized based on the CoMFA model exhibited significant inhibitory potential against NO production, validating the predictive capability of the CoMFA model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of Amide and Ester Derivatives of Cinnamic Acid and Its Analogs: Evaluation of Their Free Radical Scavenging and Monoamine Oxidase and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Koichi; Toda, Kazuhiro; Saito, Takayuki; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    A series of cinnamic acid derivatives, amides (1-12) and esters (13-22), were synthesized, and structure-activity relationships for antioxidant activity, and monoamine oxidases (MAO) A and B, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities were analyzed. Among the synthesized compounds, compounds 1-10, 12-18, and rosmarinic acid (23), which contained catechol, o-methoxyphenol or 5-hydroxyindole moieties, showed potent 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity. Compounds 9-11, 15, 17-22 showed potent and selective MAO-B inhibitory activity. Compound 20 was the most potent inhibitor of MAO-B. Compounds 18 and 21 showed moderate BChE inhibitory activity. In addition, compound 18 showed potent antioxidant activity and MAO-B inhibitory activity. In a comparison of the cinnamic acid amides and esters, the amides exhibited more potent DPPH free radical scavenging activity, while the esters showed stronger inhibitory activities against MAO-B and BChE. These results suggested that cinnamic acid derivatives such as compound 18, p-coumaric acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl ester, and compound 20, p-coumaric acid phenethyl ester, may serve as lead compounds for the development of novel MAO-B inhibitors and candidate lead compounds for the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control.

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuda, Shohei; Prabowo, Diyan Febri; Takagi, Keiko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Mori, Mihoko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A) inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III) and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:24674936

  18. Role of protein glycosylation on the expression of muscarinic receptors of N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Chiang, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are glycoproteins. Experiments were conducted to determine whether active glycosylation of proteins in N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells could affect the expression of muscarinic receptors on the cell surface. The binding of radioactive N-methylscopolamine, a membrane impermeable ligand, to intact cells was used as a measure of mAChR. In the presence of the inhibitors of glycosylation, such as tunicamycin, monensin and amphomycin, N-linked glycosylation of proteins in the N4TG1 cells was inhibited, as measured by the incorporation of radioactive glucosamine or mannose in proteins. At the concentrations of tunicamycin and monensin used, the glycosylation of proteins after 3 hours were drastically reduced, but the number of mAChR in the cells was not altered. The apparent lack of effect within a short incubation period could be attributed to the presence of preformed oligosaccharide dolichol readily available for N-glycosylation. However, after 24 hours, tunicamycin (0.05 μg/ml) caused a decrease in the number of mAChR by 17% without having any effect on protein synthesis. Therefore, de novo glycosylation of proteins may be required for the expression of mAChR receptors in the N4TG1 neuroblastoma cell surface

  19. Do piperacillin/tazobactam and other antibiotics with inhibitory activity against Clostridium difficile reduce the risk for acquisition of C. difficile colonization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Jury, Lucy A; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Musuuza, Jackson S; Sethi, Ajay K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-04-18

    Systemic antibiotics vary widely in in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile. Some agents with activity against C. difficile (e.g., piperacillin/tazobactam) inhibit establishment of colonization in mice. We tested the hypothesis that piperacillin/tazobactam and other agents with activity against C. difficile achieve sufficient concentrations in the intestinal tract to inhibit colonization in patients. Point-prevalence culture surveys were conducted to compare the frequency of asymptomatic rectal carriage of toxigenic C. difficile among patients receiving piperacillin/tazobactam or other inhibitory antibiotics (e.g. ampicillin, linezolid, carbapenems) versus antibiotics lacking activity against C. difficile (e.g., cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin). For a subset of patients, in vitro inhibition of C. difficile (defined as a reduction in concentration after inoculation of vegetative C. difficile into fresh stool suspensions) was compared among antibiotic treatment groups. Of 250 patients, 32 (13 %) were asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile. In comparison to patients receiving non-inhibitory antibiotics or prior antibiotics within 90 days, patients currently receiving piperacillin/tazobactam were less likely to be asymptomatic carriers (1/36, 3 versus 7/36, 19 and 15/69, 22 %, respectively; P = 0.024) and more likely to have fecal suspensions with in vitro inhibitory activity against C. difficile (20/28, 71 versus 3/11, 27 and 4/26, 15 %; P = 0.03). Patients receiving other inhibitory antibiotics were not less likely to be asymptomatic carriers than those receiving non-inhibitory antibiotics. Our findings suggest that piperacillin/tazobactam achieves sufficient concentrations in the intestinal tract to inhibit C. difficile colonization during therapy.

  20. Curcumin and its demethoxy derivatives possess p300 HAT inhibitory activity and suppress hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Sunagawa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound, curcumin (CUR, possesses several pharmacological properties, including p300-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitory activity. In our previous study, we demonstrated that CUR could prevent the development of cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting p300-HAT activity. Other major curcuminoids isolated from Curcuma longa including demethoxycurcumin (DMC and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC are structural analogs of CUR. In present study, we first confirmed the effect of these three curcuminoid analogs on p300-HAT activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.Our results showed that DMC and BDMC inhibited p300-HAT activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy to almost the same extent as CUR. As the three compounds have structural differences in methoxy groups at the 3-position of their phenol rings, our results suggest that these methoxy groups are not involved in the inhibitory effects on p300-HAT activity and cardiac hypertrophy. These findings provide useful insights into the structure–activity relationship and biological activity of curcuminoids for p300-HAT activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Keywords: Curcumin, Demethoxycurcumin, Bisdemethoxycurcumin, p300, Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

  1. Ventricular, but not atrial, M2-muscarinic receptors increase in the canine pacing-overdrive model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M; Giles, A; Armour, J A; Cardinal, R

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing (six weeks) on canine atrial and ventricular muscarinic receptors. Dogs (n = 4) were fitted with a bipolar pacing electrode connected to a Medtronic pacemaker set at 240 stimuli/min. Pacing was maintained for six weeks. Tissue samples obtained from the left atrium and ventral wall of the left ventricle were frozen at -70 degrees C. Control tissue was obtained from normal dogs (n = 6) following anesthesia and thoracotomy. M2-muscarinic receptors were characterized and quantified in tissue micropunches using the hydrophilic ligand [3H] N-methyl-scopolamine (NMS). Cardiac tissue bound [3H] NMS with the specificity of an M2 subtype. Tachycardia-induced heart failure did not affect atrial muscarinic receptors but signify left ventricular myocytes (control 160.0 +/- 10.0 fmol/mg protein versus heart failure 245.0 +/- 25.0 fmol/mg protein; P failure was accompanied by an increase (+ 53%) in ventricular, but not atrial, M2 receptors compared with normal dogs.

  2. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Ja Choi

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel

  3. A Support Vector Machine Classification Model for Benzo[c]phenathridine Analogues with Topoisomerase-I Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Dao Tran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, a support vector machine model was performed on a series of 73 analogues to classify BCP derivatives according to TOP-I inhibitory activity. The best SVM model with total accuracy of 93% for training set was achieved using a set of 7 descriptors identified from a large set via a random forest algorithm. Overall accuracy of up to 87% and a Matthews coefficient correlation (MCC of 0.71 were obtained after this SVM classifier was validated internally by a test set of 15 compounds. For two external test sets, 89% and 80% BCP compounds, respectively, were correctly predicted. The results indicated that our SVM model could be used as the filter for designing new BCP compounds with higher TOP-I inhibitory activity.

  4. [Study on the inhibitory activity, in vitro, of baicalein and baicalin against skin fungi and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Hu, H; Huang, S; Chaumont, J P; Millet, J

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we concentrated in examining, in vitro, the antiseptic activity of the baicalein and baicalin upon the seventeen pathogenic skin fungal and sixteen skin bacterial strains, these two flavonic compounds were known principally as the biosubstances of a traditional Chinese medicinal plant: Scutellaria baicalensis. In agar media, the baicalein possessed potent specific activity against the pathogenic yeasts with MICs of 70-100 micrograms/ml; But in the same condition, no inhibitory effect was observed upon dermatophytes and filamentous imperfect fungi for baicalein, and upon all used strains for baicalin. According to the antibacterial test of baicalein, a high efficacy was achieved against certain causative specie of axillary and foot's odour such as Micrococcus sedentarius, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. hominis and C. xerosis with a MICs inferior to 250 micrograms/ml. The good inhibitory activity of baicalein could be linked to the group hydroxyl (-OH) in position seven of the molecule.

  5. Nanocapsular Dispersion of Cinnamaldehyde for Enhanced Inhibitory Activity against Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamaldehyde (CA is marginally soluble in water, making it challenging to evenly disperse it in foods, and resulting in lowered anti-A. flavus efficacy. In the present study, nano-dispersed CA (nano-CA was prepared to increase its aqueous solubility. Free and nano-dispersed CA were compared in terms of their inhibitory activity against fungal growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus both in Sabouraud Dextrose (SD culture and in peanut butter. Our results indicated that free CA inhibited the mycelia growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC value of 1.0 mM, but promoted the aflatoxin production at some concentrations lower than the MIC. Nano-CA had a lower MIC value of 0.8 mM against A. flavus, and also showed improved activity against aflatoxin production without the promotion at lower dose. The solidity of peanut butter had an adverse impact on the antifungal activity of free CA, whereas nano-dispersed CA showed more than 2-fold improved activity against the growth of A. flavus. Free CA still promoted AFB1 production at the concentration of 0.25 mM, whereas nano-CA showed more efficient inhibition of AFB1 production in the butter.

  6. Synthesis of N-Substituted Piperidine Salts as Potential Muscarinic Ligands for Alzheimer's Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulos, J.; Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Avila, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2013), s. 1363-1367 ISSN 0022-152X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : N-piperidine substituted salts * muscarinic receptor antagonists * selectivity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.873, year: 2013

  7. Associations of Physical Activity, Sports Participation and Active Commuting on Mathematic Performance and Inhibitory Control in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Gejl, Anne Kær; Froberg, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine objectively measured physical activity level, organized sports participation and active commuting to school in relation to mathematic performance and inhibitory control in adolescents. Methods The design was cross-sectional. A convenient sample of 869 sixth and seventh grade students (12–14 years) was invited to participate in the study. A total of 568 students fulfilled the inclusion criteria and comprised the final sample for this study. Mathematic performance was assessed by a customized test and inhibitory control was assessed by a modified Eriksen flanker task. Physical activity was assessed with GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers presented in sex-specific quartiles of mean counts per minute and mean minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Active commuting and sports participation was self-reported. Mixed model regression was applied. Total physical activity level was stratified by bicycling status in order to bypass measurement error subject to the accelerometer. Results Non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute displayed a higher mathematic score, so did cyclists in the 2nd and 3rd quartile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity relative to the least active quartile. Non-cyclists in the 3rd quartile of counts per minute had an improved reaction time and cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity displayed an improved accuracy, whereas non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute showed an inferior accuracy relative to the least active quartile. Bicycling to school and organized sports participation were positively associated with mathematic performance. Conclusions Sports participation and bicycling were positively associated with mathematic performance. Results regarding objectively measured physical activity were mixed. Although, no linear nor dose-response relationship was observed there was no indication of a higher activity level impairing the

  8. Hydrostatic pressure and muscarinic receptors are involved in the release of inflammatory cytokines in human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhou; Xin, Wei; Qiang, Liu; Xiang, Cai; Bang-Hua, Liao; Jin, Yang; De-Yi, Luo; Hong, Li; Kun-Jie, Wang

    2017-06-01

    Abnormal intravesical pressure results in a series of pathological changes. We investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure and muscarinic receptors on the release of inflammatory cytokines in rat and human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). Animal model of bladder outlet obstruction was induced by urethra ligation. HBSMCs were subjected to elevated hydrostatic pressure and/or acetylcholine (Ach). Macrophage infiltration in the bladder wall was determined by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of inflammatory genes was measured by RT-PCR, ELISA and immunofluorescence. In obstructed bladder, inflammatory genes and macrophage infiltration were remarkably induced. When HBSMCs were subjected to 200-300 cm H 2 O pressure for 2-24 h in vitro, the expressions of IL-6 and RANTES were significantly increased. Hydrostatic pressure promoted the protein levels of phospho-NFκB p65 and phospho-ERK1/2 as well as muscarinic receptors. Moreover, NFκB or ERK1/2 inhibitors suppressed pressure-induced inflammatory genes mRNA. When cells were treated with 1 μM acetylcholine for 6 h, a significant increase in IL-6 mRNA expression was detected. Acetylcholine also enhanced pressure-induced phospho-NFκB p65 and IL-6 protein expression. Additionally, pressure-induced IL-6 was partially suppressed by muscarinic receptors antagonists. Hydrostatic pressure and muscarinic receptors were involved in the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in HBSMCs, indicating a pro-inflammatory effect of the two factors in the pathological process of BOO. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity in protein hydrolysates from normal and anthracnose disease-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Álvarez, Alan Javier; Carrasco-Castilla, Janet; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque-Peña, Javier; Jacinto-Hernández, Carmen; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian

    2013-03-15

    Bean seeds are an inexpensive source of protein. Anthracnose disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum results in serious losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crops worldwide, affecting any above-ground plant part, and protein dysfunction, inducing the synthesis of proteins that allow plants to improve their stress tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of beans damaged by anthracnose disease as a source of peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-inhibitory activity. Protein concentrates from beans spoiled by anthracnose disease and from regular beans as controls were prepared by alkaline extraction and precipitation at isolelectric pH and hydrolysed using Alcalase 2.4 L. The hydrolysates from spoiled beans had ACE-I-inhibitory activity (IC(50) 0.0191 mg protein mL(-1)) and were very similar to those from control beans in terms of ACE-I inhibition, peptide electrophoretic profile and kinetics of hydrolysis. Thus preparation of hydrolysates using beans affected by anthracnose disease would allow for revalorisation of this otherwise wasted product. The present results suggest the use of spoiled bean seeds, e.g. anthracnose-damaged beans, as an alternative for the isolation of ACE-I-inhibitory peptides to be further introduced as active ingredients in functional foods. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jan 16 (2017), č. článku 40381. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * N-methylscopolamine * ligand binding * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  11. Inhibitory Activity of Artemisia spicigera Essential Oil Against Fungal Species Isolated From Minced Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghajarbeygi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Meat is an important source of several nutrients. The capability top of fresh meat to rot, causing the group of studies food science, biological and chemical stability meat consideration. Objectives This study was conducted to examine the inhibitory effect of Artemisias spicigera essential oil against fungal species isolated from minced meat. Materials and Methods Two types of media dichloran 18% glycerol (DG18 agar and dichloran rosebengal chloramphenicol (DRBC agar were selected for the mycological analysis of the minced meat samples. To evaluate the antifungal activity of essential oils, the microdilution broth method based on the CLSI (M27A guideline was used. Results Artemisias spicigera essential oil has an inhibitory effect on the growth of fungi found in samples of minced meat. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most common genera on both medium types. Average Minimum Inhibitory Concentration 50 = 1.88 µL/mL and MIC90 = 2 µL/mL were reported. The genus of Mucor with MIC = 1.0 µL/mL was the most sensitive and Aspergilus versicolor was the most resistant species to the essential oil with MIC = 4 µL/mL. Conclusions The results of the present study show a favorable inhibitory effect of Artemisias spicigera essential oil on fungal growth, especially Aspergillus species. According to the results, antifungal components of Artemisias spicigera in different forms are used to prevent fungal pollution.

  12. Synergistic Action of Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Adenosine Receptors in Developmental Axonal Competition at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria Angel; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep Maria

    2016-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the initial overproduction of synapses, which promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity. We used quantitative immunohistochemistry to investigate, in the postnatal day 7 (P7) to P9 neuromuscular junctions, the involvement of muscarinic receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors and the M1, M2, and M4 subtypes) and adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A subtypes) in the control of axonal elimination after the mouse levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to selective antagonists in vivo. In a previous study we analyzed the role of each of the individual receptors. Here we investigate the additive or occlusive effects of their inhibitors and thus the existence of synergistic activity between the receptors. The main results show that the A2A, M1, M4, and A1 receptors (in this order of ability) delayed axonal elimination at P7. M4 produces some occlusion of the M1 pathway and some addition to the A1 pathway, which suggests that they cooperate. M2 receptors may modulate (by allowing a permissive action) the other receptors, mainly M4 and A1. The continued action of these receptors (now including M2 but not M4) finally promotes axonal loss at P9. All 4 receptors (M2, M1, A1, and A2A, in this order of ability) are necessary. The M4 receptor (which in itself does not affect axon loss) seems to modulate the other receptors. We found a synergistic action between the M1, A1, and A2A receptors, which show an additive effect, whereas the potent M2 effect is largely independent of the other receptors (though can be modulated by M4). At P9, there is a full mutual dependence between the A1 and A2A receptors in regulating axon loss. In summary, postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that involves the cooperation of several muscarinic and adenosine receptor subtypes.

  13. In vitro inhibitory activity of essential oil vapors against Ascosphaera apis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Pavel; Smid, Jakub; Flesar, Jaroslav; Havlik, Jaroslav; Titera, Dalibor; Rada, Vojtech; Drabek, Ondrej; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2012-02-01

    This work evaluates the in vitro inhibitory activity of 70 essential oils (EOs) in the vapor phase for the control of Chalkbrood disease caused by Ascosphaera apis Maassen ex Claussen (Olive et Spiltoir). Two wild strains isolated from infected honey bee colonies together with one standard collection strain were tested by the microatmosphere method. From 70 EOs, 39 exhibited an antifungal effect against A. apis standard and wild strains. The greatest antifungal action was observed for EO vapors from Armoracia rusticana, followed by Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon flexosus, Origanum vulgare and Allium sativum. An investigation of chemical composition by GC-MS revealed, that the most active EOs contained allyl isothiocyanate, citral, carvacrol and diallyl sulfides as the main constituents. The chemical composition plays a key role, as activities of different EOs from the same botanical species were different according to their composition.

  14. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  15. Identification of novel 2-benzoxazolinone derivatives with specific inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Elia; Mori, Mattia; Kovalenko, Lesia; Giannini, Alessia; Sosic, Alice; Saladini, Francesco; Fabris, Dan; Mély, Yves; Gatto, Barbara; Botta, Maurizio

    2018-02-10

    In this report, we present a new benzoxazole derivative endowed with inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC). NC is a 55-residue basic protein with nucleic acid chaperone properties, which has emerged as a novel and potential pharmacological target against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel NC-inhibitor chemotypes, we performed virtual screening and in vitro biological evaluation of a large library of chemical entities. We found that compounds sharing a benzoxazolinone moiety displayed putative inhibitory properties, which we further investigated by considering a series of chemical analogues. This approach provided valuable information on the structure-activity relationships of these compounds and, in the process, demonstrated that their anti-NC activity could be finely tuned by the addition of specific substituents to the initial benzoxazolinone scaffold. This study represents the starting point for the possible development of a new class of antiretroviral agents targeting the HIV-1 NC protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronal M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are essential for somatotroph proliferation and normal somatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Dinesh; Jeon, Jongrye; Starost, Matthew F; Han, Sung-Jun; Hamdan, Fadi F; Cui, Yinghong; Parlow, Albert F; Gavrilova, Oksana; Szalayova, Ildiko; Mezey, Eva; Wess, Jürgen

    2009-04-14

    The molecular pathways that promote the proliferation and maintenance of pituitary somatotrophs and other cell types of the anterior pituitary gland are not well understood at present. However, such knowledge is likely to lead to the development of novel drugs useful for the treatment of various human growth disorders. Although muscarinic cholinergic pathways have been implicated in regulating somatotroph function, the physiological relevance of this effect and the localization and nature of the receptor subtypes involved in this activity remain unclear. We report the surprising observation that mutant mice that selectively lack the M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype in the brain (neurons and glial cells; Br-M3-KO mice) showed a dwarf phenotype associated with a pronounced hypoplasia of the anterior pituitary gland and a marked decrease in pituitary and serum growth hormone (GH) and prolactin. Remarkably, treatment of Br-M3-KO mice with CJC-1295, a synthetic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) analog, rescued the growth deficit displayed by Br-M3-KO mice by restoring normal pituitary size and normal serum GH and IGF-1 levels. These findings, together with results from M(3) receptor/GHRH colocalization studies and hypothalamic hormone measurements, support a model in which central (hypothalamic) M(3) receptors are required for the proper function of hypothalamic GHRH neurons. Our data reveal an unexpected and critical role for central M(3) receptors in regulating longitudinal growth by promoting the proliferation of pituitary somatotroph cells.

  17. Plasticity of cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemke, Robert C

    2015-07-08

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior.

  18. Angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory activity and antihypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats of cobia (Rachycentron canadum) head papain hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Jiang, Yuchuan; Hong, Pengzhi; Cao, Wenhong

    2013-06-01

    Cobia head protein hydrolysate (CHPH) with angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was prepared with papain. The 3 kDa ultrafiltration filtrate CHPH-IV of the hydrolysate exerted a potent ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 being 0.24 mg/mL. The fractions with molecular weight located between 1749 Da and 173 Da represented up 66.96% of CHPH-IV, and those between 494 Da and 173 Da represented up 31.37% of CHPH-IV. It was found that the ACE inhibitory activity of CHPH-IV was intensified from IC50 0.24 mg/mL to 0.17 mg/mL after incubation with gastrointestinal proteases. The CHPH-IV significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at dose of 150 mg/kg, 600 mg/kg and 1200 mg/kg body weight. These results suggested that CHPH-IV from cobia head protein hydrolysate by papain could serve as a source of peptides with antihypertensive activity in functional food industry.

  19. [Study on the seasonal variations of the active components in Acer truncatum leaves and the inhibitory ability on fatty acid synthase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuan-Jie; Ye, Yan-Bin; Gao, Wen; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Ying-Xia

    2010-11-01

    To study the dynamic variations of the contents of total polyphenols, flvonoids and chlorogenic acid from Acer truncatum leaves in different months, and their inhibitory activities on fatty acid synthase. Spectrophotometry was used to determine the contents of total polyphenols, flavonoids and chlorogenic acid in extracts and the extracts' inhibitory effects were also investigated. All Leaves picked from May to November have inhibitory effect. But the contents of polyphenols in leaves of July appeared to be higher than other months', and consequently exhibited stronger inhibition against FAS. A positive correlation between the content of polyphenols in leaves extract and the inhibitory efficacy on FAS could be established.

  20. Analogues of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III) with elastase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rózycki, J; Kupryszewski, G; Rolka, K; Ragnarsson, U; Zbyryt, T; Krokoszyńska, I; Wilusz, T

    1994-04-01

    Three new CMTI-III analogues containing the Val residue in the reactive site (position 5) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. The analogues displayed an elastase inhibitory activity. It is shown that the removal of the N-terminal Arg residue and the introduction of the Gly-Pro-Gln tripeptide in the region 23-25 decreases the antielastase activity by two orders of magnitude. The removal of the disulfide bridge in positions 16-28 and the substitution of Ala for Cys16 and Gly for Cys28 decreases the activity (measured as Ka with HLE) by five orders of magnitude as compared with [Val5]CMTI-III.

  1. Humoral Na+-K+ pump inhibitory activity in essential hypertension and in normotensive subjects after acute volume expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamnani, M.B.; Burris, J.F.; Jemionek, J.F.; Huot, S.J.; Price, M.; Freis, E.D.; Haddy, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma from black male patients with essential hypertension was bioassayed for vascular Na+-K+ pump inhibitory activity. Halves of the same rat tail artery were incubated for two hours in boiled plasma supernates from a hypertensive patient and a paired age-, sex-, and race-matched normotensive subject and then ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb uptake was measured. Ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb uptake by their leukocytes was also measured. Eighteen pairs of subjects were studied. The uptakes were not significantly different in the hypertensive patients and control subjects. However, when we selected from the eighteen hypertensive patients, nine with low plasma renin activity on the day of the study, uptakes were reduced in the hypertensive patients relative to the paired control subjects. We also assayed plasma supernates from normotensive black and white male subjects before and after acute volume expansion (2.5 L saline IV + 1.5 L distilled water orally over a three-hour period) and from paired normotensive subjects before and after sham volume expansion and obtained a positive bioassay in the expanded subjects both on intraindividual and interindividual comparisons. These studies demonstrate increased vascular Na+-K+ pump inhibitory activity in the plasma of black male patients with low renin essential hypertension and in the plasma of normotensive subjects after acute volume expansion. The findings suggest that the inhibitory activity in the hypertensive subjects' plasma is related to volume expansion, relative or absolute

  2. Altered trafficking and unfolded protein response induction as a result of M3 muscarinic receptor impaired N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Garriga, Pere

    2011-12-01

    The human M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is present in both the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. We suggested a possible N-glycosylation map for the M(3) muscarinic receptor expressed in COS-7 cells. Here, we examined the role that N-linked glycans play in the folding and in the cell surface trafficking of this receptor. The five potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites in the muscarinic receptor were mutated and transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The elimination of N-glycan attachment sites did not affect the cellular expression levels of the receptor. However, proper receptor localization to the plasma membrane was affected as suggested by reduced [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine binding. Confocal microscopy confirmed this observation and showed that the nonglycosylated receptor was primarily localized in the intracellular compartments. The mutant variant showed an increase in phosphorylation of the α-subunit of eukaryote initiation factor 2, and other well-known endoplasmic reticulum stress markers of the unfolded protein response pathway, which further supports the proposal of the improper intracellular accumulation of the nonglycosylated receptor. The receptor devoid of glycans showed more susceptibility to events that culminate in apoptosis reducing cell viability. Our findings suggest up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and cleavage of caspase-3 effectors. Collectively, our data provide experimental evidence of the critical role that N-glycan chains play in determining muscarinic receptor distribution, localization, as well as cell integrity. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  3. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 15 (2009), s. 1-20 ISSN 1471-2210 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * rapacuronium Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Potentiation of the gastric antisecretory activity of histamine H2-receptor antagonists by clebopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A G; Massingham, R; Roberts, D J

    1988-05-01

    The substituted benzamide, clebopride, at doses (0.03-3 mg kg-1 i.p.) that were without effect per se on the secretion of gastric acid in pylorus ligated (Shay) rats, potentiated the antisecretory effects of the histamine H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine in this model but not those of the muscarine receptor antagonist pirenzepine nor those of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. By contrast, clebopride was without influence on the inhibitory effects of cimetidine on pentagastrin-induced secretion in perfused stomach (Ghosh and Schild) preparations in anaesthetized rats. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the previously described potentiating effects of clebopride on the anti-ulcer activity of cimetidine in various experimental models, and the potential beneficial effects of such combined therapy in the clinic.

  5. Production of feline leukemia inhibitory factor with biological activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegi, R; Hatoya, S; Tsujimoto, Y; Takenaka, S; Nishimura, T; Wijewardana, V; Sugiura, K; Takahashi, M; Kawate, N; Tamada, H; Inaba, T

    2016-07-15

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine which is essential for oocyte and embryo development, embryonic stem cell, and induced pluripotent stem cell maintenance. Leukemia inhibitory factor improves the maturation of oocytes in the human and the mouse. However, feline LIF (fLIF) cloning and effects on oocytes during IVM have not been reported. Thus, we cloned complete cDNA of fLIF and examined its biological activity and effects on oocytes during IVM in the domestic cat. The aminoacid sequence of fLIF revealed a homology of 81% or 92% with that of mouse or human. The fLIF produced by pCold TF DNA in Escherichia coli was readily soluble and after purification showed bioactivity in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse embryonic stem cells and enhancing the proliferation of human erythrocyte leukemia cells. Furthermore, 10- and 100-ng/mL fLIF induced cumulus expansion with or without FSH and EGF (P Feline LIF will further improve reproduction and stem cell research in the feline family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cracking the Betel Nut: Cholinergic Activity of Areca Alkaloids and Related Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horenstein, Nicole A; Quadri, Marta; Stokes, Clare; Shoaib, Mohammed; Papke, Roger L

    2017-10-03

    The use of betel quid is the most understudied major addiction in the world. The neuropsychological activity of betel quid has been attributed to alkaloids of Areca catechu. With the goal of developing novel addiction treatments, we evaluate the muscarinic and nicotinic activity of the four major Areca alkaloids: arecoline, arecaidine, guvacoline, and guvacine and four structurally related compounds. Acetylcholine receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied with two-electrode voltage clamp. Both arecoline- and guvacoline-activated muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR), while only arecoline produced significant activation of nicotinic AChR (nAChR). We characterized four additional arecoline-related compounds, seeking an analog that would retain selective activity for a α4* nAChR, with diminished effects on mAChR and not be a desensitizer of α7 nAChR. We show that this profile is largely met by isoarecolone. Three additional arecoline analogs were characterized. While the quaternary dimethyl analog had a broad range of activities, including activation of mAChR and muscle-type nAChR, the methyl analog only activated a range of α4* nAChR, albeit with low potency. The ethyl analog had no detectable cholinergic activity. Evidence indicates that α4* nAChR are at the root of nicotine addiction, and this may also be the case for betel addiction. Our characterization of isoarecolone and 1-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) ethanone as truly selective α4*nAChR selective partial agonists with low muscarinic activity may point toward a promising new direction for the development of drugs to treat both nicotine and betel addiction. Nearly 600 million people use Areca nut, often with tobacco. Two of the Areca alkaloids are muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, and one, arecoline, is a partial agonist for the α4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) associated with tobacco addiction. The profile of arecoline activity suggested its potential to be used as a

  7. Chemical Composition and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Vietnamese Citrus Peels Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hai Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inhibition of α-glucosidase is an important factor to control postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Citrus essential oils (CEO are among the most widely used essential oils, and some of them exhibited promising antidiabetic effect. However, the α-glucosidase inhibition of CEO has not been investigated so far. The present work aims to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibition of essential oils from six Vietnamese Citrus peels. Methods. The chemical composition of essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from six Citrus peels was analyzed by GC-MS. All essential oils were tested for their inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase using p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Results. In Buddha’s hand and lime peels, the major components were limonene (59.0–61.31% and γ-terpinene (13.98–23.84% while limonene (90.95–95.74% was most abundant in pomelo, orange, tangerine, and calamondin peels. Among the essential oils, the Buddha’s hand oil showed the most significant α-glucosidase inhibitory effect with the IC50 value of 412.2 μg/mL. The combination of the Buddha’s hand essential oil and the antidiabetic drug acarbose increased the inhibitory effect. Conclusions. The results suggested the potential use of Buddha’s hand essential oil as an alternative in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Myostatin inhibitory region of fish (Paralichthys olivaceus) myostatin-1 propeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Beum; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jin, Deuk-Hee; Jin, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and its activity is suppressed by MSTN propeptide (MSTNpro), the N-terminal part of MSTN precursor cleaved during post-translational MSTN processing. The current study examined which region of flatfish (Paralichthys olivaceus) MSTN-1 propeptide (MSTN1pro) is critical for MSTN inhibition. Six different truncated forms of MSTN1pro containing N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) as a fusion partner were expressed in Escherichia coli, and partially purified by an affinity chromatography for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. Peptides covering different regions of flatfish MSTN1pro were also synthesized for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-100 had the same MSTN-inhibitory potency as the full sequence flatfish MSTN1pro (residues 23-265), indicating that the region of flatfish MSTN1pro consisting of residues 45-100 is sufficient to maintain the full MSTN-inhibitory capacity. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-80 (Pro45-80) also showed MSTN-inhibitory activity with a lower potency, and the Pro45-80 demonstrated its MSTN binding capacity in a pull-down assay, indicating that the MSTN-inhibitory capacity of Pro45-80 is due to its binding to MSTN. Flatfish MSTN1pro synthetic peptides covering residues 45-65, 45-70, and 45-80 demonstrated MSTN-inhibitory activities, but not the synthetic peptide covering residues 45-54, indicating that residues 45-65 of flatfish MSTN1pro are essential for MSTN inhibition. In conclusion, current study show that like the mammalian MSTNpro, the MSTN-inhibitory region of flatfish MSTN1pro resides near its N-terminus, and imply that smaller sizes of MSTNpro can be effectively used in various applications designed for MSTN inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Four new compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia and their diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Li, Ban-Ban; Zhang, Le; Li, Hao-Ze; Meng, Xiao; Jiang, Yi-Yu; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Cui, Long

    2018-05-14

    A new bakuchiol compound Δ 11 -12-hydroxy-12-dimethyl bakuchiol (1), a new flavanone compound 2(S)-6-methoxy-7- hydroxymethylene-4'-hydroxyl-flavanone (8), and two new isoflavanone compounds 4',7-dihydroxy-3'-(6"β-hydroxy-3″,7″-dimethyl-,2″,7″-dibutenyl)-geranylisoflavone (9) and 4',7-dihydroxy-3'-(7″-hydroxy-7″-methyl-2″,5″-dibutenyl)-geranylisoflavone (10) together with eight known compounds (2-7, 11, 12) were isolated from the P. corylifolia. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and physico-chemical analyses. All the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against DGAT1/2. Among them, compounds 3, 9 and 10 were found to exhibit selective inhibitory activity on DGAT1 with IC 50 values ranging from 93.7 ± 1.3 to 96.2 ± 1.1 μM. Compound 1 showed inhibition activity on DGAT1 with IC 50 values 73.4 ± 1.3 μM and inhibition of DGAT2 with IC 50 value 121.1 ± 1.3 μM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tyrosinase inhibitory effects and antioxidative activities of saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia nutshell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhang

    Full Text Available Certain saponins are bioactive compounds with anticancer, antivirus and antioxidant activities. This paper discussed inhibitory effects of saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia on tyrosinase, through the research of the rate of tyrosinase catalyzed L-DOPA oxidation. The inhibition rate of tyrosinase activity presented non-linear changes with the saponins concentration. The rate reached 52.0% when the saponins concentration was 0.96 mg/ml. Antioxidant activities of saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia were evaluated by using hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging assays. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of the saponins were 15.5-68.7%, respectively at the concentration of 0.18-2.52 mg/ml. The superoxide radical scavenging activity reduced from 96.6% to 7.05% with the time increasing at the concentration of 1.44 mg/ml. All the above antioxidant evaluation indicated that saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia exhibited good antioxidant activity in a concentration- dependent manner.

  11. Complete unconscious control: Using (in)action primes to demonstrate completely unconscious activation of inhibitory control mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Justin; Albarracin, Dolores

    2018-01-01

    Although robust evidence indicates that action initiation can occur unconsciously and unintentionally, the literature on action inhibition suggests that inhibition requires both conscious thought and intentionality. In prior research demonstrating automatic inhibition in response to unconsciously processed stimuli, the unconscious stimuli had previously been consciously associated with an inhibitory response within the context of the experiment, and participants had consciously formed a goal to activate inhibition processes when presented with the stimuli (because task instructions required participants to engage in inhibition when the stimuli occurred). Therefore, prior work suggests that some amount of conscious thought and intentionality are required for inhibitory control. In the present research, we recorded event-related potentials during two go/no-go experiments in which participants were subliminally primed with general action/inaction concepts that had never been consciously associated with task-specific responses. We provide the first demonstration that inhibitory control processes can be modulated completely unconsciously and unintentionally. PMID:23747649

  12. Effects of agonist efficacy on desensitization of phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, J.; Wang, S.Z.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor agonist-induced desensitization of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and loss of receptors were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the m1 and m3 muscarinic receptor genes. Long-term exposure to the full agonist carbamylcholine (CBC) resulted in a time-dependent attenuation of the maximal PI response and a decrease in agonist potency. This desensitization was accompanied by a parallel loss of maximal ligand binding without an alteration of the binding affinity. The time course of both receptor desensitization and down-regulation was similar in m1 and m3 CHO cells. The PI response to the partial agonist McN-A-343 (McN) in m1 cells was more sensitive to desensitization by CBC than the response to the latter agonist, and this desensitization was faster than receptor down-regulation. Desensitization of the PI response to McN was reflected as a decrease in the maximal response without a marked change in potency. McN induced slow desensitization of the PI response to CBC but a much faster desensitization of its own response. Our data provide evidence that although muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization of PI hydrolysis in CHO cells is due mainly to loss of receptors, there are other important factors which play a role in this process, e.g., receptor-effector uncoupling. The relative contribution of these different mechanisms depends on the efficacy of the agonists used for the receptor desensitization and activation steps

  13. α-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of selected Malaysian plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzatil Awanis Mohd Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a common metabolic disease indicated by unusually high plasma glucose level that can lead to major complications such as diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular diseases. One of the effective therapeutic managements of the disease is to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia through inhibition of α-glucosidase, a carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme to retard overall glucose absorption. In recent years, a plenty of research works have been conducted looking for novel and effective α-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs from natural sources as alternatives for the synthetic AGI due to their unpleasant side effects. Plants and herbs are rich with secondary metabolites that have massive pharmaceutical potential. Besides, studies showed that phytochemicals such as flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, anthocyanins, glycosides, and phenolic compounds possess significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase enzyme. Malaysia is a tropical country that is rich with medicinal herbs. In this review, we focus on eight Malaysian plants with the potential as AGI to develop a potential functional food or lead compounds against diabetes.

  14. α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity of Selected Malaysian Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Bukhari, Dzatil Awanis; Siddiqui, Mohammad Jamshed; Shamsudin, Siti Hadijah; Rahman, Md Mukhlesur; So'ad, Siti Zaiton Mat

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disease indicated by unusually high plasma glucose level that can lead to major complications such as diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular diseases. One of the effective therapeutic managements of the disease is to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia through inhibition of α-glucosidase, a carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme to retard overall glucose absorption. In recent years, a plenty of research works have been conducted looking for novel and effective α-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) from natural sources as alternatives for the synthetic AGI due to their unpleasant side effects. Plants and herbs are rich with secondary metabolites that have massive pharmaceutical potential. Besides, studies showed that phytochemicals such as flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, anthocyanins, glycosides, and phenolic compounds possess significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase enzyme. Malaysia is a tropical country that is rich with medicinal herbs. In this review, we focus on eight Malaysian plants with the potential as AGI to develop a potential functional food or lead compounds against diabetes.

  15. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1–5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus...... musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...

  16. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of

  17. Preliminary pharmacological studies on Eugenia uniflora leaves: xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Theoduloz, C; Franco, L; Ferro, E; de Arias, A R

    1987-11-01

    Eugenia uniflora is widely used in Paraguayan folk medicine. A hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves showed some central nervous system activity in hippocratic screening when given intraperitoneally, but little to no acute or subacute toxicity in doses up to 4200 mg/kg orally in BALB c mice. The LD50 of the extract was 220 mg/kg i.p. in mice. A decoction or infusion of the leaves is recommended for treating gout by native herbalists. The known flavonoids quercitrin, quercetin, myricitrin and myricetin were found to be responsible for the xanthine oxidase inhibitory action of the plant extract.

  18. Endosulfan and cholinergic (muscarinic) transmission: effect on electroencephalograms and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in pigeon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.; Agrawal, A.K.; Gopal, K.; Sur, R.N.; Seth, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    Single exposure of endosulfan (5 mg/kg) to pigeons (Columbia livia) caused neuronal hyperexcitability as evidence by spike discharges of 200-500 μV in the electroencephalograms (EEG) from the telencephalon and hyperstriatum, but there was not effect on the ectostriatal area. Cholinergic (muscarinic) receptor binding study using [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]QNB) as a specific ligand indicated that a single exposure to 5 mg/kg of endosulfan caused a significant increase in [ 3 H]QNB binding to the striatal membrane. Behavior study further indicated that a single dose of 200 μg/kg of oxotremorine produced a significant induction in the tremor in endosulfan-pretreated pigeons. The results of this behavioral and biochemical study indicate the involvement of a cholinergic (muscarinic) transmitter system in endosulfan-induced neurotoxicity

  19. Hypocholesterolemic Effect and In Vitro Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activity of an Opuntia ficus-indica Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Fernandez-Flores, Ofelia; Gutierrez-Mercado, Yanet; Carmona-de la Luz, Joel; Sandoval-Salas, Fabiola; Mendez-Carreto, Carlos; Allen, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol control is fundamental for prevention of cardiovascular disorders. In this work, the hypocholesterolemic activity of an aqueous Opuntia ficus-indica extract (AOE) was tested in triton-induced mice. The inhibitory activity on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated in vitro by the same extract. Furthermore, polyphenol content of the extract was evaluated. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in three groups of mice by intraperitoneal administration of Triton WR-1339. After induction of hypercholesterolemia, the groups were treated with an AOE (500 mg/kg) and saline solution and the positive control group with orlistat, respectively. Cholesterol levels were measured 24 h later in peripheral blood. The levels of blood cholesterol after administration of AOE significantly decreased compared to negative control. The inhibitory activity of AOE on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated at concentrations from 60 to 1000 μg/mL. The AOE inhibited the pancreatic lipase with an IC50 = 588.5 μg/mL. The AOE had a high content of polyphenolic compounds. These results show that AOE is able to prevent hypercholesterolemia by pancreatic lipase inhibition, in part due to its polyphenolic compounds.

  20. Hypocholesterolemic Effect and In Vitro Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activity of an Opuntia ficus-indica Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol control is fundamental for prevention of cardiovascular disorders. In this work, the hypocholesterolemic activity of an aqueous Opuntia ficus-indica extract (AOE was tested in triton-induced mice. The inhibitory activity on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated in vitro by the same extract. Furthermore, polyphenol content of the extract was evaluated. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in three groups of mice by intraperitoneal administration of Triton WR-1339. After induction of hypercholesterolemia, the groups were treated with an AOE (500 mg/kg and saline solution and the positive control group with orlistat, respectively. Cholesterol levels were measured 24 h later in peripheral blood. The levels of blood cholesterol after administration of AOE significantly decreased compared to negative control. The inhibitory activity of AOE on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated at concentrations from 60 to 1000 μg/mL. The AOE inhibited the pancreatic lipase with an IC50 = 588.5 μg/mL. The AOE had a high content of polyphenolic compounds. These results show that AOE is able to prevent hypercholesterolemia by pancreatic lipase inhibition, in part due to its polyphenolic compounds.

  1. Chemical Constituents of Malaysian U. cordata var. ferruginea and Their in Vitro α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hakimah Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Continuing our interest in the Uncaria genus, the phytochemistry and the in-vitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Malaysian Uncaria cordata var. ferruginea were investigated. The phytochemical study of this plant, which employed various chromatographic techniques including recycling preparative HPLC, led to the isolation of ten compounds with diverse structures comprising three phenolic acids, two coumarins, three flavonoids, a terpene and an iridoid glycoside. These constituents were identified as 2-hydroxybenzoic acid or salicylic acid (1, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3, scopoletin or 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-coumarin (4, 3,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin (5, quercetin (6, kaempferol (7, taxifolin (8, loganin (9 and β-sitosterol (10. Structure elucidation of the compounds was accomplished with the aid of 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectral data and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS. In the α-glucosidase inhibitory assay, the crude methanolic extract of the stems of the plant and its acetone fraction exhibited strong α-glucosidase inhibition activity of 87.7% and 89.2%, respectively, while its DCM fraction exhibited only moderate inhibition (75.3% at a concentration of 1 mg/mL. The IC50 values of both fractions were found to be significantly lower than the standard acarbose suggesting the presence of potential α-glucosidase inhibitors. Selected compounds isolated from the active fractions were then subjected to α-glucosidase assay in which 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and quercetin showed strong inhibitory effects against the enzyme with IC50 values of 549 and 556 μg/mL compared to acarbose (IC50 580 μg/mL while loganin and scopoletin only showed weak α-glucosidase inhibition of 44.9% and 34.5%, respectively. This is the first report of the isolation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and loganin from the genus

  2. Chemical Constituents of Muehlenbeckia tamnifolia (Kunth) Meisn (Polygonaceae) and Its In Vitro α-Amilase and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Naranjo, María; Suárez, Alirica; Gilardoni, Gianluca; Cartuche, Luis; Flores, Paola; Morocho, Vladimir

    2016-11-02

    The phytochemical investigation of Muehlenbeckia tamnifolia , collected in Loja-Ecuador, led to the isolation of nine known compounds identified as: lupeol acetate ( 1 ); cis - p -coumaric acid ( 2 ); lupeol ( 3 ); β-sitosterol ( 4 ) trans - p -coumaric acid ( 5 ); linoleic acid ( 6 ) (+)-catechin ( 7 ); afzelin ( 8 ) and quercitrin ( 9 ). The structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on analysis of NMR and MS data, as well as comparison with the literature. The hypoglycemic activity of crude extracts and isolated compounds was assessed by the ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. The hexane extract showed weak inhibitory activity on α-amylase, with an IC 50 value of 625 µg·mL -1 , while the other extracts and isolated compounds were inactive at the maximum dose tested. The results on α-glucosidase showed more favorable effects; the hexanic and methanolic extracts exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with IC 50 values of 48.22 µg·mL -1 and 19.22 µg·mL -1 , respectively. Four of the nine isolated compounds exhibited strong inhibitory activity with IC 50 values below 8 µM, much higher than acarbose (377 uM). Linoleic acid was the most potent compound (IC 50 = 0.42 µM) followed by afzelin, (+)-catechin and quercitrin.

  3. Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activity of Solvent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regression analysis. Phytochemical contents and correlation with bioactivities. Total phenolic (TP), total proanthocyanidin. (TPro), and total hydroxycinnamic acid ..... An advantage of competitive inhibitors is that their inhibitory action is reversible, thus allowing undesirable effects to be readily mitigated by decreasing the ...

  4. Influence of baking enzymes on antimicrobial activity of five bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbutaite, V; Fernandez, A; Horn, N; Juodeikiene, G; Narbad, A

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of four different baking enzymes on the inhibitory activity of five bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs. The overlay assay and the Bioscreen methods revealed that the five BLIS exhibited an inhibitory effect against spore germination and vegetative outgrowth of Bacillus subtilis, the predominant species causing ropiness in bread. The possibility that the observed antibacterial activity of BLIS might be lost after treatment with enzymes used for baking purposes was also examined. The enzymes tested; hemicellulase, lipase, amyloglucosidase and amylase had little or no effect on the majority of the antimicrobial activities associated with the five BLIS studied. This study suggests a potential application in the sourdough baking industry for these antimicrobial producing LAB strains in the control of B. subtilis spore germination and vegetative outgrowth.

  5. Connexins and M3 Muscarinic Receptors Contribute to Heterogeneous Ca2+ Signaling in Mouse Aortic Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Boittin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle tone is controlled by Ca2+ signaling in the endothelial layer. Mouse endothelial cells are interconnected by gap junctions made of Connexin40 (Cx40 and Cx37, which allow the exchange of signaling molecules to coordinate their activity. Here, we investigated the role of Cx40 in the endothelial Ca2+ signaling of the mouse aorta. Methods: Ca2+ imaging was performed on intact aortic endothelium from both wild type (Cx40+/+ and Connexin40-deficient (Cx40 -/- mice. Results: Acetylcholine (ACh induced early fast and high amplitude Ca2+ transients in a fraction of endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors. Inhibition of intercellular communication using carbenoxolone or octanol fully blocked the propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ transients toward adjacent cells in WT and Cx40-/- mice. As compared to WT, Cx40-/- mice displayed a reduced propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ waves, indicating that Cx40 contributes to the spreading of Ca2+ signals. The propagation of those Ca2+ responses was not blocked by suramin, a blocker of purinergic ATP receptors, indicating that there is no paracrine effect of ATP release on the Ca2+ waves. Conclusions: Altogether our data show that Cx40 and Cx37 contribute to the propagation and amplification of the Ca2+ signaling triggered by ACh in endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors.

  6. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 μg/ml of tobramycin and 25 μg/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on

  7. Once-daily glycopyrronium bromide, a long-acting muscarinic antagonist, for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2012-01-01

    Long-acting bronchodilators are central in the pharmacological management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the studies evaluating the safety and clinical efficacy of inhaled glycopyrronium bromide, a novel...... long-acting muscarinic antagonist, in patients with COPD....

  8. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. Antimicrobial activities weredetermined by agar dilution and by growth yield as measured by OD560nm of the Luria Bertani broth (LB culture with orwithout extracts. In agar dilution method, extracts of Quercus infectoria inhibited the growth of all, while Myrtuscommunis extract inhibited the growth of 3 out of 8 bacterial strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 1000μg/mL. All extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced growth rate of the bacteria in comparison with the control withoutextracts in LB broth at sub-MIC concentrations (500 μg/mL. All plant extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced biofilmformation compared to the controls. Glycyrrhiza glabra and Q. infectoria had the highest anti-biofilm activities. Nocorrelation between the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity with growth or the intensity of biofilm formation was found.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Extracts of Q. infectoria and M. communis had the most antimicrobial,while Q. infectoria and G. glabra had the highest anti-biofilm activities. All plant extracts had anti-biofilm activities withmarginal effect on growth, suggesting that the mechanisms of these activities are unrelated to static or cidal effects.Further work to understand the relation between antimicrobial and biofilm formation is needed for development of newmeans to fight the infectious caused by this bacterium in future.

  9. Role of ventrolateral orbital cortex muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in modulation of capsaicin-induced orofacial pain-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Abbas Farshid, Amir; Delkhosh-Kasmaie, Fatmeh

    2017-11-15

    Acetylcholine, as a major neurotransmitter, mediates many brain functions such as pain. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and agonists into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLOC) on capsaicin-induced orofacial nociception and subsequent hyperalgesia. The right side of VLOC was surgically implanted with a guide cannula in anaesthetized rats. Orofacial pain-related behaviors were induced by subcutaneous injection of a capsaicin solution (1.5µg/20µl) into the left vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing with ipsilateral forepaw and general behavior were recorded for 10min, and then mechanical hyperalgesia was determined using von Frey filaments at 15, 30, 45 and 60min post-capsaicin injection. Alone intra-VLOC microinjection of atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) at a similar dose of 200ng/site did not alter nocifensive behavior and hyperalgesia. Microinjection of oxotremorine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 50 and 100ng/site and epibatidine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100ng/site into the VLOC suppressed pain-related behaviors. Prior microinjections of 200ng/site atropine and mecamylamine (200ng/site) prevented oxotremorine (100ng/site)-, and epibatidine (100ng/site)-induced antinociception, respectively. None of the above-mentioned chemicals changed general behavior. These results showed that the VLOC muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors might be involved in modulation of orofacial nociception and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Eosinophils express muscarinic receptors and corticotropin-releasing factor to disrupt the mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Conny; Persborn, Mats; Jönsson, Maria; Wang, Arthur; Phan, Van; Lampinen, Maria; Vicario, Maria; Santos, Javier; Sherman, Philip M; Carlson, Marie; Ericson, Ann-Charlott; McKay, Derek M; Söderholm, Johan D

    2011-05-01

    Altered intestinal barrier function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis (UC) in genetic, functional, and epidemiological studies. Mast cells and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) regulate the mucosal barrier in human colon. Because eosinophils are often increased in colon tissues of patients with UC, we assessed interactions among mast cells, CRF, and eosinophils in the mucosal barrier of these patients. Transmucosal fluxes of protein antigens (horseradish peroxidase) and paracellular markers ((51)Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000) were studied in noninflamed, colonic mucosal biopsy samples collected from 26 patients with UC and 53 healthy volunteers (controls); samples were mounted in Ussing chambers. We also performed fluorescence and electron microscopy of human tissue samples, assessed isolated eosinophils, and performed mechanistic studies using in vitro cocultured eosinophils (15HL-60), mast cells (HMC-1), and a colonic epithelial cell line (T84). Colon tissues from patients with UC had significant increases in permeability to protein antigens compared with controls. Permeability was blocked by atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), α-helical CRF(9-41) (a CRF receptor antagonist), and lodoxamide (a mast-cell stabilizer). Eosinophils were increased in number in UC tissues (compared with controls), expressed the most M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors of any mucosal cell type, and had immunoreactivity to CRF. In coculture studies, carbachol activation of eosinophils caused production of CRF and activation of mast cells, which increased permeability of T84 epithelial cells to macromolecules. We identified a neuroimmune intercellular circuit (from cholinergic nerves, via eosinophils to mast cells) that mediates colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction in patients with UC. This circuit might exacerbate mucosal inflammation. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Cadinane sesquiterpenes from Curcuma phaeocaulis with their inhibitory activities on nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianghao; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yue; Gao, Suyu; Ding, Liqin; Zhao, Feng; Chen, Lixia; Qiu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Four new cadinane-type sesquiterpenes named phacadinanes A-D (1-4) were isolated from the rhizomes of Curcuma phaeocaulis. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR, as well as accurate mass measurements. Compound 4 was the first example of a rare 4,5-seco-cadinane sesquiterpene isolated from the Zingiberaceae family. Furthermore, inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on nitric oxide production in LPS-activated macrophages were evaluated. Compounds 1 and 2 showed strong inhibitory activities on NO production with IC50 values of 3.88±0.58 and 2.25±0.71 μM, respectively. A possible biogenetic pathway for 4,5-seco-cadinane sesquiterpene (4) was postulated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Onset of effect of aclidinium, a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Vogelmeier, Claus; Creemers, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting, inhaled muscarinic antagonist in development for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to assess the rate of onset of bronchodilation with aclidinium compared with placebo and tiotropium. This ...

  14. Identification of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory peptides from mare whey protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J J; Wang, Q; Du, M; Ji, X M; Mao, X Y

    2017-09-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity is a promising strategy for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the current study, DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified from mare whey protein hydrolysates obtained by papain. The results showed that all the mare whey protein hydrolysates obtained at various hydrolysis durations possessed more potent DPP-IV inhibitory activity compared with intact whey protein. The 4-h hydrolysates showed the greatest DPP-IV inhibitory activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.18 mg/mL. The 2 novel peptides from 4-h hydrolysate fractions separated by successive chromatographic steps were characterized by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The novel peptides Asn-Leu-Glu-Ile-Ile-Leu-Arg and Thr-Gln-Met-Val-Asp-Glu-Glu-Ile-Met-Glu-Lys-Phe-Arg, which corresponded to β-lactoglobulin 1 f(71-77) and β-lactoglobulin 1 f(143-155), demonstrated DPP-IV inhibitory activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of 86.34 and 69.84 μM, respectively. The DPP-IV inhibitory activity of the 2 peptides was retained or even improved after simulated gastrointestinal digestion in vitro. Our findings indicate that mare whey protein-derived peptides may possess potential as functional food ingredients in the management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.; Martí nez-Atienza, Juliana; Villalta, Irene; Jiang, Xingyu; Kim, Woeyeon; Ali, Zhair; Fujii, Hiroaki; Mendoza, Imelda; Yun, Daejin; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Pardo, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  16. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  17. A conformational switch in the inhibitory gamma-subunit of PDE6 upon enzyme activation by transducin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, A E; Artemyev, N O

    2001-11-06

    In response to light, a photoreceptor G protein, transducin, activates cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6) by displacing the inhibitory gamma-subunits (Pgamma) from the enzyme's catalytic sites. Evidence suggests that the activation of PDE6 involves a conformational change of the key inhibitory C-terminal domain of Pgamma. In this study, the C-terminal region of Pgamma, Pgamma-73-85, has been targeted for Ala-scanning mutagenesis to identify the point-to-point interactions between Pgamma and the PDE6 catalytic subunits and to probe the nature of the conformational change. Pgamma mutants were tested for their ability to inhibit PDE6 and a chimeric PDE5-conePDE6 enzyme containing the Pgamma C-terminus-binding site of cone PDE. This analysis has revealed that in addition to previously characterized Ile86 and Ile87, important inhibitory contact residues of Pgamma include Asn74, His75, and Leu78. The patterns of mutant PDE5-conePDE6 enzyme inhibition suggest the interaction between the PgammaAsn74/His75 sequence and Met758 of the cone PDE6alpha' catalytic subunit. This interaction, and the interaction between the PgammaIle86/Ile87 and PDE6alpha'Phe777/Phe781 residues, is most consistent with an alpha-helical structure of the Pgamma C-terminus. The analysis of activation of PDE6 enzymes containing Pgamma mutants with Ala-substituted transducin-contact residues demonstrated the critical role of PgammaLeu76. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the initial step in PDE6 activation involves an interaction of transducin-alpha with PgammaLeu76. This interaction introduces a bend into the alpha-helical structure of the Pgamma C-terminus, allowing transducin-alpha to further twist the C-terminus thereby uncovering the catalytic pocket of PDE6.

  18. Inhibitory effect on nitric oxide production and free radical scavenging activity of Thai medicinal plants in osteoarthritic knee treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuthakoengkun, Areeya; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-08-01

    Thai medicine plants used for Osteoarthritis of knee (OA) treatment consist of twelve plants such as Crinumn asiaticum, Cleome viscosa, Drypetes roxburghii, Piper longum, Piper nigrum, Plumbago indica, Alpinia galanga, Curcuma aromatica, Globba malaccensis, Zingiber montanum, Zingiber officinale andZingiberzerumbet. They showedhighfrequency in OA formula. To investigate inhibitory effect on LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) release from RAW264. 7 cell and free radical scavenging activity usingDPPH assay of these ethanolic plant extracts. Plant materials were extracted by maceration in 95% ethanol. Anti-inflammatory activity were tested on LPS-induced NO production. Free radical scavenging activity was performed by DPPH assay. All of ethanolic extracts exhibited potent inhibitory effect on NO release. The ethanolic extract of Z. zerumbet exhibited the highest inhibitory effect followed by Z. montanum and G. malaccensis, respectively. Except A. galanga and C. viscosa, all extracts possessed more influential than indomethacin (IC50 = 20.32±3.23 μLg/ml), a positive control. The investigation on antioxidant activity suggested that the ethanolic extracts of D. roxburghii, Z. officinale, Z. montanum, C. aromatic, A. galanga, P indica, G malaccensis, P nigrum exhibited antioxidant activity. By means ofD. roxburghii had the highest electron donating activity,followed by Z. officinale. Moreover both extracts were more effective than BHT apositive control (EC50 = 14.04±1.95 μg/ml). Thai medicinal plants had anti-inflammatory activity and could inhibit destruction of articular cartilage that corresponded to the traditional medicine and supported using these medicinal plants for OA treatment.

  19. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  20. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  1. Z-(-,-)-[76Br]BrQNP: a high affinity PET radiotracer for central and cardiac muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijckmans, V.; Coulon, C.; Loc'h, C.; Maziere, B.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    Racemic E-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl α-(1-bromo-1-1-propen-3-yl)-α -hydroxy-α-phenylacetate (BrQNP) was prepared and evaluated in vivo as a potential candidate for imaging muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptors by Positron Emission Tomography. Initial in vivo blocking studies utilizing Z-(-,-)-[ 125 I]IQNP as a radiolabelled muscarinic probe demonstrated that a preinjection of cold E-BrQNP effectively blocks the uptake of the radiolabelled probe in the brain and heart, by 71% and 86% respectively. Z-(-,-)-[ 76 Br]BrQNP was prepared by electrophilic substitution from a tributylstannyl precursor. Peracetic acid and chloramine T was evaluated as oxidizing agents. After purification by SPE and RP-HPLC, radiolabelling yields of 85% and 95% were obtained with peracetic acid and chloramine T, respectively. The final radiochemical yield was 70% for both oxidizing agents. (author)

  2. Water-Soluble Polysaccharide Extracts from the Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Agaricomycetes) with HMGCR Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ramirez, Alicia; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Morales, Diego; Govers, Coen; Synytsya, Andriy; Wichers, Harry J; Iacomini, Marcello; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Water extracts from Pleurotus ostreatus containing no statins showed 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity (in vitro) that might be due to specific water-soluble polysaccharides (WSPs); when isolated and deproteinized, increasing concentrations of the WSP extract induced higher inhibition. The WSP extract contained mainly β-glucans, mannogalactans, and glycogen (e.g., α-glucans), although derivatives or fragments with lower molecular weights (between 14 and 3.5 kDa) were present and were able to induce the inhibitory activity. The extract contained more β-(1→3)-glucans than β-(11→3),(11→6)-glucans, and they partially survived digestion and managed to pass through Caco2 cell monolayers to the lower compartment after in vitro digestion and transport experiments. The WSP might also modulate Caco2 membrane integrity.

  3. [Evaluate drug interaction of multi-components in Morus alba leaves based on α-glucosidase inhibitory activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tao; Su, Shu-Lan; Guo, Sheng; Qian, Da-Wei; Ouyang, Zhen; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2016-06-01

    Column chromatography was used for enrichment and separation of flavonoids, alkaloids and polysaccharides from the extracts of Morus alba leaves; glucose oxidase method was used with sucrose as the substrate to evaluate the multi-components of M. alba leaves in α-glucosidase inhibitory models; isobole method, Chou-Talalay combination index analysis and isobolographic analysis were used to evaluate the interaction effects and dose-effect characteristics of two components, providing scientific basis for revealing the hpyerglycemic mechanism of M. alba leaves. The components analysis showed that flavonoid content was 5.3%; organic phenolic acids content was 10.8%; DNJ content was 39.4%; and polysaccharide content was 18.9%. Activity evaluation results demonstrated that flavonoids, alkaloids and polysaccharides of M. alba leaves had significant inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase, and the inhibitory rate was increased with the increasing concentration. Alkaloids showed most significant inhibitory effects among these three components. Both compatibility of alkaloids and flavonoids, and the compatibility of alkaloids and polysaccharides demonstrated synergistic effects, but the compatibility of flavonoids and polysaccharides showed no obvious synergistic effects. The results have confirmed the interaction of multi-components from M. alba leaves to regulate blood sugar, and provided scientific basis for revealing hpyerglycemic effectiveness and mechanism of the multi-components from M. alba leaves. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity and chemical constituents of Stenochlaena palustris fronds at two different stages of maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Jeng-Yeou Chear

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Stenochlaena palustris fronds are popular as a vegetable in Southeast Asia. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the anticholinesterase properties and phytochemical profiles of the young and mature fronds of this plant. Both types of fronds were found to have selective inhibitory effect against butyrylcholinesterase compared with acetylcholinesterase. However, different sets of compounds were responsible for their activity. In young fronds, an antibutyrylcholinesterase effect was observed in the hexane extract, which was comprised of a variety of aliphatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, and phytosterols. In the mature fronds, inhibitory activity was observed in the methanol extract, which contained a series of kaempferol glycosides. Our results provided novel information concerning the ability of S. palustris to inhibit cholinesterase and its phytochemical profile. Further research to investigate the potential use of this plant against Alzheimer's disease is warranted, however, young and mature fronds should be distinguished due to their phytochemical differences.

  5. Effect of O-methylated and glucuronosylated flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on α-glucosidase inhibitory activity: structure-activity relationship and synergistic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Abdelly, Chedly; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-03-01

    O-Methylated and glucuronosylated flavonoids were isolated from Tamarix gallica as α-glucosidase inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids suggests that catechol moiety and glucuronic acid at C-3 are factors in the increase in α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Furthermore, rhamnetin, tamarixetin, rhamnazin, KGlcA, KGlcA-Me, QGlcA, and QGlcA-Me exhibit synergistic potential when applied with a very low concentration of acarbose to α-glucosidase from rat intestine.

  6. Characterization of activating mutations of NOTCH3 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and anti-leukemic activity of NOTCH3 inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi-Elias, P; Hu, T; Jenkins, D; Firestone, B; Gans, S; Kurth, E; Capodieci, P; Deplazes-Lauber, J; Petropoulos, K; Thiel, P; Ponsel, D; Hee Choi, S; LeMotte, P; London, A; Goetcshkes, M; Nolin, E; Jones, M D; Slocum, K; Kluk, M J; Weinstock, D M; Christodoulou, A; Weinberg, O; Jaehrling, J; Ettenberg, S A; Buckler, A; Blacklow, S C; Aster, J C; Fryer, C J

    2016-11-24

    Notch receptors have been implicated as oncogenic drivers in several cancers, the most notable example being NOTCH1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To characterize the role of activated NOTCH3 in cancer, we generated an antibody that detects the neo-epitope created upon gamma-secretase cleavage of NOTCH3 to release its intracellular domain (ICD3), and sequenced the negative regulatory region (NRR) and PEST (proline, glutamate, serine, threonine) domain coding regions of NOTCH3 in a panel of cell lines. We also characterize NOTCH3 tumor-associated mutations that result in activation of signaling and report new inhibitory antibodies. We determined the structural basis for receptor inhibition by obtaining the first co-crystal structure of a NOTCH3 antibody with the NRR protein and defined two distinct epitopes for NRR antibodies. The antibodies exhibit potent anti-leukemic activity in cell lines and tumor xenografts harboring NOTCH3 activating mutations. Screening of primary T-ALL samples reveals that 2 of 40 tumors examined show active NOTCH3 signaling. We also identified evidence of NOTCH3 activation in 12 of 24 patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models, 2 of which exhibit activation of NOTCH3 without activation of NOTCH1. Our studies provide additional insights into NOTCH3 activation and offer a path forward for identification of cancers that are likely to respond to therapy with NOTCH3 selective inhibitory antibodies.

  7. α-Glucosidase and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activity of Plastoquinones from Marine Brown Alga Sargassum serratifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Yousof Ali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sargassum serratifolium C. Agardh (Phaeophyceae, Fucales is a marine brown alga that belongs to the family Sargassaceae. It is widely distributed throughout coastal areas of Korea and Japan. S. serratifolium has been found to contain high concentrations of plastoquinones, which have strong anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective activity. This study aims to investigate the anti-diabetic activity of S. serratifolium and its major constituents through inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. S. serratifolium ethanolic extract and fractions exhibited broad PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50, 1.83~7.04 and 3.16~24.16 µg/mL for PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. In an attempt to identify bioactive compounds, three plastoquinones (sargahydroquinoic acid, sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid were isolated from the active n-hexane fraction of S. serratifolium. All three plastoquinones exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against PTP1B in the IC50 range of 5.14–14.15 µM, while sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (IC50 42.41 ± 3.09 and 96.17 ± 3.48 µM, respectively. In the kinetic study of PTP1B enzyme inhibition, sargahydroquinoic acid and sargaquinoic acid led to mixed-type inhibition, whereas sargachromenol displayed noncompetitive-type inhibition. Moreover, plastoquinones dose-dependently inhibited ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. Docking simulations of these plastoquinones demonstrated negative binding energies and close proximity to residues in the binding pocket of PTP1B and α-glucosidase, indicating that these plastoquinones have high affinity and tight binding capacity towards the active site of the enzymes. These results demonstrate that S. serratifolium and its major plastoquinones may have the potential as functional food ingredients for the

  8. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ferulic Acid Amides: Curcumin-Based Design and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavath, Vishnu N; Baysal, İpek; Uçar, Gülberk; Mondal, Susanta K; Sinha, Barij N; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid has structural similarity with curcumin which is being reported for its monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity. Based on this similarity, we designed a series of ferulic acid amides 6a-m and tested for their inhibitory activity on human MAO (hMAO) isoforms. All the compounds were found to inhibit the hMAO isoforms either selectively or non-selectively. Nine compounds (6a, 6b, 6g-m) were found to inhibit hMAO-B selectively, whereas the other four (6c-f) were found to be non-selective. There is a gradual shift from hMAO-B selectivity (6a,b) to non-selectivity (6c-f) as there is an increase in chain length at the amino terminus. In case of compounds having an aromatic nucleus at the amino terminus, increasing the carbon number between N and the aromatic ring increases the potency as well as selectivity toward hMAO-B. Compounds 6f, 6j, and 6k were subjected to membrane permeability and metabolic stability studies by in vitro assay methods. They were found to have a better pharmacokinetic profile than curcumin, ferulic acid, and selegiline. In order to understand the structural features responsible for the potency and selectivity of 6k, we carried out a molecular docking simulation study. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 in addition to yogurt culture. Relative degrees of proteolysis were found to be considerably higher in yogurt samples than UHT milk as the control. Both regular and probiotic yogurts showed considerable ACE-inhibitory activities. Results showed that degree of proteolysis was not influenced by different fat contents, while was increased by high concentration of starter culture (1.5 % w/w) and reduced by inulin (1 % w/w). ACE-inhibitory activities of yogurt were also negatively affected by the presence of inulin and high levels of fat (5 % w/w). Moreover, yogurt containing probiotic bacteria showed higher inhibitory against ACE in comparison to the yogurt prepared with non-probiotic strains.

  10. Influence of Different Drying Treatments and Extraction Solvents on the Metabolite Profile and Nitric Oxide Inhibitory Activity of Ajwa Dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hamid, Nur Ashikin; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Shaari, Khozirah; Lajis, Nordin H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the variation in the metabolite profiles and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity of Ajwa dates that were subjected to 2 drying treatments and different extraction solvents. (1)H NMR coupled with multivariate data analysis was employed. A Griess assay was used to determine the inhibition of the production of NO in RAW 264.7 cells treated with LPS and interferon-γ. The oven dried (OD) samples demonstrated the absence of asparagine and ascorbic acid as compared to the freeze dried (FD) dates. The principal component analysis showed distinct clusters between the OD and FD dates by the second principal component. In respect of extraction solvents, chloroform extracts can be distinguished by the absence of arginine, glycine and asparagine compared to the methanol and 50% methanol extracts. The chloroform extracts can be clearly distinguished from the methanol and 50% methanol extracts by first principal component. Meanwhile, the loading score plot of partial least squares analysis suggested that beta glucose, alpha glucose, choline, ascorbic acid and glycine were among the metabolites that were contributing to higher biological activity displayed by FD and methanol extracts of Ajwa. The results highlight an alternative method of metabolomics approach for determination of the metabolites that contribute to NO inhibitory activity. The association between metabolite profiles and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity of the various extracts of Ajwa dates was evaluated by utilizing partial least squares (PLS) model. The validated PLS model can be employed to predict the NO inhibitory activity of new samples of date fruits based on their NMR spectra which was important for assessing fruit quality. The information gained might be used as guidance for quality control, nutritional values and as a basis for the preparation of any food supplements for human health that employs date palm fruit as the raw material. © 2015 Institute of Food

  11. Presynaptic muscarinic receptors: Change of sensitivity during long-term drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, M.; Raiteri, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate some of the characteristics of auto- and heteroreceptors from different brain areas in male rats; their alteration in sensitivity following chronic drug treatment is monitored. The synaptosomes were prelabeled with tritium-choline or tritium-dopamine and the release of tritium-acetylcholine and tritium-DA was studied in superfusion. It is shown that the difference in susceptibility between auto- and heteroreceptors with respect to changes of sensitivity may represent a further criterion to discriminate between muscarinic receptor subtypes

  12. Reversal of androgen inhibition of estrogen-activated sexual behavior by cholinergic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohanich, G P; Cada, D A

    1989-12-01

    Androgens have been found to inhibit lordosis activated by estrogen treatment of ovariectomized female rats. In the present experiments, dihydrotestosterone propionate (200 micrograms for 3 days) inhibited the incidence of lordosis in ovariectomized females treated with estradiol benzoate (1 microgram for 3 days). This inhibition of lordosis was reversed 15 min after bilateral intraventricular infusion of physostigmine (10 micrograms/cannula), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, or carbachol (0.5 microgram/cannula), a cholinergic receptor agonist. This reversal of inhibition appears to be mediated by cholinergic muscarinic receptors since pretreatment with scopolamine (4 mg/kg, ip), a muscarinic receptor blocker, prevented the reversal of androgen inhibition by physostigmine. These results indicate that androgens may inhibit estrogen-activated lordosis through interference with central cholinergic muscarinic mechanisms.

  13. Mutation at Glu23 eliminates the neuron growth inhibitory activity of human metallothionein-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhichun; Teng Xinchen; Cai Bin; Wang Hui; Zheng Qi; Wang Yang; Zhou Guoming; Zhang Mingjie; Wu Houming; Sun Hongzhe; Huang Zhongxian

    2006-01-01

    Human metallothionein-3 (hMT3), first isolated and identified as a neuronal growth inhibitory factor (GIF), is a metalloprotein expressed predominantly in brain. However, untill now, the exact mechanism of the bioactivity of hMT3 is still unknown. In order to study the influence of acid-base catalysis on S-nitrosylation of hMT3, we constructed the E23K mutant of hMT3. During the course of bioassay, we found out unexpectedly that mutation at E23 of hMT3 eliminates the neuronal growth inhibitory activity completely. To the best of our knowledge, it is First report that other residues, besides the TCPCP motif, in the β-domain can alter the bioactivity of hMT3. In order to figure out the causes for the loss of bioactivity of the E23K mutant, the biochemical properties were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, pH titration, DTNB reaction, EDTA reaction, and SNOC reaction. All data demonstrated that stability of the metal-thiolate cluster and overall structure of the E23K mutant were not altered too much. However, the reaction of the E23K mutant with SNOC exhibited biphasic kinetics and the mutant protein released zinc ions much faster than hMT3 in the initial step, while hMT3 exhibited single kinetic process. The 2D [ 1 H- 15 N] HSQC was also employed to characterize structural changes during the reaction of hMT3 with varying mounts of nitric oxide. It was shown that the resonance of Glu23 disappeared at a molar ratio of NO to protein of 4. Based on these results, we suggest that mutation at Glu23 may alter the NO metabolism and/or affect zinc homeostasis in brain, thus altering the neuronal growth inhibitory activity

  14. Two New Monoterpene Glycosides from Qing Shan Lu Shui Tea with Inhibitory Effects on Leukocyte-Type 12-Lipoxygenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhi Fang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the inhibitory effect of 12 Chinese teas on leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase (LOX activity. Tea catechins such as epigallocatechin gallate have been known to exhibit leukocyte-type 12-LOX inhibition. Qing Shan Lu Shui, which contains lower catechin levels than the other tested teas, suppressed leukocyte-type 12-LOX activity. To characterize the bioactive components of Qing Shan Lu Shui, leukocyte-type 12-LOX inhibitory activity–guided fractionation of the aqueous ethanol extract of the tea was performed, resulting in the isolation of two new monoterpene glycosides: liguroside A (1 and B (2. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were characterized as (2E,5E-7-hydroperoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl-O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1″→3′-(4′″-O-trans-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and (2E,5E-7-hydroperoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octa-dienyl- O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1″→3′-(4′″-O-cis-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, respectively, based on spectral and chemical evidence. Ligurosides A (1 and B (2 showed inhibitory effects on leukocyte-type 12-LOX activity, with IC50 values of 1.7 and 0.7 μM, respectively.

  15. In vivo and in vitro studies on the potentiation of muscarinic receptor stimulation by alaproclate, a selective 5-HT uptake blocker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oegren, S.O.; Nordstroem, Oe.; Danielsson, E.; Peterson, L.-L.; Bartfai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Alaproclate (10-60 mg/kg) injected i.p. into male mice potentiated and prolonged the oxotremorine and physostigmine-induced tremor in a dosedependent manner. Atropine completely blocked the tremor caused by oxotremorine or physostigmine both in the presence and absence of alaproclate. Pretreatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metitepine completely blocked the enhancement of oxotremorine-induced tremor caused by alaproclate. Biochemical studies indicated that the above effects cannot be explained by assuming that alaproclate a) acts as a cholinergic agonist, b) inhibits the acetylcholine esterase, c) interferes with choline uptake or acetylcholine synthesis, or d) directly potentiates the release of acetylcholine. In ligand binding studies alaproclate was found to be a weak competitive inhibitor of muscarinic antagonist binding to membranes from the rat cerebral cortex, rat striatum, human cerebral cortex and human striatum. (Ksub(i) approximately 28-40 μM in all four tissues). The present results suggest that alaproclate may potentiate muscarinic responses by a mechanism involving serotonergic receptor mechanisms rather than by a direct interaction with the muscarinic cholinergic receptors. (Author)

  16. In vivo and in vitro studies on the potentiation of muscarinic receptor stimulation by alaproclate, a selective 5-HT uptake blocker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oegren, S.O. (Astra Pharmaceuticals AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden)); Nordstroem, Oe.; Danielsson, E.; Peterson, L.L.; Bartfai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Alaproclate (10-60 mg/kg) injected i.p. into male mice potentiated and prolonged the oxotremorine and physostigmine-induced tremor in a dose dependent manner. Atropine completely blocked the tremor caused by oxotremorine or physostigmine both in the presence and absence of alaproclate. Pretreatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metitepine completely blocked the enhancement of oxotremorine-induced tremor caused by alaproclate. Biochemical studies indicated that the above effects cannot be explained by assuming that alaproclate a) acts as a cholinergic agonist, b) inhibits the acetylcholine esterase, c) interferes with choline uptake or acetylcholine synthesis, or d) directly potentiates the release of acetylcholine. In ligand binding studies alaproclate was found to be a weak competitive inhibitor of muscarinic antagonist binding to membranes from the rat cerebral cortex, rat striatum, human cerebral cortex and human striatum. (Ksub(i) approximately 28-40 ..mu..M in all four tissues). The present results suggest that alaproclate may potentiate muscarinic responses by a mechanism involving serotonergic receptor mechanisms rather than by a direct interaction with the muscarinic cholinergic receptors.

  17. An appraisal of eighteen commonly consumed edible plants as functional food based on their antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yian Hoon; Choo, Candy; Watawana, Mindani I; Jayawardena, Nilakshi; Waisundara, Viduranga Y

    2015-11-01

    Eighteen edible plants were assessed for their antioxidant potential based on oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, total phenolics, vitamin C content and various lipophilic antioxidants. The inhibitory activities of the plant extracts against the enzymatic activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase were also evaluated. The antioxidant and starch hydrolase activities of the plants varied widely across a single batch of analysis. The ORAC and DPPH radical scavenging EC50 values varied between 298 and 1984 Trolox equivalents g(-1) fresh weight and between 91 and 533 mg kg(-1) fresh weight, respectively. The total phenolics and vitamin C contents varied between 32 and 125 mg gallic acid equivalents g(-1) fresh weight and between 96 and 285 µg g(-1) fresh weight, respectively. All the plants contained neoxanthin, violaxanthin, and α- and β-carotene in varying amounts. Coccinia grandis, Asparagus racemosus, Costus speciosus, Amaranthus viridis and Annona muricata displayed the highest inhibitory activities against starch hydrolases. They were the most efficient against the breakdown of seven starches exposed to the two enzymes as well. Overall, the edible plants were observed to display a high antioxidant potential with starch hydrolase inhibitory properties, which were beneficial in their being recognized as functional food. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive activities of protein hydrolysate from meat of Kacang goat (Capra aegagrus hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirdhayati, Irdha; Hermanianto, Joko; Wijaya, Christofora H; Sajuthi, Dondin; Arihara, Keizo

    2016-08-01

    The meat of Kacang goat has potential for production of a protein hydrolysate. Functional ingredients from protein hydrolysate of Kacang goat meat were determined by the consistency of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antihypertensive effect. This study examined the potency of Kacang goat protein hydrolysate in ACE inhibition and antihypertensive activity. Protein hydrolysates of Kacang goat meat were prepared using sequential digestion of endo-proteinase and protease complex at several concentrations and hydrolysis times. The highest ACE inhibitory activity resulted from a hydrolysate that was digested for 4 h with 5 g kg(-1) of both enzymes. An ACE inhibitory peptide was purified and a novel peptide found with a sequence of Phe-Gln-Pro-Ser (IC50 value of 27.0 µmol L(-1) ). Both protein hydrolysates and a synthesised peptide (Phe-Gln-Pro-Ser) demonstrated potent antihypertensive activities in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Protein hydrolysate of Kacang goat meat produced by sequential digestion with endo-proteinase and protease complex has great potential as a functional ingredient, particularly as an antihypertensive agent. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Interactions of alaproclate, a selective 5HT-uptake blocker, with muscarinic receptors: in vivo and in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielsson, E.; Bartfai, T.; Nordstrom, O.; Ogren, S.O.; Unden, A.

    1986-01-01

    Cholinergic mechanisms play an important role in higher brain functions such as learning or memory. It is hoped that drugs which improve cholinergic transmission would be therapeutically effective in senile dementia. The results of biochemical studies on the interaction of alaproclate with the muscarinic system are summarized. Tritium-4-N-methylpiperidinylbenzilate and methyl tritium-choline chloride were used in the studies. Salivation and hypothermia were studied in adult male mice following injection of alaproclate preceding the injection of oxotremorine by 30 min. Salivation, tremor and hypothermia caused by oxotremorine were found to be centrally mediated muscarinic responses. Tritium-ACh release was studied from synaptosomes. The metabolites of alaproclate, alanine and 2(4 chlorophenyl) 1-1 dimethylethanol, do not produce tremor

  20. Multiple promoters drive tissue-specific expression of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Bruce, A. W.; Doležal, Vladimír; Tuček, Stanislav; Buckley, N. J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2004), s. 88-98 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5011306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : M2 muscarinic receptor * neuron-restrictive silence factor * promoter Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.824, year: 2004

  1. Inhibitory effects of astaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin on cytochrome P450 enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Choi, Hye Duck; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Astaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin, the major xanthophylls, are widely used in food, medicine, and health care products. To date, no studies regarding the inhibitory effects of these xanthophylls on the nine CYPs isozymes have been reported. This study investigated the reversible and time-dependent inhibitory potentials of five xanthophylls on CYPs activities in vitro. The reversible inhibition results showed that the five compounds had only a weak inhibitory effect on the nine CYPs. Lutein did not inhibit the nine CYPs activities. Astaxanthin weakly inhibited CYP2C19, with an IC₅₀ of 16.2 μM; and β-cryptoxanthin weakly inhibited CYP2C8, with an IC₅₀ of 13.8 μM. In addition, canthaxanthin weakly inhibited CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5, with IC₅₀ values of 10.9 and 13.9 μM, respectively. Zeaxanthin weakly inhibited CYP3A4/5, with an IC₅₀ of 15.5 μM. However, these IC₅₀ values were markedly greater than the Cmax values reported in humans. No significant IC₅₀ shift was observed in the time-dependent inhibition screening. Based on these observations, it is unlikely that these five xanthophylls from the diet or nutritional supplements alter the pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized by CYPs. These findings provide some useful information for the safe use of these five xanthophylls in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effects of nanosuspension and inclusion complex techniques on the in vitro protease inhibitory activity of naproxen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmalingam, Senthil Rajan; Chidambaram, Kumarappan; Srinivasan, Ramamurthy; Nadaraju, Shamala, E-mail: dsenthilrajan@yahoo.co.in [School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Bukit Jalil, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of nanosuspension and inclusion complex techniques on in vitro trypsin inhibitory activity of naproxen—a member of the propionic acid derivatives, which are a group of antipyretic, analgesic, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Nanosuspension and inclusion complex techniques were used to increase the solubility and anti-inflammatory efficacy of naproxen. The evaporative precipitation into aqueous solution (EPAS) technique and the kneading methods were used to prepare the nanosuspension and inclusion complex of naproxen, respectively. We also used an in vitro protease inhibitory assay to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of modified naproxen formulations. Physiochemical properties of modified naproxen formulations were analyzed using UV, IR spectra, and solubility studies. Beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex of naproxen was found to have a lower percentage of antitryptic activity than a pure nanosuspension of naproxen did. In conclusion, nanosuspension of naproxen has a greater anti-inflammatory effect than the other two tested formulations. This is because the nanosuspension formulation reduces the particle size of naproxen. Based on these results, the antitryptic activity of naproxen nanosuspension was noteworthy; therefore, this formulation can be used for the management of inflammatory disorders. (author)

  3. Microbial transformation of isosteviol and inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus activation of the transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akihisa, Toshihiro; Hamasaki, Yusuke; Tokuda, Harukuni; Ukiya, Motohiko; Kimura, Yumiko; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2004-03-01

    Microbial transformation of isosteviol (2), a beyerane-type diterpenoid obtained from stevioside (1) by acid hydrolysis, yielded 7beta-hydroxyisosteviol (3), 11beta-hydroxyisosteviol (5), and 12beta-hydroxyisosteviol (6) by the fungus Aspergillus niger, 17-hydroxyisosteviol (7) by the fungus Glomerella cingulata, and 3 and 7-oxoisosteviol (4) by the fungus Mortierella elongate. The five metabolites, 3-7, along with 1 and 2 were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells as a primary screening test for inhibitors of tumor promoters. All the diterpenes tested showed potent inhibitory effects, with the five metabolites 3-7 exhibiting more potent effects.

  4. Synthesis of novel and functionally selective non‐competitive muscarinic antagonists as chemical probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulos, J. F.; Jakubík, Jan; Boulos, J. M.; Randáková, Alena; Momirov, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2018), s. 93-104 ISSN 1747-0277 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : G- protein -coupled receptor * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * N-methylscopolamine * Parkinson's disease * positive allosteric modulator Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 2.396, year: 2016

  5. Impairment of muscarinic transmission in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; Michal, Pavel; Oksman, M.; Iivonen, H.; Tanila, H.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2008), s. 368-378 ISSN 0197-4580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206 Grant - others:EC(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease * muscarinic receptors * cholinergic neurotransmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.959, year: 2008

  6. Potent Inhibitory Effect of Chinese Dietary Spices on Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Liang, Yan; Sun, Xuebing; Liu, Xiaoxin; Tian, Weixi; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Dietary spices have been adopted in cooking since ancient times to enhance flavor and also as food preservatives and disease remedies. In China, the use of spices and other aromatic plants as food flavoring is an integral part of dietary behavior, but relatively little is known about their functions. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been recognized as a remedy target, and its inhibitors might be applied in disease treatment. The present work was designed to assess the inhibitory activities on FAS of spices extracts in Chinese menu. The in vitro inhibitory activities on FAS of 22 extracts of spices were assessed by spectrophotometrically monitoring oxidation of NADPH at 340 nm. Results showed that 20 spices extracts (90.9 %) exhibited inhibitory activities on FAS, with half inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 1.72 to 810.7 μg/ml. Among them, seven spices showed strong inhibitory effect with IC(50) values lower than 10 μg/ml. These findings suggest that a large proportion of the dietary spices studied possess promising inhibitory activities on FAS, and subsequently might be applied in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related human diseases.

  7. Differential involvement of cortical muscarinic and NMDA receptors in short- and long-term taste aversion memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G; Gutiérrez, R; De La Cruz, V; Bermúdez-Rattoni, F

    2002-09-01

    In conditioned taste aversion, an animal avoids a taste previously associated with toxic effects, and this aversive memory formation requires an intact insular cortex. In this paper, we investigated the possible differential involvement of cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors in the insular cortex in short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) of taste aversion in rats. Taste aversion was induced by intraperitoneal administration of lithium chloride (a malaise-inducing drug) 15 min after experience with an unfamiliar taste. In order to test STM and LTM of taste aversion, taste stimulus was again presented 4 h and 72 h after lithium injection, respectively. During the acquisition, microinjection of the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, in the insular cortex before, but not after, the presentation of the new taste, abolished STM as well as LTM. Blockade of the NMDA receptor, in the insular cortex, by AP5 before, but not after, the presentation of the taste stimulus, impaired LTM but left STM intact. Moreover, when injected 1 h after malaise induction (i.e., during taste-illness association), AP5 disrupted both STM and LTM. These results suggest that activation of muscarinic receptors in the insular cortex is involved in the acquisition of taste memory, whereas NMDA receptors participate in taste memory consolidation. These data demonstrate that different neurochemical mechanisms subserve different memory phases. NMDA receptors are also probably involved in processing the visceral input, thus allowing subsequent taste-illness association. This indicates that in the same cortical area the same neurotransmitter system can be involved in distinct processes: taste memory consolidation vs. taste-illness association.

  8. Mururins A-C, three new lignoids from Brosimum acutifolium and their protein kinase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Junko; Asano, Shoichi; Ohsaki, Ayumi

    2002-07-01

    Two new flavonolignans, mururins A and B ( 1 and 2), and a new lignan, mururin C ( 3), were isolated from the bark of Brosimum acutifolium Huber together with three known lignans. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic means and chemical modifications. They were tested for protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitory activity. Mururin A showed 3 % and 63 % inhibition to PKA and PKC, respectively, at 20 microM. Mururin B showed 58 % and 38 % inhibition, respectively. Mururin C did not have significant activity.

  9. Degree of synchronization modulated by inhibitory neurons in clustered excitatory-inhibitory recurrent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Sun, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jinghua

    2018-01-01

    An excitatory-inhibitory recurrent neuronal network is established to numerically study the effect of inhibitory neurons on the synchronization degree of neuronal systems. The obtained results show that, with the number of inhibitory neurons and the coupling strength from an inhibitory neuron to an excitatory neuron increasing, inhibitory neurons can not only reduce the synchronization degree when the synchronization degree of the excitatory population is initially higher, but also enhance it when it is initially lower. Meanwhile, inhibitory neurons could also help the neuronal networks to maintain moderate synchronized states. In this paper, we call this effect as modulation effect of inhibitory neurons. With the obtained results, it is further revealed that the ratio of excitatory neurons to inhibitory neurons being nearly 4 : 1 is an economic and affordable choice for inhibitory neurons to realize this modulation effect.

  10. Muscarinic receptors in amygdala control trace fear conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Baysinger

    Full Text Available Intelligent behavior requires transient memory, which entails the ability to retain information over short time periods. A newly-emerging hypothesis posits that endogenous persistent firing (EPF is the neurophysiological foundation for aspects or types of transient memory. EPF is enabled by the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs and is triggered by suprathreshold stimulation. EPF occurs in several brain regions, including the lateral amygdala (LA. The present study examined the role of amygdalar mAChRs in trace fear conditioning, a paradigm that requires transient memory. If mAChR-dependent EPF selectively supports transient memory, then blocking amygdalar mAChRs should impair trace conditioning, while sparing delay and context conditioning, which presumably do not rely upon transient memory. To test the EPF hypothesis, LA was bilaterally infused, prior to trace or delay conditioning, with either a mAChR antagonist (scopolamine or saline. Computerized video analysis quantified the amount of freezing elicited by the cue and by the training context. Scopolamine infusion profoundly reduced freezing in the trace conditioning group but had no significant effect on delay or context conditioning. This pattern of results was uniquely anticipated by the EPF hypothesis. The present findings are discussed in terms of a systems-level theory of how EPF in LA and several other brain regions might help support trace fear conditioning.

  11. Muscarinic receptors in amygdala control trace fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysinger, Amber N; Kent, Brianne A; Brown, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent behavior requires transient memory, which entails the ability to retain information over short time periods. A newly-emerging hypothesis posits that endogenous persistent firing (EPF) is the neurophysiological foundation for aspects or types of transient memory. EPF is enabled by the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and is triggered by suprathreshold stimulation. EPF occurs in several brain regions, including the lateral amygdala (LA). The present study examined the role of amygdalar mAChRs in trace fear conditioning, a paradigm that requires transient memory. If mAChR-dependent EPF selectively supports transient memory, then blocking amygdalar mAChRs should impair trace conditioning, while sparing delay and context conditioning, which presumably do not rely upon transient memory. To test the EPF hypothesis, LA was bilaterally infused, prior to trace or delay conditioning, with either a mAChR antagonist (scopolamine) or saline. Computerized video analysis quantified the amount of freezing elicited by the cue and by the training context. Scopolamine infusion profoundly reduced freezing in the trace conditioning group but had no significant effect on delay or context conditioning. This pattern of results was uniquely anticipated by the EPF hypothesis. The present findings are discussed in terms of a systems-level theory of how EPF in LA and several other brain regions might help support trace fear conditioning.

  12. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  13. New derivatives of 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid with free-radical scavenging, D-amino acid oxidase, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecka, Jolanta; Guśpiel, Adam; Postek, Magdalena; Ziemska, Joanna; Kawęcki, Robert; Lęczycka, Katarzyna; Osior, Agnieszka; Pietrzak, Bartłomiej; Pypowski, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowska, Agata

    2014-09-30

    A series of 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesised and tested for their free-radical scavenging activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH·), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS·+), superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and nitric oxide radical (·NO) assays. We also studied d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitory activity. Almost each of newly synthesised compounds exhibited radical scavenging capabilities. Moreover, several compounds showed moderate inhibitory activities against DAAO, AChE and BuChE. Compounds with significant free-radical scavenging activity may be potential candidates for therapeutics used in oxidative-stress-related diseases.

  14. Optimization of a fermented pumpkin-based beverage to improve Lactobacillus mali survival and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity: A response surface methodology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Y. Koh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to develop an optimum fermentation and composition model for a new fermented pumpkin-based beverage with high probiotic survival and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Relationship between fermentation temperature, inoculum and ingredient concentration with response variables (fermentation time at the fermentation endpoint pH 4.5, survival rate of Lactobacillus mali K8 in pumpkin-based beverage treated with simulated gastrointestinal tract enzyme fluids, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and sensory overall acceptability after 4 weeks of refrigerated storage was investigated using response surface methodology. Optimal formulation was obtained at an approximation of 40% pumpkin puree concentration, 8 Log CFU/mL inoculum and at 35 °C. The product derived from this optimum formula reached the fermentation endpoint after 28.34 ± 0.10 h and the quality change during 4 weeks storage was studied. The product achieved 88.56 ± 0.67% of L. mali survival after treatment with simulated gastric and intestinal juices; demonstrated 95.89 ± 0.30% α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, as well as scored 6.99 ± 0.40 on sensory overall acceptability after 4 weeks of storage. These findings illustrated that the model is effective in improving probiotic survival and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with excellent sensory acceptability, thus may offer a dietary means for the management of hyperglycaemia. Keywords: Probiotics, Response surface methodology, Box-Behnken, Hyperglycaemia, Functional food

  15. Antioxidant and protease-inhibitory potential of extracts from grains of oat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krošlák Erik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of important crops cultivated for production of foods and feeds could be considered as plants possessing nutraceutical or medically interesting compounds, especially if can be eaten without processing. Chemical and biological parameters that were evaluated in 100 oat (Avena sativa L. genotypes were others than those that are important in food and feed production. Contents of polyphenols and flavonoids, radical scavenging activity (DPPH, and inhibitory activities against five proteases (trypsin, thrombin, urokinase, elastase, cathepsin B were analyzed in extracts from mature grains. The antioxidant activity (DPPH correlated to the content of total polyphenols. Only a minority (15 from 100 of analyzed genotypes created separate subgroup with a high content of polyphenols, flavonoids, and high antioxidant activity. The best in these parameters were genotypes CDC-SOL-FI, Saul, and Avesta, respectively. Fifteen other genotypes assembled another minority subgroup (also 15 from 100 on the basis of their high inhibitory activities against tested proteases. The highest trypsin-, urokinase-, and elastase-inhibitory activities were in genotype Racoon, the best in thrombin-, and cathepsin B-inhibitory activities were genotypes Expression and SW Kerstin, respectively. Three oats genotypes – Rhea, AC Percy, and Detvan appeared in both subgroups.

  16. Evaluation of In Vitro Inhibitory Activity of Rye-Buckwheat Ginger Cakes with Rutin on the Formation of Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przygodzka Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between the inhibitory effects of extracts from rye-buckwheat ginger cakes supplemented with low and high rutin dosage baked without or with dough fermentation step on the formation of fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs, and phenolic compounds, rutin, D-chiro-inositol and antioxidant capacity were addressed. The cakes were based on rye flour substituted by light buckwheat flour or flour from roasted buckwheat groats at 30% level, and were produced with or without dough fermentation step. The inhibitory effect against AGEs formation was studied in bovine serum albumin (BSA-glucose and BSA-methylglyoxal (MGO systems. The antioxidant capacity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl- -1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and cyclic voltammetry (CV, rutin and D-chiro-inositol contents by HPLC and total phenolics (TPC by spectrophotometric assays. The study showed the inhibitory effects of extracts from rye-buckwheat ginger cakes supplemented with low and high rutin dosage. The results of the inhibitory activity were highly correlated in two applied model systems. Enrichment of rye-buckwheat ginger cakes with rutin improved their antioxidant properties. The correlation studies showed that the inhibitory effects of rye-buckwheat ginger cakes produced with dough fermentation step and enhanced with rutin against formation of AGEs were highly correlated with TPC, rutin and D-chiro-inositol contents, and antioxidant capacity. Moreover, the effect of rutin enrichment was clearly seen in cakes obtained with dough fermentation step, even the inhibitory activity was slightly lower as compared to the cakes produced without dough fermentation.

  17. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatranska, M.; Budai, D.; Gulya, K; Kvetnansky, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [ 3 H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  18. α-Glucosidase and pancreatic lipase inhibitory activities and glucose uptake stimulatory effect of phenolic compounds from Dendrobium formosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachyaporn Inthongkaew

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A methanol extract from the whole plant of Dendrobium formosum Roxb. ex Lindl., Orchidaceae, showed inhibitory potential against α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase enzymes. Chromatographic separation of the extract resulted in the isolation of twelve phenolic compounds. The structures of these compounds were determined through analysis of NMR and HR-ESI-MS data. All of the isolates were evaluated for their α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase inhibitory activities, as well as glucose uptake stimulatory effect. Among the isolates, 5-methoxy-7-hydroxy-9,10-dihydro-1,4-phenanthrenequinone (12 showed the highest α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects with an IC50 values of 126.88 ± 0.66 µM and 69.45 ± 10.14 µM, respectively. An enzyme kinetics study was conducted by the Lineweaver-Burk plot method. The kinetics studies revealed that compound 12 was a non-competitive inhibitor of α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase enzymes. Moreover, lusianthridin at 1 and 10 µg/ml and moscatilin at 100 µg/ml showed glucose uptake stimulatory effect without toxicity on L6 myotubes. This study is the first report on the phytochemical constituents and anti-diabetic and anti-obesity activities of D. formosum.

  19. Sleep: The hebbian reinforcement of the local inhibitory synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Sleep is ubiquitous among the animal realm, and represents about 30% of our lives. Despite numerous efforts, the reason behind our need for sleep is still unknown. The Theory of neuronal Cognition (TnC) proposes that sleep is the period of time during which the local inhibitory synapses (in particular the cortical ones) are replenished. Indeed, as long as the active brain stays awake, hebbian learning guarantees that efficient inhibitory synapses lose their efficiency – just because they are efficient at avoiding the activation of the targeted neurons. Since hebbian learning is the only known mechanism of synapse modification, it follows that to replenish the inhibitory synapses' efficiency, source and targeted neurons must be activated together. This is achieved by a local depolarization that may travel (wave). The period of time during which such slow waves are experienced has been named the "slow-wave sleep" (SWS). It is cut into several pieces by shorter periods of paradoxical sleep (REM) which activity resembles that of the awake state. Indeed, SWS – because it only allows local neural activation – decreases the excitatory long distance connections strength. To avoid losing the associations built during the awake state, these long distance activations are played again during the REM sleep. REM and SWS sleeps act together to guarantee that when the subject awakes again, his inhibitory synaptic efficiency is restored and his (excitatory) long distance associations are still there. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. α-Glucosidase inhibitory activities of fatty acids purified from the internal organ of sea cucumber Stichopus japonicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T H; Kim, S M

    2015-04-01

    α-Glucosidase inhibitory activities of the various solvent fractions (n-hexane, CHCl3 , EtOAc, BuOH, and water) of sea cucumber internal organ were investigated. 1,3-Dipalmitolein (1) and cis-9-octadecenoic acid (2) with potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity were purified from the n-hexane fraction of sea cucumber internal organ. IC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 4.45 and 14.87 μM against Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-glucosidase. These compounds mildly inhibited rat-intestinal α-glucosidase. In addition, both compounds showed a mixed competitive inhibition against S. cerevisiae α-glucosidase and were very stable at pH 2 up to 60 min. The KI values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.48 and 1.24 μM, respectively. Therefore, the internal organ of sea cucumber might be a potential new source of α-glucosidase inhibitors suitably used for prevention of obesity and diabetes mellitus. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. QSAR Modeling of COX -2 Inhibitory Activity of Some Dihydropyridine and Hydroquinoline Derivatives Using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Somaye; Zebardast, Tannaz; Zarghi, Afshin; Hajimahdi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    COX-2 inhibitory activities of some 1,4-dihydropyridine and 5-oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydroquinoline derivatives were modeled by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using stepwise-multiple linear regression (SW-MLR) method. The built model was robust and predictive with correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.972 and 0.531 for training and test groups, respectively. The quality of the model was evaluated by leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation (LOO correlation coefficient (Q 2 ) of 0.943) and Y-randomization. We also employed a leverage approach for the defining of applicability domain of model. Based on QSAR models results, COX-2 inhibitory activity of selected data set had correlation with BEHm6 (highest eigenvalue n. 6 of Burden matrix/weighted by atomic masses), Mor03u (signal 03/unweighted) and IVDE (Mean information content on the vertex degree equality) descriptors which derived from their structures.

  2. Preparation of ACE Inhibitory Peptides from Mytilus coruscus Hydrolysate Using Uniform Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chao Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides from mussel, Mytilus coruscus, were investigated and the variable factors, protease concentration, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature, were optimized using Uniform Design, a new statistical experimental method. The results proved that the hydrolysate of alkali proteases had high ACE-inhibitory activity, especially the alkali protease E1. Optimization by Uniform Design showed that the best hydrolysis conditions for preparation of ACE-inhibitory peptides from Mytilus coruscus were protease concentration of 36.0 U/mL, hydrolysis time of 2.7 hours, pH 8.2, and Temperature at 59.5°C, respectively. The verification experiments under optimum conditions showed that the ACE-inhibitory activity (91.3% were agreed closely with the predicted activity of 90.7%. The amino acid composition analysis of Mytilus coruscus ACE-inhibitory peptides proved that it had high percent of lysine, leucine, glycine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid.

  3. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guan Zeng; Liu, Zhe Hui; Wei, XinYa; Zhao, Pan; Yang, Chun Xiao; Xu, Man Ying

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh), pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN) and pain inhibited neurons (PIN) in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation by ACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl) or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl) decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl) produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  4. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  5. Fermentation characteristics and angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 in cow milk, soy milk, and mare milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jicheng; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Heping; Chen, Yongfu

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 demonstrated high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in previous research. Here, we evaluated the fermentation characteristics (pH, titratable acidity, free amino nitrogen, and viable bacterial counts), ACE-inhibitory activity, and contents of Val-Pro-Pro (VPP) and Ile-Pro-Pro (IPP) peptides of stored yogurt (4°C for 28 d) fermented by L. helveticus isolate H9 (initially inoculated at 4 concentrations), from cow, mare, and soy milks. During storage, the pH and titratable acidity remained stable in yogurts produced from all milk types and all inoculation concentrations. The viable bacterial counts in all stored yogurts ranged between 10(6.72) and 10(8.59) cfu/g. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity (70.9-74.5%) was achieved at inoculation concentrations of 5×10(6) cfu/mL. The ACE-inhibitory tripeptides VPP and IPP as determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were not produced in yogurt made from soy milk or mare milk. These evaluations indicate that L. helveticus H9 has good probiotic properties and would be a promising candidate for production of fermented food with probiotic properties. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62 ± 0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57 ± 0.02 and 0.59 ± 0.04 μg/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural Modifications of Benzimidazoles via Multi-Step Synthesis and Their Impact on Sirtuin-Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeong Keng; Choon, Tan Soo

    2016-01-01

    Benzimidazole derivatives have been shown to possess sirtuin-inhibitory activity. In the continuous search for potent sirtuin inhibitors, systematic changes on the terminal benzene ring were performed on previously identified benzimidazole-based sirtuin inhibitors, to further investigate their structure-activity relationships. It was demonstrated that the sirtuin activities of these novel compounds followed the trend where meta-substituted compounds possessed markedly weaker potency than ortho- and para-substituted compounds, with the exception of halogenated substituents. Molecular docking studies were carried out to rationalize these observations. Apart from this, the methods used to synthesize the interesting compounds are also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In vitro antioxidant and, α-glucosidase inhibitory activities and comprehensive metabolite profiling of methanol extract and its fractions from Clinacanthus nutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Ariful; Zaidul, I S M; Ghafoor, Kashif; Sahena, F; Hakim, M A; Rafii, M Y; Abir, H M; Bostanudin, M F; Perumal, V; Khatib, A

    2017-03-31

    This study was aimed to evaluate antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, with a subsequent analysis of total phenolic and total flavonoid content of methanol extract and its derived fractions from Clinacanthus nutans accompanied by comprehensive phytochemical profiling. Liquid-liquid partition chromatography was used to separate methanolic extract to get hexane, ethyl acetate, butanol and residual aqueous fractions. The total antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical scavenging and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The antidiabetic activity of methanol extract and its consequent fractions were examined by α-glucosidase inhibitory bioassay. The chemical profiling was carried out by gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC Q-TOF MS). The total yield for methanol extraction was (12.63 ± 0.98) % (w/w) and highest fractionated value found for residual aqueous (52.25 ± 1.01) % (w/w) as compared to the other fractions. Significant DPPH free radical scavenging activity was found for methanolic extract (63.07 ± 0.11) % and (79.98 ± 0.31) % for ethyl acetate fraction among all the fractions evaluated. Methanol extract was the most prominent in case of FRAP (141.89 ± 0.87 μg AAE/g) whereas most effective reducing power observed in ethyl acetate fraction (133.6 ± 0.2987 μg AAE/g). The results also indicated a substantial α-glucosidase inhibitory activity for butanol fraction (72.16 ± 1.0) % and ethyl acetate fraction (70.76 ± 0.49) %. The statistical analysis revealed that total phenolic and total flavonoid content of the samples had the significant (p < 0.05) impact on DPPH free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Current results proposed the therapeutic potential of Clinacanthus nutans, especially ethyl acetate and butanol fraction as chemotherapeutic agent against oxidative related cellular damages and control the

  9. Inhibitory effects of Citrus hassaku extract and its flavanone glycosides on melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kimihisa; Hirata, Noriko; Masuda, Megumi; Naruto, Shunsuke; Murata, Kazuya; Wakabayashi, Keitaro; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    The 50% ethanolic extract (CH-ext) obtained from the unripe fruit of Citrus hassaku exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The CH-ext showed antioxidant activity, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity. Activity-guided fractionation of the CH-ext indicated that flavanone glycoside-rich fractions showed potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Further examination revealed that the tyrosinase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the CH-ext were attributable to naringin and neohesperidin, respectively. The CH-ext showed inhibition of melanogenesis without any effects on cell proliferation in cultured murine B16 melanoma cells after glucosamine exposure. The topical application of the CH-ext to the dorsal skin of brownish guinea pigs showed in vivo preventive effects against UVB-induced pigmentation.

  10. In-vitro alpha amylase inhibitory activity of the leaf extracts of Adenanthera pavonina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaratne, M Nirmali; Punchihewa, J C; Wickramaratne, D B M

    2016-11-15

    Diabetes has caused a major burden to the health sector in the developing countries and has shown an increasing trend among the urban population. It is estimated that most patients are with type II diabetes which could be easily treated with dietary changes, exercise, and medication. Sri Lanka carries a long history ayurvedic medicine where it uses the plant for treating many diseases. Therefore it is important to screen medicinal plants scientifically so they could be used safely and effectively in the traditional medical system and also be used for further investigations. Adenanthera pavonina is a plant used in the Ayurvedic medical system in Sri Lanka for treating many diseases including diabetics. We evaluated the anti-diabetic properties and the antioxidant properties of Adenanthera pavonina leaves. The methanol extract of the leaves was sequentially extracted with petroleum ether and thereafter was partitioned between EtOAc, and water. The α-amylase inhibition assay was performed using the 3,5- dinitrosalicylic acid method. The antioxidant activities were measured using the DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the total phenolic content using Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent. The cytotoxicity of the extract was evaluated using the Brine shrimp bioassay. The IC 50 values of α amylase inhibitory activity of MeOH, EtOAc, petroleum ether, and water were 16.16 ± 2.23, 59.93 ± 0.25, 145.49 ± 4.86 and 214.85 ± 9.72 μg/ml respectively and was similar to that of Acarbose (18.63 ± 1.21 (μg/ml). Antioxidant activities were also determined and the EtOAc fraction showed the highest total phenolic content (34. 62 ± 1.14 mg/g extract) and the highest DPPH scavenging activity with an IC 50 of 249.92 ± 3.35 μg/ml. The leaf extracts of Adenanthera pavonina exhibit remarkable α-amylase inhibitory activity in the crude methanolic extract. Hence leaves of Adenanthera pavonina has a potential to be used as a regular green vegetable and

  11. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with 14 C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition

  12. An allosteric enhancer of M4muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could...

  13. Synthesis and GGCT Inhibitory Activity of N-Glutaryl-L-alanine Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Hiromi; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Hoshiya, Naoyuki; Uenishi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) is an important enzyme that cleaves γ-glutamyl-amino acid in the γ-glutamyl cycle to release 5-oxoproline and amino acid. Eighteen N-acyl-L-alanine analogues including eleven new compounds have been synthesized and examined for their inhibitory activity against recombinant human GGCT protein. Simple N-glutaryl-L-alanine was found to be the most potent inhibitor for GGCT. Other N-glutaryl-L-alanine analogues having methyl and dimethyl substituents at the 2-position were moderately effective, while N-(3R-aminoglutary)-L-alanine, the substrate having an (R)-amino group at the 3-position or N-(N-methyl-3-azaglutaryl)-L-alanine, the substrate having an N-methyl substituent on the 3-azaglutaryl carbon, in constract, exhibited excellent inhibition properties.

  14. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using 3 H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine

  15. Vitamin C Deficiency Reduces Muscarinic Receptor Coronary Artery Vasoconstriction and Plasma Tetrahydrobiopterin Concentration in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gry Freja Skovsted

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C (vitC deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, but its specific interplay with arteriolar function is unclear. This study investigates the effect of vitC deficiency in guinea pigs on plasma biopterin status and the vasomotor responses in coronary arteries exposed to vasoconstrictor/-dilator agents. Dunkin Hartley female guinea pigs (n = 32 were randomized to high (1500 mg/kg diet or low (0 to 50 mg/kg diet vitC for 10–12 weeks. At euthanasia, coronary artery segments were dissected and mounted in a wire-myograph. Vasomotor responses to potassium, carbachol, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, U46619, sarafotoxin 6c (S6c and endothelin-1 (ET-1 were recorded. Plasma vitC and tetrahydrobiopterin were measured by HPLC. Plasma vitC status reflected the diets with deficient animals displaying reduced tetrahydrobiopterin. Vasoconstrictor responses to carbachol were significantly decreased in vitC deficient coronary arteries independent of their general vasoconstrictor/vasodilator capacity (p < 0.001. Moreover, in vitC deficient animals, carbachol-induced vasodilator responses correlated with coronary artery diameter (p < 0.001. Inhibition of cyclooxygenases with indomethacin increased carbachol-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting an augmented carbachol-induced release of vasodilator prostanoids. Atropine abolished carbachol-induced vasomotion, supporting a specific muscarinic receptor effect. Arterial responses to SNP, potassium, S6c, U46619 and ET-1 were unaffected by vitC status. The study shows that vitC deficiency decreases tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations and muscarinic receptor mediated contraction in coronary arteries. This attenuated vasoconstrictor response may be linked to altered production of vasoactive arachidonic acid metabolites and reduced muscarinic receptor expression/signaling.

  16. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T

    2015-08-11

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties.

  17. Differential expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in Jurkat cells and their signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alea, Mileidys Perez; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Fuxe, Kjell; Garriga, Pere

    2011-08-15

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors expression and signaling in the human Jurkat T cell line were investigated. Semiquantitative real-time PCR and radioligand binding studies, using a wide set of antagonist compounds, showed the co-existence of M(3), M(4), and M(5) subtypes. Stimulation of these subpopulations caused a concentration and time- dependent activation of second messengers and ERK signaling pathways, with a major contribution of the M(3) subtype in a G(q/11)-mediated response. In addition, we found that T-cell stimulation leads to increased expression of M(3) and M(5) both at transcriptional and protein levels in a PLC/PKCθ dependent manner. Our data clarifies the functional role of AChR subtypes in Jurkat cells and pave the way to future studies on the potential cross-talk among these subpopulations and their regulation of T lymphocytes immune function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinants of positive cooperativity between strychnine-like allosteric modulators and N-methylscopolamine at muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1-2 (2006), s. 111-112 ISSN 0895-8696 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * strychnine -like allosteric modulators * cooperativity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2006

  19. Fear extinction causes target-specific remodeling of perisomatic inhibitory synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouche, Stéphanie; Sasaki, Jennifer M.; Tu, Tiffany; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A more complete understanding of how fear extinction alters neuronal activity and connectivity within fear circuits may aid in the development of strategies to treat human fear disorders. Using a c-fos based transgenic mouse, we found that contextual fear extinction silenced basal amygdala (BA) excitatory neurons that had been previously activated during fear conditioning. We hypothesized that the silencing of BA fear neurons was caused by an action of extinction on BA inhibitory synapses. In support of this hypothesis, we found extinction-induced target-specific remodeling of BA perisomatic inhibitory synapses originating from parvalbumin and cholecystokinin-positive interneurons. Interestingly, the predicted changes in the balance of perisomatic inhibition matched the silent and active states of the target BA fear neurons. These observations suggest that target-specific changes in perisomatic inhibitory synapses represent a mechanism through which experience can sculpt the activation patterns within a neural circuit. PMID:24183705

  20. Inhibitory effect of mycoplasma-released arginase. Activity in mixed-lymphocyte and tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Tscherning, T; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1990-01-01

    inhibition can be reversed by addition of excess arginine to the culture medium. Antisera raised against non-fermenting, but not against fermenting, mycoplasma species block the inhibitory effect of MAE. SDS-PAGE separation of MAE disclosed a broad band at 60 kDa which contained arginase activity when...... assayed in MLC and cell proliferation culture. SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting and reaction with antisera raised against non-fermenting mycoplasma species demonstrated a band at 43 kDa common for these micro-organisms....

  1. Lactoferricin B-derived peptides with inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Musoles, Ricardo; López-Díez, José Javier; Torregrosa, Germán; Vallés, Salvador; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma; Salom, Juan B

    2010-10-01

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), a key peptidase in the endothelin (ET) system, cleaves inactive big ET-1 to produce active ET-1, which binds to ET(A) receptors to exert its vasoconstrictor and pressor effects. ECE inhibition could be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. In this study, a set of eight lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-derived peptides, previously characterized in our laboratory as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides, was examined for their inhibitory effects on ECE. In vitro inhibitory effects on ECE activity were assessed using both the synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrate V (FPS V) and the natural substrate big ET-1. To study vasoactive effects, an ex vivo functional assay was developed using isolated rabbit carotid artery segments. With FPS V, only four LfcinB-derived peptides induced inhibition of ECE activity, whereas the eight peptides showed ECE inhibitory effects with big ET-1 as substrate. Regarding the ex vivo assays, six LfcinB-derived peptides showed inhibition of big ET-1-induced, ECE-dependent vasoconstriction. A positive correlation between the inhibitory effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ECE activity when using big ET-1 and the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction was shown. ECE-independent vasoconstriction induced by ET-1 was not affected, thus discarding effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ET(A) receptors or intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. In conclusion, a combined in vitro and ex vivo method to assess the effects of potentially antihypertensive peptides on the ET system has been developed and applied to show the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction of six LfcinB-derived peptides, five of which were dual vasopeptidase (ACE/ECE) inhibitors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Single-molecule analysis of inhibitory pausing states of V1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uner, Naciye Esma; Nishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okuno, Daichi; Nakano, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Ken; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-17

    V(1)-ATPase, the hydrophilic V-ATPase domain, is a rotary motor fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Here, we found that Thermus thermophilus V(1)-ATPase shows two types of inhibitory pauses interrupting continuous rotation: a short pause (SP, 4.2 s) that occurred frequently during rotation, and a long inhibitory pause (LP, >30 min) that terminated all active rotations. Both pauses occurred at the same angle for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Kinetic analysis revealed that the time constants of inactivation into and activation from the SP were too short to represent biochemically predicted ADP inhibition, suggesting that SP is a newly identified inhibitory state of V(1)-ATPase. The time constant of inactivation into LP was 17 min, consistent with one of the two time constants governing the inactivation process observed in bulk ATPase assay. When forcibly rotated in the forward direction, V(1) in LP resumed active rotation. Solution ADP suppressed the probability of mechanical activation, suggesting that mechanical rotation enhanced inhibitory ADP release. These features were highly consistent with mechanical activation of ADP-inhibited F(1), suggesting that LP represents the ADP-inhibited state of V(1)-ATPase. Mechanical activation largely depended on the direction and angular displacement of forced rotation, implying that V(1)-ATPase rotation modulates the off rate of ADP.

  3. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Yousr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF. Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y and tryptophan (W, in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23 and KLSDW (EYGF-33, contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56 was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69% and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL. The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL. In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33 (10 mg/mL had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk.

  4. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-12-07

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk.

  5. In silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory activity and the antidiabetic effect of sodium caseinate hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tzu-Yuan; Hung, Chuan-Chuan; Jao, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, You-Liang; Wu, Si-Xian; Hsu, Kuo-Chiang

    2016-02-01

    The frequency (A), a novel in silico parameter, was developed by calculating the ratio of the number of truncated peptides with Xaa-proline and Xaa-alanine to all peptide fragments from a protein hydrolyzed with a specific protease. The highest in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity (72.7%) was observed in the hydrolysate of sodium caseinate by bromelain (Cas/BRO), and the constituent proteins of bovine casein also had relatively high A values (0.10-0.17) with BRO hydrolysis. 1CBR (the <1 kDa fraction of Cas/BRO) showed the greatest in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity of 77.5% and was used for in vivo test by high-fat diet-fed and low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The daily administration of 1CBR for 6 weeks was effective to improve glycaemic control in diabetic rats. The results indicate that the novel in silico method has the potential as a screening tool to predict dietary proteins to generate DPP-IV inhibitory and antidiabetic peptides.

  6. Inhibitory activity of root canal irrigants against Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Kelly da Silva Fidalgo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of three root canal irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, and Staphylococcus aureus. These microorganisms were incubated in the presence of citric acid (6 and 10%, EDTA (17%, and NaOCl (0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.25%. Agar diffusion tests were performed and redox indicator resazurin was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the irrigants on the metabolic activity of these microorganisms. The mean diameters of the inhibition zones for the C. albicans cultures were 11.6 mm (17% EDTA, 5.5 mm (0.5% NaOCl, 12.9 mm (1% NaOCl, 22.1 mm (2.5% NaOCl, and 28.5 mm (5.25% NaOCl. The mean diameters of the inhibition zones for E. faecalis were 2.8 mm (1% NaOCl, 5.4 mm (2.5% NaOCl, and 8.3 mm (5.25% NaOCl. For S. aureus, the mean values were 8.0 mm (17% EDTA, 3.0 mm (1% NaOCl, 8.8 mm (2.5% NaOCl, and 10.0 mm (5.25% NaOCl. Most of the irrigant solutions presented effective antimicrobial activity against C. albicans. A high inhibitory effect on the metabolic activity of E. faecalis was detected when the microorganisms were incubated with 17% EDTA. The same result was reached when S. aureus was incubated in the presence of > 2.5% NaOCl. Altogether, these results indicate that 2.5% and 5.25% NaOCl are microbicides against S. aureus while 0.5% and 1% NaOCl are only microbiostatic against the tested bacteria. The 6% and 10% citric acid as well as 17% EDTA did not affect the viability of any of the assayed microorganisms.

  7. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF SALVIA SCLAREA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rakoe

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... This study demonstrated anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity of lavender, sage and ... Green monkey kidney cells were protected from HSV-2 infection by ... The highest inhibitory effect against HSV-2 was observed after treatment ..... some nuclear-replicating eukaryotic DNA viruses with large genomes.

  8. Virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity of novel analogue peptides based on the HP (2-20) derived from N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori Ribosomal Protein L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun; Chang, Young-Su; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2002-12-01

    HP (2-20) (AKKVFKRLEKLFSKIQNDK) is the antibacterial sequence derived from N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori Ribosomal Protein L1 (RPL1). It has a broad-spectrum microbicidal activity in vitro that is thought to be related to the membrane-disruptive properties of the peptide. Based on the putative membrane-targeted mode of action, we postulated that HP (2-20) might be possessed virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity. To develop the novel virus-cell fusion inhibitory peptides, several analogues with amino acid substitution were designed to increase or decrease only net hydrophobic region. In particular, substitution of Gln and Asp for hydrophobic amino acid, Trp at position 17 and 19 of HP (2-20) (Anal 3) caused a dramatic increase in virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity without hemolytic effect.

  9. Potential anti-cholinesterase and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitory activities of cornuside and gallotannins from Cornus officinalis fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Himanshu Kumar; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Tanaka, Takashi; Jung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jae Sue

    2017-07-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors are promising agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we examined the inhibitory activity of seven compounds isolated from the fruits of Cornus officinalis, cornuside, polymeric proanthocyanidins, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose, tellimagrandin I, tellimagrandin II, and isoterchebin, against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and BACE1. All of the compounds displayed concentration-dependent in vitro inhibitory activity toward the ChEs and BACE1. Among them, tellimagrandin II exhibited the best inhibitory activity toward ChEs, whereas the best BACE1 inhibitor was 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose. Isoterchebin and polymeric proanthocyanidins were also significant ChE inhibitors. The kinetic and docking studies demonstrated that all compounds interacted with both the catalytic active sites and the peripheral anionic sites of the ChEs and BACE1. Tellimagrandin II, isoterchebin, and the polymeric proanthocyanidins exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. In conclusion, we identified significant ChE and BACE1 inhibitors from Corni Fructus that could have value as new multi-targeted compounds for anti-AD agents.

  10. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  11. Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorains, Felicity K; Stout, Julie C; Bradshaw, John L; Dowling, Nicki A; Enticott, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is considered a core feature of problem gambling; however, self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control may reflect disparate constructs. We examined self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in 39 treatment-seeking problem gamblers and 41 matched controls using a range of self-report questionnaires and laboratory inhibitory control tasks. We also investigated differences between treatment-seeking problem gamblers who prefer strategic (e.g., sports betting) and nonstrategic (e.g., electronic gaming machines) gambling activities. Treatment-seeking problem gamblers demonstrated elevated self-reported impulsivity, more go errors on the Stop Signal Task, and a lower gap score on the Random Number Generation task than matched controls. However, overall we did not find strong evidence that treatment-seeking problem gamblers are more impulsive on laboratory inhibitory control measures. Furthermore, strategic and nonstrategic problem gamblers did not differ from their respective controls on either self-reported impulsivity questionnaires or laboratory inhibitory control measures. Contrary to expectations, our results suggest that inhibitory dyscontrol may not be a key component for some treatment-seeking problem gamblers.

  12. Determination of antioxidant capacity and a-amylase inhibitory activity of the essential oils from citronella grass and lemongrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antioxidant capacity of and in vitro a-amylase inhibitory activity of the essential oils extracted from citronella grass and lemongrass. The chemical composition of the extracted essential oils was determined by GC-MS. The antioxidant capacity ...

  13. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity and structure elucidation of a new phytol derivative and a new cinnamic acid ester from Pycnanthus angolensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Elufioye

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The leaves of Pycnanthus angolensis (Welw. Warb., Myristicaceae, are used as memory enhancer and anti-ageing in Nigerian ethnomedicine. This study aimed at evaluating the cholinesterase inhibitory property as well as isolates the bioactive compounds from the plant. The acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory potentials of extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds were evaluated by colorimetric and TLC bioautographic assay techniques. The extract inhibited both enzymes with activity increasing with purification, ethyl acetate fraction being most active fraction at 65.66 ± 1.06% and 49.38 ± 1.66% against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, respectively while the supernatant had 77.44 ± 1.18 inhibition against acetylcholinesterase. Two new bioactive compounds, (2E, 18E-3,7,11,15,18-pentamethylhenicosa-2,18-dien-1-ol (named eluptol and [12-(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-oxo-cyclopenta-1,3-dien-1yl-11-methyl-dodecyl](E-3-(3,4-dimethylphenylprop-2-enoate (named omifoate A were isolated from the plant with IC50 of 22.26 µg/ml (AChE, 34.61 µg/ml (BuChE and 6.51 µg/ml (AChE, 9.07 µg/ml (BuChE respectively. The results showed that the plant has cholinesterase inhibitory activity which might be responsible for its memory enhancing action, thus justifying its inclusion in traditional memory enhancing preparations

  14. Fear extinction causes target-specific remodeling of perisomatic inhibitory synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouche, Stéphanie; Sasaki, Jennifer M; Tu, Tiffany; Reijmers, Leon G

    2013-11-20

    A more complete understanding of how fear extinction alters neuronal activity and connectivity within fear circuits may aid in the development of strategies to treat human fear disorders. Using a c-fos-based transgenic mouse, we found that contextual fear extinction silenced basal amygdala (BA) excitatory neurons that had been previously activated during fear conditioning. We hypothesized that the silencing of BA fear neurons was caused by an action of extinction on BA inhibitory synapses. In support of this hypothesis, we found extinction-induced target-specific remodeling of BA perisomatic inhibitory synapses originating from parvalbumin and cholecystokinin-positive interneurons. Interestingly, the predicted changes in the balance of perisomatic inhibition matched the silent and active states of the target BA fear neurons. These observations suggest that target-specific changes in perisomatic inhibitory synapses represent a mechanism through which experience can sculpt the activation patterns within a neural circuit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Asperpyrone-Type Bis-Naphtho-γ-Pyrones with COX-2-Inhibitory Activities from Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Lin, Xiuping; Wang, Jianjiao; Liu, Yonghong; Tao, Huaming; Zhou, Xuefeng

    2016-07-20

    Bis-naphtho-γ-pyrones (BNPs) are an important group of aromatic polyketides derived from fungi, and asperpyrone-type BNPs are produced primarily by Aspergillus species. The fungal strain Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30, isolated from a marine alga, Sargassum sp., and identified according to its morphological traits and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequence, was studied for BNPs secondary metabolisms. After HPLC/MS analysis of crude extract of the fermentation broth, 11 asperpyrone-type BNPs were obtained directly and quickly by chromatographic separation in the extract, and those isolated asperpyrone-type BNPs were structurally identified by NMR and MS analyses. All of the BNPs showed weak cytotoxicities against 10 human tumor cells (IC50 > 30 μM). However, three of them, aurasperone F (3), aurasperone C (6) and asperpyrone A (8), exhibited obvious COX-2-inhibitory activities, with the IC50 values being 11.1, 4.2, and 6.4 μM, respectively. This is the first time the COX-2-inhibitory activities of BNPs have been reported.

  16. The gender differences in the inhibitory action of UVB-induced melanocyte activation by the administration of tranexamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    Tranexamic acid has an inhibitory action on ultraviolet (UV) B-induced melanocyte activation. This study examined the sex differences in the inhibitory action of tranexamic acid on UVB-induced melanocyte activation. We irradiated the eye and ear of male and female mice with UVB at a dose of 1.0 kJ/m(2) using a 20SE sunlamp. We orally administered tranexamic acid (750 mg/kg/day) at 30 min before UVB exposure. Tranexamic acid inhibited the UVB-induced epidermal melanocyte activation, and the effect was more remarkable under UVB eye irradiation than under UVB ear irradiation. Furthermore, the melanocyte activity suppression effect was stronger in female mice than in male mice. Following the administration of tranexamic acid, the female displayed increased blood levels of β-endorphin and μ-opioid receptor and estradiol receptor β expression in comparison with the male. Furthermore, the effect of melanocyte activity suppression in the female mice was decreased by the administration of tamoxifen (antagonist of estrogen receptor) or naltrexone (antagonist of μ-opioid receptor). These results suggest that the suppression by tranexamic acid of the UVB-induced melanocyte activation (UVB sensitivity) is stronger in female mice than in male mice and that female hormones and β-endorphin play an important role in this sex difference. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phytochemical screening and in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical screening and in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of seven plant extracts. Titilayo Johnson, Oduje A. Akinsanmi, Enoch J. Banbilbwa, Tijani A. Yahaya, Karima Abdulaziz, Kolade Omole ...

  18. β-Sitosterol and flavonoids isolated from Bauhinia malabarica found during screening for Wnt signaling inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Young; Toume, Kazufumi; Arai, Midori A; Koyano, Takashi; Kowithayakorn, Thaworn; Ishibashi, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Screening with a cell-based luciferase assay was conducted to identify bioactive natural products which inhibit Wnt signaling activity-guided separation of an MeOH extract of Bauhinia malabarica (Caesalpiniaceae) leaves yielded five compounds, which were identified as β-sitosterol (1), quercetin (2), 6,8-C-dimethyl kaempferol-3-O-rhamnopyranoside (3), hyperin (4), and 6,8-C-dimethyl kaempferol-3-methyl ether (5). The tested compounds 1, 3, and 5 exhibited Wnt signaling inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 0.77, 0.74, and 16.6 μM, respectively.

  19. Uncoupling of M1 muscarinic receptor/G-protein interaction by amyloid beta(1-42)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janíčková, Helena; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Jakubík, Jan; Tanila, H.; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, April (2013), s. 272-283 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s Disease * muscarinic receptors * G-proteins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.819, year: 2013

  20. Melanogenesis-inhibitory and cytotoxic activities of diarylheptanoids from Acer nikoense bark and their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akihisa, Toshihiro; Takeda, Ayano; Akazawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Yokokawa, Satoru; Ukiya, Motohiko; Fukatsu, Makoto; Watanabe, Kensuke

    2012-08-01

    Nine cyclic diarylheptanoids, 1-9, including two new compounds, i.e., 9-oxoacerogenin A (8) and 9-O-β-D-glucopyranosylacerogenin K (9), along with three acyclic diarylheptanoids, 10-12, and four phenolic compounds, 13-16, were isolated from a MeOH extract of the bark of Acer nikoense (Aceraceae). Acid hydrolysis of 9 yielded acerogenin K (17) and D-glucose. Two of the cyclic diarylheptanoids, acerogenin A (1) and (R)-acerogenin B (5), were converted to their ether and ester derivatives, 18-24 and 27-33, respectively, and to the dehydrated derivatives, 25, 26, 34, and 35. Upon evaluation of compounds 1-16 and 18-35 for their inhibitory activities against melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells, induced with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), eight natural glycosides, i.e., six diarylheptanoid glycosides, 2-4, 6, 9, and 12, and two phenolic glycosides, 15 and 16, exhibited inhibitory activities with 24-61% reduction of melanin content at 100 μM concentration with no or almost no toxicity to the cells (88-106% of cell viability at 100 μM). In addition, when compounds 1-16 and 18-35 were evaluated for cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines, two natural acyclic diarylheptanoids, 10 and 11, ten ether and ester derivatives, 18-22 and 27-31, and two dehydrated derivatives, 34 and 35, exhibited potent cytotoxicities against HL60 human leukemia cell line (IC(50) 8.1-19.3 μM), and five compounds, 10, 11, 20, 29, and 30, against CRL1579 human melanoma cell line (IC(50) 10.1-18.4 μM). Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  1. Using anti-muscarinic drugs in the management of death rattle: evidence-based guidelines for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mike; Lucas, Viv; Brennan, Mary; Hughes, Andrew; O'Donnell, Valerie; Wee, Bee

    2002-09-01

    The management of 'death rattle' was reviewed by a task group on behalf of the Association for Palliative Medicine's Science Committee. Evidence was searched for the effectiveness of various anti-muscarinic drugs in drying oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions in dying patients. Clinical guidelines were constructed based on evidence from volunteer and clinical studies. Death rattle occurs in half of all dying patients and some response occurs in around 80% of treated patients. Clinical studies demonstrate that subcutaneous hyoscine hydrobromide 400 microg is more effective at improving symptoms at 30 min than glycopyrronium 200 microg by the same route. Volunteer studies demonstrate that intramuscular glycopyrronium 400 microg is as effective in drying secretions at 30 min as a dose of 200 microg given intravenously. Duration of response is shortest for hyoscine butylbromide (1 h) and longest for glycopyrronium (more than 6 h). There is insufficient evidence to support the use of one drug over another in a continuous infusion and prescribers should base decisions on different characteristics of each anti-muscarinic drug.

  2. Current status of muscarinic M1 and M4 receptors as drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Christian C; Goldsmith, Paul J; Jackson, Kimberley; Sanger, Helen E; Evans, David A; Mogg, Adrian J; Broad, Lisa M

    2018-01-25

    The cholinergic signalling system has been an attractive pathway to seek targets for modulation of arousal, cognition, and attention which are compromised in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. The acetylcholine muscarinic receptor M1 and M4 subtypes which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, in cortex, hippocampus and striatum, key areas of cognitive and neuropsychiatric control, have received particular attention. Historical muscarinic drug development yielded first generation agonists with modest selectivity for these two receptor targets over M2 and M3 receptors, the major peripheral sub-types hypothesised to underlie the dose-limiting clinical side effects. More recent compound screening and medicinal chemistry optimization of orthosteric and allosteric agonists, and positive allosteric modulators binding to sites distinct from the highly homologous acetylcholine binding pocket have yielded a collection of highly selective tool compounds for preclinical validation studies. Several M1 selective ligands have progressed to early clinical development and in time will hopefully lead to useful therapeutics for treating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor as an incriminating agent in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Azza Gaber Antar; Hammam, Mostafa Ahmed; Habib, Mona SalahEldeen; Elnaidany, Nada Farag; Kamh, Mona Eaid

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune skin disorder in which the loss of melanocytes is mainly attributed to defective autoimmune mechanisms and, lately, there has been more emphasis on autoinflammatory mediators. Among these is the macrophage migration inhibitory factor, which is involved in many autoimmune skin diseases. However, little is known about the contribution of this factor to vitiligo vulgaris. To determine the hypothesized role of migration inhibitory factor in vitiligo via estimation of serum migration inhibitory factor levels and migration inhibitory factor mRNA concentrations in patients with vitiligo compared with healthy controls. We also aimed to assess whether there is a relationship between the values of serum migration inhibitory factor and/or migration inhibitory factor mRNA with disease duration, clinical type and severity in vitiligo patients. Evaluation of migration inhibitory factor serum level and migration inhibitory factor mRNA expression by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively, were performed for 50 patients with different degrees of vitiligo severity and compared to 15 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers as controls. There was a highly significant increase in serum migration inhibitory factor and migration inhibitory factor mRNA levels in vitiligo cases when compared to controls (pvitiligo patients, and each of them with duration and severity of vitiligo. In addition, patients with generalized vitiligo have significantly elevated serum migration inhibitory factor and mRNA levels than control subjects. Small number of investigated subjects. Migration inhibitory factor may have an active role in the development of vitiligo, and it may also be a useful index of disease severity. Consequently, migration inhibitory factor may be a new treatment target for vitiligo patients.

  4. Evaluation of Aldose Reductase, Protein Glycation, and Antioxidant Inhibitory Activities of Bioactive Flavonoids in Matricaria recutita L. and Their Structure-Activity Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of Matricaria recutita L. 70% methanol extract were evaluated by isolating and testing 10 of its compounds on rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging. Among these compounds, apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide, 3,5-O-di-caffeoylquinic acid, apigenin, and luteolin showed potent inhibition, and their IC50 values in RLAR were 4.25, 1.12, 1.16, 0.85, 0.72, 1.72, and 1.42 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds suppressed sorbitol accumulation in rat lens under high-glucose conditions, demonstrating their potential to prevent sorbitol accumulation ex vivo. Notably, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide and luteolin showed antioxidative as well as AGE-inhibitory activities (IC50 values of these compounds in AGEs were 3.39 and 6.01 μM. These results suggest that the M. recutita extract and its constituents may be promising agents for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetic complications.

  5. Muscarinic receptors in separate populations of noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelena, P.; Moro, M.A.; Castillo, C.J.; Garcia, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have performed binding experiments of (a)[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to partially purified membranes from noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells and (b) [3H]N-methyl-quinuclidinyl benzilate to acutely isolated, or 48-h cultured, chromaffin cells subpopulations. Using this approach, we obtained enough evidence to conclude (1st) that muscarinic receptors are present in both noradrenaline- and adrenaline containing cells; (2nd) that noradrenaline cells contain in fact 2-3 fold higher density of those receptors; and (3rd) that those receptors undergo plastic changes upon chronic culturing of the cells

  6. Inhibitory effects of drugs on the metabolic activity of mouse and human aldehyde oxidases and influence on drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Naoki; Sanoh, Seigo; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sugahara, Go; Yanagi, Ami; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Tayama, Yoshitaka; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Kurosaki, Mami; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-04-17

    As aldehyde oxidase (AOX) plays an emerging role in drug metabolism, understanding its significance for drug-drug interactions (DDI) is important. Therefore, we tested 10 compounds for species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effect of AOX activity using genetically engineered HEK293 cells over-expressing human AOX1, mouse AOX1 or mouse AOX3. The IC 50 values of 10 potential inhibitors of the three AOX enzymes were determined using phthalazine and O 6 -benzylguanine as substrates. 17β-Estradiol, menadione, norharmane and raloxifene exhibited marked differences in inhibitory effects between the human and mouse AOX isoforms when the phthalazine substrate was used. Some of the compounds tested exhibited substrate-dependent differences in their inhibitory effects. Docking simulations with human AOX1 and mouse AOX3 were conducted for six representative inhibitors. The rank order of the minimum binding energy reflected the order of the corresponding IC 50 values. We also evaluated the potential DDI between an AOX substrate (O 6 -benzylguanine) and an inhibitor (hydralazine) using chimeric mice with humanized livers. Pretreatment of hydralazine increased the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 ) of O 6 -benzylguanine compared to single administration. Our in vitro data indicate species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effects on AOX activity. Our in vivo data demonstrate the existence of a DDI which may be of relevance in the clinical context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fungal growth inhibitory properties of new phytosphingolipid analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormeneo, D; Manresa, A; Casas, J; Llebaria, A; Delgado, A

    2008-04-01

    To study the growth inhibitory properties of a series of phytosphingosine (PHS) and phytoceramide (PHC) analogues. A panel of two yeast (Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and six moulds (Aspergillus repens, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Arthroderma uncinatum and Penicillium funiculosum) has been used in this study. A series of new PHS and PHC analogues differing at the sphingoid backbone and the functional group at C1 position were synthesized. Among PHS analogues, 1-azido derivative 1c, bearing the natural D-ribo stereochemistry, showed a promising growth inhibitory profile. Among PHC analogues, compound 12, with a bulky N-pivaloyl group and a Z double bond at C3 position of the sphingoid chain, was the most active growth inhibitor. Minimal inhibitory concentration values were in the range of 23-48 micromol l(-1) for 1c and 44-87 micromol l(-1) for 12. Only scattered data on the antifungal activity of phytosphingolipids have been reported in the literature. This is the first time that a series of analogues of this kind are tested and compared to discern their structural requirements for antifungal activity.

  8. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  9. The inhibitory activity of Lactic acid bacteria isolated from fresh cow cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are the constituent part of milk microbial flora that could influence the safety of dairy products due production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and bacteriocins. Taking this in consideration, the objective of this study was to investigate the composition of lactic acid bacteria population in fresh cow cheeses taken from local markets, as well as their antimicrobial capacity. Lactic acid bacteria counts were determined according to ISO 1524:1998 method, biochemical determination using API 50 CHL system, and inhibitory activity against L. monocytogenes NCTC 10527 by agar well diffusion assay. Lactic acid bacteria count in fresh cow cheeses (n=10 ranged from 5.87 to 8.38 log10 CFU g-1. Among 52 MRS isolates collected, 61.54 % were assigned to the Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis species, 23.07 % Lactobacillus helveticus, 11.54 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 3.85 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. Antilisterial activity was found in 18 isolates.

  10. Animal and Plant Proteins as Precursors of Peptides with ACE Inhibitory Activity – An in silico Strategy of Protein Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Iwaniak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modern in silico approach useful in the evaluation of proteins as a source of ACE inhibitors. All protein sequences analyzed were derived from the BIOPEP database. To determine the protein value, the following criteria of evaluation were applied: the profile of potential biological (ACE inhibitory activity of a protein, the frequency of the occurrence of fragments with ACE inhibitory activity (A and the potential biological activity of a protein (B. The results, based on a statistical analysis, indicate that milk proteins can be a better source of ACE inhibitors than wheat gliadins. Moreover, all analyzed gliadins possessed more potent ACE inhibitors than chicken meat proteins. No significant differences were observed when comparing A values between soy globulins and β-lactoglobulins. Although criteria such as the profile of potential biological activity of protein, as well as parameters A and B, can be suitable tools in protein evaluation, the proteolytic digestion of protein needs to be considered. Moreover, computerised methods of classifying proteins according to different algorithms are often subjective due to discretion in interpretation of the results.

  11. NorA efflux pump inhibitory activity of coumarins from Mesua ferrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somendu K; Kumari, Neela; Pahwa, Sonika; Agrahari, Udai C; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Jachak, Sanjay M; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the modulator and efflux pump inhibitor activity of coumarins isolated from Mesua ferrea against clinical strains as well as NorA-over expressed strain of Staphylococcus aureus 1199B. Seven coumarins were tested for modulator activity using ethidium bromide (EtBr) as a substrate. Compounds 1, 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 2 fold against wild type clinical strains of S. aureus 1199 and S. aureus 1199B, whereas compounds 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 16 fold against MRSA 831. Compounds 1, 4-7 also reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against S. aureus 1199B, and 4-6 reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against MRSA 831 at half of their MICs. Inhibition of EtBr efflux by NorA-overproducing S. aureus 1199B and MRSA 831 confirmed the role of compounds 4-6 as NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPI). Dose-dependent activity at sub-inhibitory concentration (6.25 μg/mL) suggested that compounds 4 and 5 are promising EPI compared to verapamil against 1199B and MRSA 831 strains. © 2013.

  12. Muscarinic receptors as targets for anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, María Elena

    2010-11-01

    ACh, the main neurotransmitter in the neuronal cholinergic system, is synthesized by pre-ganglionic fibers of the sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system and by post-ganglionic parasympathetic fibers. There is increasing experimental evidence that ACh is widely expressed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic non-neuronal cells. The neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic systems comprise ACh, choline acetyltransferase and cholinesterase, enzymes that synthesize and catabolize ACh, and the nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors (nAChRs and mAChRs, respectively), which are the targets for ACh action. This review analyzes the participation of the cholinergic system, particularly through mAChRs, in inflammation, and discusses the role of the different mAChR antagonists that have been used to treat skin inflammatory disorders, asthma and COPD, as well as intestinal inflammation and systemic inflammatory diseases, to assess the potential application of these compounds as therapeutic tools.

  13. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling Coupled with Molecular Docking Analysis in Screening of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides from Qula Casein Hydrolysates Obtained by Two-Enzyme Combination Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Zhang, Lanwei; Han, Xue; Meng, Zhaoxu; Zhang, Jianming; Wu, Yifan; Cheng, Dayou

    2018-03-28

    In this study, Qula casein derived from yak milk casein was hydrolyzed using a two-enzyme combination approach, and high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity peptides were screened by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling integrated with molecular docking analysis. Hydrolysates (casein presents an excellent source to produce ACE inhibitory peptides.

  14. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl 2 ) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl 2 and MeHg on [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max ) and ligand affinity (K d ). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl 2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i ). Results demonstrate that HgCl 2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [ 3 H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  15. Synthesis and 5α-Reductase Inhibitory Activity of C21 Steroids Having 1,4-diene or 4,6-diene 20-ones and 4-Azasteroid 20-Oximes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsook Ma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and evaluation of 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of some 4-azasteroid-20-ones and 20-oximes and 3β-hydroxy-, 3β-acetoxy-, or epoxy-substituted C21 steroidal 20-ones and 20-oximes having double bonds in the A and/or B ring are described. Inhibitory activity of synthesized compounds was assessed using 5α-reductase enzyme and [1,2,6,7-3H]testosterone as substrate. All synthesized compounds were less active than finasteride (IC50: 1.2 nM. Three 4-azasteroid-2-oximes (compounds 4, 6 and 8 showed good inhibitory activity (IC50: 26, 10 and 11 nM and were more active than corresponding 4-azasteroid 20-ones (compounds 3, 5 and 7. 3β-Hydroxy-, 3β-acetoxy- and 1α,2α-, 5α,6α- or 6α,7α-epoxysteroid-20-one and -20-oxime derivatives having double bonds in the A and/or B ring showed no inhibition of 5α-reductase enzyme.

  16. Npas4 regulates excitatory-inhibitory balance within neural circuits through cell-type-specific gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Ivo; Mardinly, Alan R; Gabel, Harrison W; Bazinet, Jeremy E; Couch, Cameron H; Tzeng, Christopher P; Harmin, David A; Greenberg, Michael E

    2014-05-22

    The nervous system adapts to experience by inducing a transcriptional program that controls important aspects of synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms of experience-dependent plasticity are well characterized in excitatory neurons, the mechanisms that regulate this process in inhibitory neurons are only poorly understood. Here, we describe a transcriptional program that is induced by neuronal activity in inhibitory neurons. We find that, while neuronal activity induces expression of early-response transcription factors such as Npas4 in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, Npas4 activates distinct programs of late-response genes in inhibitory and excitatory neurons. These late-response genes differentially regulate synaptic input to these two types of neurons, promoting inhibition onto excitatory neurons while inducing excitation onto inhibitory neurons. These findings suggest that the functional outcomes of activity-induced transcriptional responses are adapted in a cell-type-specific manner to achieve a circuit-wide homeostatic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of cholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of wild and cultivated samples of sage (Salvia fruticosa) by activity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senol, Fatma Sezer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Erdem, Sinem Aslan; Kartal, Murat; Sener, Bilge; Kan, Yüksel; Celep, Ferhat; Kahraman, Ahmet; Dogan, Musa

    2011-11-01

    In European folk medicine, Salvia species have traditionally been used to enhance memory. In our previous study of 55 Salvia taxa, we explored significant anticholinesterase activity of cultivated S. fruticosa. In this study, we compared the inhibitory activity of dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol extracts of 3 wild-grown samples and 1 cultivated sample of S. fruticosa against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes (which are associated with pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease) by using the spectrophotometric Ellman method. Antioxidant activities were assessed by determining 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity, iron-chelating capacity, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power. The dichloromethane extract of the cultivated sample was then subjected to fractionation by using open column chromatography and medium-pressure liquid chromatography to obtain the most active fraction by activity-guided fractionation. All fractions and subfractions were tested in the same manner, and inactive subfractions were discarded. The essential oil of the cultivated sample was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  18. The Antioxidant and Starch Hydrolase Inhibitory Activity of Ten Spices in an In Vitro Model of Digestion: Bioaccessibility of Anthocyanins and Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Jayawardena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities of cardamom, cloves, coriander, cumin seeds, curry leaves, fenugreek, mustard seeds, nutmeg, sweet cumin, and star anise extracts were investigated in an in vitro model of digestion mimicking the gastric and duodenal conditions. The total phenolic contents in all spice extracts had statistically significantly (P<0.05 increased following both gastric and duodenal digestion. This was also in correlation with the antioxidant assays quantifying the water-soluble antioxidant capacity of the extracts. The lipophilic Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity assay did not indicate a statistically significant change in the values during any of the digestion phases. Statistically significant (P<0.05 reductions in the anthocyanin contents were observed during the digestion phases in contrast to the carotenoid contents. With the exception of the cumin seed extract, none of the spice extracts showed statistically significant changes in the initial starch hydrolase enzyme inhibitory values prior to gastric and duodenal digestion. In conclusion, this study was able to prove that the 10 spices were a significant source of total phenolics, antioxidant, and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities.

  19. Inhibitory activities of some vitamins on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel; Wang, Mingfu

    2013-09-04

    The capacities of 15 vitamins to inhibit the formation of 7α-hydroxycholesterol, 7β-hydroxycholesterol, and 7-ketocholesterol were examined in beef patties. Their inhibitory activities were tested at a concentration of 0.4 mmol in 30 g of beef. Among them, L-ascorbic acid, retinoic acid, and α-(±)-tocopherol were found to exert a potent inhibitory effect (30-50%) on 7-ketocholesterol formation and (~20%) on 7α-hydroxycholesterol and 7β-hydroxycholesterol formations. Pyridoxamine inhibited 7-ketocholesterol formation by 60% with a statistically significant difference (p cholesterol oxidation, a chemical model with pyridoxamine added in the cholesterol oxidation system (heated at 140 °C for 240 min in dimethyl sulfoxide) was employed. It was demonstrated that pyridoxamine could directly react with 7-ketocholesterol via the addition reaction. The reaction involved a nucleophilic attack of the free amine group of pyridoxamine on 7-ketocholesterol (an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound). This type of reaction was also found to occur in beef patties by chromatographic and spectral analyses.

  20. Four New Flavonoids with α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities from Morus alba var. tatarica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Long; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wan, Chuan-Xing; Zhou, Zhong-Bo; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Four new flavonoids, mortatarins A-D (1-4, resp.), along with eight known flavonoids (5-12) were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba var. tatarica. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis, and the absolute configuration of 4 was determined by analysis of its CD spectrum. All isolates were tested for inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase. Compounds 4, 7, and 8 exhibited a significant degree of inhibition with IC50 values of 5.0 ± 0.3, 7.5 ± 0.5, and 5.9 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  1. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Xiu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession, and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities.

  2. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Pinus species essential oils and their constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesi, Marco; Menichini, Federica; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica R; Conforti, Filomena; Passalacqua, Nicodemo G; Statti, Giancarlo A; Menichini, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity of the essential oils from Pinus nigra subsp. nigra, P. nigra var. calabrica, and P. heldreichii subsp. leucodermis. This activity is relevant to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), since cholinesterase drugs are currently the only drugs available to treat AD. P. heldreichii subsp. leucodermis exhibited the most promising activity, with IC(50) values of 51.1 and 80.6 microg/mL against AChE and BChE, respectively. An interesting activity against AChE was also observed with P. nigra subsp. nigra essential oil, with an IC(50) value of 94.4 microg/mL. Essential oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS with the purpose of investigating their relationships with the observed activities. Among the identified constituents, terpinolene, beta-phellandrene, linalyl acetate, trans-caryophyllene, and terpinen-4-ol were tested. trans-Caryophyllene and terpinen-4-ol inhibited BChE with IC(50) values of 78.6 and 107.6 microg/mL, respectively. beta-Phellandrene was selective against AChE (IC(50) value of 120.2 microg/mL).

  3. In vitro antioxidant, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of fractions from Cienfuegosia digitata Cav., Sida alba L. and Sida acuta Burn f. (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, K; Souza, A; Coulibaly, A Y; Meda, N T R; Kiendrebeogo, M; Lamien-Meda, A; Millogo-Rasolodimby, J; Lamidi, M; Nacoulma, O G

    2010-11-15

    In this study polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, lipoxygenase (LOX) and Xanthine Oxidase (XO) inhibitory effects of n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of aqueous acetone extracts from S. alba L., S. acuta Burn f and Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. were investigated. The total phenolics, flavonoids, flavonols and total tannins were determined by spectrophotometric methods using Folin-ciocalteu, AlCl3 reagents and tannic acid, respectively. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using three methods: inhibition of free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydramzyl (DPPH), ABTS radical cation decolorization assay and Iron (III) to iron (II) reduction activity (FRAP). For enzymatic activity, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities were used. This study shows a relationship between polyphenol contents, antioxidant and enzymatic activities. Present results showed that ethyl acetate and dichloromethane fractions elicit the highest polyphenol content, antioxidant and enzymatic activities.

  4. Lactoferricin-related peptides with inhibitory effects on ACE-dependent vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, José M; Burguete, María C; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Enrique, María; Vallés, Salvador; Salom, Juan B; Torregrosa, Germán; Marcos, José F; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma

    2006-07-26

    A selection of lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-related peptides with an angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect have been examined using in vitro and ex vivo functional assays. Peptides that were analyzed included a set of sequence-related antimicrobial hexapeptides previously reported and two representative LfcinB-derived peptides. In vitro assays using hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL) and angiotensin I as substrates allowed us to select two hexapeptides, PACEI32 (Ac-RKWHFW-NH2) and PACEI34 (Ac-RKWLFW-NH2), and also a LfcinB-derived peptide, LfcinB17-31 (Ac-FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA-NH2). Ex vivo functional assays using rabbit carotid arterial segments showed PACEI32 (both D- and L-enantiomers) and LfcinB17-31 have inhibitory effects on ACE-dependent angiotensin I-induced contraction. None of the peptides exhibited in vitro ACE inhibitory activity using bradykinin as the substrate. In conclusion, three bioactive lactoferricin-related peptides exhibit inhibitory effects on both ACE activity and ACE-dependent vasoconstriction with potential to modulate hypertension that deserves further investigation.

  5. Differentiation-associated decrease in muscarinic receptor sensitivity in human neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkilae, J.E.; Scott, J.G.; Suominen, L.A.; Akerman, K.E.O.

    1987-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor-linked increases in intracellular free Ca 2+ as measured with quin-2 and Ca 2+ release from monolayers of cells have been measured in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Induction of differentiation with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) leads to a decrease in the sensitivity of the cells to low concentrations of agonists with respect to the induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ and stimulation of Ca 2+ efflux. No decrease in agonist binding affinity was observed when the displacement of a labelled antagonist, 3 H-NMS, by a non-labelled agonist was studied

  6. Preschool Inhibitory Control Predicts ADHD Group Status and Inhibitory Weakness in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisa A; Schneider, Heather; Mahone, E Mark

    2017-12-26

    Discriminative utility of performance measures of inhibitory control was examined in preschool children with and without ADHD to determine whether performance measures added to diagnostic prediction and to prediction of informant-rated day-to-day executive function. Children ages 4-5 years (N = 105, 61% boys; 54 ADHD, medication-naïve) were assessed using performance measures (Auditory Continuous Performance Test for Preschoolers-Commission errors, Conflicting Motor Response Test, NEPSY Statue) and caregiver (parent, teacher) ratings of inhibition (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool version). Performance measures and parent and teacher reports of inhibitory control significantly and uniquely predicted ADHD group status; however, performance measures did not add to prediction of group status beyond parent reports. Performance measures did significantly predict classroom inhibitory control (teacher ratings), over and above parent reports of inhibitory control. Performance measures of inhibitory control may be adequate predictors of ADHD status and good predictors of young children's classroom inhibitory control, demonstrating utility as components of clinical assessments. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effect of N-Terminal Acylation on the Activity of Myostatin Inhibitory Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kentaro; Nakamura, Akari; Rentier, Cédric; Mino, Yusaku; Asari, Tomo; Saga, Yusuke; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-04-19

    Inhibition of myostatin, which negatively regulates skeletal muscle growth, is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle atrophic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy, cachexia and sarcopenia. Recently, we identified peptide A (H-WRQNTRYSRIEAIKIQILSKLRL-NH2 ), the 23-amino-acid minimum myostatin inhibitory peptide derived from mouse myostatin prodomain, and highlighted the importance of its N-terminal tryptophan residue for the effective inhibition. In this study, we synthesized a series of acylated peptide derivatives focused on the tryptophan residue to develop potent myostatin inhibitors. As a result of the investigation, a more potent derivative of peptide A was successfully identified in which the N-terminal tryptophan residue is replaced with a 2-naphthyloxyacetyl moiety to give an inhibitory peptide three times (1.19±0.11 μm) more potent than parent peptide A (3.53±0.25 μm). This peptide could prove useful as a new starting point for the development of improved inhibitory peptides. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of Salvia tomentosa Mill. essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREY MARCHEV

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and bioactivity of essential oil from Salvia tomentosa Mill. natively grown in Bulgaria were investigated. GC-MS analysis identified 60 compounds which represented 98% of the oil constituents. The prevalent constituents were monoterpenes with eight dominant compounds being identified: borneol (10.3%, β-pinene (9%, camphor (7.9%, α-pinene (6%, camphene (4%, 1.8-cineole (3.8%, α-limonene (3.5% and β-caryophyllene (3%. The essential oil showed considerable acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (IC50=0.28±0.06 µg/mL, comparable with that of galanthamine. Study of antioxidant activity strongly suggested that the hydrogen atom transfer reaction was preferable over the electron transfer (ORAC=175.0±0.40 µM Trolox equivalents/g oil and FRAP=1.45±0.21 mM Trolox equivalents/g oil. The essential oil showed moderate antifungal and antibacterial activities against Candida albicans and Gram-positive bacteria, whereas it was almost inactive against the investigated Gram-negative strains. The results suggested that the essential oil of Bulgarian S. tomentosa could be considered as a prospective active ingredient for prevention of oxidative stress-related and neurodegenerative disorders in aromatherapy. Because of the high antioxidant capacity, the oil could be considered as natural supplement or antioxidant in cosmetics and food products.

  9. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is associated with aneurysmal expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Jie-Hong; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sukhova, Galina K

    2003-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine released mainly from macrophages and activated lymphocytes. Both atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are inflammatory diseases tightly linked to the function of these cells. The correlation and contribution o...... of MIF to these human diseases remain unknown, although a recent rabbit study showed expression of this cytokine in atherosclerotic lesions.......Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine released mainly from macrophages and activated lymphocytes. Both atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are inflammatory diseases tightly linked to the function of these cells. The correlation and contribution...

  10. Effect of partial volume correction on muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckesser, M.; Ziemons, K.; Griessmeier, M.; Sonnenberg, F.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Hufnagel, A.; Elger, C.E.; Hacklaender, T.; Holschbach, M.

    1997-01-01

    Animal experiments and preliminary results in humans have indicated alterations of hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy often present with a reduction in hippocampal volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hippocampal atrophy on the quantification of mAChR with single photon emission tomography (SPET) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Cerebral uptake of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist [ 123 I]4-iododexetimide (IDex) was investigated by SPET in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy of unilateral (n=6) or predominantly unilateral (n=1) onset. Regions of interest were drawn on co-registered magnetic resonance images. Hippocampal volume was determined in these regions and was used to correct the SPET results for partial volume effects. A ratio of hippocampal IDex binding on the affected side to that on the unaffected side was used to detect changes in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density. Before partial volume correction a decrease in hippocampal IDex binding on the focus side was found in each patient. After partial volume no convincing differences remained. Our results indicate that the reduction in hippocampal IDex binding in patients with epilepsy is due to a decrease in hippocampal volume rather than to a decrease in receptor concentration. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Plant Manilkara subsericea against Biological Activities of Lachesis muta Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coriolano De Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom is composed of a mixture of substances that caused in victims a variety of pathophysiological effects. Besides antivenom, literature has described plants able to inhibit injuries and lethal activities induced by snake venoms. This work describes the inhibitory potential of ethanol, hexane, ethyl acetate, or dichloromethane extracts and fractions from stem and leaves of Manilkara subsericea against in vivo (hemorrhagic and edema and in vitro (clotting, hemolysis, and proteolysis activities caused by Lachesis muta venom. All the tested activities were totally or at least partially reduced by M. subsericea. However, when L. muta venom was injected into mice 15 min first or after the materials, hemorrhage and edema were not inhibited. Thus, M. subsericea could be used as antivenom in snakebites of L. muta. And, this work also highlights Brazilian flora as a rich source of molecules with antivenom properties.

  12. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of fourteen ethnomedicinally used African spices and culinary herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzoyem, Jean Paul; Kuete, Victor; McGaw, Lyndy J; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2014-10-28

    Culinary herbs and spices are widely used ethnomedically across Africa. They are traditionally employed in the treatment of several ailments including inflammation disorders, pain alleviation and infectious diseases. Pharmacological studies are necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use and safety. In this study, the 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial and the cytotoxic activities, total phenolic and flavonoid contents of fourteen edible plants were investigated. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity was evaluated by the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay method. The antioxidant activity was determined using free-radical scavenging assays. The antimycobacterial activity was determined by a broth microdilution method against three species of mycobacteria: Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium fortuitum using tetrazolium violet as growth indicator. The cytotoxicity was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on Vero monkey kidney cells. All the extracts tested had some 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity ranging from 32.9 to 78.64%. Adansonia digitata (fruit) had the highest antioxidant capacity (IC₅₀ values of 8.15 μg/mL and 9.16 μg/mL in the DPPH and ABTS assays respectively; TEAC of 0.75 in the FRAP assay) along with the highest amount of total phenolics (237.68 mg GAE/g) and total flavonoids (16.14 mg E/g). There were good correlations between DPPH and ABTS values (R(2) 0.98) and between total phenolics and total flavonoids (R(2) 0.94). Tamarindus indica had significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium aurum (MIC 78 μg/mL). As could be expected with edible plants, all the extracts had a relatively low cytotoxicity with LC₅₀ values higher than 102 μg/mL with the exception of the two Aframomum species (33 and 74 μg/mL). This study provides scientific support for some of the the traditional uses

  13. Metabolites with Gram-negative bacteria quorum sensing inhibitory activity from the marine animal endogenic fungus Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan Dong; Zhou, Li Man; Ma, Qing Yun; Huang, Sheng Zhuo; Wang, Pei; Dai, Hao Fu; Zhao, You Xing

    2017-01-01

    Three new compounds named penicitor A, aculene E and penicitor B, as well as four known compounds, were isolated from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD08 associated with a marine animal Sipunculus nudus from the Haikou bay of China. Their planar structures and absolute configurations were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic data, Mosher's method, CD spectrum analysis along with quantum ECD calculation. Among them, compounds 2-7 showed quorum sensing inhibitory activity against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and could significantly reduce violacein production in N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) induced C. violaceum CV026 cultures at sub-inhibitory concentrations.

  14. Inhibitory activity of a standardized elderberry liquid extract against clinically-relevant human respiratory bacterial pathogens and influenza A and B viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domann Eugen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Black elderberries (Sambucus nigra L. are well known as supportive agents against common cold and influenza. It is further known that bacterial super-infection during an influenza virus (IV infection can lead to severe pneumonia. We have analyzed a standardized elderberry extract (Rubini, BerryPharma AG for its antimicrobial and antiviral activity using the microtitre broth micro-dilution assay against three Gram-positive bacteria and one Gram-negative bacteria responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, as well as cell culture experiments for two different strains of influenza virus. Methods The antimicrobial activity of the elderberry extract was determined by bacterial growth experiments in liquid cultures using the extract at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The inhibitory effects were determined by plating the bacteria on agar plates. In addition, the inhibitory potential of the extract on the propagation of human pathogenic H5N1-type influenza A virus isolated from a patient and an influenza B virus strain was investigated using MTT and focus assays. Results For the first time, it was shown that a standardized elderberry liquid extract possesses antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria of Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, and the Gram-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis in liquid cultures. The liquid extract also displays an inhibitory effect on the propagation of human pathogenic influenza viruses. Conclusion Rubini elderberry liquid extract is active against human pathogenic bacteria as well as influenza viruses. The activities shown suggest that additional and alternative approaches to combat infections might be provided by this natural product.

  15. Inhibitory effects of constituents of Morinda citrifolia seeds on elastase and tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Megumi; Murata, Kazuya; Fukuhama, Akiko; Naruto, Shunsuke; Fujita, Tadashi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    A 50% ethanolic extract (MCS-ext) from seeds of Morinda citrifolia ("noni" seeds) showed more potent in vitro inhibition of elastase and tyrosinase, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity than extracts of M. citrifolia leaves or flesh. Activity-guided fractionation of MCS-ext using in vitro assays led to the isolation of ursolic acid as an active constituent of elastase inhibitory activity. 3,3'-Bisdemethylpinoresinol, americanin A, and quercetin were isolated as active constituents having both tyrosinase inhibitory and radical scavenging activities. Americanin A and quercetin also showed superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity. These active compounds were isolated from noni seeds for the first time.

  16. Antioxidant and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens Infusions Fermented with Kombucha Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Gómez, Claudia I; González-Laredo, Rubén F; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; Pérez, Mş Del Mar Larrosa; Moreno-Jiménez, Martha R; Flores-Rueda, Ana G; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E

    2016-09-01

    Physicochemical properties, consumer acceptance, antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of infusions and fermented beverages of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens were compared. Among physicochemical parameters, only the pH of fermented beverages decreased compared with the unfermented infusions. No relevant changes were reported in consumer preference between infusions and fermented beverages. Phenolic profile measured by UPLC MS/MS analysis demonstrated significant concentration changes of these compounds in plant infusions and fermented beverages. Fermentation induced a decrease in the concentration required to stabilize 50% of DPPH radical ( i . e . lower IC 50 ). Additionally, it enhanced the antioxidant activity measured by the nitric oxide scavenging assay (14% of E. camaldulensis and 49% of L. glaucescens ); whereas relevant improvements in the fermented beverage were not observed in the lipid oxidation assay compared with unfermented infusions. The same behaviour was observed in the inhibitory activity of ACE; however, both infusions and fermented beverages had lower IC 50 than positive control (captopril). The present study demonstrated that fermentation has an influence on the concentration of phenolics and their potential bioactivity. E. camaldulensis and L. glaucescens can be considered as natural sources of biocompounds with antihypertensive potential used either as infusions or fermented beverages.

  17. Antioxidant and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens Infusions Fermented with Kombucha Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia I. Gamboa-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical properties, consumer acceptance, antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activities of infusions and fermented beverages of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens were compared. Among physicochemical parameters, only the pH of fermented beverages decreased compared with the unfermented infusions. No relevant changes were reported in consumer preference between infusions and fermented beverages. Phenolic profi le measured by UPLC MS/MS analysis demonstrated significant concentration changes of these compounds in plant infusions and fermented beverages. Fermentation induced a decrease in the concentration required to stabilize 50 % of DPPH radical (i.e. lower IC50. Additionally, it enhanced the antioxidant activity measured by the nitric oxide scavenging assay (14 % of E. camaldulensis and 49 % of L. glaucescens; whereas relevant improvements in the fermented beverage were not observed in the lipid oxidation assay compared with unfermented infusions. The same behaviour was observed in the inhibitory activity of ACE; however, both infusions and fermented beverages had lower IC50 than positive control (captopril. The present study demonstrated that fermentation has an influence on the concentration of phenolics and their potential bioactivity. E. camaldulensis and L. glaucescens can be considered as natural sources of biocompounds with antihypertensive potential used either as infusions or fermented beverages.

  18. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  19. Interaction between BDNF Polymorphism and Physical Activity on Inhibitory Performance in the Elderly without Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Canivet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the elderly, physical activity (PA enhances cognitive performances, increases brain plasticity and improves brain health. The neurotrophic hypothesis is that the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is implicated in brain plasticity and cognition, is triggered by PA because motoneurons secrete BDNF into the bloodstream during exercise. Individual differences in cognitive performance may be explained by individual differences in genetic predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism on the BDNF gene, BDNFVal66Met, affects activity-dependent BDNF secretion. This study investigated the influence of the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism on the relationship between PA and controlled inhibition performance in older adults.Methods: A total of 114 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age = 71.53 years old were evaluated. Participants were genotyped for the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism. We evaluated inhibitory performance using choice reaction times (RT and error rates from a Simon-like task and estimated their PA using two self-reported questionnaires. We established four groups according to PA level (active vs. inactive and BDNFVal66Met genotype (Met carriers vs. Val-homozygous. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and ANCOVA, including age, gender and body mass index as covariates.Results: The BDNFVal66Met polymorphism interacted with PA on controlled inhibition performance. More specifically, inactive Val-homozygous participants exhibited a lower inhibition performance than active Val homozygotes and inactive Met carriers; the former had a higher error rate without differences in RT.Conclusion: Differences between individuals on inhibitory performance may be partially understood by the interaction between genetic influence in BDNF secretion and PA level. The results of this study clearly support the neurotrophic hypothesis that BDNF synthesis is an important mechanism underlying the influence of physical activity on brain

  20. Inhibitory activities of Moringa oleifera leaf extract against α-glucosidase enzyme in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Laga, A.; Arif, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    Alpha-glucosidase is a key enzyme in the final process of breaking carbohydrates into glucose. Inhibition of α-glucosidase affected more absorption of glucose, so it can reduce hyperglycemia condition. The aims of this study is to determine the effectiveness of inhibition wet and dried Moringa oleifera leaf extract through α-glucosidase activity in vitro. The effectiveness study of inhibition on the activity of α-glucosidase enzyme obtained from white glutinous rice (Oryza sativa glutinosa) was carried out using wet and dried kelor leaf extract of 13% (w/v) with 10 mM α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) substrate. A positive control used 1% acarbose and substrate without addition of extract was a negative control. Inhibitory activity was measured using spectrophotometers at a wavelength of 400 nm. The result showed that the inhibition activity against α-glucosidase enzyme of dried leaf extract, wet leaf extract and acarbose was 81,39%, 83,94%, and 95,4%, respectively on pH 7,0. The effectiveness inhibition of the wet Moringa leaf extract was greater than the dried leaf extract. The findings suggest that M. oleifera leaf has the potential to be developed as an alternative food therapy for diabetics.

  1. Four new sesqui-lignans isolated from Acanthopanax senticosus and their diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Lin; Li, Na; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Xing, Shan-Shan; Qi, Shi-Zhou; Tuo, Zhen-Dong; Zhang, Le; Li, Ban-Ban; Chen, Jian-Guang; Cui, Long

    2016-03-01

    Four new sesqui-lignans, (7R, 7'R, 7″S, 8S, 8'S, 8″S)-4',5″-dihydroxy-3,5,3',4″-tetramethoxy-7,9':7',9-diepoxy-4,8″-oxy-8,8'-sesquineo-lignan-7″,9″-diol (1), (7R, 7'R, 7″S, 8S, 8'S, 8″S)-4',3″-dihydroxy-3,5,3',5',4″-pentamethoxy-7,9':7',9-diepoxy-4,8″-oxy-8,8'-sesquineo-lignan-7″,9″-diol (2), (7R, 7'R, 7″S, 8S, 8'S, 8″S)-3',4″-dihydroxy-3,5,4',5″-tetramethoxy-7,9':7',9-diepoxy-4,8″-oxy-8,8'-sesquineo-lignan-7″,9″-diol (3) and acanthopanax A (7) together with three known compounds (4-6) were isolated from the EtOAc-soluble extract of Acanthopanax senticosus. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and physicochemical analyses. All the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against DGAT1 and DGAT2. Among them, compounds 1-6 were found to exhibit selective inhibitory activity on DGAT1 with IC50 values ranging from 61.1 ± 1.3 to 97.7 ± 1.1 μM and compound 7 showed selective inhibition of DGAT2 with IC50 value 93.2 ± 1.2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitory effects of ascorbic acid, vitamin E, and vitamin B-complex on the biological activities induced by Bothrops venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carlos Henrique de Moura; Assaid Simão, Anderson; Marcussi, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds have been widely studied with the aim of complementing antiophidic serum therapy. The present study evaluated the inhibitory potential of ascorbic acid and a vitamin complex, composed of ascorbic acid, vitamin E, and all the B-complex vitamins, on the biological activities induced by snake venoms. The effect of vitamins was evaluated on the phospholipase, proteolytic, coagulant, and fibrinogenolytic activities induced by Bothrops moojeni (Viperidae), B. jararacussu, and B. alternatus snake venoms, and the hemagglutinating activity induced by B. jararacussu venom. The vitamin complex (1:5 and 1:10 ratios) totally inhibited the fibrinogenolytic activity and partially the phospholipase activity and proteolytic activity on azocasein induced by the evaluated venoms. Significant inhibition was observed in the coagulation of human plasma induced by venoms from B. alternatus (1:2.5 and 1:5, to vitamin complex and ascorbic acid) and B. moojeni (1:2.5 and 1:5, to vitamin complex and ascorbic acid). Ascorbic acid inhibited 100% of the proteolytic activities of B. moojeni and B. alternatus on azocasein, at 1:10 ratio, the effects of all the venoms on fibrinogen, the hemagglutinating activity of B. jararacussu venom, and also extended the plasma coagulation time induced by all venoms analyzed. The vitamins analyzed showed relevant in vitro inhibitory potential over the activities induced by Bothrops venoms, suggesting their interaction with toxins belonging to the phospholipase A2, protease, and lectin classes. The results can aid further research in clarifying the possible mechanisms of interaction between vitamins and snake enzymes.

  3. Involvement of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons and M1 and M4 Muscarinic Receptors in Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ztaou, Samira; Maurice, Nicolas; Camon, Jeremy; Guiraudie-Capraz, Gaëlle; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Beurrier, Corinne; Liberge, Martine; Amalric, Marianne

    2016-08-31

    Over the last decade, striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) have reemerged as key actors in the pathophysiology of basal-ganglia-related movement disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we address the role of ChI activity in the expression of parkinsonian-like motor deficits in a unilateral nigrostriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model using optogenetic and pharmacological approaches. Dorsal striatal photoinhibition of ChIs in lesioned ChAT(cre/cre) mice expressing halorhodopsin in ChIs reduces akinesia, bradykinesia, and sensorimotor neglect. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) blockade by scopolamine produces similar anti-parkinsonian effects. To decipher which of the mAChR subtypes provides these beneficial effects, systemic and intrastriatal administration of the selective M1 and M4 mAChR antagonists telenzepine and tropicamide, respectively, were tested in the same model of Parkinson's disease. The two compounds alleviate 6-OHDA lesion-induced motor deficits. Telenzepine produces its beneficial effects by blocking postsynaptic M1 mAChRs expressed on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) at the origin of the indirect striatopallidal and direct striatonigral pathways. The anti-parkinsonian effects of tropicamide were almost completely abolished in mutant lesioned mice that lack M4 mAChRs specifically in dopamine D1-receptor-expressing neurons, suggesting that postsynaptic M4 mAChRs expressed on direct MSNs mediate the antiakinetic action of tropicamide. The present results show that altered cholinergic transmission via M1 and M4 mAChRs of the dorsal striatum plays a pivotal role in the occurrence of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The striatum, where dopaminergic and cholinergic systems interact, is the pivotal structure of basal ganglia involved in pathophysiological changes underlying Parkinson's disease. Here, using optogenetic and pharmacological approaches, we investigated the involvement of striatal

  4. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some selected Nigerian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Elufioye

    Full Text Available Plants have been found to be useful as memory enhansers as well as antiaging. Twenty two of such plants from sixteen families were investigated for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE inhibitory activities using the in vitro Ellman's spectrophotometric and in situ bioautographic methods with physostigmine as standard. At least three morphological parts were examined for each of the plants investigated and the test concentration was 42.5 µg/ mL. Some plants were active on both enzymes though with some morphological parts being more active than others. The root bark of Spondias mombin showed the highest activity to the two enzymes; 64.77% and 83.94% on AChE and BuChE respectively. Other plant parts of the selected plants exhibited some remarkable selectivity in their actions. Those selectively active against AChE were Alchornia laxiflora stem bark (41.12% and root bark, Callophyllum inophyllurn root bark (56.52%. The leaves of C. jagus (74.25%, Morinda lucida leaves (40.15%, Peltophorum pterocarpum leaves and stem bark (49.5% and 68.85%, respectively, physiostigmine gave 90.31% inhibition. Generally higher activities were found against BuChE. Bombax bromoposenze leaves, root bark and stem bark were particularly active. The inhibition was over 80%. Other selective plant parts are the leaves Antiaris africana, Cissampelos owarensis aerial parts (78.96%, Combretum molle leaves and stem bark (90.42% and 88.13%, respectively, Dioscorea dumentorum root bark and tuber (over 87%, G. kola leaves, Markhamia tomentosa root bark, Pycnanthus angolensis stem bark and Tetrapleura tetraptera leaves. Most of these plants are taken as food or are food ingredients in Nigeria and may account for the low incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the country and may play certain roles in the mediation of the disease.

  5. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity and antioxidant capacity of bioactive peptides derived from enzymatic hydrolysis of buffalo milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Hamid, Mahmoud; Otte, Jeanette; De Gobba, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    was hydrolysed using papain, pepsin or trypsin. The papain hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity and radical scavenging capacity and was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and characterized by LC-MS analysis. A SEC-fraction with intermediate peptide size showed very high ACE...

  6. Antioxidant activity and inhibitory effects of 2-hydroxy-3-methylcyclopent-2-enone isolated from ribose-histidine Maillard reaction products on aldose reductase and tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to better understand the functional properties of ribose and 20 amino acid Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The ABTS + radical scavenging ability of the ribose-20 amino acid MRPs was evaluated. Among the MRPs, ribose-histidine MRPs (RH-MRPs) showed the highest inhibitory activities on the ABTS + radical scavenging ability, aldose redu