WorldWideScience

Sample records for activating collaborative cancer

  1. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations: Advancing Collaboration and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Fleshman, Julie M; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    2015-11-01

    A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15-16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally.

  2. Confronting human papilloma virus/oropharyngeal cancer: a model for interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative practice model related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer highlights the role of the dental hygienist in addressing this condition. The incidence of HPV associated head and neck cancer is rising. Multiple professionals including the dental hygienist can work collaboratively to confront this growing public health concern. A critical review applies the growth and utilization of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to multi-disciplinary models addressing the human papilloma virus and oropharyngeal cancers. A model related to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer addresses an oral systemic condition that supports the inclusion of a dental hygienist on collaborative teams addressing prevention, detection, treatment and cure of OPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Active and passive smoking and risk of death from pancreatic cancer: findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingsong; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Ueda, Junko; Kurosawa, Michiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    There is uncertainty in the risk of pancreatic cancer with particular aspects of smoking, such as a dose-response relationship and cumulative amount, in Japanese men and women. Very few studies have addressed the role of passive smoking in pancreatic cancer among Japanese women. We examined the association between active or passive smoking and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer using data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. The cohort participants (46,395 men and 64,190 women) were followed-up for mortality from baseline (1988-1990) through December 31, 2009. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During follow-up, we recorded 611 pancreatic cancer deaths. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, current smokers had a significantly increased risk of death from pancreatic cancer compared with non-smokers, with an RR of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.33-2.19). The risk of death from pancreatic cancer significantly increased with increasing numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in public spaces was not associated with risk of death from pancreatic cancer. The RR for women who reported ETS exposure was 1.20 (95% CI: 0.87-1.67). Women exposed to ETS during childhood or adolescence had 1.21-fold increased risk, but the association was statistically insignificant. Cigarette smoking is associated with an approximately 70% increase in the risk of death from pancreatic cancer. Further studies with improved exposure assessment are needed to better quantify the association between passive smoking and pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A pooling project of studies participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; McClain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This paper describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. PMID:28600297

  5. 76 FR 13404 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Option to Collaborator AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National... Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program's Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator. [[Page 13405... Evaluation Program (CTEP)'s Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator. The proposed revision represents a...

  6. Outcomes of interprofessional collaboration for hospitalized cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin-Rodriguez, Leticia; D'Amour, Danielle; Leduc, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of the intensity of interprofessional collaboration on hospitalized cancer patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 312 patients to examine the effects of intensity of interprofessional collaboration (low vs high intensity collaboration) on patient satisfaction, uncertainty, pain management, and length of stay. Data on the intensity of interprofessional collaboration, patient satisfaction, and uncertainty were collected from professionals and patients using valid and reliable instruments. Administrative and clinical records were used to calculate the index of pain management and length of hospital stay. The analysis revealed the existence of significant differences between patients who are cared for by teams operating with a high intensity of collaboration and those who are cared for by teams operating with a low intensity of collaboration, as measured by the mean satisfaction (P management (P = .047). The analysis also found no significant difference (P = .217) in their length of hospital stay. The findings suggest that intensity of interprofessional collaboration has a positive effect on patient satisfaction, reduces uncertainty, and improves pain management, yet they also suggest that the degree of collaboration does not influence the length of hospital stay.

  7. Real-time collaboration in activity-based architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2004-01-01

    With the growing research into mobile and ubiquitous computing, there is a need for addressing how such infrastructures can support collaboration between nomadic users. We present the activity based computing paradigm and outline a proposal for handling collaboration in an activity......-based architecture. We argue that activity-based computing establishes a natural and sound conceptual and architectural basis for session management in real-time, synchronous collaboration....

  8. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  9. Mobile Collaborative Informal Learning Design: Study of collaborative effectiveness using Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Zafar Baloch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Mobile Devices (SMD are there for many years but using them as learning tools started to emerge as new research area. The trend to merge collaborative learning methodology by using mobile devices in informal context is important for implementation of Learner Centric Learning (LCL. Survey and numerous studies show that more than 95% of students in colleges are users of these smart mobile devices in developed world. Developing counties are also catching up and we can see this percentage is almost same in university level in these countries. Students are using SMDs for learning in some form. Higher education Institutions also try to embark their E-learning to Mobile learning (ML. The aim of this paper is to do propose operational framework for designing Mobile Collaborative Informal learning activities using SMDs. Show results of experimental and case study done to study the Mobile Collaborative Informal learning using Activity Theory (AT. Core Components of framework are Mobile Learning Activities/Objects, Wireless/Mobile Smart devices, Collaborative knowledge and Collaborative learning. The research mention here is its infancy stage.

  10. Collaborative teacher learning across foci of collaboration : perceived activities and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doppenberg, J.J.; Brok, den P.J.; Bakx, A.W.E.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared teacher collaboration with differing foci, in terms of various learning activities and learning outcomes. A total of 411 teachers from 49 primary schools participated by completing a questionnaire. Foci of collaboration explained significant differences in the frequency with

  11. Modeling cancer registration processes with an enhanced activity diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyalin, D; Williams, W

    2005-01-01

    Adequate instruments are needed to reflect the complexity of routine cancer registry operations properly in a business model. The activity diagram is a key instrument of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for the modeling of business processes. The authors aim to improve descriptions of processes in cancer registration, as well as in other public health domains, through the enhancements of an activity diagram notation within the standard semantics of UML. The authors introduced the practical approach to enhance a conventional UML activity diagram, complementing it with the following business process concepts: timeline, duration for individual activities, responsibilities for individual activities within swimlanes, and descriptive text. The authors used an enhanced activity diagram for modeling surveillance processes in the cancer registration domain. Specific example illustrates the use of an enhanced activity diagram to visualize a process of linking cancer registry records with external mortality files. Enhanced activity diagram allows for the addition of more business concepts to a single diagram and can improve descriptions of processes in cancer registration, as well as in other domains. Additional features of an enhanced activity diagram allow to advance the visualization of cancer registration processes. That, in turn, promotes the clarification of issues related to the process timeline, responsibilities for particular operations, and collaborations among process participants. Our first experiences in a cancer registry best practices development workshop setting support the usefulness of such an approach.

  12. Activity-Based Collaboration for Interactive Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Esbensen, Morten; Tabard, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    , folder, documents, etc., users are able to interact with ‘activities’ which encapsulate files and other low-level resources. In ABC an ‘activity’ can be shared between collaborating users and can be accessed on different devices. As such, ABC is a framework that suits the requirements of designing...... interactive spaces. This chapter provides an overview of ABC with a special focus on its support for collaboration (‘Activity Sharing’) and multiple devices (‘Activity Roaming’). These ABC concepts are illustrated as implemented in two different interactive spaces technologies; ReticularSpaces [1] and the e......LabBench [2, 3]. The chapter discusses the benefits of activity-based collaboration support for these interactive spaces, while also discussing limitations and challenges to be addressed in further research....

  13. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  14. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  15. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... identification of molecular targets associated with cancer, the focus of drug development has shifted from... Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI. The CRADA partner will (a) generate and characterize...; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment...

  16. Expanding public-private collaborations to enhance cancer drug development: a report of the Institute of Medicine's workshop series, "Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Monica M; Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J

    2014-11-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM's National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. A Formative Evaluation of Healthy Habits, Healthy U: A Collaborative School-Based Cancer Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alicia; Spear, Caile; Pritchard, Mary; George, Kayla; Young, Kyle; Smith, Carrie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Healthy Habits, Healthy U (HHHU) is a two-day school-based primary prevention cancer education program that uses interactive classroom presentations designed to help students learn how to reduce their cancer risks. HHHU is a collaboration between a local cancer hospital, school district and university. HHHU incorporates real cancerous and…

  18. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD's International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  19. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD’s International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  20. Expanding Public-Private Collaborations to Enhance Cancer Drug Development: A Report of the Institute of Medicine’s Workshop Series, “Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J.

    2014-01-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. PMID:25326161

  1. Use of activity logs to improve online collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Coll Salvador

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of works that center their interest in eLearning platforms and the data mining of participants’ activity. The studies in this research area generate information, through the analysis of such logs and data, that is provided to the students in real time to help them to collaborate and learn through collaboration on the platform. There are studies from different areas of study such as Learning Analytics, Educational Data Mining, Group Awareness Tools or Interaction Analysis Tools. The review takes a double perspective: i to analyze the data extracted from activity logs, their processing, the information generated and the ways to communicate it; and ii to explorer the model and the instruments used to assess how the information provided impact on online collaborative processes and/or the learning. The conclusions emphasize that the models of collaborative learning that justifies the selection of the data extracted from the activity logs, the processing, the information generated and provided to the students and the way of communicating it, are not explicitly stated. In addition, important biases are detected because of not considering the multidimensional nature of the collaborative learning processes. Also, few studies analyze the relations between students' uses of the information provided and the quality of their collaborative processes and learning results. The very few studies that do analyze such relation do not go into depth on the changes in group dynamics caused by information.

  2. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K; Provan, Keith G; Johnson, Kimberly J; Leischow, Scott J

    2012-07-25

    The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. 'Acquisition of additional funding or other resources' and 'development of new tools and methods' were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an outcome of collaboration, more tangible outcomes were not being

  3. 75 FR 17412 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), National... Evaluation Program (CTEP) INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OPTION. The proposed policy, if finalized, would establish... recommended Intellectual Property Option and Institution Notification if they wish to be considered for...

  4. Enhancement of collaboration activities utilizing 21st century learning design rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, Dave D.; Gargar, Clare V., Lady; Nallano, Gerlett Grace D.; Magsayo, Joy R.; Guarin, Rica Mae B.; Lahoylahoy, Myrna E.

    2018-01-01

    Twenty first century learners have incredibly diverse learning interests, needs, and aspirations. Engaging middle school students and sculpting successful, confident, and creative learners is a constant endeavor for educators [4]. In the 21st century classroom environments in which students can develop the skills they need in workplace. Collaboration occurs when students work together to create, discuss challenge and develop deeper critical thinking. In today's workplace, collaboration is essential as only few tasks are completed alone (Calgary and Park, 2016). The collaborative project-based curriculum used in this classroom develops the higher order thinking skills, effective communication skills, and knowledge of technology that students will need in the 21st century workplace. The study therefore aims to promote collaboration skills among learners as it is deemed as one of the top 21st century skills. Collaborative learning unleashes a unique intellectual and social synergy. This study aims to enhance the collaborative skills of students through conducting collaboration activities in learning the Ecosystem. This research utilizes pretest-posttest and employs descriptive research designs. It uses modified activities about the lesson on Ecosystem and utilizes a Collaboration Rubric to rate the modified activities. The activities were rated by ten In-Service teachers and there are 105 students who participated in doing the activities. The paired t-test is then used to analyze the data. The In-Service teachers evaluated the 1st and 2nd adapted activity and are rated as fair. Thus, the modified activities were enhanced since the ratings of each activity did not meet the criterion of the collaboration rubric. As for the 3rd adapted activity is rated as excellent and is ready for implementation. The evaluators provided comments and suggestions such as producing colored pictures on the activities, omitting some questions, and making the words simpler to enhance the

  5. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Kamat, Ashish M.; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B.; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety o...

  6. Authoring and Enactment of Mobile Pyramid-Based Collaborative Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Kalpani; Hernández-Leo, Davinia

    2018-01-01

    Collaborative learning flow patterns (CLFPs) formulate best practices for the orchestration of activity sequences and collaboration mechanisms that can elicit fruitful social interactions. Mobile technology features offer opportunities to support interaction mediation and content accessibility. However, existing mobile collaborative learning…

  7. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  8. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  9. Report on Integrating Activities and Models for Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Ryberg, Thomas

    This report is the deliverable for work package (WP) 28.3 “Integrated network and activities for the exchange of and collaboration between Master students, PhD students and professors” of the European Research Team (ERT) on Conditions for Productive Networked Learning Environments. The objective...... of WP28.3 is to build up an integrated network and activities for the exchange and collaboration between Master students, professional masters, PhD students and professors and to establish a virtual community around the research area of conditions for productive learning in networked learning...

  10. The Status of Public School/Business Collaborative Activities in Virginia, 1998 - 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Dennis D.

    2001-01-01

    The Status of Public School/Business Collaborative Activities in Virginia, 1998-1999. Dennis D. Parsons Steve R. Parson, Chair (ABSTRACT) The purpose of this study was to ascertain important information that was lacking about current school/business collaborative activities in the Commonwealth of Virginia and to compare those activities to the findings of a study conducted by Larkin C. Phillips of school/business collaborative activities during the 1990-91 school year. This s...

  11. Cancer in Africa: opportunities for collaborative research and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebamowo, C A; Akarolo-Anthony, S

    2009-06-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem causing increasing morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Underlying trends are changing the pattern of cancer and this is also being influenced by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Even though the pattern of cancer varies across Africa, there are identifiable trends. Breast and cervical cancers, and Kaposi sarcoma are the commonest cancers in women, while Kaposi sarcoma, liver and prostate cancers are the commonest in men. Cancer causes more morbidity and mortality in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Infections account for a disproportionate amount of cancers in Africa. The HIV epidemic is contributing to increased prevalence of many cancers particularly those associated with Herpes and Papilloma viruses. Tobacco use, another major carcinogen, is increasing, particularly among the young. Dietary factors, alcohol use, physical inactivity and environmental pollution are also important aetiological factors of cancer in Africa. In developing countries, poverty, limited government health budget and poor health care systems complicate cancer prevention, treatment and outcomes. Coordinated response by international agencies and NGOs is needed to help developing countries and several successful models exist. More action is also needed on ensuring safety and quality of chemotherapy and the price needs to be reduced. Responses advocated for cancer control in Africa include banning tobacco use, better regulation of alcohol sale, better environmental planning and immunization against cancer associated viruses. Training of health care workers to diagnose cancer and treat it effectively within limited budgets is needed. Research to develop these new treatments and others, particularly from natural products is urgently needed and this can be done safely within established health research ethics regulatory frameworks. Several opportunities for collaborative research and

  12. The mother-daughter health collaborative: a partnership development to promote cancer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavel, Maghboeba; Thomas, Teleangé; Sanders, Kimberly; Hill, Lydia; Johnson, Marcia

    2010-03-01

    Creating meaningful partnerships with community partners to address cancer disparities remain challenging and a work in progress. This paper examines what started as the traditional formation of an academic-community partnership and evolved well beyond the initial research tasks. We evaluate the partnership process, which includes assessments by the members of the Mother-Daughter Health Collaborative, focusing on how partnership involvement in the data analysis process contributed to a sense of ownership and urgency about providing cancer education. The work of partnership is on-going, fluid, and challenging.

  13. Teacher research as self-study and collaborative activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gade, Sharada

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights two insightful methods for advancing teacher research: practitioner self-study in relation to a range of texts, with which to examine one’s educational landscape; and classroom interventions conceived as a Vygotskian activity, via teacher-researcher collaboration. Both approaches allow teachers and collaborating researchers to share individual expertise across institutional boundaries and engage in creative local action.

  14. Radiology and the cancer services collaborative - an opportunity awaits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, C.J.; Seymour, R.; Wright, L.

    2003-01-01

    The principles and methodologies used by the Cancer Services Collaborative (CSC) are particularly relevant for radiology departments. A radiology project looking at the provision of barium enema examinations is used to highlight how the principles can be applied to a radiology department. Advice on how to access available CSC literature is offered. The CSC principles and methodologies are an important part of the NHS modernization agenda, and offer an exciting vehicle to improve patient care. It is important that radiologists understand the opportunities offered and the challenges posed by the modernization agenda

  15. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Randhawa, Veenu; McFadden, H Gene; Fought, Angela; Bullard, Emily; Spring, Bonnie

    2009-12-02

    High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter) or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask). Primary outcomes will be: 1) calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2) timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3) patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a public service (the Cancer Information Service) with real

  16. Collaboration between physical activity researchers and transport planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crist, Katie; Bolling, Khalisa; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between physical activity (PA) researchers and transport planners is a recommended strategy to combat the physical inactivity epidemic. Data collected by PA researchers could be used to identify, implement and evaluate active transport (AT) projects. However, despite aligned interests......, researchers and transport planners rarely collaborate. This study utilized qualitative methods to 1) gain an in-depth understanding of the data utilized in AT planning, 2) explore the utility of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and accelerometer data in supporting the planning process, 3) identify...... expertise in health or transport planning. A thematic analysis was conducted following structural coding by two researchers. The analysis revealed that geographic and physical activity data that are current, local, objective and specific to individual AT trips would improve upon currently available data...

  17. [Clinical research activity of the French cancer cooperative network: Overview and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Claire; Morin, Franck; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Seitz, Jean-François; Girault, Cécile; Salles, Gilles; Haioun, Corinne; Deschaseaux, Pascal; Casassus, Philippe; Mathiot, Claire; Pujade-Lauraine, Éric; Votan, Bénédicte; Louvet, Christophe; Delpeut, Christine; Bardet, Étienne; Vintonenko, Nadejda; Hoang Xuan, Khê; Vo, Maryline; Michon, Jean; Milleron, Bernard

    The French Cancer Plan 2014-2019 stresses the importance of strengthening collaboration between all stakeholders involved in the fight against cancer, including cancer cooperative groups and intergroups. This survey aimed to describe the basics characteristics and clinical research activity among the Cancer Cooperative Groups (Groupes coopérateurs en oncologie). The second objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to their research activity. A questionnaire was sent to all the clinicians involved in 2014 as investigators in a clinical trial sponsored by one of the ten members of the Cancer Cooperative Groups network. The questions were related to their profile, research activity and the infrastructure existing within their healthcare center to support clinical research and related compliance activities. In total, 366 investigators responded to our survey. The academic clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Cooperative Groups represented an important part of the research activity of the investigators in France in 2014. These academic groups contributed to the opening of many research sites throughout all regions in France. Factors associated with a higher participation of investigators (more than 10 patients enrolled in a trial over a year) include the existing support of healthcare professionals (more than 2 clinical research associate (CRA) OR=11.16 [3.82-32.6] compared to none) and the practice of their research activity in a University Hospital Center (CHU) rather than a Hospital Center (CH) (OR=2.15 [1.20-3.83]). This study highlighted factors that can strengthen investigator clinical research activities and subsequently improve patient access to evidence-based new cancer therapies in France. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  19. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H; Efstathiou, Jason A; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2016-04-27

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts.

  20. Risk, Activism, and Empowerment: Women's Breast Cancer in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mahmoud; Nahon-Serfaty, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of breast cancer in Venezuela is particularly alarming, which is attributed to healthcare inequalities, low health literacy, and lagging compliance with prevention methods (i.e., screening and mammography). While the right to health is acknowledged by the Venezuelan constitution, activism beyond governmental confines is required to increase women's breast cancer awareness and decrease mortality rates. Through the development of social support and strategic communicative methods enacted by healthcare providers, it may be possible to empower women with the tools necessary for breast cancer prevention. This paper discusses issues surrounding women's breast cancer, such as awareness of the disease and its risks, self-advocacy, and the roles of activists, healthcare providers, and society. Specifically, it describes a four-year action-oriented research project developed in Venezuela, which was a collaborative work among researchers, practitioners, NGOs, patients, journalists, and policymakers. The outcomes include higher levels of awareness and interest among community members and organizations to learn and seek more information about women's breast cancer, better understandings of the communicated messages, more media coverage and medical consultations, increasing positive patient treatments, expansion of networking of NGOs, as well as a widely supported declaration for a national response against breast cancer in Venezuela.

  1. Physical Activity and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Physical Activity and Cancer On This Page What is physical activity? What is known about the relationship between physical ...

  2. [Scientific production and cancer-related collaboration networks in Peru 2000-2011: a bibliometric study in Scopus and Science Citation Index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Huamaní, Charles; Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Samanez-Figari, César; González-Alcaide, Gregorio

    2013-03-01

    A bibliometric study was carried out to describe the scientific production on cancer written by Peruvians and published in international health journals, as well as to assess the scientific collaboration networks. It included articles on cancer written in Peru between the years 2000 and 2011 and published in health journals indexed in SCOPUS or Science Citation Index Expanded. In the 358 articles identified, an increase in the production was seen, from 4 articles in 2000 to 57 in 2011.The most studied types were cervical cancer (77 publications); breast cancer (53), and gastric cancer (37). The National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) was the most productive institution (121 articles) and had the highest number of collaborations (180 different institutions). 52 clinical trials were identified, 29 of which had at least one author from INEN. We can conclude that, cancer research is increasing in Peru, the INEN being the most productive institution, with an important participation in clinical trials.

  3. The effectiveness of integration of virtual patients in a collaborative learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hesham F; Donkers, Jeroen; Van Merrienboer, Jeroen J G

    2018-05-07

    Virtual patients (VPs) have been recently integrated within different learning activities. To compare between the effect of using VPs in a collaborative learning activity and using VPs in an independent learning activity on students' knowledge acquisition, retention and transfer. For two different topics, respectively 82 and 76 dental students participated in teaching, learning and assessment sessions with VPs. Students from a female campus and from a male campus have been randomly assigned to condition (collaborative and independent), yielding four experimental groups. Each group received a lecture followed by a learning session using two VPs per topic. Students were administrated immediate and delayed written tests as well as transfer tests using two VPs to assess their knowledge in diagnosis and treatment. For the treatment items of the immediate and delayed written tests, females outperformed males in the collaborative VP group but not in the independent VP group. On the female campus, the use of VPs in a collaborative learning activity is more effective than its use as an independent learning activity in enhancing students' knowledge acquisition and retention. However, the collaborative use of VPs by itself is not enough to produce consistent results across different groups of students and attention should be given to all the factors that would affect students' interaction.

  4. Applying activity theory to computer-supported collaborative learning and work-based activities in corporate settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Margaryan, A.

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in many corporations call for learning outcomes that involve problem solutions, and creating and sharing new knowledge within worksplace situation that may involve collaboration among members of a team. We argue that work-based activities (WBA) and computer-supported collaborative

  5. Cancer, Physical Activity, and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C.; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Lee, Augustine; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the relationship between physical activity and cancer along the cancer continuum, and serves as a synthesis of systematic and meta-analytic reviews conducted to date. There exists a large body of epidemiologic evidence that conclude those who participate in higher levels of physical activity have a reduced likelihood of developing a variety of cancers compared to those who engage in lower levels of physical activity. Despite this observational evidence, the causal pathway underling the association between participation in physical activity and cancer risk reduction remains unclear. Physical activity is also a useful adjunct to improve the deleterious sequelae experienced during cancer treatment. These deleterious sequelae may include fatigue, muscular weakness, deteriorated functional capacity, including many others. The benefits of physical activity during cancer treatment are similar to those experienced after treatment. Despite the growing volume of literature examining physical activity and cancer across the cancer continuum, a number of research gaps exist. There is little evidence on the safety of physical activity among all cancer survivors, as most trials have selectively recruited participants. It is also unclear the specific dose of exercise needed that is optimal for primary cancer prevention or symptom control during and after cancer treatment. PMID:23720265

  6. Developing Web literacy in collaborative inquiry activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, E.; Volman, M.L.L.; Terwel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many children are technically skilled in using the Web, their competences to use it in a critical and meaningful way are usually less well developed. In this article, we report on a multiple case study focusing on the possibilities and limitations of collaborative inquiry activities as an

  7. Do collaborative practical tests encourage student-centered active learning of gross anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rodney A; Cates, Tanya; White, Lloyd; Farchione, Davide

    2016-05-06

    Benefits of collaborative testing have been identified in many disciplines. This study sought to determine whether collaborative practical tests encouraged active learning of anatomy. A gross anatomy course included a collaborative component in four practical tests. Two hundred and seven students initially completed the test as individuals and then worked as a team to complete the same test again immediately afterwards. The relationship between mean individual, team, and difference (between team and individual) test scores to overall performance on the final examination (representing overall learning in the course) was examined using regression analysis. The overall mark in the course increased by 9% with a decreased failure rate. There was a strong relationship between individual score and final examination mark (P learning occurring during the collaborative testing and that weaker students gained the benefit from team marks without significant active learning taking place. This negative outcome may be due to insufficient encouragement of the active learning strategies that were expected to occur during the collaborative testing process. An improved understanding of the efficacy of collaborative assessment could be achieved through the inclusion of questionnaire based data to allow a better interpretation of learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 9: 231-237. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Risk, Activism, and Empowerment: Women’s Breast Cancer in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mahmoud; Nahon-Serfaty, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of breast cancer in Venezuela is particularly alarming, which is attributed to healthcare inequalities, low health literacy, and lagging compliance with prevention methods (i.e., screening and mammography). While the right to health is acknowledged by the Venezuelan constitution, activism beyond governmental confines is required to increase women’s breast cancer awareness and decrease mortality rates. Through the development of social support and strategic communicative methods enacted by healthcare providers, it may be possible to empower women with the tools necessary for breast cancer prevention. This paper discusses issues surrounding women’s breast cancer, such as awareness of the disease and its risks, self-advocacy, and the roles of activists, healthcare providers, and society. Specifically, it describes a four-year action-oriented research project developed in Venezuela, which was a collaborative work among researchers, practitioners, NGOs, patients, journalists, and policymakers. The outcomes include higher levels of awareness and interest among community members and organizations to learn and seek more information about women’s breast cancer, better understandings of the communicated messages, more media coverage and medical consultations, increasing positive patient treatments, expansion of networking of NGOs, as well as a widely supported declaration for a national response against breast cancer in Venezuela. PMID:27868080

  9. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  10. Collaboration and Networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.; Manten-Horst, E.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the need for collaboration across pediatric and adult cancer to care for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) arose from the recognition of the unique characteristics of AYAs with cancer. Neither pediatric nor adult oncology hospital departments are able to provide age-appropriate care

  11. Architecture for Collaborative Learning Activities in Hybrid Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, María Blanca; Maroto, David; García Rueda, José Jesús; Leony, Derick; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    3D virtual worlds are recognized as collaborative learning environments. However, the underlying technology is not sufficiently mature and the virtual worlds look cartoonish, unlinked to reality. Thus, it is important to enrich them with elements from the real world to enhance student engagement in learning activities. Our approach is to build learning environments where participants can either be in the real world or in its mirror world while sharing the same hybrid space in a collaborative ...

  12. Activity-Based Support for Mobility and Collaboration in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind

    2004-01-01

    is to: (1) support human activity by managing its collection of work tasks on a computer, (2) support mobility by distributing activities across heterogeneous computing environments, (3) support asynchronous collaboration by allowing several people to participate in an activity, and (4) support...

  13. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information......, the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  14. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4--a blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where......, at 95% specificity. IgA to MUC4 glycoforms were unable to discriminate between cases and controls in the UKCTOCS sera. Additional analysis was undertaken by combining the data of MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 with previously generated data on autoantibodies to p53 peptides, which increased the sensitivity...

  15. Organizational factors and collaboration and integration activities in criminal justice and drug abuse treatment agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Wayne E K; Fletcher, Bennett W; Wexler, Harry K; Melnick, Gerald

    2009-08-01

    Despite strong interest in improving collaborations between correctional and substance abuse treatment organizations, there is a lack of empirical data describing the existing practices. The current study used a national survey of correctional administrators to examine organizational factors related to cross-agency collaboration and integration activities between corrections and substance abuse treatment organizations. Using a measure of collaboration that scaled cross-agency activities from less structured, informal networking and coordination to more structured and formalized levels of cooperation and collaboration, we found that different correctional settings (e.g., community corrections, jails, prisons) differed significantly in terms of their collaborative activities with substance abuse treatment agencies. We also found that the organizational characteristics that were associated with different levels of collaboration and integration differed across the correctional settings. Further research is needed to better understand how and why correctional agencies decide to formalize collaborative arrangements with treatment agencies and whether these efforts lead to more favorable outcomes.

  16. Assessing the effect of TB-HIV collaborative activities on knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing the effect of TB-HIV collaborative activities on knowledge and perception of TB patients ... Tanzania Journal of Health Research ... which requires to be corrected as soon as possible so as to enable patients to undertake active steps ...

  17. LSD1 activates a lethal prostate cancer gene network independently of its demethylase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Archana; Gao, Lina; Wang, Yuliang; Bankhead, Armand; McWeeney, Shannon K; King, Carly J; Schwartzman, Jacob; Urrutia, Joshua; Bisson, William H; Coleman, Daniel J; Joshi, Sunil K; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Sampson, David A; Weinmann, Sheila; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Berry, Deborah L; Haque, Reina; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Sharma, Sunil; Bearss, Jared; Beer, Tomasz M; Thomas, George V; Heiser, Laura M; Alumkal, Joshi J

    2018-05-01

    Medical castration that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) function is the principal treatment for advanced prostate cancer. However, clinical progression is universal, and tumors with AR-independent resistance mechanisms appear to be increasing in frequency. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new treatments targeting molecular pathways enriched in lethal prostate cancer. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a histone demethylase and an important regulator of gene expression. Here, we show that LSD1 promotes the survival of prostate cancer cells, including those that are castration-resistant, independently of its demethylase function and of the AR. Importantly, this effect is explained in part by activation of a lethal prostate cancer gene network in collaboration with LSD1's binding protein, ZNF217. Finally, that a small-molecule LSD1 inhibitor-SP-2509-blocks important demethylase-independent functions and suppresses castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability demonstrates the potential of LSD1 inhibition in this disease.

  18. AANCART best practices: cancer awareness activities for Seattle's Combodian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Paularita; Acorda, Elizabeth; Carey Jackson, J; Marchand, Ann; Thai, Hue; Tu, Shin-Ping; Taylor, Vicky

    2005-12-15

    Census data indicate that Cambodian Americans are economically disadvantaged and linguistically isolated. In addition, cancer registry data show that Southeast Asians experience several cancer-related health disparities (e.g., markedly elevated risks of cervical and liver cancer). The Seattle regional Asian American Network for Cancer, Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) site has implemented a community-based cancer awareness program for Cambodian immigrants in collaboration with a Cambodian community coalition. Our cancer awareness program has the following goals: to assist individuals and organizations in advocating for a healthy community, to provide information within a cultural context, and to deliver information in ways that are useful and meaningful to the community. The program was guided by a community assessment that included the use of published data as well as information from qualitative interviews, focus groups, and quantitative surveys. Examples of community awareness activities include group presentations at community-based organizations (e.g., during English as a second language classes), health fair participation (including at nontraditional venues such as a farmers' market serving Cambodians), and educational displays in neighborhood locations (e.g., at Cambodian video stores). In addition, the Seattle AANCART site has both inventoried and developed culturally appropriate Khmer language cancer education materials and disseminated materials through the ETHNO-MED website. Our approach recognizes that limited English language proficiency may preclude many Cambodians from understanding publicly disseminated information, and Cambodian immigrants are often isolated and tend to stay close to their own neighborhoods. Cancer 2005. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  19. Intersectoral collaboration for physical activity in Korean Healthy Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunjeong

    2016-09-01

    Intersectoral collaboration (ISC) is important in the health field because the complexity of determinants of health makes it difficult for one institution to resolve all health issues. Promotion of physical activity can especially benefit from a multi-sectoral approach. Despite so much emphasis on its importance in both primary health and health promotion, ISC has been underachieved in the field. This study aimed to examine the characteristics and level of ISC among physical activity programs in Healthy Cities as compared to non-Healthy Cities. I conducted a postal survey where 24 people from Healthy Cities and 72 people from non-Healthy Cities participated. The survey included questions to measure the level of ISC as well as to determine ISC partners and activities. Among the entire 393 physical activity programs, 336 (85.5%) had some kind of collaboration with one or more partners. The percentage having one or more partners was greater in Healthy Cities than in non-Healthy Cities. However, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in terms of the level of ISC within a municipal organization. Collaboration activities of the other departments were mostly supportive, such as providing a venue, recruiting participants and publicizing, and other kinds of administrative support. To strengthen ISC in Korean Healthy Cities, various actions including providing a legal basis, specific and substantive supports, financial incentives, and organizational recognitions will be helpful as well as the development of partnerships with other departments in urban planning, transport, urban design, and communication. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Data set for reporting of ovary, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinoma : recommendations from the International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCluggage, W. Glenn; Judge, Meagan J.; Clarke, Blaise A.; Davidson, Ben; Gilks, C. Blake; Hollema, Harry; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Mikami, Yoshiki; Stewart, Colin J. R.; Vang, Russell; Hirschowitz, Lynn

    A comprehensive pathological report is essential for optimal patient management, cancer staging and prognostication. In many countries, proforma reports are used but these vary in their content. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR) is an alliance formed by the Royal College of

  1. Strengthening cancer biology research, prevention, and control while reducing cancer disparities: student perceptions of a collaborative master's degree program in cancer biology, preventions, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillson, I A; Cousin, C E; Blancato, J K

    2013-09-01

    This article provides the findings of a survey of previous and current students in the UDC/GU-LCCC master's degree program. This master's degree program, Cancer Biology, Prevention, and Control is administered and taught jointly by faculty of a Minority Serving Institution, the University of the District of Columbia, and the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center to incorporate the strengths of a community-based school with a research intensive medical center. The program was initiated in 2008 through agreements with both University administrations and funding from the National Cancer Institute. The master's degree program is 36 credits with a focus on coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, tumor biology, cancer prevention, medical ethics, and cancer outreach program design. For two semesters during the second year, students work full-time with a faculty person on a laboratory or outreach project that is a requirement for graduation. Students are supported and encouraged to transition to a doctoral degree after they obtain the master's and many of them are currently in doctorate programs. Since the inception of the program, 45 students have initiated the course of study, 28 have completed the program, and 13 are currently enrolled in the program. The survey was designed to track the students in their current activities, as well as determine which courses, program enhancements, and research experiences were the least and most useful, and to discern students' perceptions of knowledge acquired on various aspects of Cancer Biology Prevention, and Control Master's Program. Thirty of the 35 individuals to whom email requests were sent responded to the survey, for a response rate of 85.7%. The results of this study will inform the strengthening of the Cancer Biology program by the Education Advisory Committee. They can also be used in the development of comparable collaborative master's degree programs designed to address the significant disparities in prevalence of

  2. Characterization of Two Novel Oncogenic Pathways Collaborating With Loss of P53 or Activated Neu in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Jianrong; Leder, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Cancer develops through accumulation of multiple genetic mutations. Loss of tumor suppressor gene p53 and activation of oncogene Neu/ErbB2 are among the most frequent genetic alterations in human breast cancer...

  3. Addressing the Growing Cancer Burden in the Wake of the AIDS Epidemic in Botswana: The BOTSOGO Collaborative Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Gierga, David P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alphonse Kayembe, Mukendi K. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, National Health Laboratory, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Pathology, University of Botswana School of Medicine, Gaborone (Botswana); Mmalane, Mompati [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Russell, Anthony H.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Carolyn [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Musimar, Zola [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Abramson, Jeremy S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bruce, Kathy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Karumekayi, Talkmore [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Clayman, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hodgeman, Ryan [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Kasese, Joseph [Bokamoso Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Makufa, Remigio [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Bigger, Elizabeth [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology and Leonard David Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Busse, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Botswana has experienced a dramatic increase in HIV-related malignancies over the past decade. The BOTSOGO collaboration sought to establish a sustainable partnership with the Botswana oncology community to improve cancer care. This collaboration is anchored by regular tumor boards and on-site visits that have resulted in the introduction of new approaches to treatment and perceived improvements in care, providing a model for partnership between academic oncology centers and high-burden countries with limited resources.

  4. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  5. Synthesizing community wisdom: A model for sharing cancer-related resources through social networking and collaborative partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jacob B; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Lorenzi, Nancy

    2008-11-06

    Despite the availability of community-based support services, cancer patients and survivors are not aware of many of these resources. Without access to community programs, cancer survivors are at risk for lower quality of care and lower quality of life. At the same time, non-profit community organizations lack access to advanced consumer informatics applications to effectively promote awareness of their services. In addition to the current models of print and online resource guides, new community-driven informatics approaches are needed to achieve the goal of comprehensive care for cancer survivors. We present the formulation of a novel model for synthesizing a local communitys collective wisdom of cancer-related resources through a combination of online social networking technologies and real-world collaborative partnerships. This approach can improve awareness of essential, but underutilized community resources.

  6. Program collaboration and service integration activities among HIV programs in 59 U.S. health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz Harris, Lauren F; Toledo, Lauren; Dunbar, Erica; Aquino, Gustavo A; Nesheim, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We identified the level and type of program collaboration and service integration (PCSI) among HIV prevention programs in 59 CDC-funded health department jurisdictions. Annual progress reports (APRs) completed by all 59 health departments funded by CDC for HIV prevention activities were reviewed for collaborative and integrated activities reported by HIV programs for calendar year 2009. We identified associations between PCSI activities and funding, AIDS diagnosis rate, and organizational integration. HIV programs collaborated with other health department programs through data-related activities, provider training, and providing funding for sexually transmitted disease (STD) activities in 24 (41%), 31 (53%), and 16 (27%) jurisdictions, respectively. Of the 59 jurisdictions, 57 (97%) reported integrated HIV and STD testing at the same venue, 39 (66%) reported integrated HIV and tuberculosis testing, and 26 (44%) reported integrated HIV and viral hepatitis testing. Forty-five (76%) jurisdictions reported providing integrated education/outreach activities for HIV and at least one other disease. Twenty-six (44%) jurisdictions reported integrated partner services among HIV and STD programs. Overall, the level of PCSI activities was not associated with HIV funding, AIDS diagnoses, or organizational integration. HIV programs in health departments collaborate primarily with STD programs. Key PCSI activities include integrated testing, integrated education/outreach, and training. Future assessments are needed to evaluate PCSI activities and to identify the level of collaboration and integration among prevention programs.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists ...

  10. Preferences and actual chemotherapy decision-making in the greater plains collaborative breast cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ann M; Buzalko, Russell J; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Gardner, Bret J; Djalilova, Dilorom M; Otte, Julie L

    2017-12-01

    There is renewed interest in identifying breast cancer patients' participation in decision-making about adjuvant chemotherapy. There is a gap in the literature regarding the impact of these decisions on quality of life (QOL) and quality of care (QOC). Our aims were to determine similarities and differences in how patients diagnosed with breast cancer preferred to make decisions with providers about cancer treatment, to examine the patient's recall of her role when the decision was made about chemotherapy and to determine how preferred and actual roles, as well as congruence between them, relate to QOL and perceived QOC. Greater Plains Collaborative clinical data research network of PCORnet conducted the 'Share Thoughts on Breast Cancer' survey among women 12-18 months post-diagnosis at eight sites in seven Midwestern United States. Patients recalled their preferred and actual treatment decision-making roles and three new shared decision-making (SDM) variables were created. Patients completed QOL and QOC measurements. Correlations and t-tests were used. Of 1235 returned surveys, 873 (full sample) and 329 (subsample who received chemotherapy) were used. About one-half of women in both the full (50.7%) and subsample (49.8%,) preferred SDM with providers about treatment decisions, but only 41.2% (full) and 42.6% (subsample) reported experiencing SDM. Significant differences were found between preferred versus actual roles in the full (p decision-making variables with QOL, but there was an association with QOC. The subsample's decision-making variables related to several QOL scales and QOC items, with a more patient-centered decision than originally preferred related to higher physical and social/family well-being, overall QOL and QOC. Patients benefit from providers' efforts to identify patient preferences, encourage an active role in SDM, and tailor decision making to their desired choice.

  11. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    ). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project...... States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical......: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. conclusion: This project demonstrated...

  12. Leveraging National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration for Uterine Cervix Cancer Patient Accrual in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Kunos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Women in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR have a higher age-adjusted incidence rate for uterine cervix cancer than the U.S. mainland as well as substantial access and economic barriers to cancer care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI funds a Minority/Underserved NCI Community Oncology Research Program in PR (PRNCORP as part of a national network of community-based health-care systems to conduct multisite cancer clinical trials in diverse populations. Participation by the PRNCORP in NCI’s uterine cervix cancer clinical trials, however, has remained limited. This study reports on the findings of an NCI site visit in PR to assess barriers impeding site activation and accrual to its sponsored gynecologic cancer clinical trials. Qualitative, semi-structured individual, and group interviews were conducted at six PRNCORP-affiliated locations to ascertain: long-term trial accrual objectives; key stakeholders in PR that address uterine cervix cancer care; key challenges or barriers to activating and to enrolling patients in NCI uterine cervix cancer treatment trials; and resources, policies, or procedures in place or needed on the island to support NCI-sponsored clinical trials. An NCI-sponsored uterine cervix cancer radiation–chemotherapy intervention clinical trial (NCT02466971, already activated on the island, served as a test case to identify relevant patient accrual and site barriers. The site visit identified five key barriers to accrual: (1 lack of central personnel to coordinate referrals for treatment plans, medical tests, and medical imaging across the island’s clinical trial access points; (2 patient insurance coverage; (3 lack of a coordinated brachytherapy schedule at San Juan-centric service providers; (4 limited credentialed radiotherapy machines island-wide; and (5 too few radiology medical physicists tasked to credential trial-specified positron emission tomography scanners island-wide. PR offers a unique opportunity to

  13. Unpacking "Active Learning": A Combination of Flipped Classroom and Collaboration Support Is More Effective but Collaboration Support Alone Is Not

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Martina A.; Kennedy, Kristopher; Oxtoby, Lucas; Bollom, Mark; Moore, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Much evidence shows that instruction that actively engages students with learning materials is more effective than traditional, lecture-centric instruction. These "active learning" models comprise an extremely heterogeneous set of instructional methods: they often include collaborative activities, flipped classrooms, or a combination of…

  14. A Neuroanatomy Teaching Activity Using Case Studies and Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity for use in an introductory psychology course in which students collaborate and apply their neuroanatomy knowledge to three case studies. Provides a table with descriptions of and possible answers for the three case studies and discusses the students' responses. (CMK)

  15. A Worldwide Collaboration to Harmonize Guidelines for the Long-Term Follow-Up of Childhood and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Report From the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Mulder, Renée L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Constine, Louis S.; Wallace, W. Hamish; Caron, Huib N.; Armenian, Saro H.; Skinner, Roderick; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood and young adult cancer survivors should receive optimum care to reduce the consequences of late effects and improve quality of life. We can facilitate achieving this goal by international collaboration in guideline development. In 2010, the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer

  16. Telomerase activity in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, E; Yokoyama, T; Tatsumoto, N; Hiyama, K; Imamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Kodama, T; Piatyszek, M A; Shay, J W; Matsuura, Y

    1995-08-01

    Although many genetic alterations have been reported in gastric cancer, it is not known whether all gastric tumors are capable of indefinite proliferative potential, e.g., immortality. The expression of telomerase and stabilization of telomeres are concomitant with the attainment of immortality in tumor cells; thus, the measurement of telomerase activity in clinically obtained tumor samples may provide important information useful both as a diagnostic marker to detect immortal cancer cells in clinical materials and as a prognostic indicator of patient outcome. Telomerase activity was analyzed in 66 primary gastric cancers with the use of a PCR-based assay. The majority of tumors (85%) displayed telomerase activity, but telomerase was undetectable in 10 tumors (15%), 8 of which were early stage tumors. Most of the tumors with telomerase activity were large and of advanced stages, including metastases. Survival rate of patients of tumors with detectable telomerase activity was significantly shorter than that of those without telomerase activity. Alterations of telomere length (reduced/elongated terminal restriction fragments) were detected in 14 of 66 (21%) gastric cancers, and all 14 had telomerase activity. Cellular DNA contents revealed that all 22 aneuploid tumors had detectable telomerase activity. The present results indicate that telomerase activation may be required as a critical step in the multigenetic process of tumorigenesis, and that telomerase is frequently but not always activated as a late event in gastric cancer progression.

  17. Collaborative Genomics Study Advances Precision Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative study conducted by two Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) initiatives highlights the importance of integrating structural and functional genomics programs to improve cancer therapies, and more specifically, contribute to precision oncology treatments for children.

  18. A Descriptive Account of an Inter-Professional Collaborative Leadership Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura MacPhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative project between an academic healthcare faculty and a professional development director resulted in the design, delivery and evaluation of an inter-professional collaborative leadership workshop with ongoing leadership development activities. The workshop attendees were five inter-professional teams from one large, urban cancer care center in Taipei, Taiwan. The workshop included didactic instruction complemented with team discussions and interactive exercises. Continued practice was encouraged, such as appreciative inquiry exercises and rotated team leadership. Evaluation involved the use of a cross-culturally validated collaborative practice tool and follow-up interviews and focus groups. Although the formal workshop was a 1-day session, continued organizational support and systematic approaches to collaborative leadership practice in clinical settings were necessary components for transfer of learning from the workshop to real life. This paper will include an overview of the foundational leadership concepts covered in the workshop. The instructional strategies, evaluation methods and outcomes will be discussed. The limitations and strengths of this collaborative leadership project will be provided, as well as future plans for a collaborative leadership development program.

  19. Combining Activity DSM with Temporal Logic for Collaborative Planning and Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Baudin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an approach that implements enhanced scheduling algorithms to plan and schedule interventions in scientific facilities emitting various types of ionizing radiation such as the ones present at CERN in Geneva, (Switzerland or at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany. To deal with the collaborative process of activity creation and submission used in those organizations, we propose a framework to set the appropriate sequence or skeleton for the activities. This framework combines Allen's Interval Algebra and DSM (Design Structure Matrix. It enables the sequence of activities to be automatically computed while gathering and taking into account the needs of users and testing their compatibility. It also deals with technical-type or resource-type constraints between activities as well as incompatible submissions. The work described in this paper includes details of the collaborative submission process and introduces suggestions for compromising as well as temporal calculations with the introduction of parameterized DSMs rather than binary ones.

  20. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  1. NKG2D is a key receptor for recognition of bladder cancer cells by IL-2-activated NK cells and BCG promotes NK cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva María García-Cuesta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after trans-urethral resection or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ, reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, Natural Killer (NK and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient.

  2. The importance of food, nutrition and physical activity in cancer prevention: an interview with Dr Kate Allen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kate

    2018-05-02

    Kate Allen speaks to Roshaine Wijayatunga, Managing Commissioning Editor. Dr Kate Allen works as an Executive Director in Science and Public Affairs at World Cancer Research Fund International ( http://wcrf.org ), an NGO and leading authority in the field of cancer prevention through diet, weight and physical activity. Kate is responsible for the organization's scientific, policy and conference programs in the areas of food, nutrition, physical activity and weight management. An important aspect of her role is helping to create collaborative relationships and activities across the WCRF national charities (in Europe, America and Asia) in these areas, as well as maintaining and creating external partnerships. Previously, Kate worked at the Institute of Cancer Research, where she set up an award-winning Interactive Education Unit to develop learning materials for scientists, healthcare professionals, students, patients and the general public. Before that she worked at Medi Cine International, a medical education agency, where she developed educational materials across all media, mainly for specialist physician audiences. Kate has a PhD in neuroscience, carried out at the Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery at Queen Square, London and the Royal College of Surgeons of England. The Third Expert Report that Kate mentions in the interview, featuring the updated World Cancer Research Fund Cancer Prevention Recommendations is launched 24 May 2018. For more information see http://wcrf.org .

  3. The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: an international collaboration to inform cancer policy in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John; Foot, Catherine; Bomb, Martine; Hiom, Sara; Coleman, Michel; Bryant, Heather; Vedsted, Peter; Hanson, Jane; Richards, Mike

    2013-09-01

    The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) was initiated by the Department of Health in England to study international variation in cancer survival, and to inform policy to improve cancer survival. It is a research collaboration between twelve jurisdictions in six countries: Australia (New South Wales, Victoria), Canada (Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario), Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Wales). Leadership is provided by policymakers, with academics, clinicians and cancer registries forming an international network to conduct the research. The project currently has five modules examining: (1) cancer survival, (2) population awareness and beliefs about cancer, (3) attitudes, behaviours and systems in primary care, (4) delays in diagnosis and treatment, and their causes, and (5) treatment, co-morbidities and other factors. These modules employ a range of methodologies including epidemiological and statistical analyses, surveys and clinical record audit. The first publications have already been used to inform and develop cancer policies in participating countries, and a further series of publications is under way. The module design, governance structure, funding arrangements and management approach to the partnership provide a case study in conducting international comparisons of health systems that are both academically and clinically robust and of immediate relevance to policymakers. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  5. Collaborative quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbaugh, Amy N; Miller, David C; Ghani, Khurshid R

    2017-07-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives were developed in many medical and surgical disciplines with the goal of measuring and improving the quality of care provided to patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of surgical quality improvement collaboratives, and in particular those aimed at improving urological care. Quality improvement collaboratives collect high-quality data using standardized methodologies, and use the data to provide feedback to physicians and practices, and then implement processes to improve patient outcomes. The largest regional collaborative in urology is the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC). Recent efforts by this group have been focused at understanding variation in care, improving patient selection for treatment, reducing treatment morbidity and measuring and optimizing technical skill. The American Urological Association has also recently launched a national quality registry (AQUA), with an initial focus on prostate cancer care. By understanding factors that result in exemplary performance, quality improvement collaboratives are able to develop best practices around areas of care with high variation that have the potential to improve outcomes and reduce costs. These developments have been made possible by the unique model offered by the collaborative structure with the goal of improving patient care at a population level.

  6. Collaborative Human Engineering Work in Space Exploration Extravehicular Activities (EVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Lena; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on extravehicular activities in space exploration in collaboration with other NASA centers, industries, and universities is shown. The topics include: 1) Concept of Operations for Future EVA activities; 2) Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS); 3) Advanced EVA Walkback Test; 4) Walkback Subjective Results; 5) Integrated Suit Test 1; 6) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS); 7) Flex PLSS Design Process; and 8) EVA Information System; 9)

  7. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research support and collaborative activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities evaluated the adequacy of the plans of research support and collaborative activities to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 21, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities. (author)

  8. Advancing environmental and policy change through active living collaboratives: compositional and stakeholder engagement correlates of group effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jill; Reed, Hannah; Zieff, Susan G; Tabak, Rachel G; Eyler, Amy A; Tompkins, Nancy Oʼhara; Lyn, Rodney; Gustat, Jeanette; Goins, Karen Valentine; Bornstein, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate compositional factors, including collaborative age and size, and community, policy, and political engagement activities that may influence collaboratives' effectiveness in advancing environmental improvements and policies for active living. Structured interviews were conducted with collaboratives' coordinators. Survey items included organizational composition, community, policy, and political engagement activities and reported environmental improvements and policy change. Descriptive statistics and multivariate models were used to investigate these relationships. Environmental improvement and policy change scores reflecting level of collaborative effectiveness across 8 strategy areas (eg, parks and recreation, transit, streetscaping, and land redevelopment). Fifty-nine collaborative groups participated in the interview, representing 22 states. Groups have made progress in identifying areas for environmental improvements and in many instances have received funding to support these changes. Results from multivariate models indicate that engagement in media communication and advocacy was statistically correlated with higher levels of environmental improvement, after adjusting for age of group and area poverty levels (P engagement activities may represent important levers for achieving structural and policy changes to the built environment.

  9. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD for brain cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area – nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD. NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1 international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2 highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3 research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  10. An epidemiological study of cancer incidence and mortality among nuclear industry workers at Lucas Heights Science and Technology centre in collaboration with IARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, R.R.; Kaldor, J.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological study is being undertaken at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) where the only nuclear reactor in Australia has been in operation since 1958. The study is part of an international collaborative study coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and has dual objectives, first to assess whether workers at LHSTC have had different levels of mortality or cancer incidence from the New South Wales and the Australian populations, and second, as part of the IARC study, to estimate as precisely as possible, through collaboration with IARC, the risk of contracting cancer from low-level, long-term exposure to ionising radiation. The research project is a retrospective cohort study based on records of employment and exposure to radiation kept at LHSTC since 1957. Electronic linkage of all the available dosimetry and employment information with national registers of cancer incidence and mortality is being undertaken for the cohort of LHSTC workers, to allow for a passive follow-up of more than 7000 workers employed from 1957 onwards

  11. SANS-polymer and functional materials with neutron in Indonesia. Progress report on the collaboration activities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, A.; Gunawan; Sukirman, E.; Ridwan; Jahja, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Activities on SANS-polymer collaboration program are reported. This paper presents SANS-data from Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate that have been obtained using BATAN's SANS machine in Serpong. Reports are also presented about activities in the groups for functional materials structural determination which includes magnetic, HTc superconducting and superionic conducting materials. Discussions are also given towards the way the collaboration activities were carried out in the last three years as well as impact of neutron scattering facility conditions in Indonesia. (author)

  12. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    , these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active...

  13. Dietary agent, benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and collaborates with sulforaphane in the growth suppression of PANC-1 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis Stephanie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.

  14. Relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity in inpatient cancer rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Franziska; Catuogno, Silvio; Perseus, Josef M; Bloch, Wilhelm; Baumann, Freerk T

    2013-08-01

    Fatigue is a serious problem for the majority of patients with cancer. In this context, several studies have shown benefits of physical activity during and following treatment. However, uncertainties remain regarding the optimal type and duration of physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity in the course of inpatient rehabilitation. Fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) and physical activity (Freiburg Questionnaire of Physical Activity) were assessed in a consecutive series of 35 patients with cancer attending oncological inpatient rehabilitation during a six-month study period. The three-week rehabilitation program included daily exercise therapy consisting of aerobic endurance training, moderate resistance training, coordination exercises, relaxation training and individual physiotherapy. At discharge, a significant improvement in each dimension of cancer-related fatigue (p=0.001-0.003) and a significant increase of physical activity levels (p=0.001) were observed. A small, but significant negative correlation was found between cancer-related fatigue and the level of physical activity (R=-0.438, p=0.004). The largest effects were associated with a weekly energy expenditure of 3000 kcal through physical activity. The results support a non-linear dose-response relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity. Since this is the first study providing specific exercise recommendations for an effective treatment of cancer-related fatigue in the context of inpatient rehabilitation, further research is required to validate the observed trends.

  15. Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration for Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcie Lynne Jacklin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions

  16. Plasminogen activation and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danø, Keld; Behrendt, N.; Hoyer-Hansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    , the regulation of extracellular proteolysis in cancer involves a complex interplay between cancer cells and non-malignant stromal cells in the expression of the molecular components involved. For some types of cancer, this cellular interplay mimics that observed in the tissue of ori- gin during non......Breakdown of the extracellular matrix is crucial for cancer invasion and metastasis. It is accomplished by the concerted action of several proteases, including the serine protease plasmin and a number of matrix metalloproteases.The activity of each of these proteases is regulated by an array......-neoplastic tissue remodelling processes.We propose that cancer invasion can be considered as uncontrolled tissue remodelling. Inhibition of extracellular proteases is an attractive approach to cancer therapy. Because proteases have many different functions in the normal organism, efficient inhibition will have...

  17. Collaborative activities for improving the quality of science teaching and learning and learning to teach science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2012-03-01

    I have been involved in research on collaborative activities for improving the quality of teaching and learning high school science. Initially the collaborative activities we researched involved the uses of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue in urban middle and high schools in Philadelphia and New York (currently I have active research sites in New York and Brisbane, Australia). The research not only transformed practices but also produced theories that informed the development of additional collaborative activities and served as interventions for research and creation of heuristics for professional development programs and teacher certification courses. The presentation describes a collage of collaborative approaches to teaching and learning science, including coteaching, cogenerative dialogue, radical listening, critical reflection, and mindful action. For each activity in the collage I provide theoretical frameworks and empirical support, ongoing research, and priorities for the road ahead. I also address methodologies used in the research, illustrating how teachers and students collaborated as researchers in multilevel investigations of teaching and learning and learning to teach that included ethnography, video analysis, and sophisticated analyses of the voice, facial expression of emotion, eye gaze, and movement of the body during classroom interactions. I trace the evolution of studies of face-to-face interactions in science classes to the current focus on emotions and physiological aspects of teaching and learning (e.g., pulse rate, pulse strength, breathing patterns) that relate to science participation and achievement.

  18. [Physical activity and cancer: Update and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, A; Riesco, E; Fülöp, T; Pavic, M

    2016-06-01

    Physical activity is a key determinant of public health and contributes to decreasing the prevalence of many diseases. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Physical activity, accessible to the entire population, could prevent up to 25% of cancers, in addition to improving survival rates and quality of life in cancer patients. Physical activity acts via various mechanisms to slow or decrease tumor growth, including the production and bioavailability of sex hormones, insulin resistance and insulin secretion, and inflammation. In primary prevention, physical activity reduces breast cancer risk by 15-20% and colorectal cancer risk by 24%. All-cause mortality is reduced by 33% in cancer survivors who exercise. Health-related quality of life, fatigue and depression are enhanced by the practice of physical activity in cancer patients. In the general population, the global recommendations on physical activity for health, published by the World Health Organisation, are suggested as a means of primary prevention of cancer. In cancer patients, an adapted physical activity routine is promoted from the very beginning of patient care to decrease fatigue as well as improve tolerance and benefits of treatments. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Data set for reporting of ovary, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinoma: recommendations from the International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluggage, W Glenn; Judge, Meagan J; Clarke, Blaise A; Davidson, Ben; Gilks, C Blake; Hollema, Harry; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Mikami, Yoshiki; Stewart, Colin J R; Vang, Russell; Hirschowitz, Lynn

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive pathological report is essential for optimal patient management, cancer staging and prognostication. In many countries, proforma reports are used but these vary in their content. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR) is an alliance formed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom, the College of American Pathologists, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and the European Society of Pathology, with the aim of developing an evidence-based reporting data set for each cancer site. This will reduce the global burden of cancer data set development and reduplication of effort by different international institutions that commission, publish and maintain standardised cancer reporting data sets. The resultant standardisation of cancer reporting will benefit not only those countries directly involved in the collaboration but also others not in a position to develop their own data sets. We describe the development of a cancer data set by the ICCR expert panel for the reporting of primary ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal carcinoma and present the 'required' and 'recommended' elements to be included in the report with an explanatory commentary. This data set encompasses the recent International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists staging system for these neoplasms and the updated World Health Organisation Classification of Tumours of the Female Reproductive Organs. The data set also addresses issues about site assignment of the primary tumour in high-grade serous carcinomas and proposes a scoring system for the assessment of tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The widespread implementation of this data set will facilitate consistent and accurate data collection, comparison of epidemiological and pathological parameters between different populations, facilitate research and hopefully will result in improved patient management.

  20. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  1. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. Objectives. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Methods. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Conclusion. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients’ individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients’ entire pathway of care. PMID:26311705

  2. The Collaborative Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marlowe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has become an important goal in modern ventures, across the spectrum of commercial, social, and intellectual activities, sometimes as a mediating factor, and sometimes as a driving, foundational principle. Research, development, social programs, and ongoing ventures of all sorts benefit from interactions between teams, groups, and organizations, across intellectual disciplines and across facets and features of the inquiry, product, entity, or activity under consideration. We present a survey of the state of collaboration and collaborative enterprise, in the context of papers and presentations at the International Symposium on Collaborative Enterprises 2011 (CENT 2011, and the extended papers appearing in this special issue.

  3. Online Collaborative Learning Activities: The Perceptions of Culturally Diverse Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; Yuan, Guangji; Dogbey, James

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the perceptions of minority graduate students toward online collaborative learning activities. The participants were 20 minority graduate students from diverse cultural backgrounds (10 African Americans, 5 Hispanics, and 5 international students from Africa) enrolled in online graduate instructional technology and…

  4. Developments in Transnational Research Collaborations: Evidence from U.S. Higher-education Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Koehn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In our knowledge-driven era, multiple and mutual benefits accrue from transnational research linkages. The article identifies important directions in transnational research collaborations involving U.S. universities revealed by key dimensions of 369 projects profiled on a U.S. higher-education association’s database. Project initiators, principal research fields, regional and country distributions, and the sources and amounts of funding for different types of transnational research activity are selected for analysis. The balanced total portfolio of reported current research projects by region suggests that U.S. university principal investigators increasingly recognize the value of collaborative knowledge generation in the Global South as well as in other OECD countries. The data also show concentrations in the distribution of transnational research projects by principal field of activity that could exacerbate intra-regional asymmetries. The multi-institutional data draw attention to the often unnoticed, but vital, role that higher-education institutions play in supporting transnational research endeavors that address issues of current and future global concern. The conclusion considers wider implications for higher-education involvement in transnational knowledge generation and calls for increased symmetry in collaborative research ventures.

  5. Challenges and Prospects of Exchange Activities and Collaborative Learning Towards the Construction of Inclusive Education System : Focusing on eff ective methods of collaborative learning in the future

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Norimune; Nosaki, Hitomi

    2014-01-01

    Various studies on Exchange Activities have been conducted and revealed many instruction methods to promote exchanging between students with disabilities and those without disabilities. However, for Collaborative Learning that takes place in children between those students, the number of research studies are limited despite the fact that the importance of research on Collaborative Learning has been pointed out by many researchers and teachers. In this study, the nature of Exchange Activities ...

  6. Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative In Pursuit of a Cure The mission of the BTTC is to develop and perform state-of-the-art clinical trials in a collaborative and collegial environment, advancing treatments for patients with brain tumors, merging good scientific method with concern for patient well-being and outcome.

  7. An Analysis of Collaborative Problem-Solving Activities Mediated by Individual-Based and Collaborative Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-J.; Chang, M.-H.; Liu, C.-C.; Chiu, B.-C.; Fan Chiang, S.-H.; Wen, C.-T.; Hwang, F.-K.; Chao, P.-Y.; Chen, Y.-L.; Chai, C.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have indicated that the collaborative problem-solving space afforded by the collaborative systems significantly impact the problem-solving process. However, recent investigations into collaborative simulations, which allow a group of students to jointly manipulate a problem in a shared problem space, have yielded divergent results…

  8. Sensemaking in collaborative networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS......The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  9. Similarity-based grouping to support teachers on collaborative activities in exploratory learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Santos, Sergio; Mavrikis, M.; Geraniou, E.; Poulovassilis, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-based tool that helps teachers group their students for collaborative activities in the classroom, the challenge being to organise groups of students based on their recent work so that their collaboration results in meaningful interactions. Students first work on an exploratory task individually, and then the computer suggests possible groupings of students to the teacher. The complexity of the tasks is such that teachers would require too long a time to create...

  10. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  11. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  12. Adaptive Collaboration Support Systems : Designing Collaboration Support for Dynamic Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janeiro, J.; Knoll, S.W.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Today, engineering systems offer a variety of local and webbased applications to support collaboration by assisting groups in structuring activities, generating and sharing data, and improving group communication. To ensure the quality of collaboration, engineering system design needs to analyze and

  13. Activation and Molecular Targets of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael A. Nemenoff

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and five-year survival remains poor, raising the urgency for new treatment strategies. Activation of PPARγ represents a potential target for both the treatment and prevention of lung cancer. Numerous studies have examined the effect of thiazolidinediones such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone on lung cancer cells in vitro and in xenograft models. These studies indicate that activation of PPARγ inhibits cancer cell proliferation as well as invasiveness and metastasis. While activation of PPARγ can occur by direct binding of pharmacological ligands to the molecule, emerging data indicate that PPARγ activation can occur through engagement of other signal transduction pathways, including Wnt signaling and prostaglandin production. Data, both from preclinical models and retrospective clinical studies, indicate that activation of PPARγ may represent an attractive chemopreventive strategy. This article reviews the existing biological and mechanistic experiments focusing on the role of PPARγ in lung cancer, focusing specifically on nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  14. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer.

  15. Efficacy of bowel cancer appeals for promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalleh, Geoffrey; Donovan, Robert J; Slevin, Terry; Dixon, Helen

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the potential efficacy of bowel cancer prevention messages in increasing intentions to be more physically active. A convenience sample of 281 physically inactive persons aged 30-60 years was recruited in the Perth city centre and randomly assigned to a bowel cancer and physical activity message or a heart disease and physical activity message. After reading a booklet containing information about physical activity and its link either to bowel cancer (n = 141) or cardiovascular disease (n = 140), respondents filled in a self-completion questionnaire. The main response measures were impact on intentions to be more physically active, and perceived believability and relevance of the message. Perceived believability of the message was high in both conditions. Perceived personal relevance of the message was substantially lower in the bowel cancer than the cardiovascular disease condition. Overall, the cardiovascular disease condition achieved somewhat higher behavioural intentions than the bowel cancer condition. The finding that two in three respondents in the bowel cancer condition had increased intention to increase their level of physical activity provides support for the potential efficacy of promoting physical activity in reducing the risk of bowel cancer.

  16. Implementing Verbal and Non-Verbal Activities in an Intercultural Collaboration Project for English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kiyomi; Hirotani, Maki

    2015-01-01

    Technological development offers language teachers a myriad of options for collaborative activities. Learners, in turn, benefit from increased opportunities to interact with people who can speak their target language. Research has previously highlighted the importance of developing learners' intercultural competence through such activities. The…

  17. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the…

  18. International Collaboration Enhances Cancer Screening Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH is working with the International Agency for Research on CancerExit Disclaimer (IARC) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on the ESTAMPA Study, a multi-centric study of cervical cancer screening and triage with HPV testing.

  19. Exploring teachers' use of TPACK in design talk: The collaborative design of technology-rich early literacy activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, F.B.; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Research shows the benefits of collaborative design activity by teachers are that in their conversations (design talk) they develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). While more and more teachers engage in collaborative design, little is known about how they use TPACK during

  20. Exploring teachers' use of TPACK in design talk: The collaborative design of technology-rich early literacy activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Ferry; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Research shows the benefits of collaborative design activity by teachers are that in their conversations (design talk) they develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). While more and more teachers engage in collaborative design, little is known about how they use TPACK during

  1. Rectal Cancer Survivors' Participation in Productive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Bulkley, Joanna E; Mcmullen, Carmit K; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa Kf; Herrinton, Lisa J; Krouse, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer and its treatment impair survivors' productivity. To assess determinants of market and nonmarket employment, job search, volunteering, and homemaking among survivors five years or longer after diagnosis. We mailed questionnaires to 1063 survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente (Northern California, Northwest) during 2010 and 2011. Productive activities, functional health status, and bowel management at the time of the survey. Response rate was 60.5% (577/953). Higher comorbidity burdens were associated with lower productivity for men and women rectal cancer survivors. Productive survivors were younger and had lower disease stage and age at diagnosis, higher household income and educational attainment, and fewer comorbidity burdens and workplace adjustments than did nonproductive survivors (p < 0.05 each; 2-sided). Productive rectal cancer survivors were evenly split by sex. Staying productive is associated with better mental health for rectal cancer survivors. Rectal cancer survivors with multiple chronic conditions, higher disease stage, lower productive activities, and older age need better access to medical care and closer monitoring of the quality of their care, including self-care. To capture the full extent of the involvement of survivors in all types of productive activities, research should routinely include measures of employment, searching for employment, homemaking, and volunteering. Counting market and nonmarket productive activities is innovative and recognizes the continuum of contributions survivors make to families and society. Health care systems should routinely monitor rectal cancer survivors' medical care access, comorbidities, health-related quality of life, and productive activities.

  2. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    year of studies formed 20 groups and worked collaboratively to develop video games. Throughout the lab, students have to use a variety of tools for managing and developing their projects, such as software version control, static analysis tools, wikis, mailing lists, etc. The students are also supported......This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior...

  3. How Technology and Collaboration Promote Formative Feedback: A Role for CSCL Research in Active Learning Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sally P. W.; Rau, Martina A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence for the effectiveness of active learning interventions has led educators to advocate for widespread adoption of active learning in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Active learning interventions implement technology and collaboration to engage students actively with the content. Yet, it is…

  4. Manifestations of metacognitive activity during the collaborative planning of chemistry practical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathabathe, Kgadi Clarrie; Potgieter, Marietjie

    2017-07-01

    This paper elaborates a process followed to characterise manifestations of cognitive regulation during the collaborative planning of chemistry practical investigations. Metacognitive activity was defined as the demonstration of planning, monitoring, control and evaluation of cognitive activities by students while carrying out the chemistry task. Inherent in collaborative learning is the social aspect of metacognition, which in this study was evidenced in social cognitive regulation (notably of intra- and interpersonal metacognitive regulations) as groups of students went about planning their practical investigations. Discussions of two of the learning groups (n = 4; n = 3) as they planned the extended practical investigation were recorded, transcribed and analysed for indicators of any inherent metacognitive activity. The process of characterising the manifestations of metacognition resulted in the development of a coding system which specifies not only the regulatory strategies at play but the type of regulation (self or other), the area of regulation (cognition, task performance or behaviour) as well as the depth of regulatory contributions (high or low). The fine-grained coding system allowed for a finer theoretical elucidation of the social nature of metacognition. The implications of this study for metacognition and chemistry education research are highlighted.

  5. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  6. Information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles of Japanese women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Mitsuyo; Kuroki, Syoji; Shinkoda, Harumi; Suetsugu, Yoshiko; Shimada, Kazuo; Kaku, Tsunehisa

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles of Japanese women with breast cancer, to examine the relationship between information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles, and to explore the factors that influenced taking a more active role than the preferred role during the treatment decision-making process. In a cross-sectional study, women with breast cancer were retrospectively administered the Control Preferences Scale and the Information-Seeking Experience Scale. The Chi-Square test was used to compare differences among individual variables in decision-making roles and information-seeking experiences. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the factors that influenced taking a more active role than the preferred role. One hundred and four patients with breast cancer participated in the investigation. Eighty-five patients (78%) perceived themselves as having knowledge of breast cancer and most patients (92%) sought information on breast cancer. The preferred roles in decision-making that they reported having before treatment were 18% active, 69% collaborative and 13% passive. The actual roles they perceived having experienced were 27% active, 43% collaborative and 30% passive. Although there was concordance of preferred and actual role for only 59% of the women, most patients reported that they were satisfied with their decision-making. Many women with breast cancer reported negative experiences with information seeking, including wanting more information (49%), expending a lot of effort to obtain the information needed (53%), not having enough time to obtain needed information (55%), frustration during the search for information (44%), concerns about the quality of the information (45%) and difficulty understanding the information received (49%). This study revealed that having a more active actual role than the initial preferred role was associated with emotional expression to the physician, having undergone

  7. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Denes

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  8. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  9. Physical activity and sedentary behavior of cancer survivors and non-cancer individuals: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roy B; Phillips, Allison; Herrick, Kirsten; Helou, Marieka; Rafie, Carlin; Anscher, Mitchell S; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Ning, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behavior are associated with a higher quality of life and lower mortality rates for cancer survivors, a growing population group. Studies detailing the behavior of cancer survivors are limited. Therefore, we investigated physical activity and sedentary behavior of cancer survivors using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010. Participants were those who provided physical activity and sedentary behavior data. Those who were pregnant, physical activity, compared to non-cancer participants. These patterns are similar for breast and prostate cancer survivors, with prostate cancer survivors more likely to engage in physical activity for more than one hour per day (OR = 1.98, 95% CI (1.05, 3.71)). Our findings suggest that cancer survivors tend to have more physical activity, but they are also more likely to engage in sedentary behavior.

  10. A prospective study of occupational physical activity and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenga, Christine C; Parks, Christine G; Sandler, Dale P

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk, but studies of occupational activity have produced inconsistent results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between occupational physical activity and breast cancer in a prospective study of women with a family history of breast cancer. We studied breast cancer risk in 47,649 Sister Study participants with an occupational history. Information on occupational activity and breast cancer risk factors was collected during baseline interviews (2004-2009). Physical activity at each job was self-reported and categorized as mostly sitting, sitting and standing equally, mostly standing, and active. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate associations between lifetime occupational activity and incident breast cancer, after adjusting for established risk factors and recreational activity. During follow-up, a total of 1,798 breast cancer diagnoses were reported. Compared with women who did not spend any time in active jobs, women who spent a high proportion (≥75%) of their working years in active jobs had a reduced risk of breast cancer (HR 0.72; 95% CI 0.52-0.98). Associations were strongest among overweight (HR 0.64; 95% CI 0.42-0.98) and postmenopausal (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.45-0.98) women. Occupational activity was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Occupational activity is a domain of physical activity that should be further examined in studies of postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Additional research is necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the relationships between occupational activity, body size, and breast cancer.

  11. Perspectives on Mobilization of Musical Knowledge during Collaborative Piano Activities: Three Cases Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Henrique Cianbroni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work seeks to investigate the perspectives in respect to mobilization of musical knowledge by undergraduate students engaged in collaborative piano situations. Three undergraduate piano majors were investigated during three different types of collaborative activities: instrumental ensemble, choral ensemble and solo vocal. The qualitative methodology was based on a case study for descriptions of the data collected through interviews and recordings of rehearsals, music classes, institutional exams, and public performances. The Santos model (2007 was shown to be suitable for the study, especially with regard to identifying the differences between the investigative and the self-regulated cycles, which were distinct among the research participants. The perspectives of knowledge mobilization were revealed through the various ways of perceiving and approaching the collaborative activity with which the participants were engaged, imbued with both their beliefs and demonstrated values. The present study displayed two factors: (1 the influence with which previous systematized (i.e., already learned experiences and forms of personal interest exert on this aspect of musical practice and (2 the importance of investigating what already exists in terms of practiced knowledge (and systematized in the experiences of undergraduate students with the goal to connect forms of knowledge to means of learning.

  12. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  13. Effect of Breast Cancer on Physical Activity in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Paweł

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Breast cancer is the most commonly found type of cancer in women. One cancer risk factor related to lifestyle that seems to be particularly worth examining is physical activity. The aims of the study were to analyse the physical activity of women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer for the first time and had undergone surgical treatment as well as to determine how their physical activity patterns changed with respect to the patterns from before the diagnosis.

  14. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  15. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  16. Physical Activity in Puerto Rican Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Gómez, Maribel; Hughes, Daniel C; González-Mercado, Velda; Treviño-Whitaker, Rose A; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer survivors do not engage in appropriate levels of physical activity, despite the known benefits of such activity. This study aims to describe physical-activity levels and the barriers to it in a group of Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors, as well as detailing their preferences for an intervention. Participants who finished their chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for breast cancer at least 4 months prior to the study were included. Demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data were obtained. The Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) and questionnaires on exercise self-efficacy, barriers to self-efficacy, modeling, and social support were filled out by study participants. Data on access to exercise equipment and preferences regarding a physical-activity intervention were collected. Descriptive statistics and correlation analyses were performed. Fifty breast cancer survivors were recruited. Almost all the participants reported that they did not engage in any kind of strenuous physical activity (94%), with more than three fourths (76%) reporting that they did not even participate in any kind of moderate physical activity. The GLTEQ score was associated with barriers to selfefficacy, while the association with exercise self-efficacy approached significance (p = 0.055). Nearly half of the patients (44%) had access to exercise equipment. Preferred methods for the delivery of physical-activity interventions were participating in group settings (72%) and receiving material in the postal mail (44%). The study described herein reports on the low levels of physical activity being practiced by a group of Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors, despite the fact that many of them had access to exercise equipment and facilities. Further studies aimed at understanding breast cancer survivors' barriers to physical activity and at developing culturally competent interventions to increase the levels of such activity are warranted.

  17. Utilizing the Active and Collaborative Learning Model in the Introductory Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Nguyen Hoai

    2014-01-01

    Model of active and collaborative learning (ACLM) applied in training specific subject makes clear advantage due to the goals of knowledge, skills that students got to develop successful future job. The author exploits the learning management system (LMS) of Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE) to establish a learning environment in the…

  18. Cancer-preventive activities of tocopherols and tocotrienols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jihyeung; Picinich, Sonia C; Yang, Zhihong; Zhao, Yang; Suh, Nanjoo; Kong, Ah-Ng; Yang, Chung S

    2010-04-01

    The cancer-preventive activity of vitamin E has been studied. Whereas some epidemiological studies have suggested a protective effect of vitamin E against cancer formation, many large-scale intervention studies with alpha-tocopherol (usually large doses) have not demonstrated a cancer-preventive effect. Studies on alpha-tocopherol in animal models also have not demonstrated robust cancer prevention effects. One possible explanation for the lack of demonstrable cancer-preventive effects is that high doses of alpha-tocopherol decrease the blood and tissue levels of delta-tocopherols. It has been suggested that gamma-tocopherol, due to its strong anti-inflammatory and other activities, may be the more effective form of vitamin E in cancer prevention. Our recent results have demonstrated that a gamma-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols inhibits colon, prostate, mammary and lung tumorigenesis in animal models, suggesting that this mixture may have a high potential for applications in the prevention of human cancer. In this review, we discuss biochemical properties of tocopherols, results of possible cancer-preventive effects in humans and animal models and possible mechanisms involved in the inhibition of carcinogenesis. Based on this information, we propose that a gamma-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols is a very promising cancer-preventive agent and warrants extensive future research.

  19. CPTAC Collaborates with Molecular & Cellular Proteomics to Address Reproducibility in Targeted Assay Development | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (MCP), in collaboration with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announce new guidelines and requirements for papers describing the development and application of targeted mass spectrometry measurements of peptides, modified peptides and proteins (Mol Cell Proteomics 2017; PMID: 28183812).  NCI’s participation is part of NIH’s overall effort to address the r

  20. A Grounded Theory Approach to Physical Activity and Advanced Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya S. Lowe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity has demonstrated benefits in cancer-related fatigue and physical functioning in early-stage cancer patients, however the role of physical activity at the end stage of cancer has not been established. To challenge positivist–empiricist assumptions, I am seeking to develop a new theoretical framework that is grounded in the advanced cancer patient’s experience of activity. Aim: To gain an in-depth understanding of the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients. Objectives: (1 To explore the meaning of activity for advanced cancer patients in the context of their day-to-day life, (2 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ perceptions of activity with respect to their quality of life, and (3 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ views of barriers and facilitators to activity in the context of their day-to-day life. Study Design: A two-phase, cross-sectional, qualitative study will be conducted through the postpositivist lens of subtle realism and informed by the principles of grounded theory methods. Study Methods: Advanced cancer patients will be recruited through the outpatient department of a tertiary cancer center. For Phase one, participants will wear an activPAL™ activity monitor and fill out a daily record sheet for seven days duration. For Phase two, the activity monitor output and daily record sheets will be used as qualitative probes for face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Concurrent coding, constant comparative analysis, and theoretical sampling will continue with the aim of achieving as close as possible to theoretical saturation. Ethics and Discussion: Ethical and scientific approval will be obtained by all local institutional review boards prior to study commencement. The findings will generate new mid-level theory about the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients and aid in the development of a new theoretical framework for designing

  1. Psychological factors and mortality in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer (JACC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Kozo; Sakata, Kiyomi

    2007-01-01

    Psychological factors may have an influence on disease processes and therefore they were investigated in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. Overall there were very few consistent associations with cancer death. Persons with 'ikigai', defined as 'that which most makes one's life seem worth living', demonstrated decreased risk of mortality from all causes, ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD).There was no consistent link with being quick to judge, although those answering no to quick judgement were at increased risk of all cause, IHD and CVD mortality. psychological stress was related to a slightly elevated risk of all cause death, IHD in men and CVD in women. However, a sense of hurry was linked to a slightly reduced risk for mortality from all causes and CVD. Persons who were likely to be angry had an increased risk for mortality from all causes. In women not likely to be angry there were also positive links to death from cancers like breast. Joyfulness was associated with decreased mortality, especially from CVD. A feeling of being trusted was also protective, again particularly for CVD.

  2. Eurocan plus report: feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    , becoming the common voice of the cancer research community and serving as an interface between the cancer research community and European citizens, patients' organizations, European institutions, Member States, industry and small and medium enterprises (SMEs), putting into practice solutions aimed at alleviating barriers to collaboration and coordination of cancer research activities in the European Union, and dealing with legal and regulatory issues. The development of an effective ECI will require time, but this entity should be established immediately. As an initial step, coordination efforts should be directed towards the creation of a platform on translational research that could encompass (1) coordination between basic, clinical and epidemiological research; (2) formal agreements of co-operation between comprehensive cancer centres and basic research laboratories throughout Europe and (3) networking between funding bodies at the European level.The European Parliament and its instruments have had a major influence in cancer control in Europe, notably in tobacco control and in the implementation of effective population-based screening. To make further progress there is a need for novelty and innovation in cancer research and prevention in Europe, and having a platform such as the ECI, where those involved in all aspects of cancer research can meet, discuss and interact, is a decisive development for Europe.

  3. The SWENOTECA group: A good example of continuous binational and multidisciplinary collaboration for patients with testicular cancer in Sweden and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandstad, Torgrim; Ståhl, Olof; Håkansson, Ulf; Wahlqvist, Rolf; Klepp, Olbjørn; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the Swedish and Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group (SWENOTECA), with an emphasis on the history of SWENOTECA, organization, results and current status. SWENOTECA was founded in 1981 as a binational organization open to hospitals in Sweden and Norway treating testicular cancer. It has since published treatment protocols for testicular cancer and prospectively registered patients with testicular cancer. Today, all hospitals in Norway and Sweden involved in the care of testicular cancer participate in SWENOTECA, and all patients with testicular cancer are prospectively registered in a population-based database. Nine protocols with standardized guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of testicular cancer have been published. In addition to the guidelines, several studies have been performed or initiated within the scope of SWENOTECA. The details are presented in this article. SWENOTECA has been a very fruitful binational collaboration and has thoughtfully evolved over time. The group's continuous work and dedication have provided an example for other national and international cancer networks. The binational implementation of standardized guidelines has resulted in excellent patient outcomes, regardless of place of residence. Although testicular cancer is a relatively rare disease, the population-based binational organization of SWENOTECA has made it possible to publish some of the largest studies in the field of testicular cancer.

  4. Physical activity can lower risk of 13 types of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study of the relationship between physical activity and cancer has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer; the risk of developing seven cancer types was 20 percent lower among the most active participants as compared with the least active participants.

  5. Primary lung cancer coexisting with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Y; Varol, U; Unlu, M; Kayaalp, I; Ayranci, A; Dereli, M S; Guclu, S Z

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) comorbidity is a clinical problem that presents a challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of both diseases. To clarify the clinical and survival characteristics of cases with both lung cancer and active pulmonary TB. From 2008 to 2013, 3350 TB patients admitted to the TB Department of the Chest Diseases Hospital of Izmir, Turkey, were evaluated. In 38 (1.1%) male patients, lung cancer and TB were found to coexist. Almost all of the patients were diagnosed at Stage III (n = 14, 36.8%) or IV (n = 17, 44.7%) lung cancer, whereas four (10.6%) had Stage II and three (7.9%) had Stage I disease. Squamous cell lung cancer was the predominant histology (n = 23, 60.7%). The median overall survival among patients was 13.4 months (95%CI 8.09-18.8). One-year survival rates for patients with Stages I, II, III and IV were respectively 100%, 75%, 57% and 40%. The present study demonstrates that lung cancer combined with active pulmonary TB most frequently presents as squamous cell carcinoma, with a male predominance. The overall survival of lung cancer patients did not change even with concomitant active TB.

  6. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Chi H.J. Kao; Amalini C. Jesuthasan; Karen S. Bishop; Marcus P. Glucina; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides bei...

  7. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  8. The Role of MRI in Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis in American men, excluding skin cancer. The clinical behavior of prostate cancer varies from low-grade, slow growing tumors to high-grade aggressive tumors that may ultimately progress to metastases and cause death. Given the high incidence of men diagnosed with prostate cancer, conservative treatment strategies such as active surveillance are critical in the management of prostate cancer to reduce therapeutic complications of radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. In this review, we will review the role of multiparametric MRI in the selection and follow-up of patients on active surveillance.

  9. Overview of the PPPL International Experimental Stellarator Collaboration Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, David [Princeton University

    2012-03-28

    PPPL has initiated and strengthened collaborative experimental programs aimed at developing the required toolsets and scientific knowledge for advancing stellarators as a viable fusion energy source. In particular, activities at LHD and W7-X, the two large superconducting helical confinement systems in the world, have been expanded. The focus at LHD has been on diagnostic development and data analysis, since the device is a mature research facility with more than 20MW of heating power available. High beta stability experiments, ion and electron temperature measurements using a recently installed imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer, and 3D equilibrium reconstructions will be described. The focus on W7-X has been to develop hardware capabilities for divertor heat flux control, including plasma-facing components, error field correction coils, and power supplies. Progress on these and other activities will be presented.

  10. Means of Question-Answer Interaction for Collaborative Development Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Sosnin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of successful developing of the software intensive system (SIS is adequate conceptual interactions of stakeholders at the early stages of designing. Nowadays the success of development is extremely low. It can be increased with using artificial intelligence (AI means including models of reasoning supported by the human-computer interaction in collaborative development activity. In this paper, a number of question-answer means for modeling reasoning are suggested. Such kind of means is defined and implemented in order to get effects of integrating the collective reasoning for their positive influence on the intellectual activity of designers. Question-answer means are arranged as a specialized processor opening the possibility to question-answer programming of the tasks on the conceptual stage of designing. Suggested and investigated means can be used for solving any complicated task.

  11. The Value of Picture-Book Reading-Based Collaborative Output Activities for Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chia-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three instructional modes: picture-book reading-only (PRO), picture-book reading plus vocabulary instruction (PRVI), and picture-book reading plus reading-based collaborative output activity (PRCOA) on young adult EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' vocabulary acquisition and retention. Eighty…

  12. Deriving Process-Driven Collaborative Editing Pattern from Collaborative Learning Flow Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Olivera; Skaf-Molli, Hala; Molli, Pascal; Godart, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Learning Flow Patterns (CLFPs) have recently emerged as a new method to formulate best practices in structuring the flow of activities within various collaborative learning scenarios. The term "learning flow" is used to describe coordination and sequencing of learning tasks. This paper adopts the existing concept of CLFP and argues…

  13. Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterling, Jeanette; Wiklander, Maria; Obol, Claire Micaux; Lampic, Claudia; Eriksson, Lars E; Pelters, Britta; Wettergren, Lena

    2016-04-12

    The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial. The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs). Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs' impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention. The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention's content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable. The PRPs gave suggestions concerning the

  14. Machine Learning Detects Pan-cancer Ras Pathway Activation in The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Way

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Precision oncology uses genomic evidence to match patients with treatment but often fails to identify all patients who may respond. The transcriptome of these “hidden responders” may reveal responsive molecular states. We describe and evaluate a machine-learning approach to classify aberrant pathway activity in tumors, which may aid in hidden responder identification. The algorithm integrates RNA-seq, copy number, and mutations from 33 different cancer types across The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA PanCanAtlas project to predict aberrant molecular states in tumors. Applied to the Ras pathway, the method detects Ras activation across cancer types and identifies phenocopying variants. The model, trained on human tumors, can predict response to MEK inhibitors in wild-type Ras cell lines. We also present data that suggest that multiple hits in the Ras pathway confer increased Ras activity. The transcriptome is underused in precision oncology and, combined with machine learning, can aid in the identification of hidden responders. : Way et al. develop a machine-learning approach using PanCanAtlas data to detect Ras activation in cancer. Integrating mutation, copy number, and expression data, the authors show that their method detects Ras-activating variants in tumors and sensitivity to MEK inhibitors in cell lines. Keywords: Gene expression, machine learning, Ras, NF1, KRAS, NRAS, HRAS, pan-cancer, TCGA, drug sensitivity

  15. Integrating Physical Activity, Coach Collaboration, and Life Skill Development in Youth: School Counselors' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Laura; Cook, Amy; Scherer, Alexandra; Greenspan, Scott; Silva, Meghan Ray; Cadet, Melanie; Maki, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Given the social, emotional, and academic benefits of physical activity related to youth development (Hellison, 2011), coupled with the minimal research regarding how school counselors can use physical activity for life skill development, this article focuses on school counselors' beliefs about collaborating with coaches and using physical…

  16. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  17. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine as an Anti-cancer Vaccine: Collaborative Efforts to Promote HPV Vaccine in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Julie S.; Steele, C. Brooke; Hayes, Nikki; Bhatt, Achal; Moore, Angela R.

    2018-01-01

    Background Widespread use of the HPV vaccine has the potential to reduce incidence from HPV-associated cancers. However, vaccine uptake among adolescents remains well below the Healthy People 2020 targets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program awardees (NCCCP) are well positioned to work with immunization programs to increase vaccine uptake. Methods CDC’s chronic disease management information system was queried for objectives and activities associated with HPV vaccine that were reported by NCCCP awardees from 2013 – 2016 as part of program reporting requirements. A content analysis was conducted on the query results to categorize interventions according to strategies outlined in The Guide to Community Preventive Services and the 2014 President’s Cancer Panel report. Results Sixty-two percent of NCCCP awardees had planned or implemented at least one activity since 2013 to address low HPV vaccination coverage in their jurisdictions. Most NCCCP awardees (86%) reported community education activities, while 65% reported activities associated with provider education. Systems-based strategies such as client reminders or provider assessment and feedback were each reported by less than 25% of NCCCP awardees. Conclusion Many NCCCP awardees report planning or implementing activities to address low HPV vaccination coverage, often in conjunction with state immunization programs. NCCCP awardees can play a role in increasing HPV vaccination coverage through their cancer prevention and control expertise and access to partners in the health care community. PMID:28263672

  18. Collaborative modelling for active involvement of stakeholders in urban flood risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk of the 2nd ERANET CRUE funding initiative. The main objective of the project was to develop and test an advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of local communities to flooding. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated that enhances the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real-time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities in order to carry out more informed and shared decision-making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1 the Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding; and (2 the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding. As a result of the interactive and social learning process, supported by sociotechnical instruments, an understanding of flood risk was developed amongst the stakeholders and alternatives for flood risk management for the respective case study area were jointly developed and ranked as a basis for further planning and management.

  19. Parents' perceptions of skin cancer threat and children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Alexander D; Aalborg, Jenny; Asdigian, Nancy L; Morelli, Joseph G; Mokrohisky, Stefan T; Dellavalle, Robert P; Berwick, Marianne; Box, Neil F; Crane, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer, but without physical activity, children are at risk of childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to explore relationships between parental perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) in children. This is a cross-sectional analysis nested within the Colorado Kids Sun Care Program sun safety intervention trial. In summer 2007, parent telephone interviews provided data on demographics, perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, and physical activity. Physical examinations provided data on phenotype, freckling, and BMI. Data from 999 Colorado children born in 1998 were included in analysis. We used analysis of variance, Spearman's rho (ρ) correlation, and multivariable linear regression analysis to evaluate relationships with total amount of outdoor physical activity. After controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, skin color, and sun protection, regression analysis showed that each unit increase in perceived severity of nonmelanoma skin cancer was associated with a 30% increase in hours of outdoor physical activity (P = .005). Hours of outdoor physical activity were not related to perceived severity of melanoma or perceived susceptibility to skin cancer. BMI-for-age was not significantly correlated with perceptions of skin cancer threat, use of sun protection, or level of physical activity. The promotion of sun safety is not likely to inhibit physical activity. Skin cancer prevention programs should continue to promote midday sun avoidance and sun protection during outdoor activities.

  20. Improving Teaching through Collaborative Reflective Teaching Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and collaboration are two activities teachers can use to change and improve their practice. However, finding the time and space to do so can be challenging. The collaborative reflective teaching cycle is a structured activity teachers can use to engage in reflection and collaboration. This article describes how a seventh grade teaching…

  1. Association of proteasomal activity with metastasis in luminal breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashova, E. E.; Fesik, E. A.; Doroshenko, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Chimotrypsin-like (ChTL) and caspase-like (CL) proteasomal activities were investigated in different variants of the tumor progression of luminal breast cancer. Patients with primary luminal breast cancer (n = 123) in stage T1-3N0-2M0 who had not received neoadjuvant treatment were included in this study. Proteasome ChTL and CL activities were determined in the samples of tumor and adjacent tissues. The coefficients of chymotrypsin-like (kChTL) and caspase-like (kCL) proteasome activity were also calculated as the ratio of the corresponding activity in the tumor tissue to activity in the adjacent tissue. ChTL, CL, kChTL and kCL in the tissues of luminal A and B breast cancer with lymphogenic metastasis were compared, and their association with hematogenous metastasis was evaluated. On the one hand, CL activity of proteasomes increased in luminal A breast cancer with extensive lymphogenic metastasis (N2), on the other hand it decreased in the luminal B subtype of cancer. The ratio of proteasomal activity in the tumor and adjacent tissues plays a significant role in the hematogenic pathway of breast cancer progression and is associated with poor metastatic-free survival.

  2. ACT-Vision: active collaborative tracking for multiple PTZ cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaddus, Christopher; Germano, Thomas; Vandervalk, Nicholas; Divakaran, Ajay; Wu, Shunguang; Sawhney, Harpreet

    2009-04-01

    We describe a novel scalable approach for the management of a large number of Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) cameras deployed outdoors for persistent tracking of humans and vehicles, without resorting to the large fields of view of associated static cameras. Our system, Active Collaborative Tracking - Vision (ACT-Vision), is essentially a real-time operating system that can control hundreds of PTZ cameras to ensure uninterrupted tracking of target objects while maintaining image quality and coverage of all targets using a minimal number of sensors. The system ensures the visibility of targets between PTZ cameras by using criteria such as distance from sensor and occlusion.

  3. The Effect of Personal Characteristics, Perceived Threat, Efficacy and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Breast Cancer Screening Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick De Pelsmacker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to activate women to participate in breast cancer screening programs, a good understanding is needed of the personal characteristics that influence how women can be activated to search for more information, consult friends and doctors, and participate in breast cancer screening programs. In the current study, we investigate the effect of six personal characteristics that have in previous research been identified as important triggers of health behavior on breast cancer screening activation: Health awareness, Need for Cognition, Affect Intensity, Breast cancer knowledge, Topic involvement, and the Perceived breast cancer risk. We test the effect of these factors on four activation variables: intention of future information seeking, forwarding the message to a friend, talking to a doctor, and actual breast cancer screening attendance. Additionally, we try to unravel the process by means of which the antecedents (the six personal characteristics lead to activation. To that end, we test the mediating role of perceived breast cancer threat, perceived efficacy of screening, and the evoked breast cancer anxiety as mediators in this process. The data were collected by means of a cross-sectional survey in a sample of 700 Flemish (Belgium women who were invited to the free-of-charge breast cancer population screening. Screening attendance of this sample was provided by the government agency in charge of the organisation of the screening. Health awareness, affects intensity, topic involvement, and perceived risk have the strongest influence on activation. Breast cancer anxiety and perceived breast cancer threat have a substantial mediation effect on these effects. Efficacy perceptions are less important in the activation process. Increased health awareness and a higher level of perceived risk lead to less participation in the free of charge population based breast screening program. Implications for theory and practice are offered. The limitation

  4. The Effect of Personal Characteristics, Perceived Threat, Efficacy and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Breast Cancer Screening Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmacker, Patrick; Lewi, Martine; Cauberghe, Veroline

    2017-01-01

    In order to activate women to participate in breast cancer screening programs, a good understanding is needed of the personal characteristics that influence how women can be activated to search for more information, consult friends and doctors, and participate in breast cancer screening programs. In the current study, we investigate the effect of six personal characteristics that have in previous research been identified as important triggers of health behavior on breast cancer screening activation: Health awareness, Need for Cognition, Affect Intensity, Breast cancer knowledge, Topic involvement, and the Perceived breast cancer risk. We test the effect of these factors on four activation variables: intention of future information seeking, forwarding the message to a friend, talking to a doctor, and actual breast cancer screening attendance. Additionally, we try to unravel the process by means of which the antecedents (the six personal characteristics) lead to activation. To that end, we test the mediating role of perceived breast cancer threat, perceived efficacy of screening, and the evoked breast cancer anxiety as mediators in this process. The data were collected by means of a cross-sectional survey in a sample of 700 Flemish (Belgium) women who were invited to the free-of-charge breast cancer population screening. Screening attendance of this sample was provided by the government agency in charge of the organisation of the screening. Health awareness, affects intensity, topic involvement, and perceived risk have the strongest influence on activation. Breast cancer anxiety and perceived breast cancer threat have a substantial mediation effect on these effects. Efficacy perceptions are less important in the activation process. Increased health awareness and a higher level of perceived risk lead to less participation in the free of charge population based breast screening program. Implications for theory and practice are offered. The limitation of the study is

  5. ePAL roadmap for active ageing: a collaborative networks approach to extending professional life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.; del Cura, A.; Playfoot, J.

    2010-01-01

    Active ageing, through a balanced combination of leisure and social interaction with continued work involvement, is central to meeting older citizens expectations, and maintaining their mental and physical health. Application of the collaborative networks paradigm, and the new generation of

  6. Apoptotic and Nonapoptotic Activities of Pterostilbene against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jane Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major cause of death. The outcomes of current therapeutic strategies against cancer often ironically lead to even increased mortality due to the subsequent drug resistance and to metastatic recurrence. Alternative medicines are thus urgently needed. Cumulative evidence has pointed out that pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene, PS has excellent pharmacological benefits for the prevention and treatment for various types of cancer in their different stages of progression by evoking apoptotic or nonapoptotic anti-cancer activities. In this review article, we first update current knowledge regarding tumor progression toward accomplishment of metastasis. Subsequently, we review current literature regarding the anti-cancer activities of PS. Finally, we provide future perspectives to clinically utilize PS as novel cancer therapeutic remedies. We, therefore, conclude and propose that PS is one ideal alternative medicine to be administered in the diet as a nutritional supplement.

  7. Architecture for an advanced biomedical collaboration domain for the European paediatric cancer research community (ABCD-4-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzlnader, Michael; Falgenhauer, Markus; Gossy, Christian; Schreier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Today, progress in biomedical research often depends on large, interdisciplinary research projects and tailored information and communication technology (ICT) support. In the context of the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) project the exchange of data between data source (Source Domain) and data consumer (Consumer Domain) systems in a distributed computing environment needs to be facilitated. This work presents the requirements and the corresponding solution architecture of the Advanced Biomedical Collaboration Domain for Europe (ABCD-4-E). The proposed concept utilises public as well as private cloud systems, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework and web-based applications to provide the core capabilities in accordance with privacy and security needs. The utility of crucial parts of the concept was evaluated by prototypic implementation. A discussion of the design indicates that the requirements of ENCCA are fully met. A whole system demonstration is currently being prepared to verify that ABCD-4-E has the potential to evolve into a domain-bridging collaboration platform in the future.

  8. Literacy Education and Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joron Pihl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore inter-professional collaboration in literacy education. It examines factors that facilitate collaboration between teachers and librarians and the contributions to literacy education. The study was designed as a research and development project in multicultural schools in Norway (2007-2011. Its theoretical framework was cultural-historical theory of activity theory, and the theory of expansive learning. The methods were formative intervention, interviews, participant observation, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of student literacy. In the study, interprofessional collaboration made significant contributions to professional development and literacy education. Interprofessional collaboration was developed as a collective learning process. It was facilitated by research interventions, development of a shared object of activity and work with new theoretical concepts and cultural artefacts. The findings indicate that inter-professional collaboration can make important contributions to realization of the mandate of the teaching and library profession.

  9. Addressing cancer disparities via community network mobilization and intersectoral partnerships: a social network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Ramanadhan

    Full Text Available Community mobilization and collaboration among diverse partners are vital components of the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities in the United States. We studied the development and impact of intersectoral connections among the members of the Massachusetts Community Network for Cancer Education, Research, and Training (MassCONECT. As one of the Community Network Program sites funded by the National Cancer Institute, this infrastructure-building initiative utilized principles of Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR to unite community coalitions, researchers, policymakers, and other important stakeholders to address cancer disparities in three Massachusetts communities: Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester. We conducted a cross-sectional, sociometric network analysis four years after the network was formed. A total of 38 of 55 members participated in the study (69% response rate. Over four years of collaboration, the number of intersectoral connections reported by members (intersectoral out-degree increased, as did the extent to which such connections were reported reciprocally (intersectoral reciprocity. We assessed relationships between these markers of intersectoral collaboration and three intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities: delivery of community activities, policy engagement, and grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral out-degree and community activities and policy engagement (the relationship was borderline significant for grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral reciprocity and community activities and grants/publications (the relationship was borderline significant for policy engagement. The study suggests that intersectoral connections may be important drivers of diverse intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities

  10. Sexual activity and the risk of prostate cancer: Review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fouad Kotb

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual activity can affect prostate cancer pathogenesis in a variety of ways; including the proposed high androgen status, risk of sexually transmitted infections and the potential effect of retained carcinogens within the prostatic cells. Methods: PubMed review of all publications concerning sexual activity and the risk of prostate cancer was done by two researchers. Results: Few publications could be detected and data were classified as a prostate cancer risk in association with either heterosexual or homosexual activities. Conclusion: Frequent ejaculation seems to be protective from the development of prostate cancer. Multiple sexual partners may be protective from prostate cancer, excluding the risk of sexually transmitted infections. Homosexual men are at a greater risk for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  11. The 2011-2016 Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) initiative: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Colditz, Graham A; Hu, Frank B; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Ahima, Rexford S; Brownson, Ross C; Carson, Kenneth R; Chavarro, Jorge E; Chodosh, Lewis A; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M; Hovmand, Peter S; Irwin, Melinda L; Jacobs, Linda A; James, Aimee S; Jones, Lee W; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S; King, Irena B; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Proctor, Enola K; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D; Sesso, Howard D; Stampfer, Meir J; Subramanian, S V; Taveras, Elsie M; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Thornquist, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a center grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity, referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the centers. Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes three animal studies, three cohort studies, four randomized clinical trials, one cross-sectional study, and two modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk of cancer as well as cancer survivors.

  12. Correlates and geographic patterns of knowledge that physical activity decreases cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, A Susana; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Vanderpool, Robin C; Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W

    2013-04-01

    While many lifestyle-related cancer risk factors including tobacco use, poor diet, and sun exposure are well recognized by the general public, the role of physical activity in decreasing cancer risk is less recognized. Studies have demonstrated gender-, race/ethnicity-, and age-based disparities in cancer risk factor knowledge; however, beliefs and geographic factors that may be related to knowledge are under-examined. In this study, we analyzed data from the 2008 Health Information National Trends Survey to determine correlates of knowledge of the relationship between physical activity and reduced cancer risk in the adult US population. We generated geographic information system maps to examine the geographic distribution of this knowledge. Results revealed that there is confusion among US adults about the relationship between physical activity and cancer risk: Respondents who believed that cancer is not preventable had significantly lower odds of knowing that physical activity reduces cancer risk (p physical activity reduces cancer risk (p physical activity guidelines were also significantly more likely to know that physical activity reduces cancer risk (p physical inactivity. Correlates of cancer risk factor knowledge point to opportunities for targeted interventions.

  13. Using Electronic Communication Tools in Online Group Activities to Develop Collaborative Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Ebner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using synchronous and asynchronous communication tools in online group activities to develop collaborative learning skills. An experimental study was implemented on a sample of faculty of education students in Mansoura University. The sample was divided into two groups, a group studied…

  14. Facilitating Collaboration in Online Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geralyn E Stephens

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Demonstrating the ability to collaborate effectively is essential for students moving into 21st century workplaces. Employers are expecting new hires to already possess group-work skills and will seek evidence of their ability to cooperate, collaborate, and complete projects with colleagues, including remotely or at a distance. Instructional activities and assignments that provide students with a variety of ways to engage each other have a direct and immediate effect on their academic performance. This paper shares the Facilitating Collaboration in Online Groups (FCOG instructional planning strategy. The strategy is designed for faculty use and familiarizes students with the process and technology necessary to collaborate effectively in online classroom groups. The strategy utilizes proven teaching techniques to maximize student-student and student-content relationships. Each of the four (4 sequential phases in the FCOG instructional planning strategy are discussed: 1 Creating Groups, 2 Establishing Expectations, 3 Communication Tools, and 4 Assignments and Activities. The discussion also contains implementation suggestions as well as examples of instructional assignments and activities that provide students with a variety of ways to collaborate to reach the learning outcomes.

  15. Implementing a user-driven online quality improvement toolkit for cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; York, Laura S; Bowman, Candice; Gale, Randall C; Smith, Nina; Asch, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    Peer-to-peer collaboration within integrated health systems requires a mechanism for sharing quality improvement lessons. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) developed online compendia of tools linked to specific cancer quality indicators. We evaluated awareness and use of the toolkits, variation across facilities, impact of social marketing, and factors influencing toolkit use. A diffusion of innovations conceptual framework guided the collection of user activity data from the Toolkit Series SharePoint site and an online survey of potential Lung Cancer Care Toolkit users. The VA Toolkit Series site had 5,088 unique visitors in its first 22 months; 5% of users accounted for 40% of page views. Social marketing communications were correlated with site usage. Of survey respondents (n = 355), 54% had visited the site, of whom 24% downloaded at least one tool. Respondents' awareness of the lung cancer quality performance of their facility, and facility participation in quality improvement collaboratives, were positively associated with Toolkit Series site use. Facility-level lung cancer tool implementation varied widely across tool types. The VA Toolkit Series achieved widespread use and a high degree of user engagement, although use varied widely across facilities. The most active users were aware of and active in cancer care quality improvement. Toolkit use seemed to be reinforced by other quality improvement activities. A combination of user-driven tool creation and centralized toolkit development seemed to be effective for leveraging health information technology to spread disease-specific quality improvement tools within an integrated health care system. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Participation in Daily Life Activities among Children with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Participation in daily life activities is an essential aspect of health, which can facilitate a child’s development. Children with cancer are at risk of functional limitations and participation restrictions. The present study aims to investigate participation of children with cancer in daily life activities compared to healthy peers. Methods: This was a comparative cross-sectional study. In the first phase, we assessed the test-retest reliability of the Iranian Children Participation Assessment Scale in 30 children (6-12 years of age diagnosed with cancer and their parents (child and parent versions. The second phase of the study included a comparison of daily life activities as measured by the Iranian Children Participation Assessment Scale between the children with cancer (diagnosed at least 4 months prior and currently receiving active treatment and their age- and gender-matched healthy peers. Results: The child version had excellent reliability according to Cronbach’s alpha in diversity of activities (0.97, intensity of participation (0.95, with whom they participated (0.95, and enjoyment of daily activities (0.94. The parent version had excellent reliability (Cronbach’s alpha as follows: 0.99 for diversity, 0.97 for intensity, 0.97 for with whom, 0.98 for enjoyment, and 0.98 for parents’ satisfaction. The coefficients of agreement were 0.77 (total scores of diversity, 0.63 (intensity, 0.60 (with whom, and 0.91 (enjoyment. The child version indicated that children with cancer had significantly lower scores in daily life activities items of diversity (P=0.000, intensity (P=0.000, with whom (P=0.000, and enjoyment (P=0.000 compared to healthy children. Based on the total scores in the parent version, children with cancer showed significantly lower scores in diversity (P=0.001, intensity (P=0.000, with whom (P=0.001, enjoyment (P=0.002, and satisfaction (P=0.000 compared to the healthy group. Conclusion: The findings of the

  17. Integration of Activities in the natural environment as contents of education trhough collaborative action-research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Guillén Correas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The different values †given to Activities in the Natural Environment have become a mandated content block within the area of Physical Education. This research is based on the urging of its practical development of a school in the city of Zaragoza. So far, the analysis of these practices in this school, refers to some specific experiences focused on the volunteer activities done during the «snow week», which means less participant students. Collaborative action-research is the methodology used for this purpose, therefore team-work is demanded to overcome the limitations presented by this block of contents: teacher training as well as both facilities and materials must be provided. Thus, we found two groups of conclusions: firstly, the factors necessary to establish a dynamic collaborative work among teachers of this school. Secondly, the aspects required to design and strengthen the proposed contents of environmental Activities in the school, adapting them to its own physical contextual characteristics

  18. Surface activity, lipid profiles and their implications in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profiles of lipids in normal and cancerous tissues may differ revealing information about cancer development and progression. Lipids being surface active, changes in lipid profiles can manifest as altered surface activity profiles. Langmuir monolayers offer a convenient model for evaluating surface activity of biological membranes. Aims: The aims of this study were to quantify phospholipids and their effects on surface activity of normal and cancerous human cervical tissues as well as to evaluate the role of phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM in cervical cancer using Langmuir monolayers. Methods and Materials: Lipid quantification was done using thin layer chromatography and phosphorus assay. Surface activity was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. Monolayers were formed on the surface of deionized water by spreading tissue organic phase corresponding to 1 mg of tissue and studying their surface pressure-area isotherms at body temperature. The PC and SM contents of cancerous human cervical tissues were higher than those of the normal human cervical tissues. Role of PC and SM were evaluated by adding varying amounts of these lipids to normal cervical pooled organic phase. Statistical analysis: Student′s t-test (p < 0.05 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. Results: Our results reveals that the phosphatidylglycerol level in cancerous cervical tissue was nearly five folds higher than that in normal cervical tissue. Also PC and sphingomyelin SM were found to be the major phospholipid components in cancerous and normal cervical tissues respectively. The addition of either 1.5 µg DPPC or 0.5 µg SM /mg of tissue to the normal organic phase changed its surface activity profile to that of the cancerous tissues. Statistically significant surface activity parameters showed that PC and SM have remarkable roles in shifting the normal cervical lipophilic surface activity towards that of cancerous lipophilic

  19. You Can Be in a Group and Still Not Cooperate. Collaborative Approaches and Cooperative Learning Activities for Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma City School District, OH.

    This handbook defines and describes the benefits of both collaborative approaches and cooperative techniques. An introduction uses watercolor marbling as a metaphor for collaborative approaches and cooperative activities. Section I provides research results regarding problems of adult literacy programs, skills employers want, and Bloom's taxonomy.…

  20. Breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collaborative article gives an overview of breast cancer in LICs, ... approach to the problem; therefore they are published as two separate ... attached to the diagnosis of breast cancer. ... Their founding statement in its early form is included.

  1. Information Society and teacher training. E-activities and collaborative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Martín Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, virtual educational spaces are depicted as new learning communities and contexts, i.e. where (human interaction and the forging of educational relationships are possible. This does not include, however, other spatial, geographical or temporal limitations. In this study, Internet is presented as a universal tool for both teaching staff and general users. It is used for searching specific information, exchanging ideas, or discussing research. Within the context of this new virtual educational area, the most suitable activities are those that foster the creation of knowledge and that promote experimentation and problem solving in an individual or group context. It also refers to activities that combine students’ previous knowledge with the new contents of virtual courses. In this way, there is greater autonomous learning and problem solving of specific theoretical questions. We also examine core didactic activities that are used in virtual education areas, that is, in terms of collaborative learning.

  2. Motivations associated with physical activity in young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voege, Patricia; Bower, Julienne E; Stanton, Annette L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with positive health outcomes in breast cancer survivors. However, factors that promote or discourage physical activity in this population are not fully understood. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine approach and avoidance motivations, barriers for exercise, and their association with physical activity in breast cancer survivors younger than 50 years old at time of diagnosis. Current physical activity levels, approach and avoidance motivations, and barriers to exercise were assessed through self-report questionnaires in young breast cancer survivors (N = 156). Results indicated that barriers to exercise were negatively associated with physical activity (p physical activity (p barriers (p physical activity (p = .91).

  3. Gender and Bladder Cancer: A Collaborative Review of Etiology, Biology, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruch, Jakub; Daneshmand, Siamak; Fisch, Margit; Lotan, Yair; Noon, Aidan P; Resnick, Matthew J; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Boorjian, Stephen A

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer is three to four times greater in men than in women. However, women are diagnosed with more advanced disease at presentation and have less favorable outcomes after treatment. To review the literature on potential biologic mechanisms underlying differential gender risk for bladder cancer, and evidence regarding gender disparities in bladder cancer presentation, management, and outcomes. A literature search of English-language publications that included an analysis of the association of gender with bladder cancer was performed using Pubmed. Ninety-seven articles were selected for analysis with the consensus of all authors. It has been shown that the gender difference in bladder cancer incidence is independent of differences in exposure risk, including smoking status. Potential molecular mechanisms include disparate metabolism of carcinogens by hepatic enzymes between men and women, resulting in differential exposure of the urothelium to carcinogens. In addition, the activity of the sex steroid hormone pathway may play a role in bladder cancer development, with demonstration that both androgens and estrogens have biologic effects in bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, gender differences exist in the timeliness and completeness of hematuria evaluation, with women experiencing a significantly greater delay in urologic referral and undergoing guideline-concordant imaging less frequently. Correspondingly, women have more advanced tumors at the time of bladder cancer diagnosis. Interestingly, higher cancer-specific mortality has been noted among women even after adjusting for tumor stage and treatment modality. Numerous potential biologic and epidemiologic factors probably underlie the gender differences observed for bladder cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, and outcomes. Continued evaluation to define clinical applications for manipulation of the sex steroid pathway and to improve the standardization of hematuria

  4. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Physical activity influences the immune system of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that physical activity in breast cancer patients can not only improve quality of life. Influences on physical and psychological levels have been evaluated, but effects on the immune system of breast cancer patients are hardly known. A PubMed search identified relevant trials and meta-analyses from 1970 to 2013. This review summarizes the results of international studies and the current discussion of effects of physical activity on the immune system of breast cancer patients. Highlighted are effects of physical activity on the immune system. Seven original articles and 14 reviews included in this review. Two original and the review articles includes other tumor entities besides breast cancer.Evaluated methods such as dose-response relationships for exercise in oncology, hardly exist. Increased immunological anti-cancer activity due to physical activity is probably mediated via an increase in number and cytotoxicity of monocytes and natural killer cells and cytokines.

  6. The IAEA collaborating centre for neutron activation based methodologies of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Reactor Institute Delft of the Delft University of Technology houses the Netherlands' only academic nuclear research reactor, with associated instrumentation and laboratories, for scientific education and research with ionizing radiation. The Institute's swimming pool type research reactor reached first criticality in 1963 and is currently operated at 2MW thermal powers on a 100 h/week basis. The reactor is equipped with neutron mirror guides serving ultra modern neutron beam physics instruments and with a very bright positron facility. Fully automated gamma-ray spectrometry systems are used by the laboratory for neutron activation analysis, providing large scale services under an ISO/IEC 17025:2005 compliant management system, being (since 1993) the first accredited laboratory of its kind in the world. Already for several years, this laboratory is sustainable by rendering these services to both the public and the private sector. The prime user of the Institute's fac ilities is the scientific Research Department of Radiation, Radionuclide and Reactors of the Faculty of Applied Sciences, housed inside the building. All reactor facilities are also made available for use by or for services to, external clients (industry, government, private sector, other (international research institutes and universities). The Reactor Institute Delft was inaugurated in May 2009 as a new lAEA Collaborating Centre for Neutron Activation Based Methodologies of Research Reactors. The collaboration involves education, research and development in (I) Production of reactor-produced, no-carrier added radioisotopes of high specific activity via neutron activation; (II) Neutron activation analysis with emphasis on automation as well as analysis of large samples, and radiotracer techniques and as a cross-cutting activity, (IIl) Quality assurance and management in research and application of research reactor based techniques and in research reactor operations. This c ollaboration will

  7. Perceptual Factors Affecting the Tendency to Collaboration in SMEs: Perceived Importance of Collaboration Modes and Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeyong Noh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore key factors of SMEs’ external collaboration and identifies the perceived factors affecting propensity for collaboration. Particularly, we focus on two factors – internal strategic activities geared towards open innovation and external collaboration partners, both of which are essential to establishing an external collaboration. We conducted a survey of Korean SMEs regarding their collaboration project experiences, and used logistic regression analysis to analyze the survey data. The research findings are expected to help understanding the complex open innovation mechanism in SMEs and to have meaningful implications for the development of their collaboration model.

  8. Status of the Next European Dipole (NED) Activity of the Collaborated Accelerator Research in Europe (CARE) Project

    CERN Document Server

    Devred, Arnaud; Baynham, D Elwyn; Boutboul, T; Canfer, S; Chorowski, M; den Ouden, A; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Fessia, P; Fydrych, J; Félice, H; Greco, Michela; Greenhalgh, J; Leroy, D; Loveridge, P W; Michel, F; Oberli, L R; Pedrini, D; Polinski, J; Previtali, V; Quettier, L; Rifflet, J M; Rochford, J; Rondeaux, F; Sanz, S; Sgobba, Stefano; Sorbi, M; Toral-Fernandez, F; Van Weelderen, R; Vincent-Viry, O; Volpini, G; Védrine, P

    2005-01-01

    Plans for LHC upgrade and for the final focalization of linear colliders call for large aperture and/or high-performance dipole and quadrupole magnets that may be beyond the reach of conventional NbTi magnet technology. The Next European Dipole (NED) activity was launched on January 1st, 2004 to promote the development of high-performance, Nb$_{3}$Sn wires in collaboration with European industry (aiming at a non-copper critical current density of 1500 A/mm2 at 4.2 K and 15 T) and to assess the suitability of Nb$_{3}$Sn technology to the next generation of accelerator magnets (aiming at an aperture of 88 mm and a conductor peak field of 15 T). It is integrated within the Collaborated Accelerator Research in Europe (CARE) project, involves seven collaborators, and is partly funded by the European Union. We present here an overview of the NED activity and we report on the status of the various work packages it encompasses.

  9. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengying Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment.

  10. Collaborative exams: Cheating? Or learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyewon; Lasry, Nathaniel; Miller, Kelly; Mazur, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Virtually all human activity involves collaboration, and yet, collaboration during an examination is typically considered cheating. Collaborative assessments have not been widely adopted because of the perceived lack of individual accountability and the notion that collaboration during assessments simply causes propagation of correct answers. Hence, collaboration could help weaker students without providing much benefit to stronger students. In this paper, we examine student performance in open-ended, two-stage collaborative assessments comprised of an individually accountable round followed by an automatically scored, collaborative round. We show that collaboration entails more than just propagation of correct answers. We find greater rates of correct answers after collaboration for all students, including the strongest members of a team. We also find that half of teams that begin without a correct answer to propagate still obtain the correct answer in the collaborative round. Our findings, combined with the convenience of automatic feedback and grading of open-ended questions, provide a strong argument for adopting collaborative assessments as an integral part of education.

  11. On enhancing on-line collaboration using fuzzy logic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontios J. Hadjileontiadis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Web-based collaboration calls for professional skills and competences to the benefit of the quality of the collaboration and its output. Within this framework, educational virtual environments may provide a means for training upon these skills and in particular the collaborative ones. On the basis of the existing technological means such training may be enhanced even more. Designing considerations towards this direction include the close follow-up of the collaborative activity and provision of support grounded upon a pedagogical background. To this vein, a fuzzy logic-based expert system, namely Collaboration/Reflection-Fuzzy Inference System (C/R-FIS, is presented in this paper. By means of interconnected FISs, the C/R-FIS expert system automatically evaluates the collaborative activity of two peers, during their asynchronous, written, web-based collaboration. This information is used for the provision of adaptive support to peers during their collaboration, towards equilibrium of their collaborative activity. In particular, this enhanced formative feedback aims at diminishing the possible dissonance between the individual collaborative skills by challenging self-adjustment procedures. The proposed model extents the evaluation system of a web-based collaborative tool namely Lin2k, which has served as a test-bed for the C/R-FIS experimental use. Results from its experimental use have proved the potentiality of the proposed model to significantly contribute to the enhancement of the collaborative activity and its transferability to other collaborative learning contexts, such as medicine, environmental engineering, law, and music education.

  12. Physical activity and the risk of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Win, Aung Ko; Hardikar, Sheetal S; Glombicki, Stephen E; Mallenahalli, Sheila; Thirumurthi, Selvi; Peterson, Susan K; You, Y Nancy; Buchanan, Daniel D; Figueiredo, Jane C; Campbell, Peter T; Gallinger, Steven; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Lindor, Noralane M; Le Marchand, Loic; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Basen-Engquist, Karen M; Lynch, Patrick M; Pande, Mala

    2018-06-14

    Greater physical activity is associated with a decrease in risk of colorectal cancer for the general population; however, little is known about its relationship with colorectal cancer risk for people with Lynch syndrome, carriers of inherited pathogenic mutations in genes affecting DNA mismatch repair (MMR). We studied a cohort of 2,042 MMR gene mutations carriers (n=807, diagnosed with colorectal cancer), from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported physical activity in three age-periods (20-29, 30-49, and ≥50 years) was summarized as average metabolic equivalent of task hours per week (MET-h/week) during the age-period of cancer diagnosis or censoring (near-term exposure), and across all age-periods preceding cancer diagnosis or censoring (long-term exposure). Weighted Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between physical activity and colorectal cancer risk. Near-term physical activity was associated with a small reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (HR ≥35 vs. Lynch syndrome, however, further confirmation is warranted. The potential modifying effect of physical activity on colorectal cancer risk for people with Lynch syndrome could be useful for risk prediction and support counseling advice for lifestyle modification to reduce cancer risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  13. Experience of Southern Chinese: new challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age--a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Compared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues.

  14. The WHO activities on thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.; Cardis, E.

    1996-01-01

    The WHO has been involved in activities related to thyroid disease in populations exposed to Chernobyl fallout since 1991. The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident, based in Geneva, undertook a pilot project on screening for thyroid disease and the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health responded to claims from Belarus of an increase of childhood thyroid cancer. Since then the WHO has been developing the public health response in partnership with scientists and physicians in Belarus and a number of centres of excellence outside the CIS specializing in the disciplines relevant to the problem. In 1993 the International Thyroid Project was initiated in partnership with the International Agency for Cancer Research. The activities developed with scientists and physicians in Belarus to respond to the increase are described. The increase in thyroid cancer and its implications for future accidents have been addressed. Revised advice on stable iodine prophylaxis has been formulated

  15. Physical Activity, Biomarkers, and Disease Outcomes in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenreich, Christine M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Siddiqi, Sameer M.; McTiernan, Anne; Alfano, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors often seek information about how lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, may influence their prognosis. We systematically reviewed studies that examined relationships between physical activity and mortality (cancer-specific and all-cause) and/or cancer biomarkers. Methods We identified 45 articles published from January 1950 to August 2011 through MEDLINE database searches that were related to physical activity, cancer survival, and biomarkers potentially relevant to cancer survival. We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement to guide this review. Study characteristics, mortality outcomes, and biomarker-relevant and subgroup results were abstracted for each article that met the inclusion criteria (ie, research articles that included participants with a cancer diagnosis, mortality outcomes, and an assessment of physical activity). Results There was consistent evidence from 27 observational studies that physical activity is associated with reduced all-cause, breast cancer–specific, and colon cancer–specific mortality. There is currently insufficient evidence regarding the association between physical activity and mortality for survivors of other cancers. Randomized controlled trials of exercise that included biomarker endpoints suggest that exercise may result in beneficial changes in the circulating level of insulin, insulin-related pathways, inflammation, and, possibly, immunity; however, the evidence is still preliminary. Conclusions Future research directions identified include the need for more observational studies on additional types of cancer with larger sample sizes; the need to examine whether the association between physical activity and mortality varies by tumor, clinical, or risk factor characteristics; and the need for research on the biological mechanisms involved in the association between physical activity and survival after a cancer diagnosis. Future randomized

  16. Surface computing and collaborative analysis work

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Judith; Gossage, Stevenson; Hack, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Large surface computing devices (wall-mounted or tabletop) with touch interfaces and their application to collaborative data analysis, an increasingly important and prevalent activity, is the primary topic of this book. Our goals are to outline the fundamentals of surface computing (a still maturing technology), review relevant work on collaborative data analysis, describe frameworks for understanding collaborative processes, and provide a better understanding of the opportunities for research and development. We describe surfaces as display technologies with which people can interact directly, and emphasize how interaction design changes when designing for large surfaces. We review efforts to use large displays, surfaces or mixed display environments to enable collaborative analytic activity. Collaborative analysis is important in many domains, but to provide concrete examples and a specific focus, we frequently consider analysis work in the security domain, and in particular the challenges security personne...

  17. PROMOTING MEANINGFUL LEARNING THROUGH CREATE-SHARE-COLLABORATE

    OpenAIRE

    Sailin, Siti Nazuar; Mahmor, Noor Aida

    2017-01-01

    Students in this 21st century are required to acquire these 4C skills: Critical thinking, Communication, Collaboration and Creativity. These skills can be integrated in the teaching and learning through innovative teaching that promotes active and meaningful learning. One way of integrating these skills is through collaborative knowledge creation and sharing. This paper providesan example of meaningful teaching and learning activities designed within the Create-Share-Collaborate instructional...

  18. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection for the AS stra......Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  19. International Cancer Screening Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Cancer Screening Network promotes evidence-based cancer screening implementation and evaluation with cooperation from multilateral organizations around the globe. Learn more about how ICSN aims to reduce the global burden of cancer by supporting research and international collaboration.

  20. Anti-cancer activity of compounds from Bauhinia strychnifolia stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuenyongsawad, Supreeya; Bunluepuech, Kingkan; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2013-11-25

    The stem and root of Bauhinia strychnifolia Craib (Fabaceae family) have been traditionally used in Thailand to treat fever, alcoholic toxication, allergy and cancer. An EtOH extract of Bauhinia strychnifolia showed good inhibitory activity against several cancer cell lines including HT-29, HeLa, MCF-7 and KB. As there has been no previous reports on chemical constituents of Bauhinia strychnifolia, this study is aimed to isolate the pure compounds with anti-cancer activity. Five pure compounds were isolated from EtOH extract of Bauhinia strychnifolia stem using silica gel, dianion HP-20 and sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and were tested for their cytotoxic effects against HT-29, HeLa, MCF-7 and KB cell lines using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Among five compounds, 3,5,7,3',5'-pentahydroxyflavanonol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (2) possessed very potent activity against KB (IC₅₀=0.00054μg/mL), HT-29 (IC₅₀=0.00217 μg/mL), MCF-7 (IC₅₀=0.0585 μg/mL) and HeLa cells (IC₅₀=0.0692 μg/mL). 3,5,7-Trihydroxychromone-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (3) also showed good activity against HT-29 (IC₅₀=0.02366 μg/mL), KB (IC₅₀=0.0412 μg/mL) and MCF-7 (IC₅₀=0.297 μg/mL), respectively. The activity of 2 (IC₅₀=0.00054 μg/mL) against KB cell was ten times higher than that of the positive control, Camptothecin (anti-cancer drug, IC₅₀=0.0057 μg/mL). All compounds did not show any cytotoxicity with normal cells at the concentration of 1 μg/mL. This is the first report of compounds 2 and 3 on anti-cancer activity and based on the anti-cancer activity of extracts and pure compounds isolated from Bauhinia strychnifolia stem, it might be suggested that this plant could be useful for treatment of cancer. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical activity in advanced cancer patients: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sonya S; Tan, Maria; Faily, Joan; Watanabe, Sharon M; Courneya, Kerry S

    2016-03-11

    Progressive, incurable cancer is associated with increased fatigue, increased muscle weakness, and reduced physical functioning, all of which negatively impact quality of life. Physical activity has demonstrated benefits on cancer-related fatigue and physical functioning in early-stage cancer patients; however, its impact on these outcomes in end-stage cancer has not been established. The aim of this systematic review is to determine the potential benefits, harms, and effects of physical activity interventions on quality of life outcomes in advanced cancer patients. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on physical activity in advanced cancer patients will be undertaken. Empirical quantitative studies will be considered for inclusion if they present interventional or observational data on physical activity in advanced cancer patients. Searches will be conducted in the following electronic databases: CINAHL; CIRRIE Database of International Rehabilitation Research; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); EMBASE; MEDLINE; PEDro: the Physiotherapy Evidence Database; PQDT; PsycInfo; PubMed; REHABDATA; Scopus; SPORTDiscus; and Web of Science, to identify relevant studies of interest. Additional strategies to identify relevant studies will include citation searches and evaluation of reference lists of included articles. Titles, abstracts, and keywords of identified studies from the search strategies will be screened for inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers will conduct quality appraisal using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies (EPHPP) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A descriptive summary of included studies will describe the study designs, participant and activity characteristics, and objective and patient-reported outcomes. This systematic review will summarize the current

  2. Global variations in cancer survival. Study Group on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Black, R J

    1996-12-15

    Population-based cancer registries from Algeria, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, the Philippines, and Thailand are collaborating with the International Agency for Research on Cancer in a study of cancer survival in developing countries. Comparisons with the SEER program results of the National Cancer Institute in the United States, and the EUROCARE study of survival in European countries revealed considerable differences in the survival of patients with certain tumors associated with intensive chemotherapeutic treatment regimes (Hodgkin's disease and testicular tumors), more modest differences in the survival of patients with tumors for which early diagnosis and treatment confer an improved prognosis (carcinomas of the large bowel, breast, and cervix), and only slight differences for tumors associated with poor prognosis (carcinomas of the stomach, pancreas, and lung). With limited resources to meet the challenge of the increasing incidence of cancer expected in the next few decades, health authorities in developing countries should be aware of the importance of investing in a range of cancer control activities, including primary prevention and early detection programs as well as treatment.

  3. Distributed Collaborative Homework Activities in a Problem-Based Usability Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, John M.; Jiang, Hao; Borge, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Teams of students in an upper-division undergraduate Usability Engineering course used a collaborative environment to carry out a series of three distributed collaborative homework assignments. Assignments were case-based analyses structured using a jigsaw design; students were provided a collaborative software environment and introduced to a…

  4. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) kills human cancer-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sakakita, Hajime; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Hori, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    Medical non-thermal plasma (NTP) treatments for various types of cancers have been reported. Cells with tumorigenic potential (cancer-initiating cells; CICs) are few in number in many types of tumors. CICs efficiently eliminate anti-cancer chemicals and exhibit high-level aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. We previously examined the effects of direct irradiation via NTP on cancer cells; even though we targeted CICs expressing high levels of ALDH, such treatment affected both non-CICs and CICs. Recent studies have shown that plasma-activated medium (PAM) (culture medium irradiated by NTP) selectively induces apoptotic death of cancer but not normal cells. Therefore, we explored the anti-cancer effects of PAM on CICs among endometrioid carcinoma and gastric cancer cells. PAM reduced the viability of cells expressing both low and high levels of ALDH. Combined PAM/cisplatin appeared to kill cancer cells more efficiently than did PAM or cisplatin alone. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, PAM exerted an anti-cancer effect on CICs. Thus, our results suggest that PAM effectively kills both non-CICs and CICs, as does NTP. Therefore, PAM may be a useful new anti-cancer therapy, targeting various cancer cells including CICs. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Nutrition habits, physical activity, and lung cancer: an authoritative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsokera, Alexandra; Kiagia, Maria; Saif, Muhammad W; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Because of high incidence rates and low survival rates, it is important to study the risk factors that may help prevent the disease from developing. It has been well established that cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for lung cancer. Nonetheless it is likely that there are other modifiable risk factors that would assist in the prevention of lung cancer. Research on factors such as nutrition and physical activity and their influence on lung cancer has been carried out for nearly 3 decades. A systematic review in the MEDLINE database of published studies was conducted, focusing on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and large prospective studies. The association between physical activity and lung cancer has been conflicting. Among the researched studies, 10 showed an inverse association, whereas 11 reported no association. A meta-analysis that was conducted from 1996 to October 2003 showed that leisure physical activity (LPA) prevents lung cancer. Data from 11 cohort and case-control studies showed an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer. Evidence from case-control studies suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer, although several more recent studies have presented doubts about these findings. The possible association of physical activity, nutrition, and the risk of lung cancer development remains controversial. Further prospective studies should be conducted to determine the potential influence of these 2 risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore......, it tries to measure the impact of technology on students’ satisfaction with collaboration outcomes. In particular, the study aims to address the following research questions: Which demographic information (e.g. gender and place of origin) is significant for collaboration and ecollaboration? and Which...... are the perceived factors that influence the students’ group performance? The findings of this study emphasize that there are gender and cultural differences with respect to the perception of e-collaboration. Furthermore, the article summarizes in a model the most significant factors influencing group performance....

  8. Modalités de collaboration entre étudiants et constitution d'une communauté dans une activité à distance Students' collaborative processes and community building during an online activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Dejean-Thircuir

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cette étude s'inscrit dans le champ de la communication pédagogique médiatisée par ordinateur et s'intéresse aux échanges entre étudiants engagés dans la réalisation d'une tâche collaborative, dans le cadre d'un master 2 professionnel de didactique des langues, à distance. L'analyse des interactions d'un groupe d'étudiants, au moyen d'outils issus de la pragmatique linguistique interactionniste et de l'analyse conversationnelle, permet d'identifier certaines pratiques langagières et formes d'activités communicationnelles qui soutiennent le processus collaboratif et favorisent la constitution d'une communauté en ligne. En se focalisant sur l'étude d'un groupe particulièrement collaboratif, il s'agit de mieux comprendre les processus de collaboration afin de proposer des pistes de réflexion pour les concepteurs et tuteurs de ce type d'activité en ligne.This study belongs to the field of computer mediated pedagogical communication and focuses on students' interactions while engaged in a collaborative task as part of a professional master 2 program in online language education. Using a set of analytic tools grounded on a pragmatic and an interactionist framework, the researcher identified some linguistic practices and communicative activities that foster the collaborative process and support the construction of an online community. By focusing on a particularly collaborative group, the researcher had a better understanding of the collaborative processes involved in the completion of such tasks and was able to suggest directions for further reflection to designers and instructors of similar online activities.

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  10. Current Management Strategy for Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Jamil S; Javier-Desloges, Juan; Tatzel, Stephanie; Bhagat, Ansh; Nguyen, Kevin A; Hwang, Kevin; Kim, Sarah; Sprenkle, Preston C

    2017-02-01

    Active surveillance has been increasingly utilized as a strategy for the management of favorable-risk, localized prostate cancer. In this review, we describe contemporary management strategies of active surveillance, with a focus on traditional stratification schemes, new prognostic tools, and patient outcomes. Patient selection, follow-up strategy, and indication for delayed intervention for active surveillance remain centered around PSA, digital rectal exam, and biopsy findings. Novel tools which include imaging, biomarkers, and genetic assays have been investigated as potential prognostic adjuncts; however, their role in active surveillance remains institutionally dependent. Although 30-50% of patients on active surveillance ultimately undergo delayed treatment, the vast majority will remain free of metastasis with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. The optimal method for patient selection into active surveillance is unknown; however, cancer-specific mortality rates remain excellent. New prognostication tools are promising, and long-term prospective, randomized data regarding their use in active surveillance will be beneficial.

  11. Kaempferia parviflora Extract Exhibits Anti-cancer Activity against HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potikanond, Saranyapin; Sookkhee, Siriwoot; Na Takuathung, Mingkwan; Mungkornasawakul, Pitchaya; Wikan, Nitwara; Smith, Duncan R; Nimlamool, Wutigri

    2017-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP) has been traditionally used as a folk remedy to treat several diseases including cancer, and several studies have reported cytotoxic activities of extracts of KP against a number of different cancer cell lines. However, many aspects of the molecular mechanism of action of KP remain unclear. In particular, the ability of KP to regulate cancer cell growth and survival signaling is still largely unexplored. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of KP on cell viability, cell migration, cell invasion, cell apoptosis, and on signaling pathways related to growth and survival of cervical cancer cells, HeLa. We discovered that KP reduced HeLa cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. The potent cytotoxicity of KP against HeLa cells was associated with a dose-dependent induction of apoptotic cell death as determined by flow cytometry and observation of nuclear fragmentation. Moreover, KP-induced cell apoptosis was likely to be mediated through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway since caspase 9 and caspase 7, but not BID, were shown to be activated after KP exposure. Based on the observation that KP induced apoptosis in HeLa cell, we further investigated the effects of KP at non-cytotoxic concentrations on suppressing signal transduction pathways relevant to cell growth and survival. We found that KP suppressed the MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in cells activated with EGF, as observed by a significant decrease in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Elk1, PI3K, and AKT. The data suggest that KP interferes with the growth and survival of HeLa cells. Consistent with the inhibitory effect on EGF-stimulated signaling, KP potently suppressed the migration of HeLa cells. Concomitantly, KP was demonstrated to markedly inhibit HeLa cell invasion. The ability of KP in suppressing the migration and invasion of HeLa cells was associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 production. These data strongly suggest that KP may slow

  12. The effect of breast cancer awareness month on internet search activity - a comparison with awareness campaigns for lung and prostate cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Ronan W

    2011-10-12

    Abstract Background This work aimed to assess the effects of the annual breast cancer awareness campaign on internet search activity, and to compare these effects with those of similar campaigns in prostate and lung cancer. We further aimed to assess overall levels of online activity relating to all three neoplasms between 2004 and 2009. Methods Google Insights for Search was employed to examine search trends for the term "breast cancer", across all Google domains between January 2004 and December 2009 (6 years). Search trends for both "prostate cancer" and "lung cancer" across all domains were also analysed for the same period, and these trends were compared with those for "breast cancer". Repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc analyses were performed to assess for significant differences in activity. Results Increased levels of online activity relating to breast cancer are consistently generated each October. There is a significantly higher level of background activity in breast cancer compared with that in lung or prostate cancer (p < 0.001), and the October campaign stimulates online activity more effectively than equivalent campaigns for these other malignancies (p < 0.001). Conclusions The annual breast cancer awareness campaign is proving effective in stimulating online activity and may hold useful lessons for other cancer awareness initiatives.

  13. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Costunolide (CE and dehydrocostuslactone (DE are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  14. Collaborative entrepreneurship: On the Influence of Internal and External Collaboration on Corporate Entrepreneurial Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Timenes Laugen, Bjørge; Middel, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The present paper empirically tests the effect which internal/external collaboration has on innovation height and identifies characteristics of collaboration patterns leading to entrepreneurial innovation in particular. Doing so adds to the understanding of how corporate entrepreneurship best...... unfolds as interfirm activity, which here is termed collaborative entrepreneurship, and provides details on the particular patterns of Open Innovation. The empirical analysis is based on a data set with responses from 512 Danish engineers. The analysis finds that external collaboration has significantly...... different effects on innovation height depending on the type of partners involved, and furthermore suggests that the development of entrepreneurial innovation is not only dependent on high external involvement, but also on involvement and collaboration among internal functional departments and people....

  15. Tumor-suppressor activity of RRIG1 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guihong; Brewster, Abenaa; Guan, Baoxiang; Fan, Zhen; Brown, Powel H; Xu, Xiao-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Retinoid receptor-induced gene-1 (RRIG1) is a novel gene that has been lost in several types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether RRIG1 plays a role in breast cancer, such as in the suppression of breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect RRIG1 expression in breast tissue specimens. Gene transfection was used to restore or knock down RRIG1 expression in breast cancer cell lines for analysis of cell viability, colony formation, and migration/invasion potential. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The RhoA activation assay was used to assess RRIG1-induced inhibition of RhoA activity. The immunohistochemical data showed that RRIG1 expression was reduced in breast cancer tissues compared with normal and atypical hyperplastic breast tissues. RRIG1 expression was inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis of breast cancer but was not associated with the status of hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or HER2. Furthermore, restoration of RRIG1 expression inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. Expression of RRIG1 also reduced phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt levels; c-Jun, MMP9, and Akt expressions; and RhoA activity. In contrast, knockdown of RRIG1 expression promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion potential. The data from the current study indicated that RRIG1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer and that restoration of RRIG1 expression suppressed breast cancer cell growth and invasion capacity. Future studies will determine the underlying molecular mechanisms and define RRIG1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in breast cancer

  16. Physical activity and survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Søgaard, Karen; Karlsen, Randi V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knowledge about lifestyle factors possibly influencing survival after breast cancer (BC) is paramount. We examined associations between two types of postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) and overall survival after BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used prospective data on 959 BC survivors from...... the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, all enrolled before diagnosis. Self-reported PA was measured as time per activity, and estimated metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week were summed for each activity. We constructed measures for household, exercise, and total PA. The association between...... from all causes during the study period. In adjusted analyses, exercise PA above eight MET h/week compared to lower levels of activity was significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non...

  17. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  18. Collaborative Environment and Agile Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan GHILIC-MICU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over time, information and communications technology development has made a direct impact on human activity in the individual context as well as familial, economic and social. This has laid the premise for adoption of new and modern paradigms in individual and organizational activity management. The evolutionary climax of the social universe is called nowadays knowledge society. The knowledge society succeeds the information society, emphasizing the development of the opportunities brought by collaborative work environment and agile approach. In this paper we will highlight the use of collaborative environment in agile software development, as an instrument for managing organizations in knowledge society. Thus, we will emphasize the paradigms of agile testing, validation and verification in collaborative environment.

  19. Cancer-related fatigue and physical activity among premenopausal cervical and endometrial cancer survivors in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obama, Kyoko; Maru, Mitsue; Maeda, Rumi; Kubota, Toshiro

    2015-09-30

    To examine the relationship between cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and physical activity in daily living in premenopausal disease-free cervical and endometrial cancer survivors. A physical activity monitor was used to collect objective data on daily physical activity. CRF and related variables were measured using self-report scales in a cross-sectional manner. The average age was 44.9 years among 64 women. The higher CRF group comprised 22 women (34%), 10% of whom had severe fatigue. The participants had higher physical activity levels compared with the findings in previous studies, and reported an average of 40 min/day of moderate to vigorous activity. Moderate to vigorous levels of physical activity were derived from essential social activities rather than leisure time exercise. There were no significant differences in physical activity levels between the lower and higher CRF groups. Our study results suggested that the higher level of physical activity in daily living itself had no relationship with decreasing CRF among premenopausal cervical and endometrial cancer survivors. It would be better to focus on cognitive and psychological factors before introducing physical activity programs and be careful of the characteristics of the participants' physical activity among this population in daily basis.

  20. Managing Risk and Synergies R&D-Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Overby, Mikkel Lucas

    2004-01-01

    &D collaborations simultaneously. We use modern portfolio theory as an analogy to show how companies active in mobile telecommunication manage risks and create synergies by simultaneously engaging in several inter-firm collaborations.Keywords: Portfolio theory, risk, synergy, R&D collaboration, mobile commerce...

  1. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  2. Neighborhood influences on recreational physical activity and survival after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Theresa H M; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Sangaramoorthy, Meera; Koo, Jocelyn; Hertz, Andrew; Schupp, Clayton W; Yang, Juan; John, Esther M; Gomez, Scarlett L

    2014-10-01

    Higher levels of physical activity have been associated with improved survival after breast cancer diagnosis. However, no previous studies have considered the influence of the social and built environment on physical activity and survival among breast cancer patients. Our study included 4,345 women diagnosed with breast cancer (1995-2008) from two population-based studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area. We examined questionnaire-based moderate/strenuous recreational physical activity during the 3 years before diagnosis. Neighborhood characteristics were based on data from the 2000 US Census, business listings, parks, farmers' markets, and Department of Transportation. Survival was evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up through 2009. Women residing in neighborhoods with no fast-food restaurants (vs. fewer fast-food restaurants) to other restaurants, high traffic density, and a high percentage of foreign-born residents were less likely to meet physical activity recommendations set by the American Cancer Society. Women who were not recreationally physically active had a 22% higher risk of death from any cause than women that were the most active. Poorer overall survival was associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) (p(trend) = 0.02), whereas better breast cancer-specific survival was associated with a lack of parks, especially among women in high-SES neighborhoods. Certain aspects of the neighborhood have independent associations with recreational physical activity among breast cancer patients and their survival. Considering neighborhood factors may aide in the design of more effective, tailored physical activity programs for breast cancer survivors.

  3. Differences in Active and Collaborative Learning by Race for Community College Developmental Writing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoum, Sim; Wood, J. Luke

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the self-reported frequency of active and collaborative learning by racial/ethnic affiliation between students who have completed a developmental writing course and those that plan to take one. Drawing upon data from the Community College Survey of…

  4. Collaborative and cooperative games : facts and assumptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islas Sedano, C.; Brandao Carvalho, M.; Secco, N.; Longstreet, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration and cooperation are fundamental activities and processes for humans. There has been a recent rise in the interest in collaborative and cooperative processes in several fields of study and an increasing popularity of commercial collaborative games. In this paper, we aim to identify how

  5. ING3 promotes prostate cancer growth by activating the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbi, Arash; McClurg, Urszula L; Thalappilly, Subhash; Almami, Amal; Mobahat, Mahsa; Bismar, Tarek A; Binda, Olivier; Riabowol, Karl T

    2017-05-16

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a major driver of prostate cancer, and increased AR levels and co-activators of the receptor promote the development of prostate cancer. INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins target lysine acetyltransferase or lysine deacetylase complexes to the histone H3K4Me3 mark of active transcription, to affect chromatin structure and gene expression. ING3 is a stoichiometric member of the TIP60 lysine acetyltransferase complex implicated in prostate cancer development. Biopsies of 265 patients with prostate cancer were stained for ING3, pan-cytokeratin, and DNA. LNCaP and C4-2 androgen-responsive cells were used for in vitro assays including immunoprecipitation, western blotting, Luciferase reporter assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cell viability and migration assays were performed in prostate cancer cell lines using scrambled siRNA or siRNA targeting ING3. We find that ING3 levels and AR activity positively correlate in prostate cancer. ING3 potentiates androgen effects, increasing expression of androgen-regulated genes and androgen response element-driven reporters to promote growth and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, ING3 knockdown inhibits prostate cancer cell growth and invasion. ING3 activates the AR by serving as a scaffold to increase interaction between TIP60 and the AR in the cytoplasm, enhancing receptor acetylation and translocation to the nucleus. Activation is independent of ING3's ability to target the TIP60 complex to H3K4Me3, identifying a previously unknown chromatin-independent cytoplasmic activity for ING3. In agreement with in vitro observations, analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data (n = 498) and a prostate cancer tissue microarray (n = 256) show that ING3 levels are higher in aggressive prostate cancers, with high levels of ING3 predicting shorter patient survival in a low AR subgroup. Including ING3 levels with currently used indicators such as the Gleason score provides more

  6. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation ...... the diverse matters of concern into a coherent product or service concept, and 2) in the same process move these diverse holders of the matters of concern into a translated actor network which carry or support the concept.......Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...

  7. Activity and expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Li, Ge; Choi, Hoon; Park, Hae-Duck; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are involved in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. There is still debate whether the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 differs between tumors located in the colon and rectum. We designed this study to determine any differences in the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA system between colon and rectal cancer tissues. Cancer tissue samples were obtained from colon carcinoma (n = 12) and rectal carcinomas (n = 10). MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting; their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), were assessed by Western blotting. uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of uPA was assessed by casein-plasminogen zymography. In both colon and rectal tumors, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 protein levels were higher than in corresponding paired normal mucosa, while TIMP-2 level in tumors was significantly lower than in normal mucosa. The enzyme activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and their endogenous inhibitors did not reach a statistically significant difference between colon and rectal cancer compared with their normal mucosa. In rectal tumors, there was an increased activity of uPA compared with the activity in colon tumors (P = 0.0266), however urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showed no significant difference between colon and rectal cancer tissues. These findings suggest that uPA may be expressed differentially in colon and rectal cancers, however, the activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, PAI-1 and uPAR are not affected by tumor location in the colon or the rectum

  8. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns...... are breakdowns in collaborative grounding rather than information seeking, that the medication incidents mainly concern breakdowns in the use of records as opposed to oral communication, that the breakdowns span multiple degrees of separation between clinicians, and that the electronic medication record has...

  9. Collaborative Modeling of the Benefits and Harms Associated With Different U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Stout, Natasha K; Schechter, Clyde B; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Miglioretti, Diana L; Krapcho, Martin; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Munoz, Diego; Lee, Sandra J; Berry, Donald A; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tosteson, Anna N A; Near, Aimee M; Hoeffken, Amanda; Chang, Yaojen; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A; Chisholm, Gary; Huang, Xuelin; Huang, Hui; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Gangnon, Ronald; Sprague, Brian L; Plevritis, Sylvia; Feuer, Eric; de Koning, Harry J; Cronin, Kathleen A

    2016-02-16

    Controversy persists about optimal mammography screening strategies. To evaluate screening outcomes, taking into account advances in mammography and treatment of breast cancer. Collaboration of 6 simulation models using national data on incidence, digital mammography performance, treatment effects, and other-cause mortality. United States. Average-risk U.S. female population and subgroups with varying risk, breast density, or comorbidity. Eight strategies differing by age at which screening starts (40, 45, or 50 years) and screening interval (annual, biennial, and hybrid [annual for women in their 40s and biennial thereafter]). All strategies assumed 100% adherence and stopped at age 74 years. Benefits (breast cancer-specific mortality reduction, breast cancer deaths averted, life-years, and quality-adjusted life-years); number of mammograms used; harms (false-positive results, benign biopsies, and overdiagnosis); and ratios of harms (or use) and benefits (efficiency) per 1000 screens. Biennial strategies were consistently the most efficient for average-risk women. Biennial screening from age 50 to 74 years avoided a median of 7 breast cancer deaths versus no screening; annual screening from age 40 to 74 years avoided an additional 3 deaths, but yielded 1988 more false-positive results and 11 more overdiagnoses per 1000 women screened. Annual screening from age 50 to 74 years was inefficient (similar benefits, but more harms than other strategies). For groups with a 2- to 4-fold increased risk, annual screening from age 40 years had similar harms and benefits as screening average-risk women biennially from 50 to 74 years. For groups with moderate or severe comorbidity, screening could stop at age 66 to 68 years. Other imaging technologies, polygenic risk, and nonadherence were not considered. Biennial screening for breast cancer is efficient for average-risk populations. Decisions about starting ages and intervals will depend on population characteristics and the

  10. Public, environmental, and occupational health research activity in Arab countries: bibliometric, citation, and collaboration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze quantity, assess quality, and investigate international collaboration in research from Arab countries in the field of public, environmental and occupational health. Original scientific articles and reviews published from the 22 Arab countries in the category "public, environmental & occupational health" during the study period (1900 - 2012) were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. The total number of original and review research articles published in the category of "public, environmental & occupational health" from Arab countries was 4673. Main area of research was tropical medicine (1862; 39.85%). Egypt with 1200 documents (25.86%) ranked first in quantity and ranked first in quality of publications (h-index = 51). The study identified 2036 (43.57%) documents with international collaboration. Arab countries actively collaborated with authors in Western Europe (22.91%) and North America (21.04%). Most of the documents (79.9%) were published in public health related journals while 21% of the documents were published in journals pertaining to prevention medicine, environmental, occupational health and epidemiology. Research in public, environmental and occupational health in Arab countries is in the rise. Public health research was dominant while environmental and occupation health research was relatively low. International collaboration was a good tool for increasing research quantity and quality.

  11. Cancer-related fatigue and physical activity among premenopausal cervical and endometrial cancer survivors in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    小濵, 京子; 丸, 光惠; 前田, 留美; 久保田, 俊郎

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and physical activity in daily living in premenopausal disease-free cervical and endometrial cancer survivors. Methods: A physical activity monitor was used to collect objective data on daily physical activity. CRF and related variables were measured using self-report scales in a cross-sectional manner. Results: The average age was 44.9 years among 64 women. The higher CRF group comprised 22 women (34%), 10% of whom had...

  12. Rationale for promoting physical activity among cancer survivors: literature review and epidemiologic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Lee, Hyo

    2014-03-01

    To review the extant literature on the link between physical activity and health outcomes among cancer survivors; identify evidence-based strategies to promote physical activity among this population; and conduct an epidemiologic study based on gaps from the literature review, examining the association between physical activity and various biologic markers. The authors used PubMed and Google Scholar up to July 2013, as well as data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the empirical study. Studies were examined through a systematic review process. In the epidemiologic study, 227 adult cancer survivors wore an accelerometer for four days or longer, with biologic markers (e.g., cholesterol) assessed from a blood sample. The review study demonstrated that cancer survivors are relatively inactive, but physical activity may help to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and cancer-related mortality, increase cancer treatment rates, reduce pain and other side effects associated with cancer treatment, and improve physical and mental health. The epidemiologic study showed that physical activity was associated with several understudied biomarkers (e.g., neutrophils, white blood cells) that are linked with cancer recurrence, cancer-related mortality, and other chronic diseases. Nurses are encouraged to promote physical activity in cancer survivors.

  13. Epigenetics and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2004-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms act to change the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulation locally and globally via modifications of the DNA and by modification or rearrangement of nucleosomes. Epigenetic gene regulation collaborates with genetic alterations in cancer development. This is e......Epigenetic mechanisms act to change the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulation locally and globally via modifications of the DNA and by modification or rearrangement of nucleosomes. Epigenetic gene regulation collaborates with genetic alterations in cancer development....... This is evident from every aspect of tumor biology including cell growth and differentiation, cell cycle control, DNA repair, angiogenesis, migration, and evasion of host immunosurveillance. In contrast to genetic cancer causes, the possibility of reversing epigenetic codes may provide new targets for therapeutic...

  14. Neutrino factory and muon collider collaboration R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.; Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaborat

    2001-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises about 140 U.S. and non-U.S. accelerator and particle physicists. The MC is carrying out an R and D program aimed at validating the critical design concepts required for the construction of such machines. We are committed to encouraging international cooperation and coordination of the R and D effort. Main activities of the MC include a Targetry program, a MUCOOL program, a component development program, and a theory and simulation effort. Moreover, the MC has participated in several feasibility studies for a complete Neutrino Factory facility, with the aim of identifying any additional R and D activities needed to prepare a Zeroth-order Design Report (ZDR) in about two years and a Conceptual Design report (CDR) about two years thereafter. In this paper, the R and D goals in each area will be indicated, and the present status and future plans of the R and D program will be described

  15. Active home-based cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordonaro S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Bordonaro Fabio Raiti, Annamaria Di Mari, Calogera Lopiano, Fabrizio Romano, Vitalinda Pumo, Sebastiano Rametta Giuliano, Margherita Iacono, Eleonora Lanteri, Elena Puzzo, Sebastiano Spada, Paolo TralongoUOC Medical Oncology, RAO, ASP 8 Siracusa, ItalyBackground: Active home-based treatment represents a new model of health care. Chronic treatment requires continuous access to facilities that provide cancer care, with considerable effort, particularly economic, on the part of patients and caregivers. Oral chemotherapy could be limited as a consequence of poor compliance and adherence, especially by elderly patients.Methods: We selected 30 cancer patients referred to our department and treated with oral therapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine, imatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, temozolomide, ibandronate. This pilot study of oral therapy in the patient’s home was undertaken by a doctor and two nurses with experience in clinical oncology. The instruments used were clinical diaries recording home visits, hospital visits, need for caregiver support, and a questionnaire specially developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC, known as the QLQ-C30 version 2.0, concerning the acceptability of oral treatment from the patient’s perspective.Results: This program decreased the need to access cancer facilities by 98.1%, promoted better quality of life for patients, as reflected in increased EORTC QLQ-C30 scores over time, allowing for greater adherence to oral treatment as a result of control of drug administration outside the hospital. This model has allowed treatment of patients with difficult access to care (elderly, disabled or otherwise needed caregivers that in the project represent the majority (78% of these.Conclusions: This model of active home care improves quality of life and adherence with oral therapy, reduces the need to visit the hospital, and consequently decreases the number of lost hours of work on

  16. Analysis of stage and clinical/prognostic factors for colon and rectal cancer from SEER registries: AJCC and collaborative stage data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Charlton, Mary E; Ruiz, Bernardo A; Karlitz, Jordan; Altekruse, Sean F; Ries, Lynn A G; Jessup, J Milburn

    2014-12-01

    The Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System enables multiple cancer registration programs to document anatomic and molecular pathology features that contribute to the Tumor (T), Node (N), Metastasis (M) - TNM - system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). This article highlights changes in CS for colon and rectal carcinomas as TNM moved from the AJCC 6th to the 7th editions. Data from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries were analyzed for the years 2004-2010, which included 191,361colon and 73,341 rectal carcinomas. Overall, the incidence of colon and rectal cancers declined, with the greatest decrease in stage 0. The AJCC's 7th edition introduction of changes in the subcategorization of T4, N1, and N2 caused shifting within stage groups in 25,577 colon and 10,150 rectal cancers diagnosed in 2010. Several site-specific factors (SSFs) introduced in the 7th edition had interesting findings: 1) approximately 10% of colon and rectal cancers had tumor deposits - about 30%-40% occurred without lymph node metastases, which resulted in 2.5% of colon and 3.3% of rectal cases becoming N1c (stage III A/B) in the AJCC 7th edition; 2) 10% of colon and 12% of rectal cases had circumferential radial margins Cancer Society.

  17. Assisting Instructional Assessment of Undergraduate Collaborative Wiki and SVN Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihie; Shaw, Erin; Xu, Hao; Adarsh, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine the collaborative performance of undergraduate engineering students who used shared project documents (Wikis, Google documents) and a software version control system (SVN) to support project collaboration. We present an initial implementation of TeamAnalytics, an instructional tool that facilitates the analyses of the…

  18. Three Philosophical Pillars That Support Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    Discusses three philosophical pillars that support collaborative learning: "spaces of appearance," active engagement, and ownership. Describes classroom experiences with collaborative learning supported by these pillars. (PRA)

  19. Creating an Environment Conducive to Active and Collaborative Learning: Redesigning Introduction to Sociology at a Large Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. C.; Prohaska, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003 a Southeastern research university undertook the redesign of an introductory sociology course in order to improve student success by adding active and collaborative learning activities that gave students greater responsibility for learning. The new "hybrid" course provides most course materials online, requires electronic…

  20. Physical activity and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Nina Føns; Tjønneland, Anne; Thomsen, Birthe L R

    2009-01-01

    incidence rate and occupational activity and leisure time activity in terms of participation in sports, cycling, walking and gardening; a metabolic equivalent (MET) score based on weekly time spent on the 4 activities; and a physical activity index. MET hours per week of leisure time activity, higher score......The evidence concerning the possible association between physical activity and the risk of prostate cancer is inconsistent and additional data are needed. We examined the association between risk of prostate cancer and physical activity at work and in leisure time in the European Prospective...... in the physical activity index, participation in any of the 4 leisure time activities, and the number of leisure time activities in which the participants were active were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. However, higher level of occupational physical activity was associated with lower risk...

  1. Investigating collaborative learning success with physiological coupling indices based on electrodermal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijeira-díaz, Hector; Drachsler, Hendrik; Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative learning is considered a critical 21st century skill. Much is known about its contribution to learning, but still investigating a process of collaboration remains a challenge. This paper approaches the investigation on collaborative learning from a psychophysiological perspective. An

  2. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  3. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living...... Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). RESULTS: All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results......BACKGROUND: Many cancer patients report unmet rehabilitation needs. Rehabilitation may include activities of daily living (ADL) tasks, but little is known about how cancer patients perform these tasks and how they prioritize their daily activities. Hence, this study aims to identify...

  4. Challenges and opportunities in international molecular cancer prevention research: An ASPO Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and International Cancer Prevention Interest Groups Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Bostick, Roberd M; Mu, Lina; Ogino, Shuji; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that over half of the new cancer cases and almost two-thirds of the cancer deaths in 2012 occurred in low and middle income countries. To discuss the challenges and opportunities to reducing the burden of cancer worldwide, the Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and the International Issues in Cancer Special Interest Groups joined forces to hold a session during the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (March 2014, Arlington, Virginia). The session highlighted three topics of particular interest to molecular cancer prevention researchers working internationally, specifically: 1) biomarkers in cancer research; 2) environmental exposures and cancer; and 3) molecular pathological epidemiology. A major factor for successful collaboration illuminated during the discussion was the need for strong, committed, and reliable international partners. A key element of establishing such relationships is to thoroughly involve individual international collaborators in the development of the research question; engaged international collaborators are particularly motivated to champion and shepherd the project through all necessary steps, including issues relating to institutional review boards, political sensitivity, laboratory-based assays, and tumor subtyping. Also essential is allotting time for the building, maintaining, and investing in such relationships so that successful international collaborations may take root and bloom. While there are many challenges inherent to international molecular cancer research, the opportunities for furthering the science and prevention of cancer worldwide are great, particularly at this time of increasing cancer incidence and prevalence in low and middle income countries. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Minimizing the cancer-promotional activity of cox-2 as a central strategy in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis examining long-term mortality in subjects who participated in controlled studies evaluating the impact of daily aspirin on vascular risk, has concluded that aspirin confers substantial protection from cancer mortality. Remarkably, low-dose aspirin was as effective as higher-dose regimens; hence this protection may be achievable with minimal risk. There is reason to believe that this protection stems primarily from inhibition of cox-2 in pre-neoplastic lesions. Since safe aspirin regimens can only achieve a partial and transitory inhibition of cox-2, it may be feasible to complement the cancer-protective benefit of aspirin with other measures which decrease cox-2 expression or which limit the bioactivity of cox-2-derived PGE2. Oxidative stress boosts cox-2 expression by up-regulating activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases; NADPH oxidase activation may thus promote carcinogenesis by increasing cox-2 expression while also amplifying oxidant-mediated mutagenesis. A prospective cohort study has observed that relatively elevated serum bilirubin levels are associated with a marked reduction in subsequent cancer mortality; this may reflect bilirubin's physiological role as a potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. It may be feasible to mimic this protective effect by supplementing with spirulina, a rich source of a phycobilin which shares bilirubin's ability to inhibit NADPH oxidase. Ancillary antioxidant measures - phase 2 inducing phytochemicals, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, and astaxanthin - may also aid cox-2 down-regulation. The cancer protection often associated with high-normal vitamin D status may be attributable, in part, to the ability of the activated vitamin D receptor to decrease cox-2 expression while promoting PGE2 catabolism and suppressing the expression of PGE2 receptors. Diets with a relatively low ratio of omega-6 to long-chain omega-3 fats may achieve cancer protection by antagonizing the production and bioactivity of PGE2. Growth

  6. Implementing Collaborative Learning across the Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Tretter, Thomas R.; Kendall-Brown, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Active and collaborative teaching methods increase student learning, and it is broadly accepted that almost any active or collaborative approach will improve learning outcomes as compared to lecture. Yet, large numbers of faculty have not embraced these methods. Thus, the challenge to encourage evidence-based change in teaching is not only how to…

  7. Management of recurrent and persistent metastatic lymph nodes in well-differentiated thyroid cancer: a multifactorial decision-making guide for the Thyroid Cancer Care Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urken, Mark L; Milas, Mira; Randolph, Gregory W; Tufano, Ralph; Bergman, Donald; Bernet, Victor; Brett, Elise M; Brierley, James D; Cobin, Rhoda; Doherty, Gerard; Klopper, Joshua; Lee, Stephanie; Machac, Josef; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Orloff, Lisa A; Ross, Douglas; Smallridge, Robert C; Terris, David J; Clain, Jason B; Tuttle, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) recurs in up to 30% of patients. Guidelines from the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) provide valuable parameters for the management of recurrent disease, but fail to guide the clinician as to the multitude of factors that should be taken into account. The Thyroid Cancer Care Collaborative (TCCC) is a web-based repository of a patient's clinical information. Ten clinical decision-making modules (CDMMs) process this information and display individualized treatment recommendations. We conducted a review of the literature and analysis of the management of patients with recurrent/persistent WDTC. Surgery remains the most common treatment in recurrent/persistent WDTC and can be performed with limited morbidity in experienced hands. However, careful observation may be the recommended course in select patients. Reoperation yields biochemical remission rates between 21% and 66%. There is a reported 1.2% incidence of permanent unexpected nerve paralysis and a 3.5% incidence of permanent hypoparathyroidism. External beam radiotherapy and percutaneous ethanol ablation have been reported as therapeutic alternatives. Radioactive iodine as a primary therapy has been reported previously for metastatic lymph nodes, but is currently advocated by the ATA as an adjuvant to surgery. The management of recurrent lymph nodes is a multifactorial decision and is best determined by a multidisciplinary team. The CDMMs allow for easy adoption of contemporary knowledge, making this information accessible to both patient and clinician. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: 13 collaborative analyses of individual data from European case-control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, S.; Hill, D.; Doll, R.; Auvinen, A.; Barros Dios, J.M.; Ruano Ravina, A.; Baysson, H.; Tirmarche, M.; Bochicchio, F.; Deo, H.; Falk, R.; Forastiere, F.; Hakama, M.; Heid, I.; Schaffrath Rosario, A.; Wichmann, H.E.; Kreienbrock, L.; Kreuzer, M.; Lagarde, F.; Pershagen, G.; Makelainen, I.; Ruosteenoja, E.; Muirhead, C.; Oberaigner, W.; TomaBek, L.; Whitley, E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk of lung cancer associated with exposure at home to the radioactive disintegration products of naturally occurring radon gas. Design: Collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer. Setting: Nine European countries. Subjects: 7148 cases of lung cancer and 14 208 controls. Main outcome measures: Relative risks of lung cancer and radon gas concentrations in homes inhabited during the previous 5-34 years measured in becquerels (radon disintegrations per second) per cubic metre (Bq/m3) of household air. Results: The mean measured radon concentration in homes of people in the control group was 97 Bq/m3, with 11% measuring > 200 and 4% measuring > 400 Bq/m3. For cases of lung cancer the mean concentration was 104 Bq/m3. The risk of lung cancer increased by 8.4% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 15.8%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in measured radon (P=0.0007). This corresponds to an increase of 16% (5% to 31%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in usual radon- that is, after correction for the dilution caused by random uncertainties in measuring radon concentrations. The dose-response relation seemed to be linear with no threshold and remained significant (P = 0.04) in analyses limited to individuals from homes with measured radon < 200 Bq/m3. The proportionate excess risk did not differ significantly with study, age, sex, or smoking. In the absence of other causes of death, the absolute risks of lung cancer by age 75 years at usual radon concentrations of 0, 100, and 400 Bq/m3 would be about 0.4%, 0.5%, and 0.7%, respectively, for lifelong non-smokers, and about 25 times greater (10%, 12%, and 16%) for cigarette smokers. Conclusions: Collectively, though not separately, these studies show appreciable hazards from residential radon, particularly for smokers and recent ex-smokers, and indicate that it is responsible for about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe. (author)

  9. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... that the plasminogen activation system could play a role in this type of cancer during invasion. In addition a difference in the levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in NSCLC and SCLC is found, which could contribute to the differences in biology....

  10. Future Technology Workshop: A Collaborative Method for the Design of New Learning Technologies and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoula, Giasemi N.; Sharples, Mike

    2007-01-01

    We describe the future technology workshop (FTW), a method whereby people with everyday knowledge or experience in a specific area of technology use (such as using digital cameras) envision and design the interactions between current and future technology and activity. Through a series of structured workshop sessions, participants collaborate to…

  11. A Joint Learning Activity in Process Control and Distance Collaboration between Future Engineers and Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Jean-Sebastien; Barka, Noureddine; Michaud, Mario; Paradis, Denis; Brousseau, Jean

    2013-01-01

    A joint learning activity in process control is presented, in the context of a distance collaboration between engineering and technical-level students, in a similar fashion as current practices in the industry involving distance coordination and troubleshooting. The necessary infrastructure and the setup used are first detailed, followed by a…

  12. The opportunity to collaborate increases preschoolers' motivation for challenging tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lucas P; Walton, Gregory M

    2013-12-01

    Collaborating on challenging endeavors is a foundation of human society. Recent research suggests that young children are not only motivated to cooperate with others-for instance, to help others accomplish their goals-but may also be motivated to collaborate with others-to pursue shared goals. However, a primary reason why collaboration is so important is because opportunities to collaborate can bring people together to work hard to overcome challenges. Two studies (N=70) tested whether the collaborative nature of an activity itself can cause preschoolers to enjoy challenging tasks more and to persist longer on them. To isolate the psychological feeling of collaboration, we tested this hypothesis by manipulating purely psychological cues of collaboration; in all cases, children worked while physically alone. Both studies found that such cues substantially increased preschoolers' motivation on a challenging puzzle, including their persistence on and liking for the puzzle, relative to two non-collaborative control conditions. We suggest that an early emerging drive to engage in shared collaborative activities leads children to find collaborative activities to be intrinsically motivating. This may represent an important basis of motivation as children embark on formal schooling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Google Docs in an Out-of-Class Collaborative Writing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenyi; Simpson, Elizabeth; Domizi, Denise Pinette

    2012-01-01

    Google Docs, an online word processing application, is a promising tool for collaborative learning. However, many college instructors and students lack knowledge to effectively use Google Docs to enhance teaching and learning. Goals of this study include (1) assessing the effectiveness of using Google Docs in an out-of-class collaborative writing…

  14. Social Interaction and Collaboration among Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn; McQuestion, Maurene

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration is a complex process influenced by organizational, professional, interpersonal, and personal factors. Research has demonstrated that collaboration may also be influenced by social factors. Nurses spend much of their time working in collaborative teams, yet little is known about how they socially interact in practice. This qualitative case study explored nurse perceptions of social interaction in relation to collaboration. Data were collected using telephone interviews and documentary reviews from fourteen oncology nurses employed at one cancer center in Canada. Thematic analysis revealed two themes: knowing you is trusting you and formal and informal opportunities. Nurses reported that social interaction meant getting to know someone personally as well as professionally. Social interaction was enacted inside of work during breaks/meals and outside of work at planned events. Social interaction was facilitated by having a long-term current and/or previous professional and personal relationship. The barriers to social interaction included a lack of time to get to know each other, workload issues, and poor interpersonal skills. Findings suggest that social interaction is an important factor in the collaborative relationship among oncology nurses. Nurse leaders need to promote social interaction opportunities and facilitate educational sessions to improve social and interpersonal skills.

  15. P52 Activation and Enzalutamide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    c-Myc:hnRNPA1 pathway regulates expression of androgen receptor splice variants and enzalutamide sensitivity in prostate cancer . Castration resistant... prostate cancer (CRPC) remains dependent on androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Alternative splicing of the AR to generate constitutively active... receptor splice variants and enzalutamide sensitivity in prostate cancer . • We discovered that quercetin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound

  16. Collaboration around Research and Education (Care) in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Marva M

    2008-01-01

    ...) an historically black college or university (HBCU). Our goal is to build a collaborative relationship between Duke University and Bennett that brings together students and faculty mentors to facilitate opportunities for underrepresented minority...

  17. An assessment of Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance (PRIAS) criteria for active surveillance of clinically low-risk prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Vitor; Cagiannos, Ilias; Lavallée, Luke T.; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Witiuk, Kelsey; Cnossen, Sonya; Eastham, James A.; Fergusson, Dean A.; Morash, Chris; Breau, Rodney H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Active surveillance is a strategy to delay or prevent treatment of indolent prostate cancer. The Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance (PRIAS) criteria were developed to select patients for prostate cancer active surveillance. The objective of this study was to compare pathological findings from PRIAS-eligible and PRIAS-ineligible clinically low-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods A D’Amico low-risk cohort of 1512 radical prostatectomy patients treated at The Ottawa Hospital or Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre between January 1995 and December 2007 was reviewed. Pathological outcomes (pT3 tumours, Gleason sum ≥7, lymph node metastases, or a composite) and clinical outcomes (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] recurrence, secondary cancer treatments, and death) were compared between PRIAS-eligible and PRIAS-ineligible cohorts. Results The PRIAS-eligible cohort (n=945) was less likely to have Gleason score ≥7 (odds ratio [OR] 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49–0.75), pT3 (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.31–0.55), nodal metastases (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.10–1.31), or any adverse feature (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.45–0.69) compared to the PRIAS-ineligible cohort. The probability of any adverse pathology in the PRIAS-eligible cohort was 41% vs. 56% in the PRIAS-ineligible cohort. At median follow-up of 3.7 years, 72 (4.8%) patients had a PSA recurrence, 24 (1.6%) received pelvic radiation, and 13 (0.9%) received androgen deprivation. No difference was detected for recurrence-free and overall survival between groups (recurrence hazard ratio [HR] 0.71; 95% CI 0.46–1.09 and survival HR 0.72; 95% CI 0.36–1.47). Conclusions Low-risk prostate cancer patients who met PRIAS eligibility criteria are less likely to have higher-risk cancer compared to those who did not meet at least one of these criteria. PMID:28798822

  18. 19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  19. Beyond recreational physical activity: examining occupational and household activity, transportation activity, and sedentary behavior in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Irwin, Melinda L; Matthews, Charles E; Mayne, Susan T; Gail, Mitchell H; Moore, Steven C; Albanes, Demetrius; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2010-11-01

    We prospectively examined nonrecreational physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to breast cancer risk among 97 039 postmenopausal women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. We identified 2866 invasive and 570 in situ breast cancer cases recorded between 1996 and 2003 and used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate multivariate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Routine activity during the day at work or at home that included heavy lifting or carrying versus mostly sitting was associated with reduced risk of invasive breast cancer (RR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.42, 0.91; P(trend) = .024). Routine activity during the day at work or home may be related to reduced invasive breast cancer risk. Domains outside of recreation time may be attractive targets for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior among postmenopausal women.

  20. The Effect of Personal Characteristics, Perceived Threat, Efficacy and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Breast Cancer Screening Activation

    OpenAIRE

    De Pelsmacker, Patrick; Lewi, Martine; Cauberghe, Veroline

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In order to activate women to participate in breast cancer screening programs, a good understanding is needed of the personal characteristics that influence how women can be activated to search for more information, consult friends and doctors, and participate in breast cancer screening programs. In the current study, we investigate the effect of six personal characteristics that have in previous research been identified as important triggers of health behavior on breast cancer scre...

  1. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Collaborative sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin Wetterstrand

    2006-01-01

    Sketching is a most central activity with in most design projects. But what happens if we adopt the ideas of collaborative design and invite participants that are not trained to sketch in to the design process, how can they participate in this central activity? This paper offers an introduction to...... the design material has been used to co- author possible futures within the scope of design sessions....

  4. Physical activity and risk of prostate and bladder cancer in China: The South and East China case-control study on prostate and bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul C Reulen

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses have suggested a modest protective effect of high levels of physical activity on developing both prostate and bladder cancer, but significant heterogeneity between studies included in these meta-analyses existed. To our knowledge, few Chinese studies investigated the association between physical activity and prostate cancer and none between physical activity and bladder cancer. Given the inconsistencies between previous studies and because studies on the relation between physical activity and prostate and bladder cancer in China are scarce, it remains elusive whether there is a relationship between physical activity and prostate and bladder cancer within the Chinese population.We investigated the association between physical activity and risk of developing prostate and bladder cancer within a hospital-based case-control study in the East and South of China among 260 and 438 incident prostate and bladder cancer cases, respectively, and 427 controls. A questionnaire was administered to measure physical activity as metabolic equivalents (METs. Random effects logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs of prostate and bladder cancer for different levels of physical activity and for the specific activities of walking and cycling.Increasing overall physical activity was associated with a significant reduction in prostate cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.04 with the highest activity tertile level showing a nearly 50% reduction in prostate cancer risk (OR = 0.53, 95%CI: 0.28-0.98. Overall physical activity was not significantly associated with risk of bladder cancer (Ptrend = 0.61, neither were vigorous (Ptrend = 0.60 or moderate levels of physical activity (Ptrend = 0.21. Walking and cycling were not significantly associated with either prostate (Ptrend> = 0.62 or bladder cancer risk (Ptrend> = 0.25.The findings of this largest ever case-control study in China investigating the relationship between physical activity and

  5. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Stella Ghoma Linguissi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO list of ‘high burden’ countries for tuberculosis (TB and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs.

  6. Activation of the hedgehog pathway in advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Frank

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hedgehog pathway plays a critical role in the development of prostate. However, the role of the hedgehog pathway in prostate cancer is not clear. Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cause of cancer death in American men. Therefore, identification of novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer has significant clinical implications. Results Here we report that activation of the hedgehog pathway occurs frequently in advanced human prostate cancer. We find that high levels of hedgehog target genes, PTCH1 and hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP, are detected in over 70% of prostate tumors with Gleason scores 8–10, but in only 22% of tumors with Gleason scores 3–6. Furthermore, four available metastatic tumors all have high expression of PTCH1 and HIP. To identify the mechanism of the hedgehog signaling activation, we examine expression of Su(Fu protein, a negative regulator of the hedgehog pathway. We find that Su(Fu protein is undetectable in 11 of 27 PTCH1 positive tumors, two of them contain somatic loss-of-function mutations of Su(Fu. Furthermore, expression of sonic hedgehog protein is detected in majority of PTCH1 positive tumors (24 out of 27. High levels of hedgehog target genes are also detected in four prostate cancer cell lines (TSU, DU145, LN-Cap and PC3. We demonstrate that inhibition of hedgehog signaling by smoothened antagonist, cyclopamine, suppresses hedgehog signaling, down-regulates cell invasiveness and induces apoptosis. In addition, cancer cells expressing Gli1 under the CMV promoter are resistant to cyclopamine-mediated apoptosis. All these data suggest a significant role of the hedgehog pathway for cellular functions of prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that activation of the hedgehog pathway, through loss of Su(Fu or overexpression of sonic hedgehog, may involve tumor progression and metastases of prostate cancer. Thus, targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may have

  7. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Oxidative Stress Interplay: Implications in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Jelena; Trivanović, Drenka; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and oxidative stress/Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) both have pivotal roles in health and disease. In this review we are analyzing the interplay between TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. They have contradictory roles in cancer progression since both can have antitumor effects, through the induction of cell death, senescence and cell cycle arrest, and protumor effects by contributing to cancer cell spreading, proliferation, survival, and metastasis. TGF-β can control ROS production directly or by downregulating antioxidative systems. Meanwhile, ROS can influence TGF-β signaling and increase its expression as well as its activation from the latent complex. This way, both are building a strong interplay which can be taken as an advantage by cancer cells in order to increment their malignancy. In addition, both TGF-β and ROS are able to induce cell senescence, which in one way protects damaged cells from neoplastic transformation but also may collaborate in cancer progression. The mutual collaboration of TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis is highly complex, and, due to their differential roles in tumor progression, careful consideration should be taken when thinking of combinatorial targeting in cancer therapies. PMID:26078812

  8. Characterization of low active ghrelin ratio in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tomofumi; Mitsunaga, Shuichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Ohno, Izumi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hidetaka; Irisawa, Ai; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2018-05-18

    Acyl ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide. Active ghrelin ratio, the ratio of acyl ghrelin to total ghrelin, has an important role in physiological functions and gastrointestinal symptoms. However, low active ghrelin ratio-related characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have not been previously evaluated. The goal of this study was to identify low active ghrelin ratio-related factors in treatment-naïve advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Patients with treatment-naïve advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible for inclusion in this study. Active ghrelin ratio and clinical parameters of patients were prospectively recorded. Factors correlated with low active ghrelin ratio and survival were analyzed. In total, 92 patients were analyzed. Low active ghrelin ratio-related factors were advanced age (P advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  10. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  11. Protocol for a systematic review of psychological interventions for cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Teresa; Devane, Declan; Walsh, Jane C; Groarke, AnnMarie; McGuire, Brian E

    2015-12-04

    Fatigue is a common symptom in cancer patients that can persist beyond the curative treatment phase. Some evidence has been reported for interventions for fatigue during active treatment. However, to date, there is no systematic review on psychological interventions for fatigue after the completion of curative treatment for cancer. This is a protocol for a systematic review that aims to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological interventions for cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment cancer survivors. This systematic review protocol was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) database. We will search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and relevant sources of grey literature. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which have evaluated psychological interventions in adult cancer patients after the completion of treatment, with fatigue as an outcome measure, will be included. Two review authors will independently extract data from the selected studies and assess the methodological quality using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool. Most existing evidence on cancer-related fatigue is from those in active cancer treatment. This systematic review and meta-analysis will build upon previous evaluations of psychological interventions in people during and after cancer treatment. With the growing need for stage-specific research in cancer, this review seeks to highlight a gap in current practice and to strengthen the evidence base of randomised controlled trials in the area. PROSPERO CRD42014015219.

  12. Collaborative Researchers or Cold Warriors? The Origins, Activities, and Legacy of the Smithsonian’s Institute of Social Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peter Castro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available International research collaboration is increasingly popular, providing many scholarly and practical benefits. These collaborative endeavors also encounter obstacles and costs, including ones involving issues of power and professional ethics. My study seeks to widen our understanding of international collaborative social science research by examining the complex origins, diverse activities, and clouded legacy of the Smithsonian Institution’s Institute of Social Anthropology (ISA. The ISA was an innovative collaborative teaching and research program founded by Julian Steward during World War II to meet many goals, including increasing social science capacity in Latin America, expanding knowledge about contemporary cultural change, strengthening area expertise among U.S. scholars, and promoting closer relations among the peoples of the Americas. The ISA provided career-enhancing opportunities for U.S. and Latin American scholars, while helping to pioneer applied medical anthropology. I take issue with recent analysts who portray the ISA as promoting, including through covert research, U.S. hegemonic interests seeking to control rural Latin America.

  13. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...

  14. Collaboration space division in collaborative product development based on a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Ma, Yanqiao; Feng, Huan

    2018-02-01

    The advance in the global environment, rapidly changing markets, and information technology has created a new stage for design. In such an environment, one strategy for success is the Collaborative Product Development (CPD). Organizing people effectively is the goal of Collaborative Product Development, and it solves the problem with certain foreseeability. The development group activities are influenced not only by the methods and decisions available, but also by correlation among personnel. Grouping the personnel according to their correlation intensity is defined as collaboration space division (CSD). Upon establishment of a correlation matrix (CM) of personnel and an analysis of the collaboration space, the genetic algorithm (GA) and minimum description length (MDL) principle may be used as tools in optimizing collaboration space. The MDL principle is used in setting up an object function, and the GA is used as a methodology. The algorithm encodes spatial information as a chromosome in binary. After repetitious crossover, mutation, selection and multiplication, a robust chromosome is found, which can be decoded into an optimal collaboration space. This new method can calculate the members in sub-spaces and individual groupings within the staff. Furthermore, the intersection of sub-spaces and public persons belonging to all sub-spaces can be determined simultaneously.

  15. Cancer control activities in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Keun-Young

    2008-05-01

    South Korea has a population of 47.3 million. The whole population is covered by a mandatory social insurance system (the National Health Insurance Program) that is financed through the contributions paid by the insured and their employers. Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Korea since 1983. About 130 000 people develop cancer annually with 66 000 deaths in 2006. Cancer patients' 5-year survival rates between 1998 and 2002 were 37.8 and 57.0% for men and women, respectively. The five leading primary cancer sites were stomach, lung, liver, colon and rectum, and bladder among males, whereas the most common cancers were stomach, breast, colon and rectum, uterine cervix and lung among females. With the rapidly aging population, reducing cancer burden at the national level has become one of the major political issues in Korea. The government formulated its first 10-year plan for cancer control in 1996. In 2000, the National Cancer Center was created and the Cancer Control Division was set up within the Ministry of Health and Welfare. The Cancer Control Act was legislated in 2003. Korea's major national cancer control programs are anti-smoking campaigns, hepatitis B virus vaccination, cancer registration and networking, promotion of R&D activities for cancer control, education and training for cancer control and prevention, operation of the national cancer information center, operation of the mass screening program for five common cancers, management of cancer patients at home, financial support for cancer patients and designation of regional cancer centers.

  16. Designing for collaborative interpretation in telemonitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tariq Osman; Bjørn, Pernille; Kensing, Finn

    2011-01-01

    with a design interventionist perspective was conducted to investigate the telemonitoring arrangement for chronic heart patients with ICDs and to identify the nature of the collaborative practices involved in ICD data interpretation. We diagnose the main challenges involved in collaborative interpretation...... practices. These insights were used to re-design the socio-technical setup of the telemonitoring practices by designing and building a web-based, patient-centric, collaborative application, myRecord, to re-introduce the patients as active participants into the telemonitoring setup. Finally, we introduce my......Record at Copenhagen University Hospital and evaluate the new practices and the collaborative technology related to the transformed role of the patients. Results: The interpretation of ICD data is a collaborative practice engaging clinicians and patients and involving three separate collaborative processes...

  17. Understanding nomadic collaborative learning groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob; Hodgson, Vivien

    2018-01-01

    -term collaborations within the frame of Problem and Project Based Learning. By analysing the patterns of nomadic collaborative learning we identify and discuss how the two groups of students incorporate mobile and digital technologies as well as physical and/or non-digital technologies into their group work......The paper builds on the work of Rossitto et al. on collaborative nomadic work to develop three categories of practice of nomadic collaborative learning groups. Our study is based on interviews, workshops and observations of two undergraduate student's group practices engaged in self-organised, long....... Specifically, we identify the following categories of nomadic collaborative learning practices: “orchestration of work phases, spaces and activities,” “the orchestration of multiple technologies” and “orchestration of togetherness.” We found that for both groups of students there was a fluidity, situatedness...

  18. Establishing an Inpatient Gym for Recipients of Stem Cell Transplantation: A Multidisciplinary Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Roxann; Presson, Kimberly; Laufman, Robin; Tomczak, Nancy; Brassil, Kelly J

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that exercise can have a profound impact on physiologic and quality-of-life outcomes for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Despite this, implementation of a gym on inpatient HSCT units may be limited because of space, infrastructure, and budget. This article presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of the gym and highlights its use for individual and group patient activities. An interprofessional team at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center collaborated to design and implement gym space on an inpatient HSCT unit servicing as many as 86 beds. Informal feedback from patients, as well as metrics on use of the space, indicates that the gym is well received and frequently used. Limitations include the absence of a designated physical therapy technician to supervise individual activity, which may limit patient access when a staff member is unavailable. The cost associated with the implementation of such space may be offset by benefits to patients, including enhanced conditioning, quality of life, and time to discharge, as evidenced in the literature.

  19. Cytotoxic activity of erypogein d from erythrina poeppigiana (leguminosae) against cervical cancer (HeLa), breast cancer (MCF-7) and ovarian cancer (SKOV-3) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlina, T.; Gaffar, S.; Widowati, W.

    2018-05-01

    Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells and continues to divide rapidly in the body. Current anticancer treatment usually causes many side effects. Natural products are then explored to be new alternatives for cancer treatment. Flavonoids have been known to possess medicinal properties, including anticancer. This study was performed to observe the cytotoxic activity of isoflavanone compound, erypogein D from Erythrina poeppigiana, toward cervical cancer (HeLa), breast cancer (MCF-7) and ovarian cancer (SKOV-3) cells. The cytotoxic activity of erypogein D was tested using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3- carboxyme-thoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) assay. The percentage of cell mortality was calculated and the IC50 was analyzed using probit analysis. The result showed that cytotoxic activity of the erypogein D against HeLa, SKOV-3, and MCF-7 cells had an IC50 value 225, 70.74, and 30.12 μM, respectively. Based on IC50 value can be concluded that erypogein D is the most cytotoxic to breast cancer MCF-7 cell. However the cytotoxic activity of erypogein D toward MCF7 is moderate.

  20. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuri, Shyam M; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of patients with colorectal cancer. Introduction of the HER2 mutations S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutants are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab-resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) wild-type (WT) colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) identified 4 PDXs with HER2 mutations. HER2-targeted therapies were tested on two PDXs. Treatment with a single HER2-targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2-targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2-mutated PDXs. HER2 activating mutations cause EGFR antibody resistance in colorectal cell lines, and PDXs with HER2 mutations show durable tumor regression when treated with dual HER2-targeted therapy. These data provide a strong preclinical rationale for clinical trials targeting HER2 activating mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration...... retroviral integration sites and mapped them against the mouse genome sequence databases from Celera and Ensembl. In addition to 17 insertions targeting gene loci known to be cancer-related, we identified a total of 37 new common insertion sites (CISs), of which 8 encode components of signaling pathways...... that are involved in cancer. The effectiveness of large-scale insertional mutagenesis in a sensitized genetic background is demonstrated by the preference for activation of MAP kinase signaling, collaborating with Cdkn2a loss in generating the lymphoid and myeloid tumors. Collectively, our results show that large...

  2. Discover collaboration: Collaborative learning from the implementation of a discovery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Forsberg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Lund University Library purchased and implemented a new discovery system in the end of 2011 and the beginning of 2012. Historically there has been no collaboration between the digital library unit and the pedagogical unit at the University Library. The conditions for the implementation were quite difficult; an extremely tight time frame, changes of the member of staff, high demands from the library network, a bad relation with current system supplier, a dependency of the current system and its functionalities. What to do? In order to reach trustworthiness and to make sure that we have a learning perspective in all the processes we initiated a close collaboration between the digital unit and the pedagogical unit and formed an implementation group. We also initiated a close and active collaboration between the implementation group and an expert group formed by members from the faculty libraries i.e. the super user group. Activities We had four workshops about pedagogical issues regarding discovery systems. The workshops turned out to be a forum for a dialogue between the digital library, the pedagogical unit and the teacher librarians. They resulted in an action plan which was integrated in the implementation process. We also invited colleagues to informal discussions about the pedagogical use of the discovery system. We encouraged all teaching librarians to share their educational materials on our intranet. Conclusion We found the collaborative strategy fruitful and not only did it result in a closer collaboration between the digital library and the pedagogical unit but also with the library network. Due to several reasons we conducted a new tender of a discovery system during 2012. The tender resulted in a new system with a different supplier. In the implementation started in the autumn 2012, we implemented the experiences and learnings gained by our previous implementation.

  3. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linguissi, Laure Stella Ghoma; Gwom, Luc Christian; Nkenfou, Celine Nguefeu; Bates, Matthew; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-03-01

    The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of 'high burden' countries for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP) faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up) and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP COLLABORATION FACTORS TO SUPPORT IDEA GENERATION IN COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE e-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Lambropoulos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify, discuss and analyze students’ collaboration factors related to distributed leadership (DL, which correlates with interaction quality evident in idea generation. Scripting computer-supported collaborative e-learning (CSCeL activities based on DL can scaffold students’ interactions that support collaboration and promote idea generation. Furthermore, the associated tools can facilitate collaboration via scripting and shed light on students’ interactions and dialogical sequences. Such detailed planning can result in effective short e-courses. In this case study, 21 MSc students’ teams worked on a DL project within a 2-day e-course at the IT Institute (ITIN, France. The research methods involved a self-reported questionnaire; the Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF algorithm with qualitative analysis; and outcomes from the Social Network Analysis (SNA tools implemented within the forums. The results indicated that scripting DL based on the identified distributed leadership attributes can support values such as collaboration and can be useful in supporting idea generation in short e-courses.

  5. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Management at the Colombian National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavito, Gloria; Llamas O, Augusto; Cadena, Enrique; De Los Reyes, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant disease of the endocrine system. Two hundred and twenty-one new cases were diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCI) in 2006, roughly 4% of all new cancer cases. Weekly multidisciplinary decision-making meetings on thyroid cancer management have been held at the NCI since 1994. This article covers the body of knowledge gathered through 14 years of interdisciplinary collaboration where experience has been combined with the best available evidence.

  6. Dysplasia and cancer in inflammatory bowel disease 10 years after diagnosis: results of a population-based European collaborative follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, K H; Vermeire, S; Christodoulou, D K; Riis, L; Wolters, F; Odes, S; Freitas, J; Hoie, Ole; Beltrami, Marina; Fornaciari, G; Clofent, J; Bodini, P; Vatn, M; Nunes, Paula Borralho; Moum, B; Munkholm, P; Limonard, C; Stockbrugger, R; Rutgeerts, P; Tsianos, E V

    2007-01-01

    To determine dysplasia and cancer in the 1991-2004 European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort. A patient questionnaire and a physician per patient form were completed for each of the 1,141 inflammatory bowel disease patients (776 ulcerative colitis/365 Crohn's disease) from 9 centers (7 countries) derived from the EC-IBD cohort. Rates of detection of intestinal cancer and dysplasia as well as extra-intestinal neoplasms were computed. Patient follow-up time was 10.3 +/- 0.8 (range 9.4-11) years. The mean age of the whole group of IBD patients was 37.8 +/- 11.3 (range 16-76) years. Thirty-eight patients (3.3%; 26 with ulcerative colitis/12 with Crohn's disease, 21 males/17 females, aged 61.3 +/- 13.4, range 33-77 years), were diagnosed with 42 cancers. Cancers occurred 5.4 +/- 3.3 (range 0-11) years after inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis. Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 8 (1 Crohn's disease and 7 ulcerative colitis patients--0.3 and 0.9% of the Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis cohort, respectively) of 38 patients and 30 cancers were extra-intestinal. Four of 38 patients (10.5%) were diagnosed as having 2 cancers and they were younger compared to patients with one cancer (p = 0.0008). There was a trend for a higher prevalence of intestinal cancer in the northern centers (0.9%) compared to southern centers (0.3%, p = NS). Southern centers had more cases of extra-intestinal cancer compared to northern centers (2 vs. 3.8%, p = 0.08). Ten patients (0.9%; 8 with ulcerative colitis/2 with Crohn's disease, 8 males, aged 62.3 +/- 14.1 years) had colorectal dysplasia. In the first decade of the EC-IBD Study Group cohort follow-up study, the prevalence of cancer was as expected with most patients having a single neoplasm and an extra-intestinal neoplasm. In northern centers there was a trend for more intestinal cancers, while in southern centers there was a trend for more extra-intestinal cancers compared to northern centers. 2007

  7. Playful Collaboration (or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores how games and play, which are deeply rooted in human beings as a way to learn and interact, can be used to teach certain concepts and practices related to open collaborative innovation. We discuss how playing games can be a source of creativity, imagination and fun, while it can...... also be conducive to deep learning. As such, a game can engage different dimensions of learning and embed elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning. Building on this logic, we present an exploratory case study of the use of a particular board game in a class of a course...... collaboration at the cost of individual performance and possible long-term collective performance as well....

  8. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer....... In the future, we need to learn to differentiate between indolent and aggressive prostate cancers. This may, again, leave room for PSA testing as a screening tool. Our findings do indicate a small positive effect of more lower endoscopies, which could be investigated in an intervention study where some GPs...... are randomised to a more liberal access to lower endoscopies. Alongside this, we need to keep on exploring alternative approaches including the use of iFOBT in symptomatic patients. Overall, this thesis indicates that the role of GPs in the diagnosis of cancer should be strengthened through easy access...

  9. Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Prostate Cancer Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Maternal Morbidity & Mortality Infant Mortality & Low Birth Weight Immunizations children and adult Asthma STD’s including HIV Cancer Obesity Diabetes...TA, co-taught, or taught. “Course of Life” is the Latin translation of Curriculum Vitae. Tips on Preparing a Curriculum Vitae (CV) Conference...is the most common non-skin cancer in America , and affects 1 in 6 men. In 2009, more than 192,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and

  10. Coagulation activation anc microparticle-associated coagulant activity in cancer patients An exploratory prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Kleinjan, Ankie; Berckmans, René J.; Mackman, Nigel; Manly, David; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Richel, Dick J.; Büller, Harry R.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Cancer increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Here, we investigated the contribution of microparticle (MP)-dependent procoagulant activity to the prothrombotic state in these patients. In 43 cancer patients without VIE at study entry and 22 healthy volunteers, markers of in vivo and

  11. Gauging NOTCH1 Activation in Cancer Using Immunohistochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Kluk

    Full Text Available Fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE tissues are a potentially rich resource for studying the role of NOTCH1 in cancer and other pathologies, but tests that reliably detect activated NOTCH1 (NICD1 in FPE samples have been lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing an immunohistochemical (IHC stain that detects a neoepitope created by the proteolytic cleavage event that activates NOTCH1. Following validation using xenografted cancers and normal tissues with known patterns of NOTCH1 activation, we applied this test to tumors linked to dysregulated Notch signaling by mutational studies. As expected, frequent NICD1 staining was observed in T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, a tumor in which activating NOTCH1 mutations are common. However, when IHC was used to gauge NOTCH1 activation in other human cancers, several unexpected findings emerged. Among B cell tumors, NICD1 staining was much more frequent in chronic lymphocytic leukemia than would be predicted based on the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations, while mantle cell lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma showed no evidence of NOTCH1 activation. NICD1 was also detected in 38% of peripheral T cell lymphomas. Of interest, NICD1 staining in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in angioimmunoblastic lymphoma was consistently more pronounced in lymph nodes than in surrounding soft tissues, implicating factors in the nodal microenvironment in NOTCH1 activation in these diseases. Among carcinomas, diffuse strong NICD1 staining was observed in 3.8% of cases of triple negative breast cancer (3 of 78 tumors, but was absent from 151 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 147 ovarian carcinomas. Frequent staining of normal endothelium was also observed; in line with this observation, strong NICD1 staining was also seen in 77% of angiosarcomas. These findings complement insights from genomic sequencing studies and suggest that IHC staining is a valuable experimental tool that may be useful in selection of

  12. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  13. PPARgamma-PGC-1alpha activity is determinant of alcohol related breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed Petersen, Rasmus; Benzon Larsen, Signe; Jensen, Ditte Marie

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. One of several proposed mechanisms is that alcohol-related breast cancer is caused by increased sex hormone levels. PPARγ inhibits aromatase transcription in breast adipocytes. We reproduced previously found allele-specific effects...... of the wildtype Pro-allele of PPARG Pro12Ala in alcohol related breast cancer. In transiently transfected cells, transcriptional activation by PPARγ and the PPARγ-PGC-1α complex was inhibited by ethanol. PPARγ 12Ala-mediated transcription activation was not enhanced by PGC-1α, resulting in allele......-specific transcription activation by the PPARγ 12Pro-PGC-1α complex. Our results suggest that PPARγ and PGC-1α activity is an important determinant of alcohol related breast cancer....

  14. Fostering critical thinking and collaborative learning skills among medical students through a research protocol writing activity in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Soumendra; Mohammed, Ciraj Ali

    2018-06-01

    This intervention was aimed to analyse the effect of academic writing and journal critiquing as educational approaches in improving critical thinking and collaborative learning among undergraduate medical students. A research proposal writing format was created for the 4th year medical students of Melaka Manipal Medical College, Malaysia during their ophthalmology clinical postings. The students worked in small groups and developed research protocols through an evidence based approach. This was followed by writing reflective summaries in academic portfolios about the activity undertaken. A mixed methods study was designed to explore the possible role of collaborative research proposal writing in enhancing critical thinking and collaborative learning. Analysis of reflections submitted by 188 medical students after the intervention indicate that majority of them found an improvement in their skills of critical thinking and collaborative learning as a result of research protocol writing. All participants agreed that the model helped in applying concepts to new situations in the form of designing their own study, which reflected in enhanced higher order cognitive skills. This study shows that the introduction of a structured module in the core medical curriculum that focuses on research writing skills embedded with collaborative and reflective practices can enhance collaborative learning, critical thinking, and reasoning among medical students.

  15. Fostering critical thinking and collaborative learning skills among medical students through a research protocol writing activity in the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumendra Sahoo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This intervention was aimed to analyse the effect of academic writing and journal critiquing as educational approaches in improving critical thinking and collaborative learning among undergraduate medical students. Methods A research proposal writing format was created for the 4th year medical students of Melaka Manipal Medical College, Malaysia during their ophthalmology clinical postings. The students worked in small groups and developed research protocols through an evidence based approach. This was followed by writing reflective summaries in academic portfolios about the activity undertaken.A mixed methods study was designed to explore the possible role of collaborative research proposal writing in enhancing critical thinking and collaborative learning. Results Analysis of reflections submitted by 188 medical students after the intervention indicate that majority of them found an improvement in their skills of critical thinking and collaborative learning as a result of research protocol writing. All participants agreed that the model helped in applying concepts to new situations in the form of designing their own study, which reflected in enhanced higher order cognitive skills. Conclusion This study shows that the introduction of a structured module in the core medical curriculum that focuses on research writing skills embedded with collaborative and reflective practices can enhance collaborative learning, critical thinking, and reasoning among medical students.

  16. Troglitazone suppresses telomerase activity independently of PPARγ in estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid-Kolvear, Fariborz; Taboski, Michael AS; Nguyen, Johnny; Wang, Dong-Yu; Harrington, Lea A; Done, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is one the highest causes of female cancer death worldwide. Many standard chemotherapeutic agents currently used to treat breast cancer are relatively non-specific and act on all rapidly dividing cells. In recent years, more specific targeted therapies have been introduced. It is known that telomerase is active in over 90% of breast cancer tumors but inactive in adjacent normal tissues. The prevalence of active telomerase in breast cancer patients makes telomerase an attractive therapeutic target. Recent evidence suggests that telomerase activity can be suppressed by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). However, its effect on telomerase regulation in breast cancer has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of the PPARγ ligand, troglitazone, on telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Real time RT-PCR and telomerase activity assays were used to evaluate the effect of troglitazone. MDA-MB-231 cells had PPARγ expression silenced using shRNA interference. We demonstrated that troglitazone reduced the mRNA expression of hTERT and telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Troglitazone reduced telomerase activity even in the absence of PPARγ. In agreement with this result, we found no correlation between PPARγ and hTERT mRNA transcript levels in breast cancer patients. Statistical significance was determined using Pearson correlation and the paired Student's t test. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of troglitazone on telomerase activity in breast cancer cells has been investigated. Our data suggest that troglitazone may be used as an anti-telomerase agent; however, the mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect remains to be determined

  17. Cytotoxic activities of amentoflavone against human breast and cervical cancers are mediated by increasing of PTEN expression levels due to peroxisomes proliferate-activated receptor {gamma} activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunjung; Shin, Soyoung; Lee, Jeeyoung; Lee, So Jung; Kim, Jinkyoung; Yoon, Doyoung; Kim, Yangmee [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Eunrhan [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Human peroxisomes proliferate-activated receptor gamma (hPPAR{gamma}) has been implicated in numerous pathologies, including obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Previously, we verified that amentoflavone is an activator of hPPAR{gamma} and probed the molecular basis of its action. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of amentoflavone in cancer cells and demonstrated that amentoflavone showed strong cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines. We showed that hPPAR{gamma} expression in MCF-7 and HeLa cells is specifically stimulated by amentoflavone, and suggested that amentoflavone-induced cytotoxic activities are mediated by activation of hPPAR{gamma} in these two cancer cell lines. Moreover, amentoflavone increased PTEN levels in these two cancer cell lines, indicating that the cytotoxic activities of amentoflavone are mediated by increasing of PTEN expression levels due to hPPAR{gamma} activation.

  18. The impact of cancer and its treatment on physical activity levels and quality of life among young Hong Kong Chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Katherine K W; Li, William H C; Chiu, S Y; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2016-04-01

    Despite the evidence that regular physical activity can have beneficial effects on the physical and psychological well-being of cancer patients, a review of the literature reveals that a majority of young cancer patients fail to attain the same levels of physical activity that they had before contracting the disease. This study is to examine the impact of cancer and its treatment on the physical activity levels and quality of life of young Hong Kong Chinese cancer patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted, with 76 young cancer patients admitted for treatment to a pediatric oncology unit, and another similar age group of 148 healthy counterparts from the two integrated child and youth service centers were invited to join the study. The study found that the current physical activity levels of young cancer patients were markedly reduced when compared with their pre-cancer situation. Moreover, they were significantly less active in performing physical exercise, and reported lower levels of self-efficacy and quality of life than their healthy counterparts. The results of the hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that physical activity is an important indicator of quality of life among young cancer patients. The results provide further evidence that cancer and its treatment have negative effects on physical and psychological well-being and quality of life among young cancer patients. There is an imperative need for healthcare professionals to promote the adoption of regular physical activity among such patients, even during the treatment itself. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PAK1 is a breast cancer oncogene that coordinately activates MAPK and MET signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Y; Schafer, E J; Boehm, J S; Thomas, S R; He, F; Du, J; Wang, S; Barretina, J; Weir, B A; Zhao, J J; Polyak, K; Golub, T R; Beroukhim, R; Hahn, W C

    2012-07-19

    Activating mutations in the RAS family or BRAF frequently occur in many types of human cancers but are rarely detected in breast tumors. However, activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK MAPK pathway is commonly observed in human breast cancers, suggesting that other genetic alterations lead to activation of this signaling pathway. To identify breast cancer oncogenes that activate the MAPK pathway, we screened a library of human kinases for their ability to induce anchorage-independent growth in a derivative of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMLE). We identified p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) as a kinase that permitted HMLE cells to form anchorage-independent colonies. PAK1 is amplified in several human cancer types, including 30--33% of breast tumor samples and cancer cell lines. The kinase activity of PAK1 is necessary for PAK1-induced transformation. Moreover, we show that PAK1 simultaneously activates MAPK and MET signaling; the latter via inhibition of merlin. Disruption of these activities inhibits PAK1-driven anchorage-independent growth. These observations establish PAK1 amplification as an alternative mechanism for MAPK activation in human breast cancer and credential PAK1 as a breast cancer oncogene that coordinately regulates multiple signaling pathways, the cooperation of which leads to malignant transformation.

  20. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  1. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. ► PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. ► PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. ► These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  2. Association of Physical Activity by Type and Intensity With Digestive System Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, NaNa; Bao, Ying; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Orav, John; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that common carcinogenic pathways may underlie digestive system cancers. Physical activity may influence these pathways. Yet, to our knowledge, no previous study has evaluated the role of physical activity in overall digestive system cancer risk. To examine the association between physical activity and digestive system cancer risk, accounting for amount, type (aerobic vs resistance), and intensity of physical activity. A prospective cohort study followed 43 479 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1986 to 2012. At enrollment, the eligible participants were 40 years or older, were free of cancer, and reported physical activity. Follow-up rates exceeded 90% in each 2-year cycle. The amount of total physical activity expressed in metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours/week. Incident cancer of the digestive system encompassing the digestive tract (mouth, throat, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colorectum) and digestive accessory organs (pancreas, gallbladder, and liver). Over 686 924 person-years, we documented 1370 incident digestive system cancers. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower digestive system cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74 for ≥63.0 vs ≤8.9 MET-hours/week; 95% CI, 0.59-0.93; P value for trend = .003). The inverse association was more evident with digestive tract cancers (HR, 0.66 for ≥63.0 vs ≤8.9 MET-hours/week; 95% CI, 0.51-0.87) than with digestive accessary organ cancers. Aerobic exercise was particularly beneficial against digestive system cancers, with the optimal benefit observed at approximately 30 MET-hours/week (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.83; P value for nonlinearity = .02). Moreover, as long as the same level of MET-hour score was achieved from aerobic exercise, the magnitude of risk reduction was similar regardless of intensity of aerobic exercise. Physical activity, as indicated by MET-hours/week, was inversely associated with the risk of

  3. Background risk of breast cancer and the association between physical activity and mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thang; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Bonn, Stephanie E; Brand, Judith S; Cuzick, Jack; Czene, Kamila; Sjölander, Arvid; Bälter, Katarina; Hall, Per

    2015-04-02

    High physical activity has been shown to decrease the risk of breast cancer, potentially by a mechanism that also reduces mammographic density. We tested the hypothesis that the risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years according to the Tyrer-Cuzick prediction model influences the association between physical activity and mammographic density. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 38,913 Swedish women aged 40-74 years. Physical activity was assessed using the validated web-questionnaire Active-Q and mammographic density was measured by the fully automated volumetric Volpara method. The 10-year risk of breast cancer was estimated using the Tyrer-Cuzick (TC) prediction model. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association between physical activity and volumetric mammographic density and the potential interaction with the TC breast cancer risk. Overall, high physical activity was associated with lower absolute dense volume. As compared to women with the lowest total activity level (association was seen for any type of physical activity among women with association between total activity and absolute dense volume was modified by the TC breast cancer risk (P interaction = 0.05). As anticipated, high physical activity was also associated with lower non-dense volume. No consistent association was found between physical activity and percent dense volume. Our results suggest that physical activity may decrease breast cancer risk through reducing mammographic density, and that the physical activity needed to reduce mammographic density may depend on background risk of breast cancer.

  4. Physical activity and risk of pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Gundula; Jochem, Carmen; Schmid, Daniela; Keimling, Marlen; Ricci, Cristian; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity may prevent pancreatic cancer by regulating body weight and decreasing insulin resistance, DNA damage, and chronic inflammation. Previous meta-analyses found inconsistent evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on pancreatic cancer but those studies did not investigate whether the association between physical activity and pancreatic cancer varies by smoking status, body mass index (BMI), or level of consistency of physical activity over time. To address these issues, we conducted an updated meta-analysis following the PRISMA guidelines among 30 distinct studies with a total of 10,501 pancreatic cancer cases. Random effects meta-analysis of cohort studies revealed a weak, statistically significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk for high versus low levels of physical activity (relative risk (RR) 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-0.98). By comparison, case-control studies yielded a stronger, statistically significant risk reduction (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94; p-difference by study design = 0.07). When focusing on cohort studies, physical activity summary risk estimates appeared to be more pronounced for consistent physical activity over time (RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.76-0.97) than for recent past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.90-1.01) or distant past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.79-1.15, p-difference by timing in life of physical activity = 0.36). Physical activity summary risk estimates did not differ by smoking status or BMI. In conclusion, physical activity is not strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk, and the relation is not modified by smoking status or BMI level. While overall findings were weak, we did find some suggestion of potential pancreatic cancer risk reduction with consistent physical activity over time.

  5. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  6. Making It All Count: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration Model Incorporating Scholarship, Creative Activity, and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rocky; Hauschild-Mork, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    This study takes a grounded theory approach as a basis for a case study examining a cross-disciplinary artistic and academic collaborative project involving faculty from the areas of English, music, dance, theatre, design, and visual journalism resulting in the creation of research, scholarly, and creative activity that fosters student engagement…

  7. Instant collaboration: Using context-aware instant messaging for session management in distributed collaboration tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Damm, Christian Heide

    2002-01-01

    Distributed collaboration has become increasingly important, and instant messaging has become widely used for distributed communication. We present findings from an investigation of instant messaging use for work-related activities in a commercial setting. Based on these findings, we propose...... a lightweight session management design for distributed collaboration tools based on context-aware instant messaging. An implementation of this design is presented and an ongoing evaluation is discussed....

  8. The Effects of Mobile Collaborative Activities in a Second Language Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This research is designed to explore the areas of collaborative learning and the use of smartphones as a support for collaborative learning through a year-long exploratory multiple case study approach integrating both qualitative and quantitative data analysis. Qualitative exploratory interviews are combined with Multidimensional Scaling Analysis…

  9. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was measured using the griess method. iNOS and proteins regulating NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling were analyzed by Western blot. In anti-cancer activity, cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Cleaved PARP, ATF3 and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Western blot. Results In anti-inflammatory effect, MRBE blocked NO production via suppressing iNOS over-expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, MRBE inhibited NF-κB activation through p65 nuclear translocation via blocking IκB-α degradation and ERK1/2 activation via its hyper-phosphorylation. In anti-cancer activity, MRBE deos-dependently induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. MRBE treatment to SW480 cells activated ATF3 expression and down-regulated cyclin D1 level. We also observed that MRBE-induced ATF3 expression was dependent on ROS and GSK3β. Moreover, MRBE-induced cyclin D1 down-regulation was mediated from cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, which was dependent on ROS. Conclusions These findings suggest that mulberry root bark exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. PMID:24962785

  10. Effects of Breast Cancer and Mastectomy on Fibrinolytic Activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is good to know if this is also the case in Africans with breast cancer. Africans are known to possess enhanced fibrinolysis. This study was designed to assess the effect of breast cancer on fibrinolytic activity and the effect of mastectomy on fibrinolysis in African women. Sixty histo-patholically proven breast cancer patients ...

  11. Coordinated computer-supported collaborative learning: Awareness and awareness tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Bodermer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, research on awareness during online collaboration focused on topics such as the effects of spatial information about group members’ activities on the collaborative process. When the concept of awareness was introduced to computer-supported collaborative learning, this focus shifted to

  12. Understanding collaborative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinsmann, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Fast product follow-ups and increasing customer demands have changed product design from a rather unstructured process, into a systematic activity. Nowadays, both companies and researchers have developed the organizational aspects of integrated product design. However, attention to the collaborative

  13. A Comparison of Collaborative and Traditional Instruction in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubera, Chip; Aruguete, Mara S.

    2013-01-01

    Although collaborative instructional techniques have become popular in college courses, it is unclear whether collaborative techniques can replace more traditional instructional methods. We examined the efficacy of collaborative courses (in-class, collaborative activities with no lectures) compared to traditional lecture courses (in-class,…

  14. Discovering beaten paths in collaborative ontology-engineering projects using Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50,000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  15. Discovering Beaten Paths in Collaborative Ontology-Engineering Projects using Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50, 000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  16. H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS gene activation in human bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybojewska, B; Jagiello, A; Jalmuzna, P

    2000-08-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in most developed countries. In this work, 19 bladder cancer specimens, along with their infiltrations of the urinary bladder wall from the same patients, were examined for the presence of H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS activation using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. The H-RAS activation was found in 15 (about 84%) of the 19 bladder cancers studied. The same results were obtained in the infiltrating urinary bladder wall samples. N-RAS gene mutations were observed in all cases (except 1) in which H-RAS gene mutations were detected. The results suggest a strong relationship between H-RAS and N-RAS gene activation in bladder cancer. Changes in the K-RAS gene in bladder cancers seem to be a rare event; this is in agreement with findings of other authors. We found activation of the gene in one specimen of bladder cancer and its infiltration of the urinary bladder wall in the same patient.

  17. Perspectives on Strengthening Cancer Research and Control in Latin America Through Partnerships and Diplomacy: Experience of the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Frech

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the Pan American Health Organization, noncommunicable diseases, including cancer, are the leading causes of preventable and premature death in the Americas. Governments and health care systems in Latin America face numerous challenges as a result of increasing morbidity and mortality from cancer. Multiple international organizations have recognized the need for collaborative action on and technical support for cancer research and control in Latin America. The Center for Global Health at the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-CGH is one entity among many that are working in the region and has sought to develop a strategy for working in Latin America that draws on and expands the collaborative potential of engaged, skilled, and diverse partners. NCI-CGH has worked toward developing and implementing initiatives in collaboration with global partners that share the common objectives of building a global cancer research community and translating research results into evidence-informed policy and practice. Both objectives are complementary and synergistic and are additionally supported by an overarching strategic framework that is focused on partnerships and science diplomacy. This work highlights the overall strategy for NCI-CGH engagement in Latin America through partnerships and diplomacy, and highlights selected collaborative efforts that are aimed at improving cancer outcomes in the region.

  18. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  19. Brain-computer interface supported collaborative work: Implications for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, C S; Lee, J; Bahn, S

    2013-01-01

    Working together and collaborating in a group can provide greater benefits for people with severe motor disability. However, it is still not clear how collaboration should be supported by BCI systems. The present study explored BCI-supported collaborative work by investigating differences in performance and brain activity between when a pair of users performs a task jointly with each other and when they do alone only through means of their brain activity. We found differences in performance and brain activity between different work conditions. The results of this research should provide fundamental knowledge of BCI-supported cooperative work.

  20. Online University-Industry Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Bergenholtz, Carsten; Juhl, Hans Jørn

    Extant studies have shown how online communities can promote collaborative and innovative activities in general. Studies on university-industry collaborations have so far focused less on online activities. We therefore set out to examine the individual and organizational drivers and barriers...... for academics and industrial professionals to contribute to online community-based platforms. We use a mixed method approach using both survey data and in-depth interviews with respondents from the Danish food sector. Findings show that in line with known studies on online innovation communities in general......, the main drivers for engagement are organizational and individual learning, and establishing connections, rather than monetary incentives. In contrast to offline studies on university-industry interactions, well-connected academics are less interested in online communities of academics and industry...

  1. Does Telecare Improve Interorganisational Collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannie Kristine Bang Christensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies have suggested that telecare can improve interorganisational collaboration within fragmented health care systems, yet this outcome has not been examined in a large-scale setting. This study explores the effects of a large-scale interorganisational telecare programme in Denmark based on home-monitoring on collaboration in a telecare network between municipalities, hospitals, and general practitioners. Methodology: Semi-structured interviews and observations of collaborating health professionals from the municipalities, hospitals, and general practitioners were undertaken and then repeated a year later. Collaboration was analysed both at the interorganisational network level and within each part of the network, including its interrelations. Results: Collaboration between municipalities and general practitioners was initially intensified as a result of implementing telecare, though this changed over time as the first start-up obstacles were overcome and the patients became more active in their treatment. Conversely, collaboration between 'hospitals and municipalities' and 'hospitals and general practitioners' was unaffected by telecare. Discussion: Changes in collaboration among municipal nurses, general practitioners, and hospital staff were related to dependency structures and municipalities’ newly gained central role in a telecare network. While the telecare network was initially characterised by asymmetrical dependency structures, these were partially equalised over time because of the municipalities’ new position in the network.

  2. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo eFridlender

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70-95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early 19th century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next 2 decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity.

  3. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, Lotta; Järvelä, Liisa; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Arola, Mikko; Heinonen, Olli J; Axelin, Anna; Lilius, Johan; Vahlberg, Tero; Salanterä, Sanna

    2014-04-05

    Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children's cancer treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children's perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012).

  4. Inhibitory Activity of (+-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  5. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  6. Trace elements determinations in cancerous and non-cancerous human tissues using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Insup.

    1989-01-01

    Recent improvements in analyzing techniques when coupled to the growing knowledge of trace element biochemistry provide a powerful tool to investigate the relationship between trace elements and cancer. It is hoped that selective delivery or restriction of specific minerals may aid in cancer prevention or treatment. Tissues were collected at the time of surgery of various cancer patients including colon cancer and breast cancer. Three kinds of tissues were taken from a patient; cancerous, noncancerous, and transitional tissue obtained from a region located between the cancer and healthy tissues. A total of 57 tissues were obtained from 19 cancer patients. Seven of them were colon cancer patients, and 5 of them were breast cancer patients. Nine elements were determined using instrumental activation analysis. Cancerous colon tissue had significantly higher concentrations of selenium and iron than healthy tissues. Cancerous breast tissue had significantly higher concentrations of selenium, iron, manganese, and rubidium than healthy tissues. Iron can be enriched in cancer tissue because cancer tissue retains more blood vessels. Selenium is enriched in cancer tissue, possibly in an effort of the body to inhibit the growth of tumors. The manganese enrichment can be explained in the same manner as selenium considering its suspected anticarcinogenicity. It is not certain why rubidium was enriched in cancer tissue. It could be that this is the result of alteration of cell membrane permeability, change in extracellular matrix, or increased metabolism in cancer tissue

  7. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  8. K63-Linked Ubiquitination in Kinase Activation and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guocan [Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gao, Yuan [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Liren [Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Jin, Guoxiang; Cai, Zhen [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Chao, Jui-I [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hui-Kuan, E-mail: hklin@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-31

    Ubiquitination has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in multiple biological functions, which include cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, innate immune response, and neuronal degeneration. Although the role of ubiquitination in targeting proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation have been extensively studied and well-characterized, the critical non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitination, such as protein trafficking and kinase activation, involved in cell survival and cancer development, just start to emerge, In this review, we will summarize recent progresses in elucidating the non-proteolytic function of ubiquitination signaling in protein kinase activation and its implications in human cancers. The advancement in the understanding of the novel functions of ubiquitination in signal transduction pathways downstream of growth factor receptors may provide novel paradigms for the treatment of human cancers.

  9. K63-Linked Ubiquitination in Kinase Activation and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guocan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Liren; Jin, Guoxiang; Cai, Zhen; Chao, Jui-I; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in multiple biological functions, which include cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, innate immune response, and neuronal degeneration. Although the role of ubiquitination in targeting proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation have been extensively studied and well-characterized, the critical non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitination, such as protein trafficking and kinase activation, involved in cell survival and cancer development, just start to emerge, In this review, we will summarize recent progresses in elucidating the non-proteolytic function of ubiquitination signaling in protein kinase activation and its implications in human cancers. The advancement in the understanding of the novel functions of ubiquitination in signal transduction pathways downstream of growth factor receptors may provide novel paradigms for the treatment of human cancers.

  10. Altered deoxyribonuclease activity in cancer cells and its role in non toxic adjuvant cancer therapy with mixed vitamins C and K3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taper, Henryk S

    2008-01-01

    The alterations of deoxyribonuclease DNase activity in cancer cells were the basis of the utilization of mixed vitamins C and K3 in a nontoxic, adjuvant cancer therapy. In order to localize exactly the altered activities of DNase in cancer cells, histochemical methods were utilized. The deficiency of alkaline and acid DNase activity appeared to be characteristic for non-necrotic cells of malignant human and animal tumors. This enzymatic deficiency appeared in experimental carcinogenesis before the phenotypic signs of malignancy. Tumor promoters directly reduced the activity of both DNases. The incidence of spontaneous malignant human and animal tumors appeared to be inversely proportional to the intensity of the activity of both DNases in normal cells and tissues from which these tumors were derived. The fact that alkaline and acid DNase activity was reactivated during the spontaneous and therapeutically induced necrosis of cancer cells suggests that this enzymatic deficiency of DNase activity in cancer cells was due to the action of specific inhibitors of DNases. Characteristic variations of serum alkaline DNase activity in positive responders to therapy, examined in more than 800 cancer-bearing patients, may be the basis for the development of a useful test for therapeutic prognosis and for monitoring of cancer bearing patients. Acid DNase was selectively reactivated in malignant tumor cells by vitamin C (sodium ascorbate), whereas alkaline DNase was reactivated by vitamin K3. Joint vitamin C and K3 administration produced in vitro and in vivo tumor growth inhibition, potentiation and sensitization of chemo- and/or radiotherapy and a decrease in the number of metastases in animals with experimental tumors. Joint vitamin C and K3 administration may be considered as a possible new, non-toxic, adjuvant cancer therapy, which can be easily introduced into the classic protocols of clinical cancer therapy without any supplementary risk for patients.

  11. Modulation of Telomerase Activity in Cancer Cells by Dietary Compounds: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Eitsuka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase is expressed in ~90% of human cancer cell lines and tumor specimens, whereas its enzymatic activity is not detectable in most human somatic cells, suggesting that telomerase represents a highly attractive target for selective cancer treatment. Accordingly, various classes of telomerase inhibitors have been screened and developed in recent years. We and other researchers have successfully found that some dietary compounds can modulate telomerase activity in cancer cells. Telomerase inhibitors derived from food are subdivided into two groups: one group directly blocks the enzymatic activity of telomerase (e.g., catechin and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and the other downregulates the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, via signal transduction pathways (e.g., retinoic acid and tocotrienol. In contrast, a few dietary components, including genistein and glycated lipid, induce cellular telomerase activity in several types of cancer cells, suggesting that they may be involved in tumor progression. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the effects of dietary factors on telomerase regulation in cancer cells and discusses their molecular mechanisms of action.

  12. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: Panelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    At the meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), in Geneva in July, Chairman A.N. Skrinsky of Novosibirsk reviewed ICFA progress, particularly the activities of the specialist Panels which pursue specific Committee objectives in guiding worldwide collaboration in high energy physics

  13. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: Panelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-10-15

    At the meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), in Geneva in July, Chairman A.N. Skrinsky of Novosibirsk reviewed ICFA progress, particularly the activities of the specialist Panels which pursue specific Committee objectives in guiding worldwide collaboration in high energy physics.

  14. Human papillomavirus infection correlates with inflammatory Stat3 signaling activity and IL-17 level in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xin Li

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major burden of public health and healthcare worldwide. Microbiota has been suggested in promoting chronic inflammation in the intestine which, in turn, promotes tumor development. This study focuses on possible correlations of human papillomavirus (HPV infection with proinflammatory Stat3 signaling activities and the resulting levels of its downstream proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 in CRC patients.HPV was examined using HPV Genotyping Chip technology and constitutively active Stat3 (p-Stat3 and IL-17 levels were tested using immunohistochemistry (IHC in paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent normal tissues (ANT from a cohort of 95 CRC patients. Correlation analyses were performed between HPV infection and clinicopathological characteristics, Stat3 activities and IL-17 levels among these CRC patients.Three major findings were observed: (1 HPV infection existed in a high rate of CRC cases (48.4%, 46/95, of which 45 cases (45/46, 97.8% were high-risk HPV16-positive and only one case was HPV53-positive. (2 HPV infection correlated with poorer clinical stages (III+IV of CRC. (3 HPV infection strongly correlated with both constitutively higher Stat3 activities (P<0.01 and higher IL-17 levels (P<0.01 only in CRC tissues but not in ANT tissues.HPV infection is common in CRC patients suggesting potentially preventive effectiveness of HPV vaccination among high-risk young individuals. We have for the first time revealed a tri-lateral relationship among HPV infection, constitutive Stat3 activity and IL-17 level, whose collaborative act may orchestrate a proinflammatory microenvironment in the colorectum that, in turn, may promote carcinogenesis and possibly facilitate progression of CRC.

  15. Legal Considerations for International Collaborative Research Contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. S.; Oh, K. B.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Though collaborative research is pure academic activity the research plan and resource allocation for the research are shaped under foam of contract. Thus, legal binding effect and compulsive instrument is adopted at the research contract. This paper aimed at guiding equal collaborative research contract in legal aspect. To reach the goal (1) enforceability and elements of international collaborative contract, (2) damage calculation and related issues with those topics shall be discussed in each section

  16. C-Mod Collaboration Informal Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth W. Gentle

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the collaboration have not changed. A specific list of tasks was agreed upon during the Fall of 2006 in preparation for the 2007 C-Mod campaign by Earl Marmar, Head of the Alcator Project, Kenneth Gentle, Principal Investigator, and William Rowan, Collaboration Coordinator with the facilitation of Adam Rosenberg (DOE grant monitor for the collaboration). The activities follow the list of tasks and are discussed in this progress report

  17. PAK1 is a breast cancer oncogene that coordinately activates MAPK and MET signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Yashaswi; Schafer, Eric J.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Thomas, Sapana R.; He, Frank; Du, Jinyan; Wang, Shumei; Barretina, Jordi; Weir, Barbara A.; Zhao, Jean J.; Polyak, Kornelia; Golub, Todd R.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Hahn, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Activating mutations in the RAS family or BRAF frequently occur in many types of human cancers but are rarely detected in breast tumors. However, activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway is commonly observed in human breast cancers, suggesting that other genetic alterations lead to activation of this signaling pathway. To identify breast cancer oncogenes that activate the MAPK pathway, we screened a library of human kinases for their ability to induce ...

  18. Managing collaborative innovation networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vidar; Agger, Annika

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative innovation networks are increasingly used as vehicles for fostering innovative policy solutions. However, scholars have noted that the extent to which collaborative networks can actually contribute to the development of innovative policy solutions depends on how they are managed...... a Flemish administrative network to develop a radical new Spatial Planning Policy Plan. This study shows that the best way to manage collaborative innovation networks is not to press directly for results, but take the time to invest in relationship-building and together agree on a planning and clear process...... steps. Such a management approach allows actors to get to know each other and from thereon expand, with more background and appreciation for the others’ goals, behaviors, and intentions, their group activities concerning the formulation of a radical and innovative policy plan....

  19. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  20. Active surveillance strategy for patients with localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Active surveillance - an initial observational strategy - offers a tailored management of patients with localised prostate cancer. The aim of the strategy is to appoint patients with potentially lethal prostate cancer to curatively intended treatment, while patients with slowly evolving...... measurements, repeated biopsies, and regular digital rectal examinations. The programme recommended change of management from active surveillance to curatively intended treatment based on PSA doubling time, deteriorating histopathology in repeated prostatic biopsies, and increased clinical tumour category...... with defined final histopathological findings at radical prostatectomy that was perceived as unacceptable for a continued observational strategy. CONCLUSION: The thesis has demonstrated that active surveillance is feasible and reduces the number of patients undergoing curative intended treatment. However...

  1. Internet-based physical activity intervention for women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sheri J; Dunsiger, Shira I; Marinac, Catherine R; Marcus, Bess H; Rosen, Rochelle K; Gans, Kim M

    2015-12-01

    Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Physical activity interventions that can be delivered through the Internet have the potential to increase participant reach. The efficacy of an Internet-based physical activity intervention was tested in a sample of women at an elevated risk for breast cancer. A total of 55 women with at least 1 first-degree relative with breast cancer (but no personal history of breast cancer) were randomized to a 3-month theoretically grounded Internet-based physical activity intervention or an active control arm. Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, psychosocial mediators of physical activity adoption and maintenance, as well as worry and perceived risk of developing breast cancer were assessed at baseline, 3-month, and 5-month follow up. Participants were on average 46.2 (SD = 11.4) years old with a body mass index of 27.3 (SD = 4.8) kg/m2. The intervention arm significantly increased minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity compared to the active control arm at 3 months (213 vs. 129 min/week) and 5 months (208 vs. 119 min/week; both ps Internet-based physical activity intervention may substantially increase physical activity in women with a family history of breast cancer. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Lysyl oxidase activates cancer stromal cells and promotes gastric cancer progression: quantum dot-based identification of biomarkers in cancer stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng CW

    2017-12-01

    -based multiplexed molecular imaging method, the spatial relationship between LOX and stromal essential events could be simultaneously evaluated histologically. Stromal activation was defined and then evaluated. Survival analysis showed that the stromal activation was correlated with overall survival and disease-free survival (P<0.001 for all. The expression of LOX was significantly increased in the intense activation subgroup (P<0.001.Conclusion: Quantifying assessment of the stroma indicates that the LOX may be a stromal marker for GC and stromal activation, which is not only responsible for the ECM remodeling morphologically, but also for the formation of invasive properties and recurrence. These results support the possibility to integrate morphological and molecular biomarker information for cancer research by the biomedical application of QDs. Keywords: nanomedicine, cancer stromal, gastric cancer, multiplexed molecular imaging 

  3. American Society of Clinical Oncology Summit on Addressing Obesity Through Multidisciplinary Provider Collaboration: Key Findings and Recommendations for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn L; Merrill, Janette K; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dixon, Suzanne; Hassink, Sandra G; Jakicic, John M; Morton, John Magaña; Okwuosa, Tochi M; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Rothberg, Amy E; Stephens, Mark; Streett, Sarah E; Wild, Robert A; Westman, Eric A; Williams, Ronald J; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2017-11-01

    Given the increasing evidence that obesity increases the risk of developing and dying from malignancy, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) launched an Obesity Initiative in 2013 that was designed to increase awareness among oncology providers and the general public of the relationship between obesity and cancer and to promote research in this area. Recognizing that the type of societal change required to impact the obesity epidemic will require a broad-based effort, ASCO hosted the "Summit on Addressing Obesity through Multidisciplinary Collaboration" in 2016. This meeting was held to review current challenges in addressing obesity within the respective health care provider communities and to identify priorities that would most benefit from a collective and cross-disciplinary approach. Efforts focused on four key areas: provider education and training; public education and activation; research; and policy and advocacy. Summit attendees discussed current challenges in addressing obesity within their provider communities and identified priorities that would most benefit from multidisciplinary collaboration. A synopsis of recommendations to facilitate future collaboration, as well as examples of ongoing cooperative efforts, provides a blueprint for multidisciplinary provider collaboration focused on obesity prevention and treatment. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  4. Crystals against cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This is a remarkable example of direct technology transfer from particle physics to medicine. Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new medical imaging system for the diagnosis of breast cancer, which uses positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  5. Collaborative learning in radiologic science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Radiologic science is a complex health profession, requiring the competent use of technology as well as the ability to function as part of a team, think critically, exercise independent judgment, solve problems creatively and communicate effectively. This article presents a review of literature in support of the relevance of collaborative learning to radiologic science education. In addition, strategies for effective design, facilitation and authentic assessment of activities are provided for educators wishing to incorporate collaborative techniques into their program curriculum. The connection between the benefits of collaborative learning and necessary workplace skills, particularly in the areas of critical thinking, creative problem solving and communication skills, suggests that collaborative learning techniques may be particularly useful in the education of future radiologic technologists. This article summarizes research identifying the benefits of collaborative learning for adult education and identifying the link between these benefits and the necessary characteristics of medical imaging technologists.

  6. Lung Cancer Chemopreventive Activity of Patulin Isolated from Penicillium vulpinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Monteillier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most lethal form of cancer in the world. Its development often involves an overactivation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, mobility, and a decrease in apoptosis. Therefore, NF-κB inhibitors are actively sought after for both cancer chemoprevention and therapy, and fungi represent an interesting unexplored reservoir for such molecules. The aim of the present work was to find naturally occurring lung cancer chemopreventive compounds by investigating the metabolites of Penicillium vulpinum, a fungus that grows naturally on dung. Penicillium vulpinum was cultivated in Potato Dextrose Broth and extracted with ethyl acetate. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract was performed by measuring NF-κB activity using a HEK293 cell line transfected with an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene. The mycotoxin patulin was identified as a nanomolar inhibitor of TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that its mechanism of action involved an inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation and was independent from the NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα degradation process. Enhancing its interest in lung cancer chemoprevention, patulin also exhibited antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antimigration effects on human lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibition of the Wnt pathway.

  7. Immunologically active biomaterials for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Omar A; Mooney, David J

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of immunological regulation has progressed tremendously alongside the development of materials science, and at their intersection emerges the possibility to employ immunologically active biomaterials for cancer immunotherapy. Strong and sustained anticancer, immune responses are required to clear large tumor burdens in patients, but current approaches for immunotherapy are formulated as products for delivery in bolus, which may be indiscriminate and/or shortlived. Multifunctional biomaterial particles are now being developed to target and sustain antigen and adjuvant delivery to dendritic cells in vivo, and these have the potential to direct and prolong antigen-specific T cell responses. Three-dimensional immune cell niches are also being developed to regulate the recruitment, activation and deployment of immune cells in situ to promote potent antitumor responses. Recent studies demonstrate that materials with immune targeting and stimulatory capabilities can enhance the magnitude and duration of immune responses to cancer antigens, and preclinical results utilizing material-based immunotherapy in tumor models show a strong therapeutic benefit, justifying translation to and future testing in the clinic.

  8. Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke with Active Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Woong Nam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke patients with active cancer are known to have poor clinical outcomes. However, the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase (IV t-PA in this group are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether stroke patients with cancer had poor clinical outcomes after use of IV t-PA. We reviewed ischemic stroke patients with active cancer treated with isolated IV t-PA between April 2010 and March 2015 at three national university hospitals from the registry for ischemic stroke in Korea. The clinical outcomes of early neurological deterioration (END, hemorrhagic transformation, in-hospital mortality, 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS discharge score, and duration of hospitalization were compared. We enrolled a total of 12 patients, and the cohort showed poor outcomes including 4 (33% END events, 7 (58% hemorrhagic transformations, 3 (25% in-hospital mortality cases, and 7 (58% poor mRS (3–6 scores. Additionally, the cryptogenic stroke group (n = 6 more frequently had high mRS scores (P = 0.043 as well as tendencies for frequent END events, hemorrhagic transformations, in-hospital mortality cases, and higher discharge NIHSS scores without statistical significance. In conclusion, ischemic stroke patients with active cancer, especially those with a cryptogenic mechanism, showed poor clinical outcomes after use of IV t-PA.

  9. δ-Tocopherol inhibits receptor tyrosine kinase-induced AKT activation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S

    2016-11-01

    The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies and supported by animal studies with vitamin E forms, γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol (δ-T). Several recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-tocopherol, however, yielded disappointing results. Whether vitamin E prevents or promotes cancer is a serious concern. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of the different forms of tocopherols would enhance our understanding of this topic. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-T was the most effective tocopherol form in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. By profiling the effects of δ-T on the cell signaling using the phospho-kinase array, we found that the most inhibited target was the phosphorylation of AKT on T308. Further study on the activation of AKT by EGFR and IGFR revealed that δ-T attenuated the EGF/IGF-induced activation of AKT (via the phosphorylation of AKT on T308 induced by the activation of PIK3). Expression of dominant active PIK3 and AKT in prostate cancer cell line DU145 in which PIK3, AKT, and PTEN are wild type caused the cells to be reflectory to the inhibition of δ-T, supporting that δ-T inhibits the PIK3-mediated activation of AKT. Our data also suggest that δ-T interferes with the EGF-induced EGFR internalization, which leads to the inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent activation of AKT. In summary, our results revealed a novel mechanism of δ-T in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, supporting the cancer preventive activity δ-T. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Palorini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment.

  11. T-cell activation promotes tumorigenesis in inflammation-associated cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lairmore Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic inflammation has long been associated with a wide range of malignancies, is now widely accepted as a risk factor for development of cancer, and has been implicated as a promoter of a variety of cancers including hematopoietic malignancies. We have described a mouse model uniquely suited to examine the link between inflammation and lymphoma in which the Tax oncogene, expressed in activated T and NK cells, perpetuates chronic inflammation that begins as microscopic intraepithelial lesions and develops into inflammatory nodules, subcutaneous tumors, and large granular lymphocytic leukemia. The use of bioluminescent imaging in these mice has expanded our ability to interrogate aspects of inflammation and tumorigenesis non-invasively. Here we demonstrate that bioluminescence induction in these mice correlated with inflammation resulting from wounding, T cell activation, and exposure to chemical agents. In experiments in which long-term effects of inflammation on disease outcome were monitored, the development of lymphoma was promoted by an inflammatory stimulus. Finally we demonstrated that activation of T-cells in T-cell receptor (TCR transgenic TAX-LUC animals dramatically exacerbated the development of subcutaneous TCR- CD16+ LGL tumors. The role of activated T-cells and acquired immunity in inflammation-associated cancers is broadly applicable to hematopoietic malignancies, and we propose these mice will be of use in dissecting mechanisms by which activated T-cells promote lymphomagenesis in vivo.

  12. Observations of Student Behavior in Collaborative Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brissenden, Gina; Lindell, Rebecca S.; Slater, Timothy F.; Wallace, Joy

    In an effort to determine how our students were responding to the use of collaborative learning groups in our large enrollment introductory astronomy (ASTRO 101) courses, we systematically observed the behavior of 270 undergraduate students working in 48 self-formed groups. Their observed behaviors were classified as: (i) actively engaged; (ii) watching actively; (iii) watching passively; and (iv) disengaged. We found that male behavior is consistent regardless of the sex-composition of the groups. However, females were categorized as watching passively and or disengaged significantly more frequently when working in groups that contained uneven numbers of males and females. This case study observation suggests that faculty who use collaborative learning groups might find that the level of student participation in collaborative group learning activities can depend on the sex-composition of the group.

  13. Potential anticancer activity of curcumin analogs containing sulfone on human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qiuyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three curcumin analogs(S1-S3 containing sulfone were investigated for their effects on human prostate cancer PC-3, colon cancer HT-29, lung cancer H1299 and pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells. The three compounds were approximately 16-to 96-fold more active than curcumin in these cell lines as determined by the MTT assay. The effects of these compounds on cell growth were further studied in prostate cancer PC-3 cells in both two dimensional (2D and three dimensional (3D cultures. S1-S3strongly inhibited the growth and induced cell death in PC-3 cells, and the effects of these compounds were associated with suppression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, treatment of PC-3 cells with all three compounds caused a decrease in the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (p-STAT3 (Tyr705,but not p-STAT3(Ser727. Only S1and S2decreased the presence of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt in PC-3 cells. These curcumin analogs warrant further in vivo studies for anticancer activities in suitable animal models.

  14. Tools for collaboration across STEM fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Supporting learners at different stages of learning is essential to achieve positive learning, critical thinking, technical and problem solving skills, and gainful employment upon graduation. Collaboration is critical to providing strong foundational educational support to all learners as they advance to higher level of learning. More important is the need to promote collaboration among educators and other professionals across the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM fields who educate the learners throughout their academic pursuit in their respective institutions of learning. To reap the value in diverse teams, the promotion of emergent interdependence fosters seamless collaborative activities across STEM disciplines.  For industrial technology programs to prepare students with skills necessary to supervise and manage the future workforce of any organization successfully, necessary tools must be utilized for the success of the collaborative effort. This paper addresses leadership and knowledge sharing among collaborators, the educational aspects of research facilities and research clusters as some of the tools necessary to develop program through collaboration in STEM fields.

     

  15. Tools for collaboration across STEM fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Supporting learners at different stages of learning is essential to achieve positive learning, critical thinking, technical and problem solving skills, and gainful employment upon graduation. Collaboration is critical to providing strong foundational educational support to all learners as they advance to higher level of learning. More important is the need to promote collaboration among educators and other professionals across the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM fields who educate the learners throughout their academic pursuit in their respective institutions of learning. To reap the value in diverse teams, the promotion of emergent interdependence fosters seamless collaborative activities across STEM disciplines.  For industrial technology programs to prepare students with skills necessary to supervise and manage the future workforce of any organization successfully, necessary tools must be utilized for the success of the collaborative effort. This paper addresses leadership and knowledge sharing among collaborators, the educational aspects of research facilities and research clusters as some of the tools necessary to develop program through collaboration in STEM fields.  

  16. Predicting physical activity and outcome expectations in cancer survivors: an application of Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Philip M; Blanchard, Chris M; Nehl, Eric; Baker, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of autonomous and controlled motives drawn from Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Intrinsic Motivation and Self-determination in Human Behavior. Plenum Press: New York, 1985; Handbook of Self-determination Research. University of Rochester Press: New York, 2002) towards predicting physical activity behaviours and outcome expectations in adult cancer survivors. Participants were cancer-survivors (N=220) and a non-cancer comparison cohort (N=220) who completed an adapted version of the Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire modified for physical activity behaviour (TSRQ-PA), an assessment of the number of minutes engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) weekly, and the anticipated outcomes expected from regular physical activity (OE). Simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that autonomous motives was the dominant predictor of OEs across both cancer and non-cancer cohorts (R(2adj)=0.29-0.43), while MVPA was predicted by autonomous (beta's ranged from 0.21 to 0.34) and controlled (beta's ranged from -0.04 to -0.23) motives after controlling for demographic considerations. Cancer status (cancer versus no cancer) did not moderate the motivation-physical activity relationship. Collectively, these findings suggest that the distinction between autonomous and controlled motives is useful and compliments a growing body of evidence supporting SDT as a framework for understanding motivational processes in physical activity contexts with cancer survivors.

  17. Cardio-Oncology - A new subspecialty with collaboration at its heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arjun K; Walker, J Malcolm

    Cardio-Oncology is the care of cancer patients with cardiovascular disease, overt or occult, already established or acquired during treatment. Cancer patients can present with a variety of cardiovascular problems not all of which are directly related to cancer therapy (medications or radiotherapy). The cardiovascular problems of oncology patients can range from ischaemia to arrhythmias and can also include valve problems and heart failure. As such, within cardiology, teamwork is required with members of different cardiology subspecialties. The way forward will be to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to produce optimal individual care. Close collaboration between cardiology and oncology specialists in a Cardio-Oncology setting can make this happen. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Impact of physical activity in group versus individual physical activity on fatigue in patients with breast cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, Christine; Filion, Myriam; Brien, Marie-Chantale; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Laflamme, Christian; Lemieux, Julie

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity improves the quality of life of cancer survivors, but whether there is a difference between individual vs. group physical activity is unknown. To compare fatigue at 12 weeks in breast cancer survivors after participation in a program of group vs. individual video-assisted physical activity. This was a randomized phase II pilot study carried out in breast cancer survivors at a tertiary breast cancer center. Eligible patients were randomized to individual or group 12-week physical activity program. The primary outcome was fatigue (FACT-F). Aerobic capacity (6-min walk test), muscular strength, and quality-of-life (FACT-G and FACT-B) were assessed. Because of poor accrual, 200 consecutive breast cancer patients were surveyed about their physical activity habits to assess reasons for low recruitment. For all participants (n = 26; n = 12 for group vs. n = 14 for individual), there were some improvement in FACT-F, FACT-G, FACT-B, physical activity level, aerobic capacity, and shoulder strength. Among the 200 patients surveyed, 58% were interested to increase their physical activity level, 15% declared that they were already exercising enough, 9% declared being unable to, 3% declared having no time, and 2% declared having no interest, and other reasons (13%). Among the 200 patients surveyed, 25% preferred in group, 57% preferred alone, and 18% had no preference. Low recruitment precluded conclusions about the efficacy of physical activity practiced in group vs. individually, but both groups derived a benefit. Low willingness to change exercising habits could be the biggest barrier to physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Collaborative filtering for brain-computer interaction using transfer learning and active class selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongrui; Lance, Brent J; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction (BCI) and physiological computing are terms that refer to using processed neural or physiological signals to influence human interaction with computers, environment, and each other. A major challenge in developing these systems arises from the large individual differences typically seen in the neural/physiological responses. As a result, many researchers use individually-trained recognition algorithms to process this data. In order to minimize time, cost, and barriers to use, there is a need to minimize the amount of individual training data required, or equivalently, to increase the recognition accuracy without increasing the number of user-specific training samples. One promising method for achieving this is collaborative filtering, which combines training data from the individual subject with additional training data from other, similar subjects. This paper describes a successful application of a collaborative filtering approach intended for a BCI system. This approach is based on transfer learning (TL), active class selection (ACS), and a mean squared difference user-similarity heuristic. The resulting BCI system uses neural and physiological signals for automatic task difficulty recognition. TL improves the learning performance by combining a small number of user-specific training samples with a large number of auxiliary training samples from other similar subjects. ACS optimally selects the classes to generate user-specific training samples. Experimental results on 18 subjects, using both k nearest neighbors and support vector machine classifiers, demonstrate that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the number of user-specific training data samples. This collaborative filtering approach will also be generalizable to handling individual differences in many other applications that involve human neural or physiological data, such as affective computing.

  20. Collaborative filtering for brain-computer interaction using transfer learning and active class selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongrui Wu

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interaction (BCI and physiological computing are terms that refer to using processed neural or physiological signals to influence human interaction with computers, environment, and each other. A major challenge in developing these systems arises from the large individual differences typically seen in the neural/physiological responses. As a result, many researchers use individually-trained recognition algorithms to process this data. In order to minimize time, cost, and barriers to use, there is a need to minimize the amount of individual training data required, or equivalently, to increase the recognition accuracy without increasing the number of user-specific training samples. One promising method for achieving this is collaborative filtering, which combines training data from the individual subject with additional training data from other, similar subjects. This paper describes a successful application of a collaborative filtering approach intended for a BCI system. This approach is based on transfer learning (TL, active class selection (ACS, and a mean squared difference user-similarity heuristic. The resulting BCI system uses neural and physiological signals for automatic task difficulty recognition. TL improves the learning performance by combining a small number of user-specific training samples with a large number of auxiliary training samples from other similar subjects. ACS optimally selects the classes to generate user-specific training samples. Experimental results on 18 subjects, using both k nearest neighbors and support vector machine classifiers, demonstrate that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the number of user-specific training data samples. This collaborative filtering approach will also be generalizable to handling individual differences in many other applications that involve human neural or physiological data, such as affective computing.

  1. Implementing Child-focused Activity Meter Utilization into the Elementary School Classroom Setting Using a Collaborative Community-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, B A; Jones, A; Biggs, B K; Kaufman, T; Cristiani, V; Kumar, S; Quigg, S; Maxson, J; Swenson, L; Jacobson, N

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased over the past 3 decades and is a pressing public health program. New technology advancements that can encourage more physical in children are needed. The Zamzee program is an activity meter linked to a motivational website designed for children 8-14 years of age. The objective of the study was to use a collaborative approach between a medical center, the private sector and local school staff to assess the feasibility of using the Zamzee Program in the school-based setting to improve physical activity levels in children. This was a pilot 8-week observational study offered to all children in one fifth grade classroom. Body mass index (BMI), the amount of physical activity by 3-day recall survey, and satisfaction with usability of the Zamzee Program were measured pre- and post-study. Out of 11 children who enrolled in the study, 7 completed all study activities. In those who completed the study, the median (interquartile range) total activity time by survey increased by 17 (1042) minutes and the BMI percentile change was 0 (8). Both children and their caregivers found the Zamzee Activity Meter (6/7) and website (6/7) "very easy" or "easy" to use. The Zamzee Program was found to be usable but did not significantly improve physical activity levels or BMI. Collaborative obesity intervention projects involving medical centers, the private sector and local schools are feasible but the effectiveness needs to be evaluated in larger-scale studies.

  2. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... localities of tourism Greg Richards 11.Collaborative economy and destination marketing organizations: A systems approach Jonathan Day 12.Working within the Collaborative Tourist Economy: The complex crafting of work and meaning Jane Widtfeldt Meged and Mathilde Dissing Christensen PART - III Encounters...

  3. Computer-supported collaborative decision-making

    CERN Document Server

    Filip, Florin Gheorghe; Ciurea, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    This is a book about how management and control decisions are made by persons who collaborate and possibly use the support of an information system. The decision is the result of human conscious activities aiming at choosing a course of action for attaining a certain objective (or a set of objectives). The act of collaboration implies that several entities who work together and share responsibilities to jointly plan, implement and evaluate a program of activities to achieve the common goals. The book is intended to present a balanced view of the domain to include both well-established concepts and a selection of new results in the domains of methods and key technologies. It is meant to answer several questions, such as: a) “How are evolving the business models towards the ever more collaborative schemes?”; b) “What is the role of the decision-maker in the new context?” c) “What are the basic attributes and trends in the domain of decision-supporting information systems?”; d) “Which are the basic...

  4. Obtaining informedness in collaborative networks through automated information provisioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thimm, Heiko; Rasmussen, Karsten Boye

    2013-01-01

    Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network. The importa......Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network...... provisioning service. This article presents a corresponding modelling framework and a rule-based approach for the active system capabilities required. Details of a prototype implementation building on concepts of the research area of active databases are also reported....

  5. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, Z.I.; Sang, Q.A.; Sahab, Z.J.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome

  6. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  7. Mitotically Active Leiomyoma of the Uterus in a Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patient Receiving Tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Feng Liu

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Endometrial cancer is rarely noted in breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen. Further, none have reported mitotically active leiomyoma of the uterus. From this case, endometrial proliferation and mitotically active leiomyoma of the uterus may be related to tamoxifen therapy, and should not be neglected in breast cancer patients.

  8. Evaluation of coexistence of cancer and active tuberculosis; 16 case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Çakar

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is an important risk factor for cancer. Pulmonary TB and lung cancer(LC may mimic each other especially in the aspect of the clinical and radiological features. The aim of the study was to evaluate the features and risk factors of cases with coexistence cancer and active TB. Methodology: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with coexisting TB and cancer a period from 2009 to 2014. We evaluated demographic data, the ways diagnosis of TB cases, the location of TB and cancer, TB treatment results of the cases. Results: We recorded 374 TB cases in our dyspensary at this study period. In 16 (4% of these cases, a coexistence of cancer and TB was detected. The male/female ratio was 12/4. The mean age was 62,12 ± 15,13 years. There were TST results except three cases. There were ten pulmonary TB and six extra-pulmonary TB (four peripheral lymphadenopathy TB, one abdominal TB lymphadenopathy and one salivary gland TB. Cancer types were as follows; eight lung cancer, two breast cancer, one base of tongue, one endometrium cancer, one hypopharyngeal cancer, one stomach cancer, one bladder cancer and one maxillary cancer. Diagnosis of all cases was confirmed by bacteriologic and/or histopathological examination. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common type of cancers. This rate was 9/16. All TB cases were new. There were risk factors out of two case in the cases. Five cases were died during TB treatment. Others completed TB treatment without any complication. Conclusions: In our study, the coexistence of LC and pulmonary TB was more common. The local immunity is deteriorated in cancer cases. If there is pulmonary infiltrates in lung or peripheral lymphadenopathy, we must search tuberculosis too out of metastatic lesion and other infectious diseases. We should not make delay in the diagnosis of active TB in cancer cases. Keywords: Coexistent, Cancer, Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis treatment

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of pu...

  10. Designing flexible instructional space for teaching introductory physics with emphasis on inquiry and collaborative active learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Tikhon

    2010-03-01

    In recent years McMurry University's introductory physics curriculum has gone through a series of significant changes to achieve better integration of traditional course components (lecture/lab/discussion) by means of instructional design and technology. A system of flexible curriculum modules with emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and collaborative active learning has been introduced. To unify module elements, a technology suite has been used that consists of Tablet PC's and software applications including Physlets, tablet-adapted personal response system, PASCO data acquisition systems, and MS One-note collaborative writing software. Adoption of the new teaching model resulted in reevaluation of existing instructional spaces. The new teaching space will be created during the renovation of the McMurry Science Building. This space will allow for easy transitions between lecture and laboratory modes. Movable partitions will be used to accommodate student groups of different sizes. The space will be supportive of small peer-group activities with easy-to-reconfigure furniture, multiple white and black board surfaces and multiple projection screens. The new space will be highly flexible to account for different teaching functions, different teaching modes and learning styles.

  11. Collaborative Learning at Engineering Universities: Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Olga V. Sumtsova; Tatiana Yu. Aikina; Liudmila M. Bolsunovskaya; Chris Phillips; Olga M. Zubkova; Peter J. Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns the cutting edge educational approaches incorporated into syllabuses of the most progressive Russian higher technical schools. The authors discuss one of the active methods in teaching foreign languages – collaborative learning implemented in e-courses. Theoretical and historical aspects of this approach are addressed, as are its suitability for engineering education and possible ways of introducing collaborative learning into e-courses. Collaborative learning technology o...

  12. Anti-cancer activity of tectona hamiltoniana-an endemic plant of Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mya, K.M.; Shyaula, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The ethanolic extracts of barks and leaves of Tectona hamiltoniana (Verbenaceae) were tested for anti-cancer activity against MCF-7 (Human breast cancer) and NCI-H460 (Lung cancer) cell lines employing sulpho rhodamine B (SRB) bioassay. These extracts demonstrated cytotoxicity with GI/sub 50/ values ranging between 24-33 macro g/mL against both cell lines. Upon further fractionation, dichloromethane fraction appeared to be most active against the MCF-7 cell line (GI/sub 50/ value of 3.4+-0.9 macro g/mL) leading to the isolation of lupane type triterpenoids, betulinic acid (1), betulin aldehyde ( 2 ) and betulin (3). Compound 2 and 3, both showed significant cytotoxic effect against both cancerous cell lines (GI/sub 50/ value range 6-11 macro M). (author)

  13. Mediated transitions between CPD-activities & teaching and collaboration at local schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    sampling: school size, town/rural etc.). Likert-scale questions were analysed by frequency, and open-ended reflections, and the qualitative data, were categorized/coded through an iterative data based process (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2007). To answer the first two research questions teachers’ reports...... methods (Creswell & Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were retrieved during and after each of the course-modules. One part of data was a repeated questionnaire with 5 point Likert-scale questions and open-ended categories focused on teachers’ experiences from the seminars, from trials in own...... classrooms, and from collaborative activities at their schools. Qualitative data also included observations at the seminar days, interviews with students, teachers and school leaders at the local schools, observation from PLC-meetings, and repeated observations in classrooms at five schools (diversity...

  14. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring Collaborative Reverse Subtitling for the Enhancement of Written Production Activities in English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaván, Noa; Ibáñez, Ana; Bárcena, Elena

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the effects of collaborative reverse subtitling as an activity for the promotion of writing skills in English as a second language. An initial analysis is undertaken of the pros and cons of the role of translation in second language learning historically and the role of information and communication technology in this…

  16. Parameters of biological activity in colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Š.; Topolčan, O.; Holubec jr., L.; Levý, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Svačina, Š.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2011), s. 373-378 ISSN 0250-7005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : colorectal cancer * biological activity * prognosis * tumor markers * angiogenetic factors * metalloproteinases * adhesion molecules Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  17. Overlapping activities of TGF-β and Hedgehog signaling in cancer: therapeutic targets for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Carole Y; Javelaud, Delphine; Mauviel, Alain

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of cancer therapeutics come from the development of drugs that specifically recognize validated oncogenic or pro-metastatic targets. The latter may be mutated proteins with altered function, such as kinases that become constitutively active, or critical components of growth factor signaling pathways, whose deregulation leads to aberrant malignant cell proliferation and dissemination to metastatic sites. We herein focus on the description of the overlapping activities of two important developmental pathways often exacerbated in cancer, namely Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) and Hedgehog (HH) signaling, with a special emphasis on the unifying oncogenic role played by GLI1/2 transcription factors. The latter are the main effectors of the canonical HH pathway, yet are direct target genes of TGF-β/SMAD signal transduction. While tumor-suppressor in healthy and pre-malignant tissues, TGF-β is often expressed at high levels in tumors and contributes to tumor growth, escape from immune surveillance, invasion and metastasis. HH signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and aberrant HH signaling is found in a variety of cancers. We discuss the current knowledge on HH and TGF-β implication in cancer including cancer stem cell biology, as well as the current state, both successes and failures, of targeted therapeutics aimed at blocking either of these pathways in the pre-clinical and clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PARP-1 and PARP-2 activity in cancer-induced cachexia: potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2018-01-26

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction and mass loss is a characteristic feature in patients with chronic diseases including cancer and acute conditions such as critical illness. Maintenance of an adequate muscle mass is crucial for the patients' prognosis irrespective of the underlying condition. Moreover, aging-related sarcopenia may further aggravate the muscle wasting process associated with chronic diseases and cancer. Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation has been demonstrated to contribute to the pathophysiology of muscle mass loss and dysfunction in animal models of cancer-induced cachexia. Genetic inhibition of PARP activity attenuated the deleterious effects seen on depleted muscles in mouse models of oncologic cachexia. In the present minireview the mechanisms whereby PARP activity inhibition may improve muscle mass and performance in models of cancer-induced cachexia are discussed. Specifically, the beneficial effects of inhibition of PARP activity on attenuation of increased oxidative stress, protein catabolism, poor muscle anabolism and mitochondrial content and epigenetic modulation of muscle phenotype are reviewed in this article. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies of pharmacological PARP activity inhibition for the treatment of cancer-induced cachexia are also being described in this review.

  19. Metformin blocks progression of obesity-activated thyroid cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Won Gu; Zhao, Li; Enomoto, Keisuke; Willingham, Mark; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-06-07

    Compelling epidemiologic evidence indicates that obesity is associated with a high risk of human malignancies, including thyroid cancer. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet (HFD) effectively induces the obese phenotype in a mouse model of aggressive follicular thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PVPten+/-mice). We showed that HFD promotes cancer progression through aberrant activation of the leptin-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway. HFD-promoted thyroid cancer progression allowed us to test other molecular targets for therapeutic opportunity for obesity-induced thyroid cancer. Metformin is a widely used drug to treat patients with type II diabetes. It has been shown to reduce incidences of neoplastic diseases and cancer mortality in type II diabetes patients. The present study aimed to test whether metformin could be a therapeutic for obesity-activated thyroid cancer. ThrbPV/PVPten+/-mice were fed HFD together with metformin or vehicle-only, as controls, for 20 weeks. While HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/-mice had shorter survival than LFD-treated mice, metformin had no effects on the survival of HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/-mice. Remarkably, metformin markedly decreased occurrence of capsular invasion and completely blocked vascular invasion and anaplasia in HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/-mice without affecting thyroid tumor growth. The impeded cancer progression was due to the inhibitory effect of metformin on STAT3-ERK-vimentin and fibronectin-integrin signaling to decrease tumor cell invasion and de-differentiation. The present studies provide additional molecular evidence to support the link between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Importantly, our findings suggest that metformin could be used as an adjuvant in combination with antiproliferative modalities to improve the outcome of patients with obesity-activated thyroid cancer.

  20. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Delogu, Giuseppe [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Capobianco, Giampiero [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Farace, Cristiano [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Madeddu, Roberto [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Rome (Italy); Olivero, Martina [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Di Renzo, Maria Flavia, E-mail: mariaflavia.direnzo@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  1. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-01-01

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT

  2. Integrative exercise and lifestyle intervention increases leisure-time activity in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casla, Soraya; Hojman, Pernille; Cubedo, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity has been demonstrated to increase survival in breast cancer patients, but few breast cancer patients meet the general recommendations for physical activity. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if a supervised integrated counseling and group-based exercise...... program could increase leisure-time activity in women with breast cancer. METHODS: This pilot project, designed as a single-arm study with pre-post testing, consisted of 24 classes of combined aerobic and strength exercise training as well as classes on dietary and health behavior. A total of 48 women...... with breast cancer who were undergoing or had recently completed anticancer treatment completed the study. Leisure-time physical activity, grip strength, functional capacity, quality of life (QoL), and depression were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at the 12-week follow-up after intervention...

  3. Physical activity and cancer prevention: awareness and meeting the recommendations among adult Saudis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al-Hammam, Abudllah Mohammed; AlMulhim, Nasser Abdullah; Al-Hayan, Mohammed Ibrahim; Al-Mulhim, Mona Mohammed; Al-Mosabeh, Modhahir Jawad; Al-Subaie, Mohammed Ali; Al-Hmmad, Qassem Ahmed; Al-Omran, Ahmed Adi

    2014-01-01

    There is a scarcity of information about the proportion of the adult Saudi population that meet the recommended guidelines of physical activity (PA) to reduce cancer risk. Moreover, their awareness about the role of PA in cancer prevention is unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating the proportion of adult Saudis meeting the PA guidelines, specifically those recommended by American Cancer Society (ACS) for cancer prevention, and to assess the public awareness about the role of PA in cancer prevention. Using a multistage sampling method, 2,127 adult Saudis of both genders were recruited from 6 urban and 4 rural primary health care centers in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Participants were personally interviewed to gather information about their sociodemographic characteristics, searching activity about PA and cancer, and the time spent in leisure time PA (moderate and vigorous)/week using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire with show cards. Finally, items about the role of PA in cancer risk reduction were inquired. Of the included participants, 11.6% met the recommendations for cancer prevention (≥ 45 minutes of moderate-vigorous PA activity/≥ 5 days/week or 225 minutes/week). Multivariate regression showed that being male (AOR=1.49, CI=1.09-2.06), cancer prevention. Only 11.4% of the sample indicated correctly the frequency and duration of PA required for an average adult to be physically active and while >70% of them indicated the role of PA in prevention of hypertension, coronary heart disease and lowering elevated blood cholesterol, only 18.6% and 21.7% correctly mentioned the role of PA in reducing colon and breast cancer risk, respectively. Poor knowledge was found among those with less than college education and aged ≥ 50 years. The level of knowledge was significantly positively correlated with total leisure time PA of the participants. A minority of adult Saudis in Al Hassa was aware about the role of PA in cancer prevention and

  4. Collaboration Meets Interactive Surfaces (CMIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anslow, Craig; Campos, Pedro; Grisoni, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This workshop proposes to bring together researchers who are interested in improving collaborative experiences through the combination of multiple interaction surfaces with diverse sizes and formats, ranging from large-scale walls, to tables, mobiles, and wearables. The opportunities for innovation...... exist, but the ITS, CHI, CSCW, and other HCI communities have not yet thoroughly addressed the problem of bringing effective collaboration activities together using multiple interactive surfaces, especially in complex work domains. Of particular interest is the potential synergy that one can obtain...

  5. Vav3 oncogene activates estrogen receptor and its overexpression may be involved in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kiwon; Liu, Yin; Mo, Jun Qin; Zhang, Jinsong; Dong, Zhongyun; Lu, Shan

    2008-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human prostate cancer, activates androgen receptor, and stimulates growth in prostate cancer cells. The current study is to determine a potential role of Vav3 oncogene in human breast cancer and impact on estrogen receptor a (ERα)-mediated signaling axis. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 43 breast cancer specimens and western blot analysis was used for human breast cancer cell lines to determine the expression level of Vav3 protein. The impact of Vav3 on breast cancer cell growth was determined by siRNA knockdown of Vav3 expression. The role of Vav3 in ERα activation was examined in luciferase reporter assays. Deletion mutation analysis of Vav3 protein was performed to localize the functional domain involved in ERα activation. Finally, the interaction of Vav3 and ERα was assessed by GST pull-down analysis. We found that Vav3 was overexpressed in 81% of human breast cancer specimens, particularly in poorly differentiated lesions. Vav3 activated ERα partially via PI3K-Akt signaling and stimulated growth of breast cancer cells. Vav3 also potentiated EGF activity for cell growth and ERα activation in breast cancer cells. More interestingly, we found that Vav3 complexed with ERα. Consistent with its function for AR, the DH domain of Vav3 was essential for ERα activation. Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human breast cancer. Vav3 complexes with ERα and enhances ERα activity. These findings suggest that Vav3 overexpression may aberrantly enhance ERα-mediated signaling axis and play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression

  6. Collaboration Between Childcare and Parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn Larsen, Maja

    2017-01-01

    other’s arrangements, but on the other hand, they are structurally connected and continuously interacting due to the crossover of the children’s activities. Therefore, collaboration and coordination between parents and professionals is an important part of childcare practice. Based on comprehensive...... empirical work in different Danish childcare centres, this chapter discusses how parental collaboration in the pedagogical practice is often a rather paradoxical effort, developed in relation to contradictory historical and institutional conditions and requirements to treat parents both as equal...... participants, consumers and clients. In this way, challenges and dilemmas in parental collaboration in childcare are analysed in relation to larger societal conflicts about the relation between society and citizen and the overall purpose of childcare as state institutions....

  7. Developing Collaborative Product Development Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Tran, Yen

    2012-01-01

    innovation strategies’. Our analyses suggest that developing such collaboration capabilities benefits from the search for complementary practices, the combination of learning styles, and the development of weak and strong ties. Results also underscore the crucial importance of co-evolution of multi......Collaborative product development capabilities support a company’s product innovation activities. In the context of the fast fashion sector, this paper examines the development of the product development capabilities (PDC) that align product development capabilities in a dual innovation context......, one, slow paced, where the firm is well established and the other, fast paced, which represents a new competitive arena in which the company competes. To understand the process associated with collaborative capability development, we studied three Scandinavian fashion companies pursuing ‘dual...

  8. STAT3 activation in monocytes accelerates liver cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Zhang, Chang-Le; Meng, Xiang-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an important transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in different cell types. STAT3 plays an essential role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Aberrantly hyper-activated STAT3 signaling in cancer cells and in the tumor microenvironment has been detected in a wide variety of human cancers and is considered an important factor for cancer initiation, development, and progression. However, the role of STAT3 activation in monocytes in the development of HCC has not been well understood. Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated STAT3 was performed on tissue microarray from HCC patients. Using a co-culture system in vivo, HCC cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo experiments were conducted with mice given diethylinitrosamine (DEN), which induces HCC was used to investigate the role of STAT3 expression in monocytes on tumor growth. Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression of cell proliferation and cell arrest associated genes in the tumor and nontumor tissue from liver. Phosphorylated STAT3 was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples and was expressed in tumor cells and also in monocytes. Phosphorylated STAT3 expression in monocyte was significantly correlated to advanced clinical stage of HCC and a poor prognosis. Using a co-culture system in vivo, monocytes promoted HCC cell growth via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. The STAT3 inhibitor, NSC 74859, significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo in mice with diethylinitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. In this animal model, blockade of STAT3 with NSC 74859 induced tumor cell apoptosis, while inhibiting both tumor cells and monocytes proliferation. Furthermore, NSC 74859 treatment suppressed cancer associated inflammation in DEN-induce HCC. Our data suggest constitutively activated STAT3 monocytes promote liver tumorigenesis in clinical patients and animal experiments. Thus, STAT3 in tumor

  9. Community-Academic Partnership to implement a Breast and Cervical Cancer screening education program in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-López, Vivian; González, Daisy; Vélez, Camille; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Soler, Alana Feldman; Escobar, Kelly Ayala; Ayala-Marín, Alelí M.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Calo, William A.; Aragón, Angela Pattatucci; Rivera-Díaz, Marinilda; Fernández, María E.

    2018-01-01

    Objective To describe how a community-academic partnership between Taller Salud Inc., a community-based organization, and the Puerto Rico Community Cancer Control Outreach Program of the University of Puerto Rico was crucial in the adaptation and implementation of Cultivando La Salud (CLS), an evidence-based educational outreach program designed to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Hispanic women living in Puerto Rico. This collaboration facilitated the review and adaptation of the CLS intervention to improve cultural appropriateness, relevance, and acceptability for Puerto Rican women. Methods A total of 25 interviewers and 12 Lay Health Workers (LHWs) were recruited and trained to deliver the program. The interviewers recruited women who were non-adherent to recommended screening guidelines for both breast and cervical cancer. LHWs then provided one-on-one education using the adapted CLS materials. Results A total of 444 women were recruited and 48% of them were educated through this collaborative effort. Conclusions Our main accomplishment was establishing the academic-community partnership to implement the CLS program. Nevertheless, in order to promote better collaborations with our community partners, it is important to carefully delineate and establish clear roles and shared responsibilities for each partner for the successful execution of research activities, taking into consideration the community’s needs. PMID:29220062

  10. Community-Academic Partnership to Implement a Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Education Program in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-López, Vivian; González, Daisy; Vélez, Camille; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Feldman-Soler, Alana; Ayala-Escobar, Kelly; Ayala-Marín, Alelí M; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Calo, William A; Pattatucci-Aragón, Angela; Rivera-Díaz, Marinilda; Fernández, María E

    2017-12-01

    To describe how a community-academic partnership between Taller Salud Inc., a community-based organization, and the Puerto Rico Community Cancer Control Outreach Program of the University of Puerto Rico was crucial in the adaptation and implementation of Cultivando La Salud (CLS), an evidencebased educational outreach program designed to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Hispanic women living in Puerto Rico. This collaboration facilitated the review and adaptation of the CLS intervention to improve cultural appropriateness, relevance, and acceptability for Puerto Rican women. A total of 25 interviewers and 12 Lay Health Workers (LHWs) were recruited and trained to deliver the program. The interviewers recruited women who were non-adherent to recommended screening guidelines for both breast and cervical cancer. LHWs then provided one-on-one education using the adapted CLS materials. A total of 444 women were recruited and 48% of them were educated through this collaborative effort. Our main accomplishment was establishing the academic-community partnership to implement the CLS program. Nevertheless, in order to promote better collaborations with our community partners, it is important to carefully delineate and establish clear roles and shared responsibilities for each partner for the successful execution of research activities, taking into consideration the community's needs.

  11. Empowering underserved populations through cancer prevention and early detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Colón, Venessa; Ramos, Roberto; Davis, Jenna L; Escobar, Myriam; Inda, Nikki Ross; Paige, Linda; Palencia, Jeannette; Vives, Maria; Grant, Cathy G; Green, B Lee

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that cancer is disproportionately distributed in racial/ethnic minority groups and medically underserved communities. In addition, cancer prevention and early detection represent the key defenses to combat cancer. The purpose of this article is to showcase the comprehensive health education and community outreach activities at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute (Moffitt) designed to promote and increase access to and utilization of prevention and early detection services among underserved populations. One of Moffitt's most important conduits for cancer prevention and early detection among underserved populations is through its community education and outreach initiatives, in particular, the Moffitt Program for Outreach Wellness Education and Resources (M-POWER). M-POWER works to empower underserved populations to make positive health choices and increase screening behaviors through strengthening collaboration and partnerships, providing community-based health education/promotion, and increasing access to care. Effective, empowering, and culturally and linguistically competent health education and community outreach, is key to opening the often impenetrable doors of cancer prevention and early detection to this society's most vulnerable populations.

  12. The main activities and scientific collaboration possibilities at Ankara Nuclear research and training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, H.; Turhan, S.; Zararsiz, A.; Oksuz, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Founded in 1964, Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (ANRTC) conducts and facilitates the scientific activities including training (summer practice, MSc and Ph D studies in physics and chemistry, IAEA fellowship programs etc.), research and other studies in nuclear and related fields. As it's a part of main duties, ANRTC has analysis on the variety of samples, and radiation protection services commercially, for radiation workers in state, public and private sectors. Research, development and application projects implemented in this Center have mostly been supported by State Planning Organization (SPO) and Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA). In addition to the projects there are on going collaborative studies with some national Universities and International Atomic Energy Agency. The main activities carried out in ANRTC can be summarized as: studies on experimental nuclear physics, application of nuclear techniques such as XRF, XRD, Gamma, Alpha, etc. for environmental pollutants, archaeological and geological dating, elemental and crystal structural analyses, studies on the detection of irradiated foodstuff by ESR, development of accident dosimeters to be used in the case of a nuclear or radiological accident, and radiation matter interaction studies. In near future, for young scientists, there will be new collaboration possibilities related to accelerator-based applications, especially the new production methods of radioisotopes and their radiopharmaceuticals by using a cyclotron when our 30 MeV p / 15MeV d cyclotron facility project is underway

  13. Diet and physical activity in relation to weight change among breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaw, Yong Heng; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Weay, Yong Heng; Saibul, Nurfaizah; Sariman, Sarina; Hashim, Zailina

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide an overview of lifestyle changes after breast cancer diagnosis and to examine the relationship between dietary and physical activity changes with weight changes in breast cancer patients. Women with breast carcinomas (n=368) were recruited from eight hospitals and four breast cancer support groups in peninsular Malaysia. Dietary and physical activity changes were measured from a year preceding breast cancer diagnosis to study entry. Mean duration since diagnosis was 4.86±3.46 years. Dietary changes showed that majority of the respondents had decreased their intake of high fat foods (18.8-65.5%), added fat foods (28.3-48.9%), low fat foods (46.8-80.7%), red meat (39.7%), pork and poultry (20.1-39.7%) and high sugar foods (42.1-60.9%) but increased their intake of fish (42.7%), fruits and vegetables (62.8%) and whole grains (28.5%). Intake of other food groups remained unchanged. Only a small percentage of the women (22.6%) had increased their physical activity since diagnosis where most of them (16.0%) had increased recreational activities. Age at diagnosis (β= -0.20, p= 0.001), and change in whole grain (β= -0.15, p= 0.003) and fish intakes (β= 0.13, p= 0.013) were associated with weight changes after breast cancer diagnosis. In summary, the majority of the women with breast cancer had changed their diets to a healthier one. However, many did not increase their physical activity levels which could improve their health and lower risk of breast cancer recurrence.

  14. Designing for Transformations in Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Thomsen, Anders Bo

    2005-01-01

    Transformations in collaborative work due to the introduction of new technology are inevitable, but are often difficult to study. In this paper, we consider the patterns of transformation that are seen in a patient-physician relationship based on the introduction of homecare monitoring equipment....... We report findings from interviews and fieldwork with patients and physicians participating in a clinical experiment of homecare monitoring. By studying both the group of patients who receive homecare-based treatment and the control group we were able to identify transformations in the collaborative...... activity as caused by the homecare monitoring technology. We apply activity theory as a theoretical basis for this analysis. We consider the implications of these findings for the design of pervasive health monitoring technologies....

  15. International collaboration on inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    Science and technology transcend economic and political ideologies, providing a means of communications and approach common to both the United States and the Soviet Union. This paper suggests that the field of nuclear fission is a logical and productive area for superpower and broader collaboration, but that the kind of collaboration characteristic of past and present activity is less than it optimally could be. The case for cost sharing is compelling with budget constraints and mounting concerns over global warming. The case for collaboration is based on economic, psychological, and political grounds. A collaborative effort in nuclear fission is presented as a near term effort by building and testing of a prototype reactor in the 1990s

  16. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 interacts with and activates TGFβ-activated kinase 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and NFκB signaling in multiple myeloma and bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Salazar

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major public health problem worldwide. In the United States alone, 1 in 4 deaths is due to cancer and for 2013 a total of 1,660,290 new cancer cases and 580,350 cancer-related deaths are projected. Comprehensive profiling of multiple cancer genomes has revealed a highly complex genetic landscape in which a large number of altered genes, varying from tumor to tumor, impact core biological pathways and processes. This has implications for therapeutic targeting of signaling networks in the development of treatments for specific cancers. The NFκB transcription factor is constitutively active in a number of hematologic and solid tumors, and many signaling pathways implicated in cancer are likely connected to NFκB activation. A critical mediator of NFκB activity is TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1. Here, we identify TAK1 as a novel interacting protein and target of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 tyrosine kinase activity. We further demonstrate that activating mutations in FGFR3 associated with both multiple myeloma and bladder cancer can modulate expression of genes that regulate NFκB signaling, and promote both NFκB transcriptional activity and cell adhesion in a manner dependent on TAK1 expression in both cancer cell types. Our findings suggest TAK1 as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-associated cancers, and other malignancies in which TAK1 contributes to constitutive NFκB activation.

  17. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation correlates with better prognosis and Akt activation in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Lan; Lee, Hye Seung; Jung, Jieun; Cho, Sung Jin; Chung, Hee-Yong; Kim, Woo Ho; Jin, Young-Woo; Kim, Chong Soon; Nam, Seon Young

    2005-04-01

    Because the biological significance of constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in human gastric cancer is unclear, we undertook this study to clarify the regulatory mechanism of NF-kappaB activation and its clinical significance. Immunohistochemistry for NF-kappaB/RelA was done on 290 human gastric carcinoma specimens placed on tissue array slides. The correlations between NF-kappaB activation and clinicopathologic features, prognosis, Akt activation, tumor suppressor gene expression, or Bcl-2 expression were analyzed. We also did luciferase reporter assay, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-PCR using the SNU-216 human gastric cancer cell line transduced with retroviral vectors containing constitutively active Akt or the NF-kappaB repressor mutant of IkappaBalpha. Nuclear expression of RelA was found in 18% of the gastric carcinomas and was higher in early-stage pathologic tumor-node-metastasis (P = 0.019). A negative correlation was observed between NF-kappaB activation and lymphatic invasion (P = 0.034) and a positive correlation between NF-kappaB activation and overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients (P = 0.0228). In addition, NF-kappaB activation was positively correlated with pAkt (P = 0.047), p16 (P = 0.004), adenomatous polyposis coli (P Smad4 (P = 0.002), and kangai 1 (P Akt. NF-kappaB activation was frequently observed in early-stage gastric carcinoma and was significantly correlated with better prognosis and Akt activation. These findings suggest that NF-kappaB activation is a valuable prognostic variable in gastric carcinoma.

  18. Is There a Relationship between the Usage of Active and Collaborative Learning Techniques and International Students' Study Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshlessan, Rezvan

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the relationships between the international students' perception of professors' instructional practices (the usage of active and collaborative learning techniques in class) and the international students' study anxiety. The dominant goal of this research was to investigate whether the professors' usage of active…

  19. Active smoking and risk of breast cancer in a Danish nurse cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Grøn, Randi; Brauner, Elvira Vaclavik; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2017-08-22

    No scientific consensus has been reached on whether active tobacco smoking causes breast cancer. We examine the association between active smoking and breast cancer risk in Denmark, which has some of the highest smoking and breast cancer rates in women worldwide. We used the data from a nationwide Danish Nurse Cohort on 21,867 female nurses (age > 44 years) who at recruitment in 1993 or 1999 reported information on smoking status, onset, duration, and intensity, as well as breast cancer risk factors. We obtained data on incidence of breast cancer from Danish Cancer Registry until 2013, and used Cox regression models to analyze the association between smoking and breast cancer. Of 21,831 women (mean age 53.2 years) 1162 developed breast cancer during 15.7 years of follow-up. 33.7% of nurses were current and 30.0% former smokers at cohort baseline. Compared to never smokers, we found increased risk of breast cancer of 18% in ever (hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval: 1.18; 1.04-1.34) and 27% in current (1.27; 1.11-1.46) smokers. We detected a dose-response relationship with smoking intensity with the highest breast cancer risk in women smoking >15 g/day (1.31; 1.11-1.56) or >20 pack-years (1.32; 1.12-1.55). Parous women who smoked heavily (>10 pack-years) before first childbirth had the highest risk of breast cancer (1.58; 1.20-2.10). Association between smoking and breast cancer was not modified by menopausal status, obesity, alcohol or hormone therapy use, and seemed to be limited to the estrogen receptor positive breast cancer subtype. Active smoking increases risk of breast cancer, with smoking before first birth being the most relevant exposure window.

  20. Beehive: A Software Application for Synchronous Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turani, Aiman; Calvo, Rafael A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe Beehive, a new web application framework for designing and supporting synchronous collaborative learning. Design/methodology/approach: Our web engineering approach integrates educational design expertise into a technology for building tools for collaborative learning activities. Beehive simplifies…

  1. Best Collaborative Publication Announced during Spring Research Festival Week | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The winner of the 2012 competition for the best collaborative publication was announced on May 7, as part of the lead-up to the Spring Research Festival sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) and the National Cancer Institute at Frederick on May 8 and 9.

  2. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Data from 8 breast cancer genome-sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized 13 HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture, and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGF receptor (EGFR) exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings show that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. We show that the majority of HER2 somatic mutations in breast cancer patients are activating mutations that likely drive tumorigenesis. Several patients had mutations that are resistant to the reversible HER2 inhibitor lapatinib, but are sensitive to the irreversible HER2 inhibitor, neratinib. Our results suggest that patients with HER2 mutation–positive breast cancers could benefit from existing HER2-targeted drugs.

  3. Semi-synthetic salinomycin analogs exert cytotoxic activity against human colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Johannes; Kattner, Sarah; Borgström, Björn; Volz, Claudia; Schmidt, Thomas; Schneider, Martin; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel; Ulrich, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, is a well-known inhibitor of human cancer stem cells. Chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin has enabled access to synthetic analogs that display increased cytotoxic activity compared to the native structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of a cohort of C20-O-acyl analogs of salinomycin on human colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro. Two human colorectal cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620) were exposed to three C20-O-acylated analogs and salinomycin. The impact of salinomycin and its analogs on tumor cell number, migration, cell death, and cancer stem cell specifity was analyzed. Exposure of human colorectal cancer cells to the C20-O-acylated analogs of salinomycin resulted in reduced tumor cell number and impaired tumor cell migration at lower concentrations than salinomycin. When used at higher (micromolar) concentrations, these effects were accompanied by induction of apoptotic cell death. Salinomycin analogs further expose improved activity against cancer stem cells compared to salinomycin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  5. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  6. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  7. New Epigenetic Therapeutic Intervention for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China...Foundation 2016 NIH - New Innovator Award 2017 NIH - “ Cancer Drug Development & Therapeutics” (CDDT) 2017 NIH/NIAID - Special Emphasis Panel...Chemistry 2011 - Editor, Cancer Reports, Pancreatic Disorders & Therapy 2015 - Associate Editor, Molecular and Cellular Oncology (sections of

  8. A Quality Improvement Initiative to Increase Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening: Collaboration between a Primary Care Clinic and Research Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Beverly B; Fuller, Sharon; Anderson, Melissa L; Mahoney, Christine; Mendy, Peter; Powell, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that mailed fecal testing programs are effective in increasing colorectal cancer screening participation. However, few healthcare organization in the US have Implemented such programs. Stakeholders from one clinic in an integrated healthcare system in Washington State initiated collaboration with researchers with expertise in CRC screening, aiming to increase screening rates at their clinic. Age-eligible individuals who were overdue for CRC screening and had previously completed a fecal test were randomized to receive mailed fecal immunochemical test kits (FIT) at the start of the project (Early) or 6 months later (Late). Outcomes included comparing FIT completion at 6 months by randomization group, and overall CRC screening rates at 12 months. We also assessed implementation facilitators and challenges. Overall 2,421 FIT tests were mailed at a cost of $10,739. At 6 months, FIT completion was significantly higher among the Early compared to the Late group (62% vs.47%, p CRC screening rate was 75.1% at baseline and 78.0% 12 months later. Key constructs associated with successful program implementation included strong stakeholder involvement, use of evidence-based strategies, simplicity, and low cost. Challenges included lack of a plan for maintaining the program. Collaboration between clinic stakeholders and researchers led to a successful project that rapidly increased CRC screening rates. However, institutional normalization of the program would be required to maintain it.

  9. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key

  10. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...; Development of Molecular Diagnostics Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: February 15, 2011. Time... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Collaborative Research in Integrative Cancer Biology and the Tumor... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  11. Rectal cancer : developments in multidisciplinary treatment, quality control and European collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, Willem van

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, treatment of rectal cancer has considerably improved in Europe. Although this applies to most solid malignancies, improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer surpass virtually all others. In the early 1990s, outcome after rectal cancer treatment was poor,

  12. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE 2 . ► The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. ► Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. ► Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  13. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  14. A STING-activating nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Min; Wang, Hua; Wang, Zhaohui; Cai, Haocheng; Lu, Zhigang; Li, Yang; Du, Mingjian; Huang, Gang; Wang, Chensu; Chen, Xiang; Porembka, Matthew R.; Lea, Jayanthi; Frankel, Arthur E.; Fu, Yang-Xin; Chen, Zhijian J.; Gao, Jinming

    2017-07-01

    The generation of tumour-specific T cells is critically important for cancer immunotherapy. A major challenge in achieving a robust T-cell response is the spatiotemporal orchestration of antigen cross-presentation in antigen-presenting cells with innate stimulation. Here, we report a minimalist nanovaccine, comprising a simple physical mixture of an antigen and a synthetic polymeric nanoparticle, PC7A NP, which generates a strong cytotoxic T-cell response with low systemic cytokine expression. Mechanistically, the PC7A NP achieves efficient cytosolic delivery of tumour antigens to antigen-presenting cells in draining lymph nodes, leading to increased surface presentation while simultaneously activating type I interferon-stimulated genes. This effect is dependent on stimulator of interferon genes (STING), but not the Toll-like receptor or the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) pathway. The nanovaccine led to potent tumour growth inhibition in melanoma, colon cancer and human papilloma virus-E6/E7 tumour models. The combination of the PC7A nanovaccine and an anti-PD-1 antibody showed great synergy, with 100% survival over 60 days in a TC-1 tumour model. Rechallenging of these tumour-free animals with TC-1 cells led to complete inhibition of tumour growth, suggesting the generation of long-term antitumour memory. The STING-activating nanovaccine offers a simple, safe and robust strategy in boosting anti-tumour immunity for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  16. Increased activity of the mannan-binding lectin complement activation pathway in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Christensen, I J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative bacterial infectious complications are frequent in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), with subsequent increased recurrence rates and poor prognosis. Deficiency of the mannan-binding lectin (MBL) complement activation pathway may cause increased risk of infection......: Serum MBL concentrations and MBL/MASP activity were determined using immunofluorometric assays. The levels are presented as the median, inter-quartile range and range. RESULTS: Serum MBL levels were significantly (P cancer (1384 (400-2188) ng/mL) (median...... in the colon or rectum, and disease stages according to Dukes' classification. No statistical difference (P=0.20) in frequency of MBL deficiency was found between the patients (20%) and the donors (27%). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the MBL complement activation pathway is significantly increased in patients...

  17. Author Productivity and Collaboration Among Academic Scientists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A lot of researches on author productivity and collaboration were carried out in different fields. Many of the researches established that productive, active and prolific authors are also highly collaborative. This study determines whether the most productive author among the academic scientists in Modibbo Adama University ...

  18. Src is activated by the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ in ultraviolet radiation-induced skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, Alexandra; Delgado, Maria B; Tallichet-Blanc, Corinne; Chan, Jeremy S K; Sng, Ming K; Mottaz, Hélén; Degueurce, Gwendoline; Lippi, Yannick; Moret, Catherine; Baruchet, Michael; Antsiferova, Maria; Werner, Sabine; Hohl, Daniel; Saati, Talal Al; Farmer, Pierre J; Tan, Nguan S; Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Although non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence continues to rise worldwide, the mechanisms underlying its development remain incompletely understood. Here, we unveil a cascade of events involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ and the oncogene Src, which promotes the development of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin cancer in mice. UV-induced PPARβ/δ activity, which directly stimulated Src expression, increased Src kinase activity and enhanced the EGFR/Erk1/2 signalling pathway, resulting in increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker expression. Consistent with these observations, PPARβ/δ-null mice developed fewer and smaller skin tumours, and a PPARβ/δ antagonist prevented UV-dependent Src stimulation. Furthermore, the expression of PPARβ/δ positively correlated with the expression of SRC and EMT markers in human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and critically, linear models applied to several human epithelial cancers revealed an interaction between PPARβ/δ and SRC and TGFβ1 transcriptional levels. Taken together, these observations motivate the future evaluation of PPARβ/δ modulators to attenuate the development of several epithelial cancers.

  19. Challenges for Product Roadmapping in Inter-company Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomalainen, Tanja; Tihinen, Maarit; Parviainen, Päivi

    Product roadmapping is a critical activity in product development, as it provides a link between business aspects and requirements engineering and thus helps to manage a high-level view of the company’s products. Nowadays, inter-company collaboration, such as outsourcing, is a common way of developing software products, as through collaboration, organisations gain advantages, such as flexibility with in-house resources, savings in product development costs and gain a physical presence in important markets. The role of product roadmapping becomes even more critical in collaborative settings, since different companies need to align strategies and work together to create products. In order to support companies in improving their own product roadmapping processes, this paper first gives an overview of product roadmapping and then discusses in detail an empirical study of the current practices in industry. The presented results particularly focus on the most challenging and important activities of product roadmapping in collaboration.

  20. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  1. Self-reported physical activity behaviour; exercise motivation and information among Danish adult cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, J.; Baadsgaard, M.T.; Moller, T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity is considered an important and determining factor for the cancer patient's physical well-being and quality of life. However, cancer treatment may disrupt the practice of physical activity, and the prevention of sedentary lifestyles in cancer survivors is imperative....... PURPOSE: The current study aimed at investigating self-reported physical activity behaviour, exercise motivation and information in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. METHODS AND SAMPLE: Using a cross-sectional design, 451 patients (18-65 years) completed a questionnaire assessing pre......-illness and present physical activity; motivation and information received. RESULTS: Patients reported a significant decline in physical activity from pre-illness to the time in active treatment (p

  2. The Activity of Sirtuin 1 in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Line: The Effects of Visfatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kiarash behrouzfar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Obesity, hormones, and growth factors are the risk factors for this kind of cancer. One of the changes observed in patients suffering from breast cancer is the elevated Visfatin or nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT in their tumor tissues and blood. The increased activity of Visfatin and SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1 in breast cancer and many other cancers has been determined, and its value is correlated with cancer prognosis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of Visfatin on SIRT1 activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Materials & Methods: In this study, in order to investigate the effects of Visfatin on SIRT1 activity in MCF-7 cells, cells were treated after cell culture by Visfatin for 12, 24, and 48 hours. Subsequently, the cells were lysed by nuclear extraction kit, and their total protein concentrations were measured by Bradford assay. Finally, we estimated the general activity of SIRT1 by measuring the SIRT1 activity with the assay kit via spectrofluorometric device. Results: The findings of this research show that SIRT1 activity is not significantly changed following Visfatin treatments for 12 and 24 hours. However, after 48 hour, Visfatin increases SIRT1 activity about 2 times more than control group. Conclusion: The antiapoptotic effects of Visfatin are exerted by increasing SIRT1 activity in MCF-7 cells, and these effects happen after 24 hours. 

  3. Design and Implementation of the Retinoblastoma Collaborative Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Seemi; Limo, Alice; Gichana, Josiah; Kimani, Kahaki; Githanga, Jessie; Waweru, Wairimu; Dimba, Elizabeth A O; Dimaras, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe the design and implementation of a digital pathology laboratory, the Retinoblastoma Collaborative Laboratory (RbCoLab) in Kenya. The RbCoLab is a central lab in Nairobi that receives retinoblastoma specimens from all over Kenya. Specimens were processed using evidence-based standard operating procedures. Images were produced by a digital scanner, and pathology reports were disseminated online. The lab implemented standard operating procedures aimed at improving the accuracy, completeness, and timeliness of pathology reports, enhancing the care of Kenyan retinoblastoma patients. Integration of digital technology to support pathology services supported knowledge transfer and skills transfer. A bidirectional educational network of local pathologists and other clinicians in the circle of care of the patients emerged and served to emphasize the clinical importance of cancer pathology at multiple levels of care. A 'Robin Hood' business model of health care service delivery was developed to support sustainability and scale-up of cancer pathology services. The application of evidence-based protocols, comprehensive training, and collaboration were essential to bring improvements to the care of retinoblastoma patients in Kenya. When embraced as an integrated component of retinoblastoma care, digital pathology offers the opportunity for frequent connection and consultation for development of expertise over time.

  4. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  5. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  6. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension) than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted. PMID:27656243

  7. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Prakash Somasekharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted.

  8. Comparison of telomerase activity in prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA on chromosome ends. The enzyme is important for the immortalization of cancer cells because it maintains the telomeres. METHODS: Telomerase activity (TA was measured by fluorescence-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (FTRAP assay in prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. RESULTS: TA was present in 91.4% of 70 prostate cancers, 68.8% of 16 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, 43.3% of 30 BPH*, 21.4% of 14 atrophy and 20% of 15 normal samples adjacent to tumor. There was not any significant correlation between TA, histopathological tumor stage or gleason score. In contrast to high TA in the BPH* tissue from the cancer-bearing gland, only 6.3% of 32 BPH specimens from patients only diagnosed with BPH were telomerase activity-positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that TA is present in most prostate cancers. The high rate of TA in tissue adjacent to tumor may be attributed either to early molecular alteration of cancer that was histologically unapparent, or to the presence of occult cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the re-expression of telomerase activity could be one step in the transformation of BPH to PIN. KEY WORDS: Telomerase activity, prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  9. The Effects of a Creative Commons Approach on Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Tao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Sherry Y.; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2013-01-01

    Social media on the World Wide Web, such as Wiki, are increasingly applied to support collaborative learning for students to conduct a project together. However, recent studies indicated that students, learning in the collaborative project, may not actively contribute to the collaborative work and are involved only in a limited level of positive…

  10. Disposal R&D in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign: A Discussion of Opportunities for Active International Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-06-01

    For DOE's Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), international collaboration is a beneficial and cost-effective strategy for advancing disposal science with regards to multiple disposal options and different geologic environments. While the United States disposal program focused solely on Yucca Mountain tuff as host rock over the past decades, several international programs have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other geologic repository options, most of which are very different from the Yucca Mountain site in design and host rock characteristics. Because Yucca Mountain was so unique (e.g., no backfill, unsaturated densely fractured tuff), areas of direct collaboration with international disposal programs were quite limited during that time. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel at Yucca Mountain has shifted UFDC's interest to disposal options and geologic environments similar to those being investigated by disposal programs in other nations. Much can be gained by close collaboration with these programs, including access to valuable experience and data collected over recent decades. Such collaboration can help to efficiently achieve UFDC's long-term goals of conducting 'experiments to fill data needs and confirm advanced modeling approaches' (by 2015) and of having a 'robust modeling and experimental basis for evaluation of multiple disposal system options' (by 2020). This report discusses selected opportunities of active international collaboration, with focus on both Natural Barrier System (NBS) and Engineered Barrier System (EBS) aspects and those opportunities that provide access to field data (and respective interpretation/modeling) or allow participation in ongoing field experiments. This discussion serves as a basis for the DOE/NE-53 and UFDC planning process for FY12 and beyond.

  11. Effect of propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kenichiro; Hirotsu, Akiko; Daijo, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Terada, Naoki; Tanaka, Tomoharu

    2017-08-15

    Androgen receptor is a nuclear receptor and transcription factor activated by androgenic hormones. Androgen receptor activity plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Although accumulating evidence suggests that general anesthetics, including opioids, affect cancer cell growth and impact patient prognosis, the effect of those drugs on androgen receptor in prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the general anesthetic propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells. An androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) was stimulated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and exposed to propofol. The induction of androgen receptor target genes was investigated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and androgen receptor protein levels and localization patterns were analyzed using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. The effect of propofol on the proliferation of LNCaP cells was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Propofol significantly inhibited DHT-induced expression of androgen receptor target genes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays indicated that propofol suppressed nuclear levels of androgen receptor proteins. Exposure to propofol for 24h suppressed the proliferation of LNCaP cells, whereas 4h of exposure did not exert significant effects. Together, our results indicate that propofol suppresses nuclear androgen receptor protein levels, and inhibits androgen receptor transcriptional activity and proliferation in LNCaP cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibacterial and anti-breast cancer cell line activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of extracts of Sanghuangporus sp.1 fungus against pathogenic bacteria and a breast cancer cell line. Methods: The wild fruiting body and mycelium of Sanghuangporus sp.1 were extracted with water and ethanol by ultrasonication extraction. The activity of the extracts against pathogenic ...

  13. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  14. Socially Challenged Collaborative Learning of Secondary School Students in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Pang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Using a grounded theory research design, this paper examined the collaborative learning experiences of secondary school students in Singapore. The core phenomenon that emerged was the need for social interactions in collaborative learning, both in classroom and online settings. Educators often take for granted that effective collaborative learning will occur naturally once students are assigned to work in groups. In examining students’ dissatisfaction when working in groups, this study highlighted the importance of surfacing these hidden assumptions for careful scrutiny. The key factors identified were centered on the need to address social challenges within collaborative learning. These included a pragmatic, results-oriented approach with limited interpersonal engagement used by students that can compromise collaborative learning outcomes. Having a deeper understanding of the challenges that resulted from limited social interactions provides educators with insights when designing classroom and online learning activities. This paper contributes to the understanding of groups’ active learning to inform pedagogical practices for educators engaged in designing better collaborative learning experiences. Educators and curriculum designers need to be aware of the social drawbacks in collaborative learning in order to design a more socially engaging learning environment.

  15. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  16. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  17. Cancer registration data and quality indicators in low and middle income countries: their interpretation and potential use for the improvement of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Maria Paula; Voti, Lydia; Sortino-Rachou, Ana Maria

    2009-07-01

    Cancer registration data plays a major role in the design and monitoring of cancer control activities and policies, and population-based cancer registries (PBCR) are the main source of information. In developed countries, the healthcare infrastructure enables the registration of quality cancer data. In low and middle Income countries (LMIC), where health care facilities are limited or scarce, cancer registration data may be of low quality. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the value of cancer incidence data for LMIC, even when quality is questionable, as well as to attempt to interpret the messages that the quality indicators convey both for cancer registration and the healthcare system. The study of data submitted to the Cancer incidence in five continents, volume nine (CI5-IX) leads to the conclusion that when PBCR from LMIC cannot provide good quality data it may indicate a deficiency that goes above and beyond the registrar ability. The quality control indicators evaluated provide insight on local conditions for cancer diagnosis and care. Low data quality not only signals lack of collaboration among reporting sources and the inability of the registrar to perform quality abstracting, but also points to specific weaknesses of the cancer care system and can guide improvement goals and efforts.

  18. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells augments antitumor activity against lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava MK

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Minu K Srivastava,1,2 Li Zhu,1,2 Marni Harris-White,2 Min Huang,1–3 Maie St John,1,3 Jay M Lee,1,3 Ravi Salgia,4 Robert B Cameron,1,3,5 Robert Strieter,6 Steven Dubinett,1–3 Sherven Sharma1–31Department of Medicine, UCLA Lung Cancer Research Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2Molecular Gene Medicine Laboratory, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, 3Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 4Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 5Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, 6Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Lung cancer evades host immune surveillance by dysregulating inflammation. Tumors and their surrounding stromata produce growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines that recruit, expand, and/or activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. MDSCs regulate immune responses and are frequently found in malignancy. In this review the authors discuss tumor-MDSC interactions that suppress host antitumor activities and the authors' recent findings regarding MDSC depletion that led to improved therapeutic vaccination responses against lung cancer. Despite the identification of a repertoire of tumor antigens, hurdles persist for immune-based anticancer therapies. It is likely that combined therapies that address the multiple immune deficits in cancer patients will be required for effective therapy. MDSCs play a major role in the suppression of T-cell activation and they sustain tumor growth, proliferation, and metastases. Regulation of MDSC recruitment, differentiation or expansion, and inhibition of the MDSC suppressive function with pharmacologic agents will be useful in the control of cancer growth and progression. Pharmacologic agents that regulate MDSCs may be more effective when combined with

  19. Infrastructure Support for Collaborative Pervasive Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Mogensen, Martin

    Collaborative Pervasive Computing Systems (CPCS) are currently being deployed to support areas such as clinical work, emergency situations, education, ad-hoc meetings, and other areas involving information sharing and collaboration.These systems allow the users to work together synchronously......, but from different places, by sharing information and coordinating activities. Several researchers have shown the value of such distributed collaborative systems. However, building these systems is by no means a trivial task and introduces a lot of yet unanswered questions. The aforementioned areas......, are all characterized by unstable, volatile environments, either due to the underlying components changing or the nomadic work habits of users. A major challenge, for the creators of collaborative pervasive computing systems, is the construction of infrastructures supporting the system. The complexity...

  20. O8.10A MODEL FOR RESEARCH INITIATIVES FOR RARE CANCERS: THE COLLABORATIVE EPENDYMOMA RESEARCH NETWORK (CERN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T.S.; Aldape, K.; Gajjar, A.; Haynes, C.; Hirakawa, D.; Gilbertson, R.; Gilbert, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    investigators from Project 2 are evaluating potential predictive markers from tumor tissue from the same clinical trial. Results from genomic and molecular discoveries generated by Project 4 were evaluated using the clinical material from the Tumor Registry (Project 2). Agents identified from the high throughput screening in Project 3 are being used to create novel clinical trials (Project 1). As a complimentary effort, CERN's community outreach efforts provide a major gateway to patients, families, caregivers and healthcare providers, contributing to greater awareness of ependymoma, and supporting clinical trial accrual in Project 1. In summary, CERN has successfully created a collaborative, multi-national integrated effort combining pediatric- and adult-focused investigators spanning from basic science to patient outcomes measures. This research paradigm may be an effective approach for other rare cancers.

  1. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Bernard A; Schendel, Dolores J; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2011-01-01

    of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical...... immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation...... companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed...

  2. Dasatinib inhibits both osteoclast activation and prostate cancer PC-3-cell-induced osteoclast formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, John C; Poblenz, Ann; Corn, Paul; Parikh, Nila U; Starbuck, Michael W; Thompson, Jerry T; Lee, Francis; Logothetis, Christopher J; Darnay, Bryant G

    2009-11-01

    Therapies to target prostate cancer bone metastases have only limited effects. New treatments are focused on the interaction between cancer cells, bone marrow cells and the bone matrix. Osteoclasts play an important role in the development of bone tumors caused by prostate cancer. Since Src kinase has been shown to be necessary for osteoclast function, we hypothesized that dasatinib, a Src family kinase inhibitor, would reduce osteoclast activity and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell-induced osteoclast formation. Dasatinib inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes with an EC(50) of 7.5 nM. PC-3 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, were able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocytic cell line, into osteoclasts, and dasatinib inhibited this differentiation. In addition, conditioned medium from PC-3 cell cultures was able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts and this too, was inhibited by dasatinib. Even the lowest concentration of dasatinib, 1.25 nmol, inhibited osteoclast differentiation by 29%. Moreover, dasatinib inhibited osteoclast activity by 58% as measured by collagen 1 release. We performed in vitro experiments utilizing the Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib to target osteoclast activation as a means of inhibiting prostate cancer bone metastases. Dasatinib inhibits osteoclast differentiation of mouse primary bone marrow-derived monocytes and PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. Dasatinib also inhibits osteoclast degradation activity. Inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activity may be an effective targeted therapy in patients with prostate cancer bone metastases.

  3. WHO collaboration in hazardous waste management in the Western Pacific Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hisashi [Western Pacific Regional Environmental Health Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1996-12-31

    Since April 1989 when the World Health Organization`s (WHO`s) activities in hazardous waste management in the Western Pacific Region were presented at the Pacific Basin Conference in Singapore, WHO and its Member States have carried out a number of collaborative activities in hazardous waste management. These activities focused on three main areas: national capacity building in the management of toxic chemicals and hazardous wastes in rapidly industrializing countries, management of clinical or medical waste, and hazardous waste management in Pacific Island countries. This paper summarizes these collaborative activities, identifies the main problems and issues encountered, and discusses future prospects of WHO collaboration with its Member States in the area of hazardous waste management. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. CHIP promotes thyroid cancer proliferation via activation of the MAPK and AKT pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li [Department of Pharmacy, Urumchi General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Region, Urumchi, Xinjiang 830000 (China); Liu, Lianyong [Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Punan Hospital, Shanghai 200125 (China); He, Xiaohua; Shen, Yunling; Liu, Xuerong; Wei, Jing; Yu, Fang [Department of Endocrinology, Urumchi General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Region, Urumchi, Xinjiang 830000 (China); Tian, Jianqing, E-mail: jianqing0991@163.com [Department of Endocrinology, Urumchi General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Region, Urumchi, Xinjiang 830000 (China)

    2016-08-26

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a U box-type ubiquitin ligase that plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression. To date, the functional mechanism of CHIP in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Here, we obtained evidence of upregulation of CHIP in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. CHIP overexpression markedly enhanced thyroid cancer cell viability and colony formation in vitro and accelerated tumor growth in vivo. Conversely, CHIP knockdown impaired cell proliferation and tumor growth. Notably, CHIP promoted cell growth through activation of MAPK and AKT pathways, subsequently decreasing p27 and increasing cyclin D1 and p-FOXO3a expression. Our findings collectively indicate that CHIP functions as an oncogene in thyroid cancer, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • CHIP is significantly upregulated in thyroid cancer cells. • Overexpression of CHIP facilitates proliferation and tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer cells. • Silencing of CHIP inhibits the proliferation and tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer cells. • CHIP promotes thyroid cancer cell proliferation via activating the MAPK and AKT pathways.

  5. Technical Service Agreement (TSA) | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) scientists provide services and solutions to collaborators through the Technical Services Program, whose portfolio includes more than 200 collaborations with more than 80 partners. The Frederi

  6. Graduate Education to Facilitate Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration: Identifying Individual Competencies and Developmental Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Valerie Ciocca

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research collaborations (IDRC) are considered essential for addressing the most complex global community problems concerning science, health, education, energy, the environment, and society. In spite of technological advances, supportive funding, and even researcher proclivity to collaborate, these complex interdisciplinary…

  7. The anti-esophageal cancer cell activity by a novel tyrosine/phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor PP121

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yi; Zhou, Yajuan [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Long [Department of Interventional Radiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Suzhou 215001 (China); Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhaohua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: ZhouFuxiangwuhan@126.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-09-11

    Here we explored the potential effect of PP121, a novel dual inhibitor of tyrosine and phosphoinositide kinases, against human esophageal cancer cells. We showed that PP121 exerted potent cytotoxic effect in primary (patient-derived) and established (Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-3 lines) esophageal cancer cells, possibly through activating caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis. PP121 was, however, non-cytotoxic to the normal human esophageal epithelial cells (EECs). At the molecular level, we showed that PP121 blocked Akt-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation in esophageal cancer cells, which was restored by introducing a constitutively-active Akt (CA-Akt). Yet, CA-Akt only partly inhibited cytotoxicity by PP121 in Eca-109 cells. Importantly, we showed that PP121 inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling activation in esophageal cancer cells, which appeared independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. In vivo, oral administration of PP121 remarkably inhibited Eca-109 xenograft growth in nude mice, and significantly improved mice survival. Further, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot assays analyzing xenografted tumors showed that PP121 inhibited Akt-mTOR and NFκB activations in vivo. Together, we demonstrate that PP121 potently inhibits esophageal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, possibly through concurrently inhibiting Akt-mTOR and NFκB signalings. - Highlights: • PP121 is cytotoxic against primary and established esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 induces caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 blocks Akt-mTOR activation in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 inhibits NFκB activation, independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. • PP121 inhibits Eca-109 xenograft growth and Akt-mTOR/NFκB activation in vivo.

  8. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark; Yoon, Paul; Fathi, Zak; Beyer, Wayne F.; Adamson, Justus; Liu, Leihua; Alcorta, David; Xia, Wenle; Osada, Takuya; Liu, Congxiao; Yang, Xiao Y.; Dodd, Rebecca D.; Herndon, James E.; Meng, Boyu; Kirsch, David G.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Fecci, Peter; Walder, Harold; Spector, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy): a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen) that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce) at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1), glioma (CT2A) and sarcoma (KP-B) cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor) and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate) were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (pphosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001). Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA light which in-turn unleashes both short- and potentially long

  9. Collaborative Work or Individual Chores: The Role of Family Social Organization in Children's Learning to Collaborate and Develop Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Arauz, Rebeca; Correa-Chávez, Maricela; Keyser Ohrt, Ulrike; Aceves-Azuara, Itzel

    2015-01-01

    In many communities, children learn about family and community endeavors as they collaborate and become involved in community activities. This chapter analyzes how parents promote collaboration and learning to collaborate at home in an Indigenous and in a non-Indigenous Mexican community. We examine variation among parents with different extent of experience with schooling and concepts regarding child development and relate these to patterns of child collaboration at home among Mexican Indigenous and urban families. Drawing on interviews with 34 mothers in the P'urhépecha community of Cherán, Michoacán, and 18 interviews in the cosmopolitan city of Guadalajara, Mexico, we argue that the social nature of participation may be a key feature of learning to collaborate and pitch in in families and communities where school has not been a central institution of childhood over generations. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Decline in physical activity level in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carmen L; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy L; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nathan, Paul C; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Hudson, Melissa M; Castellino, Sharon M; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T; Brinkman, Tara M; Krull, Kevin R; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to identify demographic and health-related predictors of declining physical activity levels over a four-year period among participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Analyses included 7,287 ≥5-year childhood cancer survivors and 2,107 siblings who completed multiple follow-up questionnaires. Participants were classified as active if they met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for physical activity. Generalized linear models were used to compare participants whose physical activity levels declined from active to inactive over the study to those who remained active. In addition, selected chronic conditions (CTCAE v4.03 Grade 3 and 4) were evaluated as risk factors in an analysis limited to survivors only. The median age at last follow-up among survivors and siblings was 36 (range, 21-58) and 38 (range, 21-62) years, respectively. The rate of decline did not accelerate over time among survivors when compared with siblings. Factors that predicted declining activity included body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) [RR = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19-1.46, P physical activity levels were associated with the presence of chronic musculoskeletal conditions (P = 0.034), but not with the presence of cardiac (P = 0.10), respiratory (P = 0.92), or neurologic conditions (P = 0.21). Interventions designed to maximize physical activity should target female, obese, and less educated survivors. Survivors with chronic musculoskeletal conditions should be monitored, counseled, and/or referred for physical therapy. Clinicians should be aware of low activity levels among subpopulations of childhood cancer survivors, which may heighten their risk for chronic illness. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain by Inhibiting Microglial Cells Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-yin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The present study is to investigate the analgesic roles of L-THP in rats with bone cancer pain caused by tumor cell implantation (TCI. Methods. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured at different time points before and after operation. L-THP (20, 40, and 60 mg/kg were administrated intragastrically at early phase of postoperation (before pain appearance and later phase of postoperation (after pain appearance, respectively. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18 in spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was used to test the activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in spinal cord after TCI treatment. Results. TCI treatment induced significant thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Administration of L-THP at high doses significantly prevented and/or reversed bone cancer-related pain behaviors. Besides, TCI-induced activation of microglial cells and the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-18 were inhibited by L-THP administration. However, L-THP failed to affect TCI-induced astrocytes activation and IL-1β increase. Conclusion. This study suggests the possible clinical utility of L-THP in the treatment of bone cancer pain. The analgesic effects of L-THP on bone cancer pain maybe underlying the inhibition of microglial cells activation and proinflammatory cytokines increase.

  12. Comparison of self-reported physical activity in children and adolescents before and during cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Miriam; Kesting, Sabine; Winter, Corinna; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Boos, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Physical activities are important for the development of children and increasing evidence suggests beneficial effects of physical activity promotion during cancer treatment as well. The present study aimed at evaluating the current need of exercise interventions in pediatric cancer patients undergoing acute treatment and identifying risk factors for inactivity. Data about self-reported physical activity before and during treatment was collected in a cross-sectional design with the physical activity questionnaire from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) in a modified cancer specific version. One hundred thirty pediatric cancer patients with various entities were questioned 3.0 ± 1.6 months since diagnosis. Patients' activity levels before diagnosis mainly matched reference values for healthy children in Germany. Reductions during treatment affected all dimensions of daily physical activities and minutes of exercise per week decreased significantly (P physical activities during treatment were identified for bone tumor patients and in-patient stays. Due to the well known importance of physical activity during childhood and the identified risk of inactivity during cancer treatment, supervised exercise interventions should be implemented into acute treatment phase to enhance activity levels and ensure a continuously support by qualified exercise professionals. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Physical activity, hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizot, Cécile; Boniol, Mathieu; Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Magali; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Lower risk of breast cancer has been reported among physically active women, but the risk in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to be higher. We quantified the association between physical activity and breast cancer, and we examined the influence that HRT use and other risk factors had on this association. After a systematic literature search, prospective studies were meta-analysed using random-effect models applied on highest versus lowest level of physical activity. Dose-response analyses were conducted with studies reporting physical activity either in hours per week or in hours of metabolic equivalent per week (MET-h/week). The literature search identified 38 independent prospective studies published between 1987 and 2014 that included 116,304 breast cancer cases. Compared to the lowest level of physical activity, the highest level was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85, 0.90) for all breast cancer, 0.89 (95% CI 0.83, 0.95) for ER+/PR+ breast cancer and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.92) for ER-/PR- breast cancer. Risk reductions were not influenced by the type of physical activity (occupational or non-occupational), adiposity, and menopausal status. Risk reductions increased with increasing amounts of physical activity without threshold effect. In six studies, the SRR was 0.78 (95% CI 0.70, 0.87) in women who never used HRT and 0.97 (95% CI 0.88, 1.07) in women who ever used HRT, without heterogeneity in results. Findings indicate that a physically inactive women engaging in at least 150 min per week of vigorous physical activity would reduce their lifetime risk of breast cancer by 9%, a reduction that might be two times greater in women who never used HRT. Increasing physical activity is associated with meaningful reductions in the risk of breast cancer, but in women who ever used HRT, the preventative effect of physical activity seems to be cancelled out. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... and similar phenomena are among these collective innovations in tourism that are shaking the very bedrock of an industrial system that has been traditionally sustained along commercial value chains. To date there has been very little investigation of these trends, which have been inspired by, amongst other...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  15. Image denoising via collaborative support-agnostic recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Muzammil; Masood, Mudassir; Ballal, Tarig; Shadaydeh, Maha; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel patch-based image denoising algorithm using collaborative support-agnostic sparse reconstruction. In the proposed collaborative scheme, similar patches are assumed to share the same support taps. For sparse reconstruction, the likelihood of a tap being active in a patch is computed and refined through a collaboration process with other similar patches in the similarity group. This provides a very good patch support estimation, hence enhancing the quality of image restoration. Performance comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms, in terms of PSNR and SSIM, demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Image denoising via collaborative support-agnostic recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Muzammil

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we propose a novel patch-based image denoising algorithm using collaborative support-agnostic sparse reconstruction. In the proposed collaborative scheme, similar patches are assumed to share the same support taps. For sparse reconstruction, the likelihood of a tap being active in a patch is computed and refined through a collaboration process with other similar patches in the similarity group. This provides a very good patch support estimation, hence enhancing the quality of image restoration. Performance comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms, in terms of PSNR and SSIM, demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  17. The Challenge of Childhood Cancer in Developing Countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-05-12

    May 12, 2016 ... Abraham Haileamlak, MD, Professor of Pediatrics and Child Health ... children under the age of 15 years due to cancer. Childhood cancer is the second leading .... collaboration on childhood leukaemia. Int J. Hematol 2003 ...

  18. Translational Partnership Development Lead | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) is a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc on behalf of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The staff of FNLCR support the NCI’s mission in the fight against cancer and HIV/AIDS. Currently we are seeking a Translational Partnership Development Lead (TPDL) who will work closely with the Office of Translational Resources (OTR) within the Office of the Director (OD) of NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) to facilitate the successful translation of CCR’s basic and preclinical research advances into new therapeutics and diagnostics. The TPDL with be strategically aligned within FNLCR’s Partnership Development Office (PDO), to maximally leverage the critical mass of expertise available within the PDO. CCR comprises the basic and clinical components of the NCI’s Intramural Research Program (IRP) and consists of ~230 basic and clinical Investigators located at either the NIH main campus in Bethesda or the NCI-Frederick campus. CCR Investigators are focused primarily on cancer and HIV/AIDS, with special emphasis on the most challenging and important high-risk/high-reward problems driving the fields. (See https://ccr.cancer.gov for a full delineation of CCR Investigators and their research activities.) The process of developing research findings into new clinical applications is high risk, complex, variable, and requires multiple areas of expertise seldom available within the confines of a single Investigator’s laboratory. To accelerate this process, OTR serves as a unifying force within CCR for all aspects of translational activities required to achieve success and maintain timely progress. A key aspect of OTR’s function is to develop and strengthen essential communications and collaborations within NIH, with extramural partners and with industry to bring together experts in chemistry, human subjects research

  19. Inter-firm collaboration in the Fuzzy Front-End of the innovation process - Exploring New Forms of Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Høj; Goduscheit, René Chester; Bergenholz, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    , marketing, sales. The focus of this paper is on collaboration where innovation is the main part of the collaborative effort. Innovation refers to the research and development (R&D) activity devoted to increasing scientific or technical knowledge and the application of that knowledge to the creation of new...... and tendencies in formal R&D partnering relations. This paper, however, focuses on collaboration between independent companies prior to such formal agreements as joint ventures or other contractual agreements. This first phase of the innovation process is often referred to as the Fuzzy Front-End (FFE....... In this article we examine the characteristics of the FFE phase and explore this phase in an inter-firm perspective. Through an in-depth case-study of a single firm and its innovation partners we identify parameters for improved collaboration in the FFE. In conclusion we outline a model for inter...

  20. [Collaboration between public health nurses and the private sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutani, Miki; Okada, Yumiko; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We clarified collaborations between public health nurses (PHNs) and the private sector, such as nonprofit organizations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 private sector organizations and 13 PHNs who collaborate with them between December 2012 to October 2013. Interview guides were: overall suicide preventive measurements, details of collaboration between private sector organizations and PHNs, and suicide prevention outcomes/issues. Data from private sector organizations and PHNs were separately analyzed and categories created using qualitative and inductive design. Private sector organizations' and PHNs' categories were compared and separated into core categories by similarities. Six categories were created: 1. establishing a base of mutual understanding; 2. raising public awareness of each aim/characteristic; 3. competently helping high suicidal risk persons detected during each activity; 4. guarding lives and rehabilitating livelihoods after intervention; 5. restoring suicide attempters/bereaved met in each activity; and 6. continuing/expanding activities with reciprocal cohesion/evaluation. PHNs are required to have the following suicide prevention tasks when collaborating with private sector organizations: understanding the private sector civilization, sharing PHN experiences, improving social determinants of health, meeting basic needs, supporting foundation/difficulties each other (Dear editor. Thank you for kind comments. I was going to explain that PHNs and NPOs support each other their foundation of activity and difficulties in their activities. The foundations include knowledge, information, budgets, manpower etc. The difficulties mean like suffering faced with suicide during activities.), and enhancing local governments' flexibilities/ promptness.

  1. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour, diet, and cancer: an update and emerging new evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Anderson, Cheryl; Lippman, Scott M

    2017-08-01

    The lifestyle factors of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and diet are increasingly being studied for their associations with cancer. Physical activity is inversely associated with and sedentary behaviour is positively (and independently) associated with an increased risk of more than ten types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (and advanced adenomas), endometrial cancers, and breast cancer. The most consistent dietary risk factor for premalignant and invasive breast cancer is alcohol, whether consumed during early or late adult life, even at low levels. Epidemiological studies show that the inclusion of wholegrain, fibre, fruits, and vegetables within diets are associated with reduced cancer risk, with diet during early life (age diet-related factors have not yet shown any conclusive associations between diet and cancer incidence. Obesity is a key contributory factor associated with cancer risk and mortality, including in dose-response associations in endometrial and post-menopausal breast cancer, and in degree and duration of fatty liver disease-related hepatocellular carcinoma. Obesity produces an inflammatory state, characterised by macrophages clustered around enlarged hypertrophied, dead, and dying adipocytes, forming crown-like structures. Increased concentrations of aromatase and interleukin 6 in inflamed breast tissue and an increased number of macrophages, compared with healthy tissue, are also observed in women with normal body mass index, suggesting a metabolic obesity state. Emerging randomised controlled trials of physical activity and dietary factors and mechanistic studies of immunity, inflammation, extracellular matrix mechanics, epigenetic or transcriptional regulation, protein translation, circadian disruption, and interactions of the multibiome with lifestyle factors will be crucial to advance this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. "Let's work together": what do infants understand about collaborative goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Annette M E; Woodward, Amanda L

    2011-10-01

    Collaboration is fundamental to our daily lives, yet little is known about how humans come to understand these activities. The present research was conducted to fill this void by using a novel visual habituation paradigm to investigate infants' understanding of the collaborative-goal structure of collaborative action. The findings of the three experiments reported here suggest that 14-month-old infants understand that the actions of collaborative partners are complementary and critical to the attainment of a common collaborative goal. Importantly, 14-month-olds do not interpret the actions of two individuals in terms of a collaborative goal when their actions are not causally related. The implications of our findings for theories of collaboration and folk psychology are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. How can computers support, enrich, and transform collaborative creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Inie, Nanna; Hansen, Nicolai Brodersen

    2017-01-01

    of different approaches to providing digital support for collaborative creativity. Participation in the workshop requires participants to actively document and identify salient themes in one or more examples of computer- supported collaborative creativity, and the resulting material will serve as the empirical...

  4. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK α subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 waf/cip as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21 waf/cip and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21 waf/cip pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  5. General practitioners' role in cancer care: a French-Norwegian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bungener Martine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer care, a GP's work is rarely defined clearly. Our aim was to assess GPs' work with cancer patients in France and in Norway, where the roles of the GP and the organization of the system are rather different. Findings A questionnaire with 40 closed-ended questions about GP involvement in diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and terminal care was constructed and mailed to samples of GPs. The patients had seen the doctor at least once over the past year. In France 1679 and in Norway 386 individual patient questionnaires were completed. GPs have a major role in the diagnosis of cancer, and this role varies according to cancer type. The GPs participated actively in different phases of follow-up after cancer treatment. Low response rates do not allow direct comparison between countries, but higher PSA screening rates in France seem to increase the percentage of patients diagnosed after screening rather than after a clinical suspicion. Interaction between GPs and specialists during cancer treatment and follow-up was important in both countries. Conclusion Both in France and in Norway GPs participate actively in cancer care. Early clinical diagnosis is a challenge. More research is needed about how GPs can improve their early diagnostic work. Organisational issues may influence cancer responsibilities for the GP, and national health systems should be challenged to look at possible new roles for GPs in cancer care. Medical training, both pre- and post-graduate, should prepare doctors for collaboration between primary and secondary care, particularly important in cancer care.

  6. General practitioners' role in cancer care: a French-Norwegian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demagny, Lise; Holtedahl, Knut; Bachimont, Janine; Thorsen, Tommy; Letourmy, Alain; Bungener, Martine

    2009-09-29

    In cancer care, a GP's work is rarely defined clearly. Our aim was to assess GPs' work with cancer patients in France and in Norway, where the roles of the GP and the organization of the system are rather different. A questionnaire with 40 closed-ended questions about GP involvement in diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and terminal care was constructed and mailed to samples of GPs. The patients had seen the doctor at least once over the past year. In France 1679 and in Norway 386 individual patient questionnaires were completed. GPs have a major role in the diagnosis of cancer, and this role varies according to cancer type. The GPs participated actively in different phases of follow-up after cancer treatment. Low response rates do not allow direct comparison between countries, but higher PSA screening rates in France seem to increase the percentage of patients diagnosed after screening rather than after a clinical suspicion. Interaction between GPs and specialists during cancer treatment and follow-up was important in both countries. Both in France and in Norway GPs participate actively in cancer care. Early clinical diagnosis is a challenge. More research is needed about how GPs can improve their early diagnostic work. Organisational issues may influence cancer responsibilities for the GP, and national health systems should be challenged to look at possible new roles for GPs in cancer care. Medical training, both pre- and post-graduate, should prepare doctors for collaboration between primary and secondary care, particularly important in cancer care.

  7. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics.

  8. Objectively assessed physical activity levels in Spanish cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casado, Ana; Verdugo, Ana Soria; Solano, María J Ortega; Aldazabal, Itziar Pagola; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Alejo, Lidia Brea; del Hierro, Julio R Padilla; Palomo, Isabel; Aguado-Arroyo, Oscar; Garatachea, Nuria; Cebolla, Héctor; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    To objectively assess physical activity (PA) levels in a cohort of Spanish cancer survivors. Descriptive, cross-sectional. The Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada and two healthcare centers in Madrid, Spain. 204 cancer survivors and 115 adults with no history of cancer. Participants wore a triaxial accelerometer for seven or more consecutive days to assess PA levels. Body mass index (BMI), indirect indicators of adiposity (waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio), and cardiorespiratory fitness also were determined. Light, moderate, vigorous, and total PA (sum of the former). Most (94%) of the cancer survivors met international recommendations for moderate PA, but very few (3%) fulfilled those (75 minutes or more per week) for vigorous PA. Except for lower total (minute per day, p=0.048) and vigorous PA levels (p0.05). A high percentage of the survivors (33%) were obese (BMI greater than 30 kg/m2), and many also showed poor cardiorespiratory fitness (45% were below the 8 metabolic equivalent threshold). Although cancer survivors overall met international PA recommendations for a healthy lifestyle, their BMI and cardiorespiratory profiles were not within the healthy range. Cancer survivors need to be informed about healthy lifestyle habits and should be regularly monitored.

  9. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  10. An evaluation of the behaviour-change techniques used on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to support physical activity behaviour for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, B D; Zammit, K; Fong, A J; Sabiston, C M

    2017-12-01

    Cancer centre Web sites can be a useful tool for distributing information about the benefits of physical activity for breast cancer (bca) survivors, and they hold potential for supporting health behaviour change. However, the extent to which cancer centre Web sites use evidence-based behaviour change techniques to foster physical activity behaviour among bca survivors is currently unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate the presentation of behaviour-change techniques on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to promote physical activity behaviour for bca survivors. All Canadian cancer centre Web sites ( n = 39) were evaluated by two raters using the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (calo-re) taxonomy of behaviour change techniques and the eEurope 2002 Quality Criteria for Health Related Websites. Descriptive statistics were calculated. The most common behaviour change techniques used on Web sites were providing information about consequences in general (80%), suggesting goal-setting behaviour (56%), and planning social support or social change (46%). Overall, Canadian cancer centre Web sites presented an average of M = 6.31 behaviour change techniques (of 40 that were coded) to help bca survivors increase their physical activity behaviour. Evidence of quality factors ranged from 90% (sites that provided evidence of readability) to 0% (sites that provided an editorial policy). Our results provide preliminary evidence that, of 40 behaviour-change techniques that were coded, fewer than 20% were used to promote physical activity behaviour to bca survivors on cancer centre Web sites, and that the most effective techniques were inconsistently used. On cancer centre Web sites, health promotion specialists could focus on emphasizing knowledge mobilization efforts using available research into behaviour-change techniques to help bca survivors increase their physical activity.

  11. Research reactor collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Byung Jin

    2006-01-01

    The number of research reactors over the world has been decreasing since its peak in the middle of the 1970s, and it is predicted to decrease more rapidly than before in the future. International collaboration on research reactors is an effective way for their continued safe service to human welfare in various technical areas. The number of new research reactors under construction or planned for in the Asia-Pacific region is the greatest in the world. Among the regional collaboration activities on research reactors, safety has been the most important subject followed by neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production and neutron beam applications. It is understood that more regional collaboration on basic technologies important for the safety, management and utilization of the research reactors is demanding. The new project proposal of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia on 'Research Reactor Technology for Effective Utilization' is understood to meet the demands. Meanwhile, there is a consensus on the need for research reactor resource sharing in the region. As a result of the review on the international collaboration activities in the region, the author suggests a linkage between the above new project and IAEA/RCA project considering a possible sharing of research reactor resources in the region. (author)

  12. Explaining interindividual differences in toddlers’ collaboration with unfamiliar peers: Individual, dyadic, and social factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils eSchuhmacher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During their third year of life, toddlers become increasingly skillful at coordinating their actions with peer partners and they form joint commitments in collaborative situations. However, little effort has been made to explain interindividual differences in collaboration among toddlers. Therefore, we examined the relative influence of distinct individual, dyadic, and social factors on toddlers’ collaborative activities (i.e., level of coordination and preference for joint activity in joint problem-solving situations with unfamiliar peer partners (n = 23 dyads aged M = 35.7 months. We analyzed the dyadic nonindependent data with mixed models. Results indicated that mothers’ expectations regarding their children’s social behaviors significantly predicted toddlers’ level of coordination. Furthermore, the models revealed that toddlers’ positive mutual experiences with the unfamiliar partner assessed during an initial free play period (Phase 1 and their level of coordination in an obligatory collaboration task (Phase 2 promoted toddlers’ preference for joint activity in a subsequent optional collaboration task (Phase 3. In contrast, children’s mastery motivation and shyness conflicted with their collaborative efforts. We discuss the role of parents’ socialization goals in toddlers’ development toward becoming active collaborators and discuss possible mechanisms underlying the differences in toddlers’ commitment to joint activities, namely social preferences and the trust in reliable cooperation partners.

  13. Obesity, physical activity and cancer risks: Results from the Cancer, Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk Study (CLEAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Carlos; Bauman, Adrian; Egger, Sam; Sitas, Freddy; Nair-Shalliker, Visalini

    2017-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, but the evidence linking PA with lower cancer risk is inconclusive. We examined the independent and interactive effects of PA and obesity using body mass index (BMI) as a proxy for obesity, on the risk of developing prostate (PC), postmenopausal breast (BC), colorectal (CRC), ovarian (OC) and uterine (UC) cancers. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for cancer specific confounders, in 6831 self-reported cancer cases and 1992 self-reported cancer-free controls from the Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk Study, using unconditional logistic regression. For women, BMI was positively associated with UC risk; specifically, obese women (BMI≥30kg/m 2 ) had nearly twice the risk of developing UC compared to women with healthy-BMI-range (risk of developing any cancer type, CRC and PC. In particular, obese men had 37% (OR=1.37;CI:1.11-1.70), 113% (OR=2.13;CI:1.55-2.91) and 51% (OR=1.51;CI:1.17-1.94) higher risks of developing any cancer, CRC and PC respectively, when compared to men with healthy-BMI-range (BMIrisks of CRC, UC and BC. In particular, the highest level of PA (versus nil activity) was associated with reduced risks of CRC (OR=0.60;CI:0.44-0.84) and UC (OR=0.47;CI:0.27-0.80). Reduced risks of BC were associated with low (OR=0.66;CI:0.51-0.86) and moderate (OR=0.72;CI:0.57-0.91) levels of PA. There was no association between PA levels and cancer risks for men. We found no evidence of an interaction between BMI and PA in the CLEAR study. These findings suggest that PA and obesity are independent cancer risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Collaboration between Chiang Mai and Aarhus Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Henrik; Trisonthi, Chusie; Srithi, Kamonnate

    2011-01-01

    Thai-Danish botanical research collaboration started over 100 years ago with Schmidts work on the flora of Koh Chang. In the 1950es the collaboration was fortalized with the initiation of the Flora of Thailand project. The collaboration was for many years centered in the Royal Forest Department i...... projects involving ethnobotanical studies are still under way. The funding for these projects has come from the Royal Golden Jubilee Program, Chiang Mai University and Thai Government stipends, and from Aarhus University........ in Bangkok and involved a large amount of collaborative fieldwork, graduate and post-graduate training, and publication. Over the years the collaboration has been extended to several other institutions and universities. Recent activities of Aarhus University have involved joint graduate training with Chiang...... Mai University, which is the subject of this presentation. Three graduate students have completed their doctoral training with research projects covering botany of ethnic groups in Thailand, taxonomic and ecological studies of Thai Nymphaeaceae, and ecophysiological studies of aquatic plants. Two...

  15. RD50 Collaboration overview: Development of new radiation hard detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, S., E-mail: susanne.kuehn@cern.ch

    2016-07-11

    Silicon sensors are widely used as tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This results in several specific requirements like radiation hardness and granularity. Therefore research for highly performing silicon detectors is required. The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for application in high luminosity collider experiments. Extensive research is ongoing in different fields since 2001. The collaboration investigates both defect and material characterization, detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. The report gives selected results of the collaboration and places an emphasis on the development of new structures, namely 3D devices, CMOS sensors in HV technology and low gain avalanche detectors. - Highlights: • The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for high luminosity collider experiments. • The collaboration investigates defect, material and detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. • Results of measured data of n-in-p type sensors allow recommendations for silicon tracking detectors at the HL-LHC. • The charge multiplication effect was investigated to allow its exploitation and resulted in new structures like LGAD sensors. • New sensor types like slim and active edge sensors, 3D detectors, and lately HVCMOS devices were developed in the active collaboration.

  16. Site-specific RNase A activity was dramatically reduced in serum from multiple types of cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyan Huang

    Full Text Available Potent RNase activities were found in the serum of mammals but the physiological function of the RNases was never well illustrated, largely due to the caveats in methods of RNase activity measurement. None of the existing methods can distinguish between RNases with different target specificities. A systematic study was recently carried out in our lab to investigate the site-specificity of serum RNases on double-stranded RNA substrates, and found that serum RNases cleave double-stranded RNAs predominantly at 5'-U/A-3' and 5'-C/A-3' dinucleotide sites, in a manner closely resembling RNase A. Based on this finding, a FRET assay was developed in the current study to measure this site-specific serum RNase activity in human samples using a double stranded RNA substrate. We demonstrated that the method has a dynamic range of 10(-5 mg/ml- 10(-1 mg/ml using serial dilution of RNase A. The sera of 303 cancer patients were subjected to comparison with 128 healthy controls, and it was found that serum RNase activities visualized with this site-specific double stranded probe were found to be significantly reduced in patients with gastric cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer, ovary cancer, cervical cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer and lung cancer, while only minor changes were found in breast and colon cancer patients. This is the first report using double stranded RNA as probe to quantify site-specific activities of RNase A in a serum. The results illustrated that RNase A might be further evaluated to determine if it can serve as a new class of biomarkers for certain cancer types.

  17. Site-Specific RNase A Activity Was Dramatically Reduced in Serum from Multiple Types of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiyan; Zhao, Mei; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiaoxia; Cao, Huqing; Du, Quan; Liang, Zicai

    2014-01-01

    Potent RNase activities were found in the serum of mammals but the physiological function of the RNases was never well illustrated, largely due to the caveats in methods of RNase activity measurement. None of the existing methods can distinguish between RNases with different target specificities. A systematic study was recently carried out in our lab to investigate the site-specificity of serum RNases on double-stranded RNA substrates, and found that serum RNases cleave double-stranded RNAs predominantly at 5′-U/A-3′ and 5′-C/A-3′ dinucleotide sites, in a manner closely resembling RNase A. Based on this finding, a FRET assay was developed in the current study to measure this site-specific serum RNase activity in human samples using a double stranded RNA substrate. We demonstrated that the method has a dynamic range of 10−5 mg/ml- 10−1 mg/ml using serial dilution of RNase A. The sera of 303 cancer patients were subjected to comparison with 128 healthy controls, and it was found that serum RNase activities visualized with this site-specific double stranded probe were found to be significantly reduced in patients with gastric cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer, ovary cancer, cervical cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer and lung cancer, while only minor changes were found in breast and colon cancer patients. This is the first report using double stranded RNA as probe to quantify site-specific activities of RNase A in a serum. The results illustrated that RNase A might be further evaluated to determine if it can serve as a new class of biomarkers for certain cancer types. PMID:24805924

  18. Nanofibrous matrixes with biologically active hydroxybenzophenazine pyrazolone compound for cancer theranostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandhasamy, Subramani; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Thyagarajan, SitaLakshmi; Umamaheshwari, Narayanan; Santhanakrishnan, V P; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli; Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai

    2017-01-01

    The nanomaterial with the novel biologically active compounds has been actively investigated for application in cancer research. Substantial use of nanofibrous scaffold for cancer research with potentially bioactive compounds through electrospinning has not been fully explored. Here, we describe the series of fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold loaded with novel potential biologically active hydroxybenzo[a]phenazine pyrazol-5(4H)-one derivatives were designed, synthesized by a simple one-pot, two step four component condensation based on Michael type addition reaction of lawsone, benzene-1,2-diamine, aromatic aldehydes and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H)-one as the substrates. The heterogeneous solid state catalyst (Fe (III) Y-Zeolite) could effectively catalyze the reaction to obtain the product with high yield and short reaction time. The synthesized compounds (5a–5p) were analyzed by NMR, FTIR and HRMS analysis. Compound 5c was confirmed by single crystal XRD studies. All the compounds were biologically evaluated for their potential inhibitory effect on anticancer (MCF-7, Hep-2) and microbial (MRSA, MTCC 201 and FRCA) activities. Among the compounds 5i exhibited the highest levels of inhibitory activity against both MCF-7, Hep-2 cell lines. Furthermore, the compound 5i (BPP) was evaluated for DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry studies and cytotoxicity against MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. In addition, molecular docking (PDB ID: (1T46)) studies were performed to predict the binding affinity of ligand with receptor. Moreover, the synthesized BPP compound was loaded in to the PHB-PCL nanofibrous scaffold to check the cytotoxicity against the MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. The in vitro apoptotic potential of the PHB-PCL-BPP nanofibrous scaffold was assessed against MCF-7, Hep-2 cancerous cells and fibroblast cells at 12, 24 and 48 h respectively. The nanofibrous scaffold with BPP can induce apoptosis and also suppress the

  19. Nanofibrous matrixes with biologically active hydroxybenzophenazine pyrazolone compound for cancer theranostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandhasamy, Subramani [Organic Chemistry Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Ramanathan, Giriprasath [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Muthukumar, Thangavelu [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine (IKE), Division of Neuro and Inflammation Sciences (NIV), Linkoping University (Sweden); Thyagarajan, SitaLakshmi [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Umamaheshwari, Narayanan [Organic Chemistry Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Santhanakrishnan, V P [Department of Plant Biotechnology, TNAU, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli, E-mail: suma67@gmail.com [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai, E-mail: ptperumal@gmail.com [Organic Chemistry Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-05-01

    The nanomaterial with the novel biologically active compounds has been actively investigated for application in cancer research. Substantial use of nanofibrous scaffold for cancer research with potentially bioactive compounds through electrospinning has not been fully explored. Here, we describe the series of fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold loaded with novel potential biologically active hydroxybenzo[a]phenazine pyrazol-5(4H)-one derivatives were designed, synthesized by a simple one-pot, two step four component condensation based on Michael type addition reaction of lawsone, benzene-1,2-diamine, aromatic aldehydes and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H)-one as the substrates. The heterogeneous solid state catalyst (Fe (III) Y-Zeolite) could effectively catalyze the reaction to obtain the product with high yield and short reaction time. The synthesized compounds (5a–5p) were analyzed by NMR, FTIR and HRMS analysis. Compound 5c was confirmed by single crystal XRD studies. All the compounds were biologically evaluated for their potential inhibitory effect on anticancer (MCF-7, Hep-2) and microbial (MRSA, MTCC 201 and FRCA) activities. Among the compounds 5i exhibited the highest levels of inhibitory activity against both MCF-7, Hep-2 cell lines. Furthermore, the compound 5i (BPP) was evaluated for DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry studies and cytotoxicity against MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. In addition, molecular docking (PDB ID: (1T46)) studies were performed to predict the binding affinity of ligand with receptor. Moreover, the synthesized BPP compound was loaded in to the PHB-PCL nanofibrous scaffold to check the cytotoxicity against the MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. The in vitro apoptotic potential of the PHB-PCL-BPP nanofibrous scaffold was assessed against MCF-7, Hep-2 cancerous cells and fibroblast cells at 12, 24 and 48 h respectively. The nanofibrous scaffold with BPP can induce apoptosis and also suppress the

  20. Dasatinib inhibits both osteoclast activation and prostate cancer PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, John C.; Poblenz, Ann; Corn, Paul G.; Parikh, Nila U.; Starbuck, Michael W.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Lee, Francis; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Darnay, Bryant G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Therapies to target prostate cancer bone metastases have only limited effects. New treatments are focused on the interaction between cancer cells, bone marrow cells and the bone matrix. Osteoclasts play an important role in the development of bone tumors caused by prostate cancer. Since Src kinase has been shown to be necessary for osteoclast function, we hypothesized that dasatinib, a Src family kinase inhibitor, would reduce osteoclast activity and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell-induced osteoclast formation. Results Dasatinib inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes with an EC50 of 7.5 nM. PC-3 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, were able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocytic cell line, into osteoclasts and dasatinib inhibited this differentiation. In addition, conditioned medium from PC-3 cell cultures was able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts and this too, was inhibited by dasatinib. Even the lowest concentration of dasatinib, 1.25 nmol, inhibited osteoclast differentiation by 29%. Moreover, dasatinib inhibited osteoclast activity by 58% as measured by collagen 1 release. Experimental design We performed in vitro experiments utilizing the Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib to target osteoclast activation as a means of inhibiting prostate cancer bone metastases. Conclusion Dasatinib inhibits osteoclast differentiation of mouse primary bone marrow-derived monocytes and PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. Dasatinib also inhibits osteoclast degradation activity. Inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activity may be an effective targeted therapy in patients with prostate cancer bone metastases. PMID:19855158

  1. Long-term and baseline recreational physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer: the California Teachers Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Conwright, C M; Ma, H; Lacey, J V; Henderson, K D; Neuhausen, S; Horn-Ross, P L; Deapen, D; Sullivan-Halley, J; Bernstein, L

    2013-08-06

    Physical activity may be associated with decreasing endometrial cancer risk; it remains unclear whether the association is modified by body size. Among 93 888 eligible California Teachers Study participants, 976 were diagnosed with incident endometrial cancer between 1995-1996 and 2007. Cox proportional hazards regression methods were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer associated with long-term (high school through age 54 years) and baseline (3 years prior to joining the cohort) strenuous and moderate recreational physical activity, overall and by body size. Increased baseline strenuous recreational physical activity was associated with decreased endometrial cancer risk (Ptrend=0.006) with approximately 25% lower risk among women exercising >3 h per week per year than among those exercising activity was associated with lower risk among overweight/obese women. Increasing physical activity, particularly strenuous activity, may be a lifestyle change that overweight and obese women can implement to reduce their endometrial cancer risk.

  2. Breast cancer services in Vietnam: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Chris; Minh, Luu Ngoc; Anh, Tran Tuan; Ngan, Tran Thu; Tuan, Ngo Tri; Giang, Kim Bao; Hoat, Luu Ngoc; Lohfeld, Lynne; Donnelly, Michael; Van Minh, Hoang; Murray, Liam

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence has been increasing consistently in Vietnam. Thus far, there have been no analytical reviews of research produced within this area. We sought to analyse the nature andextent of empirical studies about breast cancer in Vietnam, identifying areas for future research and systemsstrengthening. We undertook a scoping study using a five-stage framework to review published and grey literature in English and Vietnamese on breast cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment. We focused specifically on research discussing the health system and service provision. Our results show that breast cancer screening is limited, with no permanent or integrated national screening activities. There is a lack of information on screening processes and on the integration of screening services with other areas of the health system. Treatment is largely centralised, and across all services there is a lack of evaluation and data collection that would be informative for recommendations seeking to improve accessibility and quality of breast cancer services. This paper is the first scoping review of breast cancer services in Vietnam. It outlines areas for future focus for policy makers and researchers with the objective of strengthening service provision to women with breast cancer across the country while also providing a methodological example for how to conduct a collaborative scoping review.

  3. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Cancer Pain Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Paice, Judith A.; Mulvey, Matt; Bennett, Michael; Dougherty, Patrick M.; Farrar, John T.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Miaskowski, Christine; Schmidt, Brian; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cancer pain is a serious complication of malignancy or its treatment. Currently, no comprehensive, universally accepted cancer pain classification system exists. Clarity in classification of common cancer pain syndromes would improve clinical assessment and management. Moreover, an evidence-based taxonomy would enhance cancer pain research efforts by providing consistent diagnostic criteria, ensuring comparability across clinical trials. As part of a collaborative effort between the A...

  4. Effects of Community-Based Collaborative Group Characteristics on Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Cheryl L.; Fernandez-Gimenez, Maria E.

    2009-10-01

    Recent research suggests that community-based collaboration may build social capital—defined as trust, norms of reciprocity, and networks. Social capital may improve a group’s ability to collaborate, manage risk, innovate, and adapt to change. We used mail surveys of group participants and key informant interviews to assess whether the following collaborative group characteristics affected social capital built within 10 collaborative groups in northwest Colorado: perceived success, conflict, activeness, stakeholder diversity, previous collaboration experience, similar values and beliefs, group size, group age, and initial social capital. Perceived success and initial levels of social capital were the strongest predictors of current levels of and changes in social capital over time. Collaboration experience negatively influenced current levels of trust. Our results suggest that collaborative groups may need to consider the outcomes of collaborative interactions in order to build social capital.

  5. Activation of β-catenin signaling in androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Liu, Jie; Lu, Jing-Fang; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Efstathiou, Eleni; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Maity, Sankar N; Navone, Nora M

    2012-02-01

    To study Wnt/β-catenin in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and understand its function independently of the β-catenin-androgen receptor (AR) interaction. We carried out β-catenin immunocytochemical analysis, evaluated TOP-flash reporter activity (a reporter of β-catenin-mediated transcription), and sequenced the β-catenin gene in MDA prostate cancer 118a, MDA prostate cancer 118b, MDA prostate cancer 2b, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells. We knocked down β-catenin in AR-negative MDA prostate cancer 118b cells and carried out comparative gene-array analysis. We also immunohistochemically analyzed β-catenin and AR in 27 bone metastases of human CRPCs. β-Catenin nuclear accumulation and TOP-flash reporter activity were high in MDA prostate cancer 118b but not in MDA prostate cancer 2b or PC-3 cells. MDA prostate cancer 118a and MDA prostate cancer 118b cells carry a mutated β-catenin at codon 32 (D32G). Ten genes were expressed differently (false discovery rate, 0.05) in MDA prostate cancer 118b cells with downregulated β-catenin. One such gene, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), synthesizes hyaluronan, a core component of the extracellular matrix. We confirmed HAS2 upregulation in PC-3 cells transfected with D32G-mutant β-catenin. Finally, we found nuclear localization of β-catenin in 10 of 27 human tissue specimens; this localization was inversely associated with AR expression (P = 0.056, Fisher's exact test), suggesting that reduced AR expression enables Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We identified a previously unknown downstream target of β-catenin, HAS2, in prostate cancer, and found that high β-catenin nuclear localization and low or no AR expression may define a subpopulation of men with bone metastatic prostate cancer. These findings may guide physicians in managing these patients.

  6. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Okusaka, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  7. Cancer-induced cardiac cachexia: Pathogenesis and impact of physical activity (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloum, Yassine; Rannou-Bekono, Françoise; Favier, François B

    2017-05-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome observed in many patients suffering from several chronic diseases including cancer. In addition to the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, cancer cachexia results in cardiac function impairment. During the severe stage of the disease, patients as well as animals bearing cancer cells display cardiac atrophy. Cardiac energy metabolism is also impeded with disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and reduced oxidative capacity, although the available data remain equivocal. The release of inflammatory cytokines by tumor is a key mechanism in the initiation of heart failure. Oxidative stress, which results from the combination of chemotherapy, inadequate antioxidant consumption and chronic inflammation, will further foster heart failure. Protein catabolism is due to the concomitant activation of proteolytic systems and inhibition of protein synthesis, both processes being triggered by the deactivation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The reduction in oxidative capacity involves AMP-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α dysregulation. The nuclear factor-κB transcription factor plays a prominent role in the coordination of these alterations. Physical exercise appears as an interesting non-pharmaceutical way to counteract cancer cachexia-induced-heart failure. Indeed, aerobic training has anti-inflammatory effects, increases anti-oxidant defenses, prevents atrophy and promotes oxidative metabolism. The present review points out the importance of better understanding the concurrent structural and metabolic changes within the myocardium during cancer and the protective effects of exercise against cardiac cachexia.