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Sample records for activated ras alters

  1. Activated Ras alters lens and corneal development through induction of distinct downstream targets

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    Reneker Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian Ras genes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation and differentiation and are frequently mutated in human cancers. Tumor development in response to Ras activation varies between different tissues and the molecular basis for these variations are poorly understood. The murine lens and cornea have a common embryonic origin and arise from adjacent regions of the surface ectoderm. Activation of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathway induces the corneal epithelial cells to proliferate and the lens epithelial cells to exit the cell cycle. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the differential responses of these two related tissues have not been defined. We have generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active version of human H-Ras in their lenses and corneas. Results Ras transgenic lenses and corneal epithelial cells showed increased proliferation with concomitant increases in cyclin D1 and D2 expression. This initial increase in proliferation is sustained in the cornea but not in the lens epithelial cells. Coincidentally, cdk inhibitors p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were upregulated in the Ras transgenic lenses but not in the corneas. Phospho-Erk1 and Erk2 levels were elevated in the lens but not in the cornea and Spry 1 and Spry 2, negative regulators of Ras-Raf-Erk signaling, were upregulated more in the corneal than in the lens epithelial cells. Both lens and corneal differentiation programs were sensitive to Ras activation. Ras transgenic embryos showed a distinctive alteration in the architecture of the lens pit. Ras activation, though sufficient for upregulation of Prox1, a transcription factor critical for cell cycle exit and initiation of fiber differentiation, is not sufficient for induction of terminal fiber differentiation. Expression of Keratin 12, a marker of corneal epithelial differentiation, was reduced in the Ras transgenic corneas. Conclusions Collectively, these

  2. Expression of activated Ras during Dictyostelium development alters cell localization and changes cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Z M; Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    2001-03-01

    There is now a body of evidence to indicate that Ras proteins play important roles in development. Dictyostelium expresses several ras genes and each appears to perform a distinct function. Previous data had indicated that the overexpression of an activated form of the major developmentally regulated gene, rasD, caused a major aberration in morphogenesis and cell type determination. We now show that the developmental expression of an activated rasG gene under the control of the rasD promoter causes a similar defect. Our results indicate that the expression of activated rasG in prespore cells results in their transdifferentiation into prestalk cells, whereas activated rasG expression in prestalk causes gross mislocalization of the prestalk cell populations.

  3. Molecular kinetics. Ras activation by SOS: allosteric regulation by altered fluctuation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen; Christensen, Sune M; Abel, Steven M; Iwig, Jeff; Wu, Hung-Jen; Gureasko, Jodi; Rhodes, Christopher; Petit, Rebecca S; Hansen, Scott D; Thill, Peter; Yu, Cheng-Han; Stamou, Dimitrios; Chakraborty, Arup K; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual SOS molecules catalyzing nucleotide exchange in H-Ras. Single-molecule kinetic traces revealed that SOS samples a broad distribution of turnover rates through stochastic fluctuations between distinct, long-lived (more than 100 seconds), functional states. The expected allosteric activation of SOS by Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was conspicuously absent in the mean rate. However, fluctuations into highly active states were modulated by Ras-GTP. This reveals a mechanism in which functional output may be determined by the dynamical spectrum of rates sampled by a small number of enzymes, rather than the ensemble average.

  4. Ras activation by SOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen;

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual ...

  5. Raft protein clustering alters N-Ras membrane interactions and activation pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, Sharon; Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A; Dekker, Frank J; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Henis, Yoav I; Dekker, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking, membrane localization, and lipid raft association of Ras proteins, which are crucial oncogenic mediators, dictate their isoform-specific biological responses. Accordingly, their spatiotemporal dynamics are tightly regulated. While extensively studied for H- and K-Ras, such informati

  6. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  7. Activation of Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by coordinated alteration of H3K27 trimethylation in Ras-induced senescence.

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    Atsushi Kaneda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence involves epigenetic alteration, e.g. loss of H3K27me3 in Ink4a-Arf locus. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF, we here analyzed transcription and epigenetic alteration during Ras-induced senescence on genome-wide scale by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-sequencing and microarray. Bmp2 was the most activated secreted factor with H3K4me3 gain and H3K27me3 loss, whereas H3K4me3 loss and de novo formation of H3K27me3 occurred inversely in repression of nine genes, including two BMP-SMAD inhibitors Smad6 and Noggin. DNA methylation alteration unlikely occurred. Ras-activated cells senesced with nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8. Senescence was bypassed in Ras-activated cells when Bmp2/Smad1 signal was blocked by Bmp2 knockdown, Smad6 induction, or Noggin induction. Senescence was induced when recombinant BMP2 protein was added to Bmp2-knocked-down Ras-activated cells. Downstream Bmp2-Smad1 target genes were then analyzed genome-wide by ChIP-sequencing using anti-Smad1 antibody in MEF that was exposed to BMP2. Smad1 target sites were enriched nearby transcription start sites of genes, which significantly correlated to upregulation by BMP2 stimulation. While Smad6 was one of Smad1 target genes to be upregulated by BMP2 exposure, Smad6 repression in Ras-activated cells with increased enrichment of Ezh2 and gain of H3K27me3 suggested epigenetic disruption of negative feedback by Polycomb. Among Smad1 target genes that were upregulated in Ras-activated cells without increased repressive mark, Parvb was found to contribute to growth inhibition as Parvb knockdown lead to escape from senescence. It was revealed through genome-wide analyses in this study that Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by harmonized epigenomic alteration play an important role in Ras-induced senescence.

  8. Regulation of p21ras activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowy, D R; Zhang, K; DeClue, J E

    1992-01-01

    The ras genes encode GTP/GDP-binding proteins that participate in mediating mitogenic signals from membrane tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. The activity of p21ras is determined by the concentration of GTP-p21ras, which is tightly regulated by a complex array of positive and negative contr...... mechanisms. GAP and NF1 can negatively regulate p21ras activity by stimulating hydrolysis of GTP bound to p21ras. Other cellular factors can positively regulate p21ras by stimulating GDP/GTP exchange....

  9. ras activation in human tumors and in animal model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corominas, M.; Sloan, S.R.; Leon, J.; Kamino, Hideko; Newcomb, E.W.; Pellicer, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Environmental agents such as radiation and chemicals are known to cause genetic damage. Alterations in a limited set of cellular genes called proto-oncogenes lead to unregulated proliferation and differentiation. The authors have studied the role of the ras gene family in carcinogenesis using two different animal models. In one case, thymic lymphomas were induced in mice by either gamma or neutron radiation, and in the other, keratoacanthomas were induced in rabbit skin with dimethylbenzanthracene. Human keratoacanthomas similar to the ones induced in rabbits were also analyzed. They found that different types of radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons, induced different point mutations in ras genes. A novel K-ras mutation in codon 146 has been found in thymic lymphomas induced by neutrons. Keratoacanthomas induced in rabbit skin by dimethylbenzanthracene show a high frequency of H-ras-activated genes carrying a mutation in codon 61. The same is observed in human keratoacanthomas, although mutations are in both the 12th and the 61st codons of the H-ras gene. H-ras activation is less frequent in human squamous cell carcinomas than in keratoacanthomas, suggesting that ras genes could play a role in vivo in differentiation as well as in proliferation.

  10. Ras activation in Hirudo medicinalis angiogenic process

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    R Valvassori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In some leeches like Hirudo medicinalis, any kind of stimulation (surgical wound or growth factor injection provokes the botryoidal tissue response. This peculiar tissue, localized in the loose connective tissue between gut and body wall, is formed by granular botryoidal cells and flattened endothelial-like cells. Under stimulation, the botryoidal tissue changes its shape to form new capillaries. In mammals, the molecular regulation of the angiogenic phenotype requires coordinated input from a number of signalling molecules: among them the GTPase Ras is one of the major actor. In our current study, we determine whether Ras activation alone would be sufficient to drive vessels formation from leech botryoidal tissue. Our findings indicate that assembly and disassembly of actin filaments regulated by Ras protein is involved in morphological modification of botryoidal tissue cells during leech angiogenic process.

  11. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

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    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  12. Altered expression of Bcl-2, c-Myc, H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras does not influence the course of mycosis fungoides

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    Maj, Joanna; Jankowska-Konsur, Alina; Plomer-Niezgoda, Ewa; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Data about genetic alterations in mycosis fungoides (MF) are limited and their significance not fully elucidated. The aim of the study was to explore the expression of various oncogenes in MF and to assess their influence on the disease course. Material and methods Skin biopsies from 27 MF patients (14 with early MF and 13 with advanced disease) and 8 healthy volunteers were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Bcl-2, c-Myc, H-Ras, K-Ras and N-Ras expression. All PCR reactions were performed using an Applied Biosystems 7900HT Fast Real-Time PCR System and interpreted using Sequence Detection Systems software which utilizes the comparative delta Ct method. The level of mRNA was normalized to GAPDH expression. All data were analyzed statistically. Results All evaluated oncogenes were found to be expressed in the skin from healthy controls and MF patients. Bcl-2 (–4.2 ±2.2 vs. –2.2 ±1.1; p = 0.01), H-Ras (–3.0 ±3.3 vs. 0.6 ±2.6; p = 0.01) and N-Ras (–3.6 ±2.0 vs. –1.1 ±2.4; p = 0.03) were expressed at significantly lower levels in MF. No relationships between oncogene expression and disease stage, presence of distant metastases and survival were observed (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusions The pathogenic role and prognostic significance of analyzed oncogenes in MF seem to be limited and further studies are needed to establish better prognostic factors for patients suffering from MF. PMID:24273576

  13. Alterations in metastatic properties of hepatocellular carcinoma cell following H-ras oncogene transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Zhi Ying Lin; Xiao Li Feng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To demonstrate the relationship betweenH-ras oncogene and hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) metastasis.METHODS Activated H-ras oncogene wastransfected into SMMC 7721, a cell line derivedfrom human HCC, by calcium phosphatetransfection method. Some metastasis-relatedparameters were detected in vitro, includingadhesion assay, migration assay, expression ofcollagenase ⅣV (c ⅣV ase) and epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR).RESULTS The abilities of H-ras-transfected cellclones in adhesion to laminin (LN) or fibronectin(FN), migration, c Ⅳ ase secretion increasedmarkedly, and the expression of EGFR elevatedmoderately. More importantly, these alterationswere consistent positively with the expressionof p21, the protein product of H-ras oncogene.CONCLUSION H-ras oncogene could inducethe metastatic phenotype of HCC cell in vitro toraise its metastatic potential.

  14. A Genetic Screen Identifies PITX1 as a Suppressor of RAS Activity and Tumorigenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, I.G.M.; Leeuwen, Bart van; Berns, K.; Mullenders, J.; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.; Voorhoeve, P.M.; Agami, R.

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations of RAS frequently occur in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is important for tumorigenesis. However, a large proportion of these cancers still retain wild-type RAS alleles, suggesting that either the RAS pathway is activated in a distinct manner or anothe

  15. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

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    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  16. Genome profiling of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: frequent alterations of RAS and RUNX1 genes

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    Olschwang Sylviane

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML is a hematological disease close to, but separate from both myeloproliferative disorders (MPD and myelodysplastic syndromes and may show either myeloproliferative (MP-CMML or myelodysplastic (MD-CMML features. Not much is known about the molecular biology of this disease. Methods We studied a series of 30 CMML samples (13 MP- and 11 MD-CMMLs, and 6 acutely transformed cases from 29 patients by using Agilent high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and sequencing of 12 candidate genes. Results Two-thirds of samples did not show any obvious alteration of aCGH profiles. In one-third we observed chromosome abnormalities (e.g. trisomy 8, del20q and gain or loss of genes (e.g. NF1, RB1 and CDK6. RAS mutations were detected in 4 cases (including an uncommon codon 146 mutation in KRAS and PTPN11 mutations in 3 cases. We detected 11 RUNX1 alterations (9 mutations and 2 rearrangements. The rearrangements were a new, cryptic inversion of chromosomal region 21q21-22 leading to break and fusion of RUNX1 to USP16. RAS and RUNX1 alterations were not mutually exclusive. RAS pathway mutations occurred in MP-CMMLs (~46% but not in MD-CMMLs. RUNX1 alterations (mutations and cryptic rearrangement occurred in both MP and MD classes (~38%. Conclusion We detected RAS pathway mutations and RUNX1 alterations. The latter included a new cryptic USP16-RUNX1 fusion. In some samples, two alterations coexisted already at this early chronic stage.

  17. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

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    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  18. Feedback activation of neurofibromin terminates growth factor-induced Ras activation

    OpenAIRE

    Hennig, Anne; Markwart, Robby; Wolff, Katharina; Schubert, Katja; Cui, Yan; Ian A Prior; Manuel A Esparza-Franco; Ladds, Graham; Rubio, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://biosignaling.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12964-016-0128-z. Background Growth factors induce a characteristically short-lived Ras activation in cells emerging from quiescence. Extensive work has shown that transient as opposed to sustained Ras activation is critical for the induction of mitogenic programs. Mitogen-induced accumulation of active Ras-GTP results from increased nucleotide exchange driven by the nucleo...

  19. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

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    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  20. Mechanism of Ras Activation by TGFBeta

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    transcriptional activity of the vitamin D receptor (Yanagi- sawa et al, 1999). Smad3 and Smad4 can also associate with the acute myeloid leukemia family of... Ishii , S. (1999). ATF-2 is a common nuclear target of Smad and TAK1 pathways in transforming growth factor-ß signaling. J Biol Chem 274, 8949

  1. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Hanson, Gregory R [ORNL; Sexton, Angela Kay [ORNL; Jones Jr, J P [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  2. Alteration of glycerolipid and sphingolipid-derived second messenger kinetics in ras transformed 3T3 cells.

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    Laurenz, J C; Gunn, J M; Jolly, C A; Chapkin, R S

    1996-01-05

    The effect of ras transformation (rasB fibroblasts) on basal and serum-stimulated diacylglycerol (DAG) composition and mass was examined over time with respect to changes in membrane phospholipid composition and ceramide mass. RasB cells vs. nontransformed control cells (rasD and NR6) had chronically elevated DAG levels (up to 240 min) following serum stimulation, indicating a defect in the recovery phase of the intracellular DAG pulse. Ras transformation also had a dramatic effect on DAG composition. Molecular species analysis revealed that DAG from unstimulated rasB cells was enriched in the delta 9 desaturase fatty acyl species (monoenoate 18:1(n - 7) and 18:1(n - 9)), and depleted in arachidonic acid (20:4(n - 6)). With the exception of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI), DAG remodeling paralleled the compositional alterations in individual phospholipid classes. Importantly, ras transformation altered the fatty acyl composition of sphingomyelin, a precursor to the ceramide second messenger. With the addition of serum, control cells (rasD) had a progressive increase in ceramide mass with levels approximately 5-fold higher by 240 min. In contrast, ceramide levels did not increase in rasB cells at either 4 or 240 min. These results demonstrate that ras-oncogene, in addition to its effects on DAG metabolism, can also abolish the cellular increase in ceramide mass in response to serum stimulation. Since DAG and ceramide may have opposing biological functions, the prolonged elevation of DAG and the suppression of ceramide levels would be consistent with an enhanced proliferative capacity.

  3. Ras-mutant cancer cells display B-Raf binding to Ras that activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase and is inhibited by protein kinase A phosphorylation.

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    Li, Yanping; Takahashi, Maho; Stork, Philip J S

    2013-09-20

    The small G protein Ras regulates proliferation through activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) cascade. The first step of Ras-dependent activation of ERK signaling is Ras binding to members of the Raf family of MAP kinase kinase kinases, C-Raf and B-Raf. Recently, it has been reported that in melanoma cells harboring oncogenic Ras mutations, B-Raf does not bind to Ras and does not contribute to basal ERK activation. For other types of Ras-mutant tumors, the relative contributions of C-Raf and B-Raf are not known. We examined non-melanoma cancer cell lines containing oncogenic Ras mutations and express both C-Raf and B-Raf isoforms, including the lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. Both B-Raf and C-Raf were constitutively bound to oncogenic Ras and contributed to Ras-dependent ERK activation. Ras binding to B-Raf and C-Raf were both subject to inhibition by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA. cAMP inhibited the growth of H1299 cells and Ras-dependent ERK activation via PKA. PKA inhibited the binding of Ras to both C-Raf and B-Raf through phosphorylations of C-Raf at Ser-259 and B-Raf at Ser-365, respectively. These studies demonstrate that in non-melanocytic Ras-mutant cancer cells, Ras signaling to B-Raf is a significant contributor to ERK activation and that the B-Raf pathway, like that of C-Raf, is a target for inhibition by PKA. We suggest that cAMP and hormones coupled to cAMP may prove useful in dampening the effects of oncogenic Ras in non-melanocytic cancer cells through PKA-dependent actions on B-Raf as well as C-Raf.

  4. Developmental lineage priming in Dictyostelium by heterogeneous Ras activation.

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    Chattwood, Alex; Nagayama, Koki; Bolourani, Parvin; Harkin, Lauren; Kamjoo, Marzieh; Weeks, Gerald; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2013-11-26

    In cell culture, genetically identical cells often exhibit heterogeneous behavior, with only 'lineage primed' cells responding to differentiation inducing signals. It has recently been proposed that such heterogeneity exists during normal embryonic development to allow position independent patterning based on 'salt and pepper' differentiation and sorting out. However, the molecular basis of lineage priming and how it leads to reproducible cell type proportioning are poorly understood. To address this, we employed a novel forward genetic approach in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. These studies reveal that the Ras-GTPase regulator gefE is required for normal lineage priming and salt and pepper differentiation. This is because Ras-GTPase activity sets the intrinsic response threshold to lineage specific differentiation signals. Importantly, we show that although gefE expression is uniform, transcription of its target, rasD, is both heterogeneous and dynamic, thus providing a novel mechanism for heterogeneity generation and position-independent differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01067.001.

  5. Approach for targeting Ras with small molecules that activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Sun, Qi; Daniels, R Nathan; Camper, DeMarco; Kennedy, J Phillip; Phan, Jason; Olejniczak, Edward T; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2014-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the small GTPase Ras by oncogenic mutation or constitutively active upstream receptor tyrosine kinases results in the deregulation of cellular signals governing growth and survival in ∼30% of all human cancers. However, the discovery of potent inhibitors of Ras has been difficult to achieve. Here, we report the identification of small molecules that bind to a unique pocket on the Ras:Son of Sevenless (SOS):Ras complex, increase the rate of SOS-catalyzed nucleotide exchange in vitro, and modulate Ras signaling pathways in cells. X-ray crystallography of Ras:SOS:Ras in complex with these molecules reveals that the compounds bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the CDC25 domain of SOS adjacent to the Switch II region of Ras. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of multiple X-ray cocrystal structures. Mutational analyses confirmed the functional relevance of this binding site and showed it to be essential for compound activity. These molecules increase Ras-GTP levels and disrupt MAPK and PI3K signaling in cells at low micromolar concentrations. These small molecules represent tools to study the acute activation of Ras and highlight a pocket on SOS that may be exploited to modulate Ras signaling.

  6. Guanosine triphosphatase activating protein (GAP) interacts with the p21 ras effector binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adari, H; Lowy, D R; Willumsen, B M;

    1988-01-01

    A cytoplasmic protein that greatly enhances the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity of N-ras protein but does not affect the activity of oncogenic ras mutants has been recently described. This protein (GAP) is shown here to be ubiquitous in higher eukaryotes and to interact with H-ras as w......A cytoplasmic protein that greatly enhances the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity of N-ras protein but does not affect the activity of oncogenic ras mutants has been recently described. This protein (GAP) is shown here to be ubiquitous in higher eukaryotes and to interact with H......-ras as well as with N-ras proteins. To identify the region of ras p21 with which GAP interacts, 21 H-ras mutant proteins were purified and tested for their ability to undergo stimulation of GTPase activity by GAP. Mutations in nonessential regions of H-ras p21 as well as mutations in its carboxyl....... Transforming mutations at positions 12, 59, and 61 (the phosphoryl binding region) abolished GTPase stimulation by GAP. Point mutations in the putative effector region of ras p21 (amino acids 35, 36, and 38) were also insensitive to GAP. However, a point mutation at position 39, shown previously not to impair...

  7. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  8. R-(+)-perillyl alcohol-induced cell cycle changes, altered actin cytoskeleton, and decreased ras and p34(cdc2) expression in colonic adenocarcinoma SW480 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Thorgeirsdottir, S; Broitman, S A

    1999-01-01

    Monoterpenes as S-(-)-perillyl alcohol (PA) have been shown to inhibit the isoprenylation of such growth regulatory proteins as ras. In this study, we investigated the effects of the R-(+) enantiomer of PA on cell cycle, signaling, and cytoskeletal control in the colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW480, which carries a K-ras mutation. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry of SW480 cells treated with 1 mM PA for 24 hours demonstrated an increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 with a decrease in S phase, compared with untreated control cells. These cell cycle changes correlated with an inhibition of protein isoprenylation from (14)C-mevalonate and decreased expression of the cell cycle regulatory kinase p34(cdc2). Additionally, PA-treated cells acquired a flattened morphology with a condensation of cytoskeletal actin spikes to the periphery. This was in contrast to treatment with 15 microM mevinolin (MVN), a direct mevalonate synthesis inhibitor, which imparted to SW480 cells a more rounded and spindly morphology, associated with the depolymerization of actin microfilaments. Together, these data suggest that fluctuations in mevalonate and isoprenoid pools may involve different morphologic phenomenon. Because ras mediated signaling is related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the effects of PA on the isoprenylation of ras. Although MVN treatment inhibited ras farnesylation, PA treatment decreased the expression of total ras protein. In summary, R-(+)-PA-induced cell signaling events correlated with alterations in the organization of cytoskeletal actin and decreased protein expression of growth regulatory proteins, such as ras and cdc2 kinase. These effects may contribute to the growth inhibitory activity of R-(+)-PA.

  9. Mutation-Specific RAS Oncogenicity Explains N-RAS Codon 61 Selection in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Christin E.; Liu, Wenjin; Huynh, Minh V.; Waqas, Meriam A.; Gillahan, James E.; Clark, Kelly S.; Fu, Kailing; Martin, Brit L.; Jeck, William R.; Souroullas, George P.; Darr, David B.; Zedek, Daniel C.; Miley, Michael J.; Baguley, Bruce C.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    N-RAS mutation at codon 12, 13 or 61 is associated with transformation; yet, in melanoma, such alterations are nearly exclusive to codon 61. Here, we compared the melanoma susceptibility of an N-RasQ61R knock-in allele to similarly designed K-RasG12D and N-RasG12D alleles. With concomitant p16INK4a inactivation, K-RasG12D or N-RasQ61R expression efficiently promoted melanoma in vivo, whereas N-RasG12D did not. Additionally, N-RasQ61R mutation potently cooperated with Lkb1/Stk11 loss to induce highly metastatic disease. Functional comparisons of N-RasQ61R and N-RasG12D revealed little difference in the ability of these proteins to engage PI3K or RAF. Instead, N-RasQ61R showed enhanced nucleotide binding, decreased intrinsic GTPase activity and increased stability when compared to N-RasG12D. This work identifies a faithful model of human N-RAS mutant melanoma, and suggests that the increased melanomagenecity of N-RasQ61R over N-RasG12D is due to heightened abundance of the active, GTP-bound form rather than differences in the engagement of downstream effector pathways. PMID:25252692

  10. Rap1 overexpression reveals that activated RasD induces separable defects during Dictyostelium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S A; Weeks, G; Spiegelman, G B

    1997-10-15

    One of the Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD, is expressed preferentially in prestalk cells at the slug stage of development and overexpression of this gene containing a G12T activating mutation causes the formation of aberrant multitipped aggregates that are blocked from further development (Reymond et al., 1986, Nature, 323, 340-343). The ability of the Dictyostelium rap1 gene to suppress this abnormal developmental phenotype was investigated. The rap1 gene and G12V activated and G10V negative mutant forms of the rap1 gene were independently linked to the rasD promoter and each construct used to transform M1, a Dictyostelium cell line expressing RasD[G12T]. Transformants of M1 that expressed Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] protein still formed multitipped aggregates, but most tips were able to complete development and form fruiting bodies. Cell lines showing this modified phenotype were designated ME (multitipped escape). The rap1[G10V] construct did not modify the M1 phenotype. These data suggest that overexpression of RasD[G12T] has two effects, the formation of a multitipped aggregate and a block in subsequent differentiation and that the expression of Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] reverses only the latter. Differentiation of ME cells in low density monolayers showed the identical low level of stalk and spore cell formation seen for M1 cells under the same conditions. Thus the cell autonomous defect in monolayer differentiation induced in the M1 strain was not corrected in the ME strain. Cell type-specific gene expression during the development of M1 cells is dramatically altered: prestalk cell-specific gene expression is greatly enhanced, whereas prespore-specific gene expression is almost suppressed (Louis et al., 1997, Mol. Biol. Cell, 8, 303-312). During the development of ME cells, ecmA mRNA levels were restored to those seen for Ax3, and tagB mRNA levels were also markedly reduced, although not to Ax3 levels. cotC expression in ME cells was enhanced severalfold relative to M1

  11. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  12. Formation of the Ras dimer is essential for Raf-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, K; Mizutani, S; Koide, H; Kaziro, Y

    2000-02-11

    Although it is well established that Ras requires membrane localization for activation of its target molecule, Raf-1, the reason for this requirement is not fully understood. In this study, we found that modified Ras, which is purified from Sf9 cells, could activate Raf-1 in a cell-free system, when incorporated into liposome. Using a bifunctional cross-linker and a protein-fragmentation complementation assay, we detected dimer formation of Ras in the liposome and in the intact cells, respectively. These results suggest that dimerization of Ras in the lipid membrane is essential for activation of Raf-1. To support this, we found that, when fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), unprocessed Ras expressed in Escherichia coli could bypass the requirement for liposome. A Ras-dependent Raf-1 activator, which we previously reported (Mizutani, S., Koide, H., and Kaziro, Y. (1998) Oncogene 16, 2781-2786), was still required for Raf-1 activation by GST-Ras. Furthermore, an enforced dimerization of unmodified oncogenic Ras mutant in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, using a portion of gyrase B or estrogen receptor, also resulted in activation of Raf-1. From these results, we conclude that membrane localization allows Ras to form a dimer, which is essential, although not sufficient, for Raf-1 activation.

  13. PP2A/B56 and GSK3/Ras suppress PKB activity during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Pino, Marbelys; Castillo, Boris; Kim, Bohye; Kim, Lou W

    2015-12-01

    We have previously shown that the Dictyostelium protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56, encoded by psrA, modulates Dictyostelium cell differentiation through negatively affecting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) function. Our follow-up research uncovered that B56 preferentially associated with GDP forms of RasC and RasD, but not with RasG in vitro, and psrA(-) cells displayed inefficient activation of multiple Ras species, decreased random motility, and inefficient chemotaxis toward cAMP and folic acid gradient. Surprisingly, psrA(-) cells displayed aberrantly high basal and poststimulus phosphorylation of Dictyostelium protein kinase B (PKB) kinase family member PKBR1 and PKB substrates. Expression of constitutively active Ras mutants or inhibition of GSK3 in psrA(-) cells increased activities of both PKBR1 and PKBA, but only the PKBR1 activity was increased in wild-type cells under the equivalent conditions, indicating that either B56- or GSK3-mediated suppressive mechanism is sufficient to maintain low PKBA activity, but both mechanisms are necessary for suppressing PKBR1. Finally, cells lacking RasD or RasC displayed normal PKBR1 regulation under GSK3-inhibiting conditions, indicating that RasC or RasD proteins are essential for GSK3-mediated PKBR1 inhibition. In summary, B56 constitutes inhibitory circuits for PKBA and PKBR1 and thus heavily affects Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

  14. Study Illuminates K-Ras4B Activation, Which May Help Predict Drug Resistance | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Until recently, researchers studying RAS, a family of proteins involved in transmitting signals within cells, believed that the exchange of guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP) by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was sufficient to activate the protein. Once activated, RAS can cause unintended and overactive signaling in cells, which can lead to cell division and, ultimately, cancer.

  15. RasGRP1, but not RasGRP3, is required for efficient thymic β-selection and ERK activation downstream of CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic P Golec

    Full Text Available T cell development is a highly dynamic process that is driven by interactions between developing thymocytes and the thymic microenvironment. Upon entering the thymus, the earliest thymic progenitors, called CD4(-CD8(- 'double negative' (DN thymocytes, pass through a checkpoint termed "β-selection" before maturing into CD4(+CD8(+ 'double positive' (DP thymocytes. β-selection is an important developmental checkpoint during thymopoiesis where developing DN thymocytes that successfully express the pre-T cell receptor (TCR undergo extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the DP stage. Signals transduced through the pre-TCR, chemokine receptor CXCR4 and Notch are thought to drive β-selection. Additionally, it has long been known that ERK is activated during β-selection; however the pathways regulating ERK activation remain unknown. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the β-selection events in mice lacking RasGRP1, RasGRP3 and RasGRP1 and 3. We report that RasGRP1 KO and RasGRP1/3 DKO deficient thymi show a partial developmental block at the early DN3 stage of development. Furthermore, DN3 thymocytes from RasGRP1 and RasGRP1/3 double knock-out thymi show significantly reduced proliferation, despite expression of the TCRβ chain. As a result of impaired β-selection, the pool of TCRβ(+ DN4 is significantly diminished, resulting in inefficient DN to DP development. Also, we report that RasGRP1 is required for ERK activation downstream of CXCR4 signaling, which we hypothesize represents a potential mechanism of RasGRP1 regulation of β-selection. Our results demonstrate that RasGRP1 is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation at the β-selection checkpoint and functions downstream of CXCR4 to activate the Ras/MAPK pathway.

  16. The Ras mutant D119N is both dominant negative and activated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cool, RH; Schmidt, G; Lenzen, CU; Prinz, H; Vogt, D; Wittinghofer, A

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of mutation D119N (or its homolog) in the NKxD nucleotide binding motif of various Ras-like proteins produces constitutively activated or dominant-negative effects, depending on the system and assay. Here we show that Ras(D119N) has an inhibitory effect at a cell-specific concentrat

  17. Tiam1 mediates Ras activation of Rac by a PI(3)K-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, John M; Lambert, Que T; Reuther, Gary W; Malliri, Angeliki; Siderovski, David P; Sondek, John; Collard, John G; Der, Channing J

    2002-08-01

    Rac is a member of the Ras superfamily of GTPases and functions as a GDP/GTP-regulated switch. Formation of active Rac-GTP is stimulated by Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), such as Tiam1 (ref. 2). Once activated, Rac stimulates signalling pathways that regulate actin organization, gene expression and cellular proliferation. Rac also functions downstream of the Ras oncoprotein in pathways that stimulate membrane ruffling, growth transformation, activation of the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase, activation of the NF-kappa B transcription factor and promotion of cell survival. Although recent studies support phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI(3)K)-dependent mechanisms through which Ras might activate Rac (refs 9,10), the precise mechanism remains to be determined. Here we demonstrate that Tiam1, a Rac-specific GEF, preferentially associates with activated GTP-bound Ras through a Ras-binding domain. Furthermore, activated Ras and Tiam1 cooperate to cause synergistic formation of Rac-GTP in a PI(3)K-independent manner. Thus, Tiam1 can function as an effector that directly mediates Ras activation of Rac.

  18. The effects of expression of an activated rasG mutation on the differentiation of Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, R; Robbins, S; Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1992-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum contains two ras genes, rasG and rasD, that are expressed during growth and differentiation, respectively. It was shown previously that Dictyostelium transformants expressing an activated rasD gene (a mutation producing a change in amino acid 12 from glycine to threonine) developed abnormally. When developed on filters these transformants formed multitipped aggregates, which did not go on to produce final fruiting bodies, but in a submerged culture assay on a plastic surface they either formed small aggregates or did not aggregate. In this study we transformed cells with the rasG gene, mutated to change amino acid 12 from glycine to threonine. The resulting transformants developed normally on filters, but aggregation under other conditions was impaired. In particular, in submerged culture on a plastic surface they either produced very small aggregates or did not aggregate, one of the phenotypes exhibited by the activated rasD transformants. Molecular analysis of the transformants revealed the presence of high copy numbers of the mutated rasG gene, but the level of expression of the mutant gene never exceeded the level of expression of the endogenous gene. These results indicate a powerful dominant effect of a relatively small amount of the activated RasG protein in Dictyostelium.

  19. Identification of H-Ras-Specific Motif for the Activation of Invasive Signaling Program in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression and/or activation of H-Ras are often associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. Previously, we showed that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces MCF10A human breast epithelial cell invasion and migration, whereas both H-Ras and N-Ras induce cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation. In an attempt to determine the sequence requirement directing the divergent phenotype induced by H-Ras and N-Ras with a focus on the induction of human breast cell invasion, we investigated the structural and functional relationships between H-Ras and N-Ras using domain-swap and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Here, we report that the hypervariable region (HVR, consisting of amino acids 166 to 189 in H-Ras, determines the invasive/migratory signaling program as shown by the exchange of invasive phenotype by swapping HVR sequences between H-Ras and N-Ras. We also demonstrate that the H-Ras-specific additional palmitoylation site at Cys184 is not responsible for the signaling events that distinguish between H-Ras and N-Ras. Importantly, this work identifies the C-terminal HVR, especially the flexible linker domain with two consecutive proline residues Pro173 and Pro174, as a critical domain that contributes to activation of H-Ras and its invasive potential in human breast epithelial cells. The present study sheds light on the structural basis for the Ras isoform-specific invasive program of breast epithelial cells, providing information for the development of agents that specifically target invasion-related H-Ras pathways in human cancer.

  20. RCP is a human breast cancer-promoting gene with Ras-activating function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Xuejing; Datta, Arpita; Govindarajan, Kunde; Tam, Wai Leong; Han, Jianyong; George, Joshy; Wong, Christopher; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Phua, Tze Yoong; Leong, Wan Yee; Chan, Yang Sun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Karuturi, Krishna Murthy; Lim, Bing; Miller, Lance David

    2009-08-01

    Aggressive forms of cancer are often defined by recurrent chromosomal alterations, yet in most cases, the causal or contributing genetic components remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized microarray informatics to identify candidate oncogenes potentially contributing to aggressive breast cancer behavior. We identified the Rab-coupling protein RCP (also known as RAB11FIP1), which is located at a chromosomal region frequently amplified in breast cancer (8p11-12) as a potential candidate. Overexpression of RCP in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in acquisition of tumorigenic properties such as loss of contact inhibition, growth-factor independence, and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, knockdown of RCP in human breast cancer cell lines inhibited colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and markedly reduced tumor formation and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Overexpression of RCP enhanced ERK phosphorylation and increased Ras activation in vitro. As these results indicate that RCP is a multifunctional gene frequently amplified in breast cancer that encodes a protein with Ras-activating function, we suggest it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, these studies provide new insight into the emerging role of the Rab family of small G proteins and their interacting partners in carcinogenesis.

  1. Activating Ras mutations fail to ensure efficient replication of adenovirus mutants lacking VA-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses lacking their PKR-antagonizing VA RNAs replicate poorly in primary cells. It has been suggested that these virus recombinants still replicate efficiently in tumor cells with Ras mutations and might therefore be useful in tumor therapy. The ability of interferon-sensitive viruses...... to grow in Ras-mutant tumor cells is generally ascribed to a postulated inhibitory effect of mutant Ras on PKR. We have constructed a set of isogenic adenoviruses that lack either or both VA RNA species, and tested virus replication in a variety of cell species with different Ras status. In tendency, VA...... mutational status, upon infection with VA-less adenoviruses in the presence of interferon, but also upon addition of the PKR activator polyIC to cells. When comparing two isogenic cell lines that differ solely with regard to the presence or absence of mutant Ras, no difference was observed concerning...

  2. Ras GTPase-activating protein gap1 of the homobasidiomycete Schizophyllum commune regulates hyphal growth orientation and sexual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Daniela; Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Knabe, Nicole; Kothe, Erika

    2006-04-01

    The white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune is used for the analysis of mating and sexual development in homobasidiomycete fungi. In this study, we isolated the gene gap1 encoding a GTPase-activating protein for Ras. Disruption of gap1 should therefore lead to strains accumulating Ras in its activated, GTP-bound state and to constitutive Ras signaling. Haploid Deltagap1 monokaryons of different mating types did not show alterations in mating behavior in the four different mating interactions possible in fungi expressing a tetrapolar mating type system. Instead, the growth rate in Deltagap1 monokaryons was reduced by ca. 25% and ca. 50% in homozygous Deltagap1/Deltagap1 dikaryons. Monokaryons, as well as homozygous dikaryons, carrying the disrupted gap1 alleles exhibited a disorientated growth pattern. Dikaryons showed a strong phenotype during clamp formation since hook cells failed to fuse with the peg beside them. Instead, the dikaryotic character of the hyphae was rescued by fusion of the hooks with nearby developing branches. Deltagap1/Deltagap1 dikaryons formed increased numbers of fruitbody primordia, whereas the amount of fruitbodies was not raised. Mature fruitbodies formed no or abnormal gills. No production of spores could be observed. The results suggest Ras involvement in growth, clamp formation, and fruitbody development.

  3. Genetic Validation of Cell Proliferation via Ras-Independent Activation of the Raf/Mek/Erk Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Carmen G; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Jacob, Harrys K C; Drosten, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Signaling transmitted by the Ras family of small GTPases (H-, N-, and K-Ras) is essential for proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). However, constitutive activation of the downstream Raf/Mek/Erk pathway can bypass the requirement for Ras proteins and allow cells to proliferate in the absence of the three Ras isoforms. Here we describe a protocol for a colony formation assay that permits evaluating the role of candidate proteins that are positive or negative regulators of cell proliferation mediated via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk pathway activation. K-Ras(lox) (H-Ras (-/-), N-Ras (-/-), K-Ras (lox/lox), RERT(ert/ert)) MEFs are infected with retro- or lentiviral vectors expressing wild-type or constitutively activated candidate cDNAs, shRNAs, or sgRNAs in combination with Cas9 to ascertain the possibility of candidate proteins to function either as an activator or inhibitor of Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation. These cells are then seeded in the absence or presence of 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), which activates the resident CreERT2 alleles resulting in elimination of the conditional K-Ras alleles and ultimately generating Rasless cells. Colony formation in the presence of 4-OHT indicates cell proliferation via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation.

  4. Photochemical Modulation of Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction using Caged Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors: Activation via One- and Two-Photon Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Warmka, Janel K.; Dore, Timothy M.; Blank, David A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates, and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase, Bhc-FTI, is described. The inhibitor was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol functional group with a Bhc moiety; while Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryls. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor (FTI) that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies. PMID:22492666

  5. Photochemical modulation of Ras-mediated signal transduction using caged farnesyltransferase inhibitors: activation by one- and two-photon excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Ochocki, Joshua D; Warmka, Janel K; Dore, Timothy M; Blank, David A; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-07

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase is described. The inhibitor, FTI, was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol group with a bromohydroxycoumarin (Bhc) moiety. While Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryl groups. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies.

  6. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  7. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  8. Molecular alterations of Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathways in colorectal cancers from a tertiary hospital at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Wai Kien; Choo, Chee Wei; Leong, Vincent Ching-Shian; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Jabar, Mohd Faisal; Seow, Heng Fong

    2013-10-01

    Molecular alterations in KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and PTEN have been implicated in designing targeted therapy for colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study aimed to determine the status of these molecular alterations in Malaysian CRCs as such data are not available in the literature. We investigated the mutations of KRAS, BRAF, and PTEN, the gene amplification of PIK3CA, and the protein expression of PTEN and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (p110α) by direct DNA sequencing, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in 49 CRC samples. The frequency of KRAS (codons 12, 13, and 61), BRAF (V600E), and PTEN mutations, and PIK3CA amplification was 25.0% (11/44), 2.3% (1/43), 0.0% (0/43), and 76.7% (33/43), respectively. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated loss of PTEN protein in 54.5% (24/44) of CRCs and no significant difference in PI3K p110α expression between CRCs and the adjacent normal colonic mucosa (p = 0.380). PIK3CA amplification was not associated with PI3K p110α expression level, but associated with male cases (100% of male cases vs 56% of female cases harbored amplified PIK3CA, p = 0.002). PI3K p110α expression was significantly higher (p = 0.041) in poorly/moderately differentiated carcinoma compared with well-differentiated carcinoma. KRAS mutation, PIK3CA amplification, PTEN loss, and PI3K p110α expression did not correlate with Akt phosphorylation or Ki-67 expression. KRAS mutation, PIK3CA amplification, and PTEN loss were not mutually exclusive. This is the first report on CRC in Malaysia showing comparable frequency of KRAS mutation and PTEN loss, lower BRAF mutation rate, higher PIK3CA amplification frequency, and rare PTEN mutation, as compared with published reports.

  9. NMR characterization of full-length farnesylated and non-farnesylated H-Ras and its implications for Raf activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Roopa; Williams, Jason G; Campbell, Sharon L

    2004-11-01

    The C terminus, also known as the hypervariable region (residues 166-189), of H-, N-, and K-Ras proteins has sequence determinants necessary for full activation of downstream effectors such as Raf kinase and PI-3 kinase as well as for the correct targeting of Ras proteins to lipid rafts and non-raft membranes. There is considerable interest in understanding how residues in the extreme C terminus of the different Ras proteins and farnesylation of the CaaX box cysteine affect Ras membrane localization and allosteric activation of Raf kinase. To provide insights into the structural and dynamic changes that occur in Ras upon farnesylation, we have used NMR spectroscopy to compare the properties of truncated H-Ras (1-166), to non-processed full-length H-Ras (residues 1-185) and full-length (1-189) farnesylated H-Ras. We report that the C-terminal helix alpha-5 extends to residue N172, and the remaining 17 amino acid residues in the C terminus are conformationally averaged in solution. Removal of either 23 or 18 amino acid residues from the C terminus of full length H-Ras generates truncated H-Ras (1-166) and H-Ras (1-171) proteins, respectively, that have been structurally characterized and are biochemical active. Here we report that C-terminal truncation of H-Ras results in minor structural and dynamic perturbations that are propagated throughout the H-Ras protein including increased flexibility of the central beta-sheet and the C-terminal helix alpha-5. Ordering of residues in loop-2, which is involved in Raf CRD binding is also observed. Farnesylation of full-length H-Ras at C186 does not result in detectable conformational changes in H-Ras. Chemical shift mapping studies of farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of H-Ras with the Raf-CRD show that the farnesyl moiety, the extreme H-Ras C terminus and residues 23-30, contribute to H-Ras:Raf-CRD interactions, thereby increasing the affinity of H-Ras for the Raf-CRD.

  10. Role of neuronal Ras activity in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eManns

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is modulated by various signals like growth factors, hormones, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. All of these factors can (but not necessarily do converge on the activation of the G protein p21Ras. We used a transgenic mouse model (synRas mice expressing constitutively activated G12V-Harvey Ras selectively in differentiated neurons to investigate the possible effects onto neurogenesis. Ras activation in neurons attenuates hippocampal precursor cell generation at an early stage of the proliferative cascade before neuronal lineage determination occurs. Therefore it is unlikely that the transgenically activated Ras in neurons mediates this effect by a direct, intracellular signaling mechanism. Voluntary exercise restores neurogenesis up to wild type level presumably mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor. Reduced neurogenesis is linked to impairments in spatial short-term memory and object recognition, the latter can be rescued by voluntary exercise, as well. These data support the view that new cells significantly increase complexity that can be processed by the hippocampal network when experience requires high demands to associate stimuli over time and/or space.

  11. H-ras transformation sensitizes volume-activated anion channels and increases migratory activity of NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Linda; Klausen, Thomas K; Stock, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the H-ras oncogene increases the migratory activity of many cell types and thereby contributes to the metastatic behavior of tumor cells. Other studies point to an involvement of volume-activated anion channels (VRAC) in (tumor) cell migration. In this paper, we tested whether...... VRACs are required for the stimulation of cell migration upon expression of the H-ras oncogene. We compared VRAC activation and migration of wild-type and H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 fibroblasts by means of patch-clamp techniques and time-lapse video microscopy. Both cell types achieve the same degree...... of VRAC activation upon maximal stimulation, induced by reducing extracellular osmolarity from 300 to 190 mOsm/l. However, upon physiologically relevant reductions in extracellular osmolarity (275 mOsm/l), the level of VRAC activation is almost three times higher in H-ras-transformed compared to wild...

  12. Expression of an activated rasD gene changes cell fate decisions during Dictyostelium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S A; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1997-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the expression of an activated rasD gene in wild-type Dictyostelium cells results in formation of aggregates with multitips, instead of the normal single tips, and a block in further development. In an attempt to better understand the role of activated RasD development, we examined cell-type-specific gene expression in a strain stably expressing high levels of RasD[G12T]. We found that the expression of prestalk cell-specific genes ecmA and tagB was markedly enhanced, whereas the expression of the prespore cell-specific gene cotC was reduced to very low levels. When the fate of cells in the multitipped aggregate was monitored with an ecmA/lacZ fusion, it appeared that most of the cells eventually adopted prestalk gene expression characteristics. When mixtures of the [G12T]rasD cells and Ax3 cells were induced to differentiate, chimeric pseudoplasmodia were not formed. Thus, although the [G12T]rasD transformant had a marked propensity to form prestalk cells, it could not supply the prestalk cell population when mixed with wild-type cells. Both stalk and spore cell formation occurred in low cell density monolayers of the [G12T]rasD strain, suggesting that at least part of the inhibition of stalk and spore formation during multicellular development involved inhibitory cell interactions within the cell mass. Models for the possible role of rasD in development are discussed.

  13. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis.

  14. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Bray, Francesca; García de Lacoba, Mario; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Ruiz-Sánchez, Antonio J; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-06

    Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184) in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and Δ(12)-PGJ(2) selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2). Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  15. Loss of p53 induces cell proliferation via Ras-independent activation of the Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Sum, Eleanor Y M; Lechuga, Carmen G; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Jacob, Harrys K C; García-Medina, Raquel; Huang, Sidong; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Bernards, Rene; Barbacid, Mariano

    2014-10-21

    The Ras family of small GTPases constitutes a central node in the transmission of mitogenic stimuli to the cell cycle machinery. The ultimate receptor of these mitogenic signals is the retinoblastoma (Rb) family of pocket proteins, whose inactivation is a required step to license cell proliferation. However, little is known regarding the molecular events that connect Ras signaling with the cell cycle. Here, we provide genetic evidence to illustrate that the p53/p21 Cdk-interacting protein 1 (Cip1)/Rb axis is an essential component of the Ras signaling pathway. Indeed, knockdown of p53, p21Cip1, or Rb restores proliferative properties in cells arrested by ablation of the three Ras loci, H-, N- and K-Ras. Ras signaling selectively inactivates p53-mediated induction of p21Cip1 expression by inhibiting acetylation of specific lysine residues in the p53 DNA binding domain. Proliferation of cells lacking both Ras proteins and p53 can be prevented by reexpression of the human p53 ortholog, provided that it retains an active DNA binding domain and an intact lysine residue at position 164. These results unveil a previously unidentified role for p53 in preventing cell proliferation under unfavorable mitogenic conditions. Moreover, we provide evidence that cells lacking Ras and p53 proteins owe their proliferative properties to the unexpected retroactivation of the Raf/Mek/Erk cascade by a Ras-independent mechanism.

  16. A WXW motif is required for the anticancer activity of the TAT-RasGAP317-326 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-08-22

    TAT-RasGAP317-326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317-326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326.

  17. A WXW Motif Is Required for the Anticancer Activity of the TAT-RasGAP317–326 Peptide*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A.; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    TAT-RasGAP317–326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317–326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. PMID:25008324

  18. An orthosteric inhibitor of the RAS-SOS interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Seth; Joy, Stephen T; Arora, Paramjit S; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) proteins are signaling nodes that transduce extracellular cues into precise alterations in cellular physiology by engaging effector pathways. RAS signaling thus regulates diverse cell processes including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Owing to this central role in governing mitogenic signals, RAS pathway components are often dysregulated in human diseases. Targeted therapy of RAS pathways has generally not been successful, largely because of the robust biochemistry of the targets and their multifaceted network of molecular regulators. The rate-limiting step of RAS activation is Son of Sevenless (SOS)-mediated nucleotide exchange involving a single evolutionarily conserved catalytic helix from SOS. Structure function data of this mechanism provided a strong platform to design an SOS-derived, helically constrained peptide mimic as an inhibitor of the RAS-SOS interaction. In this chapter, we review RAS-SOS signaling dynamics and present evidence supporting the novel paradigm of inhibiting their interaction as a therapeutic strategy. We then describe a method of generating helically constrained peptide mimics of protein surfaces, which we have employed to inhibit the RAS-SOS active site interaction. The biochemical and functional properties of this SOS mimic support the premise that inhibition of RAS-nucleotide exchange can effectively block RAS activation and downstream signaling.

  19. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  20. Activation of c-Ki-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V S; Sakamoto, H; Nishimura, S; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1985-09-01

    DNA isolated from a lymph node with metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a Japanese male patient transformed NIH3T3 cells upon transfection by the calcium-phosphate precipitation technique. Analysis of DNA from the transformant revealed the presence of an activated human c-Ki-ras gene, which is considered to be responsible for the transformation of the NIH3T3 cells.

  1. N-Ras induces alterations in Golgi complex architecture and in constitutive protein transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babia, T; Ayala, [No Value; Valderrama, F; Mato, E; Bosch, M; Santaren, JF; Renau-Piqueras, J; Kok, JW; Thomsen, TM; Egea, G

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids is a common feature of many tumor cell types, and is often accompanied by alterations in membrane traffic and an anomalous localization of Golgi-resident proteins and glycans. These observations suggest that the Golgi complex is a key organelle for at le

  2. Constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity substitutes for p53 loss, or MYC or oncogenic RAS expression in the transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Junk

    Full Text Available Cancer develops following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that inactivate tumor suppressor genes and activate proto-oncogenes. Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK activity has oncogenic potential in breast cancer due to its ability to inactivate key tumor suppressor networks and drive aberrant proliferation. Accumulation or over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1 occurs in a majority of breast cancers and over-expression of CCND1 leads to accumulation of activated CCND1/CDK2 complexes in breast cancer cells. We describe here the role of constitutively active CCND1/CDK2 complexes in human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation. A genetically-defined, stepwise HMEC transformation model was generated by inhibiting p16 and p53 with shRNA, and expressing exogenous MYC and mutant RAS. By replacing components of this model, we demonstrate that constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity effectively confers anchorage independent growth by inhibiting p53 or replacing MYC or oncogenic RAS expression. These findings are consistent with several clinical observations of luminal breast cancer sub-types that show elevated CCND1 typically occurs in specimens that retain wild-type p53, do not amplify MYC, and contain no RAS mutations. Taken together, these data suggest that targeted inhibition of constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity may enhance the effectiveness of current treatments for luminal breast cancer.

  3. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: George Tsokos, M.D. CONTRACTING...Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) George Tsokos, M.D...a decreased level of disease. Further studies will expand upon these observations better outlining the function of platelets in the injury associated

  4. Structural basis for the interaction of the adaptor protein grb14 with activated ras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Qamra

    Full Text Available Grb14, a member of the Grb7-10-14 family of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins, is a tissue-specific negative regulator of insulin signaling. Grb7-10-14 contain several signaling modules, including a Ras-associating (RA domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2 region, and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 (SH2 domain. We showed previously that the RA and PH domains, along with the BPS region and SH2 domain, are necessary for downregulation of insulin signaling. Here, we report the crystal structure at 2.4-Å resolution of the Grb14 RA and PH domains in complex with GTP-loaded H-Ras (G12V. The structure reveals that the Grb14 RA and PH domains form an integrated structural unit capable of binding simultaneously to small GTPases and phosphoinositide lipids. The overall mode of binding of the Grb14 RA domain to activated H-Ras is similar to that of the RA domains of RalGDS and Raf1 but with important distinctions. The integrated RA-PH structural unit in Grb7-10-14 is also found in a second adaptor family that includes Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM and lamellipodin, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement. The structure of Grb14 RA-PH in complex with H-Ras represents the first detailed molecular characterization of tandem RA-PH domains bound to a small GTPase and provides insights into the molecular basis for specificity.

  5. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongde; Polejaeva, Irina; Salgia, Ravi; Kao, Chien-Min; Chen, Chin-Tu; Chen, Guangchun; Chen, Liaohai

    2014-01-01

    Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF) cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D) was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency), hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  6. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Gong

    Full Text Available Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency, hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  7. RAS Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Heimbrook, now CEO of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, played a major role in a large pharma as it tried to develop an anti-RAS drug. Lessons from that failure inform the RAS Initiative today.

  8. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yi Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  9. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  10. In Drosophila, RhoGEF2 cooperates with activated Ras in tumorigenesis through a pathway involving Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II and JNK signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peytee Khoo

    2013-05-01

    The Ras oncogene contributes to ∼30% of human cancers, but alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. In a Drosophila screen for oncogenes that cooperate with an activated allele of Ras (RasACT to promote tissue overgrowth and invasion, we identified the GTP exchange factor RhoGEF2, an activator of Rho-family signalling. Here, we show that RhoGEF2 also cooperates with an activated allele of a downstream effector of Ras, Raf (RafGOF. We dissect the downstream pathways through which RhoGEF2 cooperates with RasACT (and RafGOF, and show that RhoGEF2 requires Rho1, but not Rac, for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, of the Rho1 effectors, we show that RhoGEF2 + Ras (Raf-mediated tumorigenesis requires the Rho kinase (Rok–Myosin-II pathway, but not Diaphanous, Lim kinase or protein kinase N. The Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II pathway leads to the activation of Jun kinase (JNK, in cooperation with RasACT. Moreover, we show that activation of Rok or Myosin II, using constitutively active transgenes, is sufficient for cooperative tumorigenesis with RasACT, and together with RasACT leads to strong activation of JNK. Our results show that Rok–Myosin-II activity is necessary and sufficient for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Our observation that activation of Myosin II, which regulates Filamentous actin (F-actin contractility without affecting F-actin levels, cooperates with RasACT to promote JNK activation and tumorigenesis, suggests that increased cell contractility is a key factor in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that signalling via the Tumour necrosis factor (TNF; also known as Egr-ligand–JNK pathway is most likely the predominant pathway that activates JNK upon Rok activation. Overall, our analysis highlights the need for further analysis of the Rok–Myosin-II pathway in cooperation with Ras in human cancers.

  11. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  12. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  13. INHIBITION OF ACTIVATED K-RAS GENE BY SIRNA EXPRESSION CASSETTES IN HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELL LINE MIAPACA-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Chun-you; DONG Ji-hua; CHEN Xiong; ZHANG Min; ZHAO Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct the small interfering RNA(siRNA) expression cassettes (SECs) targeting activated K-ras gene sequence and investigate the effects of SECs on K-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer cell line MIAPaCa-2. Methods: Three different sites of SECs were constructed by PCR. The K1/siRNA, K2/siRNA and K3/siRNA were located at the site 194, 491 and 327, respectively. They were transfected into MiaPaCa-2 cells by liposome to inhibit the expression of activated K-ras. In the interfering groups of site 194,491, we observed the cytopathic effect of confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells after they were incubated for 48 hours, and detected the apoptosis in cells by FACS, then we tested the alternation of K-ras gene in confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells by RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot, respectively. Results: Introductions of the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA against K-ras into MiaPaCa-2 cells led to cytopathic effect, slower proliferation and increased apoptosis, while the appearances of control MiaPaCa-2 cells remained well. The number of apoptotic cells increased compared with control cells. RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot showed the effects of inhibited expression of activated K-ras gene by RNA interference in the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA groups. We also found that the introduction of K3/siRNA had no effect on MiaPaCa-2 cells. Conclusion: K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA can inhibit the expression of activated K-ras and decrease the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cells, while K3/siRNA has no such effect, demonstrating that the suppression of tumor growth by siRNA is sequence-specific. We conclude that K-ras is involved in maintenance of tumor growth of human pancreatic cancer, and SECs against K-ras expression may be a powerful tool to be used therapeutically against human pancreatic cancer.

  14. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors.

  15. Detection of K-ras point mutation and telomerase activity during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Jie-Fei Huang; Zhao-Shen Li; Guo-Ming Xu; Feng Liu; Hong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the value of monitoring K-ras point mutation at codon 12 and telomerase activity in exfoliated cells obtained from pancreatic duct brushings during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Exfoliated cells obtained from pancreatic duct brushings during ERCP were examined in 27 patients: 23with pancreatic cancers, 4 with chronic pancreatitis. K-fas point mutation was detected with the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Telomerase activity was detected by PCR and telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay (PCR-TRAPELISA).RESULTS: The telomerase activities in 27 patients were measured in 21 exfoliated cell samples obtained from pancreatic duct brushings. D450 value of telomerase activities in pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis were 0.446±0.27and 0.041±0.0111, respectively. Seventy-seven point eight percent (14/18) of patients with pancreatic cancer and none of the patients with chronic pancreatitis showed telomerase activity in cells collected from pancreatic duct brushings when cutoff value of telomerase activity was set at 2.0. The K-ras gene mutation rate (72.2%) in pancreatic cancer was higher than that in chronic pancreatitis (33.3%)(P<0.05). In considering of both telomerase activities and K-ras point mutation, the total positive rate was 83.3%(15/18), and the specificity was 100%.CONCLUSION: Changes of telomerase activities and K-ras point mutation at codon 12 may be an early event of malignant progression in pancreatic cancer. Detection of telomerase activity and K-ras point mutation at codon 12may be complementary to each other, and is useful in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  16. The R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 complex controls endothelial cell adhesion and morphogenesis via active integrin endocytosis and Rac signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiara Sandri; Guido Serini; Francesca Caccavari; Donatella Valdembri; Chiara Camillo; Stefan Veltel; Martina Santambrogio; Letizia Lanzetti; Fedenco Bussolino; Johanna Ivaska

    2012-01-01

    During developmental and tumor angiogenesis,semaphorins regulate blood vessel navigation by signaling through plexin receptors that inhibit the R-Ras subfamily of small GTPases.R-Ras is mainly expressed in vascular cells,where it induces adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through unknown mechanisms.We identify the Ras and Rab5 interacting protein RIN2 as a key effector that in endothelial cells interacts with and mediates the pro-adhesive and-angiogenic activity of R-Ras.Both R-Ras-GTP and RIN2 localize at nascent ECM adhesion sites associated with lamellipodia.Upon binding,GTP-loaded R-Ras converts RIN2 from a Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)to an adaptor that first interacts at high affinity with Rab5-GTP to promote the selective endocytosis of ligand-bound/active β1 integrins and then causes the translocation of R-Ras to early endosomes.Here,the R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 signaling module activates Racl-dependent cell adhesion via TIAM1,a Rac GEF that localizes on early endosomes and is stimulated by the interaction with both Ras proteins and the vesicular lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate.In conclusion,the ability of R-Ras-GTP to convert RIN2 from a GEF to an adaptor that preferentially binds Rab5-GTP allows the triggering of the endocytosis of ECM-bound/active β1 integrins and the ensuing funneling of R-Ras-GTP toward early endosomes to elicit the pro-adhesive and TIAM1-mediated activation of Racl.

  17. H-ras-transformed NRK-52E renal epithelial cells have altered growth, morphology, and cytoskeletal structure that correlates with renal cell carcinoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, C J; Tanzer, L R; Phelps, P C; Merriman, R L; Boder, G G; Trump, B F; Elliget, K A

    1999-04-01

    We studied the effect of the ras oncogene on the growth kinetics, morphology, cytoskeletal structure, and tumorigenicity of the widely used NRK-52E rat kidney epithelial cell line and two H-ras oncogene-transformed cell lines, H/1.2-NRK-52E (H/1.2) and H/6.1-NRK-52E (H/6.1). Population doubling times of NRK-52E, H/1.2, and H/6.1 cells were 28, 26, and 24 h, respectively, with the transformed cells reaching higher saturation densities than the parent cells. NRK-52E cells had typical epithelial morphology with growth in colonies. H/1.2 and H/6.1 cell colonies were more closely packed, highly condensed, and had increased plasma membrane ruffling compared to parent cell colonies. NRK-52E cells showed microfilament, microtubule, and intermediate filament networks typical of epithelial cells, while H/1.2 and H/6.1 cells showed altered cytoskeleton architecture, with decreased stress fibers and increased microtubule and intermediate filament staining at the microtubule organizing center. H/1.2 and H/6.1 cells proliferated in an in vitro soft agar transformation assay, indicating anchorage-independence, and rapidly formed tumors in vivo with characteristics of renal cell carcinoma, including mixed populations of sarcomatoid, granular, and clear cells. H/6.1 cells consistently showed more extensive alterations of growth kinetics, morphology, and cytoskeleton than H/1.2 cells, and formed tumors of a more aggressive phenotype. These data suggest that analysis of renal cell characteristics in vitro may have potential in predicting tumor behavior in vivo, and significantly contribute to the utility of these cell lines as in vitro models for examining renal epithelial cell biology and the role of the ras proto-oncogene in signal transduction involving the cytoskeleton.

  18. OSBP-related protein 3 (ORP3) coupling with VAMP-associated protein A regulates R-Ras activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Lilja, Johanna; Vihervaara, Terhi; Hanninen, Raisa; Zhou, You; Peränen, Johan; Nyman, Tuula A; Ivaska, Johanna; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-02-15

    ORP3 is an R-Ras interacting oxysterol-binding protein homolog that regulates cell adhesion and is overexpressed in several cancers. We investigated here a novel function of ORP3 dependent on its targeting to both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). Using biochemical and cell imaging techniques we demonstrate the mechanistic requirements for the subcellular targeting and function of ORP3 in control of R-Ras activity. We show that hyperphosphorylated ORP3 (ORP3-P) selectively interacts with the ER membrane protein VAPA, and ORP3-VAPA complexes are targeted to PM sites via the ORP3 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. A novel FFAT (two phenylalanines in an acidic tract)-like motif was identified in ORP3; only disruption of both the FFAT-like and canonical FFAT motif abolished the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated interaction of ORP3-P with VAPA. Co-expression of ORP3 and VAPA induced R-Ras activation, dependent on the interactions of ORP3 with VAPA and the PM. Consistently, downstream AktS473 phosphorylation and β1-integrin activity were enhanced by ORP3-VAPA. To conclude, phosphorylation of ORP3 controls its association with VAPA. Furthermore, we present evidence that ORP3-VAPA complexes stimulate R-Ras signaling.

  19. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  20. The RafC1 cysteine-rich domain contains multiple distinct regulatory epitopes which control Ras-dependent Raf activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, M; Jöckel, J; Quack, T; Weber, C K; Schmitz, F; Rapp, U R; Wittinghofer, A; Block, C

    1998-11-01

    Activation of c-Raf-1 (referred to as Raf) by Ras is a pivotal step in mitogenic signaling. Raf activation is initiated by binding of Ras to the regulatory N terminus of Raf. While Ras binding to residues 51 to 131 is well understood, the role of the RafC1 cysteine-rich domain comprising residues 139 to 184 has remained elusive. To resolve the function of the RafC1 domain, we have performed an exhaustive surface scanning mutagenesis. In our study, we defined a high-resolution map of multiple distinct functional epitopes within RafC1 that are required for both negative control of the kinase and the positive function of the protein. Activating mutations in three different epitopes enhanced Ras-dependent Raf activation, while only some of these mutations markedly increased Raf basal activity. One contiguous inhibitory epitope consisting of S177, T182, and M183 clearly contributed to Ras-Raf binding energy and represents the putative Ras binding site of the RafC1 domain. The effects of all RafC1 mutations on Ras binding and Raf activation were independent of Ras lipid modification. The inhibitory mutation L160A is localized to a position analogous to the phorbol ester binding site in the protein kinase C C1 domain, suggesting a function in cofactor binding. Complete inhibition of Ras-dependent Raf activation was achieved by combining mutations K144A and L160A, which clearly demonstrates an absolute requirement for correct RafC1 function in Ras-dependent Raf activation.

  1. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-01-16

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH)2D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH)2D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention.

  2. Transforming activity of the c-Ha-ras oncogene having two point mutations in codons 12 and 61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, T; Prassolov, V S; Fushimi, M; Nishimura, S

    1985-09-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the human c-Ha-ras gene with two point mutations in codons 12 and 61 was constructed and its transforming activity on mouse NIH 3T3 cells was compared with those of genes with a single mutation in either codon 12 or 61. Quantitative analyses revealed that the gene with two mutations had essentially the same transforming activity as the genes with single mutations. These results indicate that a single mutation of the c-Ha-ras gene in either codon 12 or 61 is sufficient to activate the gene and that neither of the two mutation sites involved in activation of the gene needs to be intact for transforming activity.

  3. Renoprotective effect of renal liver-type fatty acid binding protein and angiotensin II type 1a receptor loss in renal injury caused by RAS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Shibagaki, Yugo; Yasuda, Takashi; Katayama, Kimie; Hoshino, Seiko; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the renoprotective effect of renal human liver-type fatty acid binding protein (hL-FABP) and angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptor (AT1a) loss in renal injury caused by renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation. We established hL-FABP chromosomal transgenic mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)), crossed the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+) with AT1a knockdown homo mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)), and generated L-FABP(+/-)AT1a hetero mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)). After the back-cross of these cubs, L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were obtained. To activate the renal RAS, wild-type mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-), and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were administered high-dose systemic ANG II infusion plus a high-salt diet for 28 days. In the L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+), RAS activation (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS) caused hypertension and tubulointerstitial damage. In the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS, tubulointerstitial damage was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS. In the AT1a partial knockout (AT1a(+/-)) or complete knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice, reduction of AT1a expression led to a significantly lower degree of renal injury compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS or L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS mice. Renal injury in L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice. In both L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS mice, renal damage was rarely found. The degrees of renal hL-FABP expression and urinary hL-FABP levels increased by RAS activation and gradually decreased along with reduction of AT1a expression levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model, renal hL-FABP expression and a decrease in AT1a expression attenuated tubulointerstitial damage due to RAS activation.

  4. Activation of H-Ras and Rac1 correlates with epidermal growth factor-induced invasion in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Min-Soo; Moon, Aree

    2011-03-01

    There is considerable experimental evidence that hyperactive Ras proteins promote breast cancer growth and development including invasiveness, despite the low frequency of mutated forms of Ras in breast cancer. We have previously shown that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces an invasive phenotype mediated by small GTPase Rac1 in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays an important role in aberrant growth and metastasis formation of many tumor types including breast cancer. The present study aims to investigate the correlation between EGF-induced invasiveness and Ras activation in four widely used breast cancer cell lines. Upon EGF stimulation, invasive abilities and H-Ras activation were significantly increased in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 cell lines, but not in MDA-MB-453 and T47D cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target H-Ras, we showed a crucial role of H-Ras in the invasive phenotype induced by EGF in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, siRNA-knockdown of Rac1 significantly inhibited the EGF-induced invasiveness in these cells. Taken together, this study characterized human breast cancer cell lines with regard to the relationship between H-Ras activation and the invasive phenotype induced by EGF. Our data demonstrate that the activation of H-Ras and the downstream molecule Rac1 correlates with EGF-induced breast cancer cell invasion, providing important information on the regulation of malignant progression in mammary carcinoma cells.

  5. Ras CAAX peptidomimetic FTI-277 selectively blocks oncogenic Ras signaling by inducing cytoplasmic accumulation of inactive Ras-Raf complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E C; Qian, Y; Blaskovich, M A; Fossum, R D; Vogt, A; Sun, J; Cox, A D; Der, C J; Hamilton, A D; Sebti, S M

    1995-11-10

    Ras-induced malignant transformation requires Ras farnesylation, a lipid posttranslational modification catalyzed by farnesyltransferase (FTase). Inhibitors of this enzyme have been shown to block Ras-dependent transformation, but the mechanism by which this occurs remains largely unknown. We have designed FTI-276, a peptide mimetic of the COOH-terminal Cys-Val-Ile-Met of K-Ras4B that inhibited potently FTase in vitro (IC50 = 500 pM) and was highly selective for FTase over geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGTase I) (IC50 = 50 nM). FTI-277, the methyl ester derivative of FTI-276, was extremely potent (IC50 = 100 nM) at inhibiting H-Ras, but not the geranylgeranylated Rap1A processing in whole cells. Treatment of H-Ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells with FTI-277 blocked recruitment to the plasma membrane and subsequent activation of the serine/threonine kinase c-Raf-1 in cells transformed by farnesylated Ras (H-RasF), but not geranylgeranylated, Ras (H-RasGG). FTI-277 induced accumulation of cytoplasmic non-farnesylated H-Ras that was able to bind Raf and form cytoplasmic Ras/Raf complexes in which Raf kinase was not activated. Furthermore, FTI-277 blocked constitutive activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in H-RasF, but not H-RasGG, or Raf-transformed cells. FTI-277 also inhibited oncogenic K-Ras4B processing and constitutive activation of MAPK, but the concentrations required were 100-fold higher than those needed for H-Ras inhibition. The results demonstrate that FTI-277 blocks Ras oncogenic signaling by accumulating inactive Ras/Raf complexes in the cytoplasm, hence preventing constitutive activation of the MAPK cascade.

  6. Primary murine CD4+ T cells fail to acquire the ability to produce effector cytokines when active Ras is present during Th1/Th2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available Constitutive Ras signaling has been shown to augment IL-2 production, reverse anergy, and functionally replace many aspects of CD28 co-stimulation in CD4+ T cells. These data raise the possibility that introduction of active Ras into primary T cells might result in improved functionality in pathologic situations of T cell dysfunction, such as cancer or chronic viral infection. To test the biologic effects of active Ras in primary T cells, CD4+ T cells from Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Transgenic mice were transduced with an adenovirus encoding active Ras. As expected, active Ras augmented IL-2 production in naive CD4+ T cells. However, when cells were cultured for 4 days under conditions to promote effector cell differentiation, active Ras inhibited the ability of CD4+ T cells to acquire a Th1 or Th2 effector cytokine profile. This differentiation defect was not due to deficient STAT4 or STAT6 activation by IL-12 or IL-4, respectively, nor was it associated with deficient induction of T-bet and GATA-3 expression. Impaired effector cytokine production in active Ras-transduced cells was associated with deficient demethylation of the IL-4 gene locus. Our results indicate that, despite augmenting acute activation of naïve T cells, constitutive Ras signaling inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to properly differentiate into Th1/Th2 effector cytokine-producing cells, in part by interfering with epigenetic modification of effector gene loci. Alternative strategies to potentiate Ras pathway signaling in T cells in a more regulated fashion should be considered as a therapeutic approach to improve immune responses in vivo.

  7. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells.

  8. Exploration of Aspergillus fumigatus Ras pathways for novel antifungal drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qusai eAl Abdallah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ras pathway signaling is a critical virulence determinant for pathogenic fungi. Localization of Ras to the plasma membrane (PM is required for Ras network interactions supporting fungal growth and virulence. For example, loss of A. fumigatus RasA signaling at the PM via inhibition of palmitoylation leads to decreased growth, altered hyphal morphogenesis, decreased cell wall integrity and loss of virulence. In order to be properly localized and activated, Ras proteins must transit a series of post-translational modification (PTM steps. These steps include farnesylation, proteolytic cleavage of terminal amino acids, carboxymethylation, and palmitoylation. Because Ras activation drives tumor development, Ras pathways have been extensively studied in mammalian cells as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. Inhibitors of mammalian Ras interactions and PTM components have been, or are actively being, developed. This review will focus on the potential for building upon existing scaffolds to exploit fungal Ras proteins for therapy, synthesizing data from studies employing both mammalian and fungal systems.

  9. Impeded Nedd4-1-Mediated Ras Degradation Underlies Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoling Zeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RAS genes are among the most frequently mutated proto-oncogenes in cancer. However, how Ras stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we report a regulatory loop involving the E3 ligase Nedd4-1, Ras, and PTEN. We found that Ras signaling stimulates the expression of Nedd4-1, which in turn acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates Ras levels. Importantly, Ras activation, either by oncogenic mutations or by epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling, prevents Nedd4-1-mediated Ras ubiquitination. This leads to Ras-induced Nedd4-1 overexpression, and subsequent degradation of the tumor suppressor PTEN in both human cancer samples and cancer cells. Our study thus unravels the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of Ras, Nedd4-1, and PTEN and suggests a basis for the high prevalence of Ras-activating mutations and EGF hypersignaling in cancer.

  10. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  11. Synthesis, biological, and biophysical studies of DAG-indololactones designed as selective activators of RasGRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lia C; Donadío, Lucia Gandolfi; Mann, Ella; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Hill, Colin S; Kelsey, Jessica S; Yang, Jing; Esch, Timothy E; Santos, Marina; Peach, Megan L; Kelley, James A; Blumberg, Peter M; Jelinek, Raz; Marquez, Victor E; Comin, Maria J

    2014-06-15

    The development of selective agents capable of discriminating between protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and other diacylglycerol (DAG)-responsive C1 domain-containing proteins represents an important challenge. Recent studies have highlighted the role that Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) isoforms play both in immune responses as well as in the development of prostate cancer and melanoma, suggesting that the discovery of selective ligands could have potential therapeutic value. Thus far, the N-methyl-substituted indololactone 1 is the agonist with the highest reported potency and selectivity for RasGRP relative to PKC. Here we present the synthesis, binding studies, cellular assays and biophysical analysis of interactions with model membranes of a family of regioisomers of 1 (compounds 2-5) that differ in the position of the linkage between the indole ring and the lactone moiety. These structural variations were studied to explore the interaction of the active complex (C1 domain-ligand) with cellular membranes, which is believed to be an important factor for selectivity in the activation of DAG-responsive C1 domain containing signaling proteins. All compounds were potent and selective activators of RasGRP when compared to PKCα with selectivities ranging from 6 to 65 fold. However, the parent compound 1 was appreciably more selective than any of the other isomers. In intact cells, modest differences in the patterns of translocation of the C1 domain targets were observed. Biophysical studies using giant vesicles as model membranes did show substantial differences in terms of molecular interactions impacting lipid organization, dynamics and membrane insertion. However, these differences did not yield correspondingly large changes in patterns of biological response, at least for the parameters examined.

  12. Oncogenic Ras promotes butyrate-induced apoptosis through inhibition of gelsolin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfer, Lidija; Huang, Jie; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2004-08-27

    Activation of Ras promotes oncogenesis by altering a multiple of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. Oncogenic Ras can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cell type and the nature of the apoptotic stimuli. The response of normal and transformed colonic epithelial cells to the short chain fatty acid butyrate, a physiological regulator of epithelial cell maturation, is also divergent: normal epithelial cells proliferate, and transformed cells undergo apoptosis in response to butyrate. To investigate the role of k-ras mutations in butyrate-induced apoptosis, we utilized HCT116 cells, which harbor an oncogenic k-ras mutation and two isogenic clones with targeted inactivation of the mutant k-ras allele, Hkh2, and Hke-3. We demonstrated that the targeted deletion of the mutant k-ras allele is sufficient to protect epithelial cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this, we showed that apigenin, a dietary flavonoid that has been shown to inhibit Ras signaling and to reverse transformation of cancer cell lines, prevented butyrate-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. To investigate the mechanism whereby activated k-ras sensitizes colonic cells to butyrate, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Ras target genes in the isogenic cell lines HCT116, Hkh2, and Hke-3. The gene exhibiting the greatest down-regulation by the activating k-ras mutation was gelsolin, an actin-binding protein whose expression is frequently reduced or absent in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We demonstrated that silencing of gelsolin expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cells to butyrate-induced apoptosis through amplification of the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-7. These data therefore demonstrate that gelsolin protects cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis and suggest that Ras promotes apoptosis, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of gelsolin.

  13. Biological aspects and tumorigenic activity of the Ras proto-oncogenic family Aspectos biológicos e atividade tumorigênica da família proto-oncogênica Ras

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    Juliano André Boquett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Proto-oncogenes play an important role in the regulation of the cellular cycle, being critical to the tumorigenesis. In this category we can find the RAS family. Due to the high transformation potential of these genes, this family is the best described and most studied one. It is formed by the H-, K- and the N-RAS genes, that codify highly related proteins expressed in several types of cells, denominated p21.These proteins act in the sign transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, as well as in the control of proliferation, differentiation and cellular death, and they are regulated by the interaction with GDP (inactive and GTP (active. These proteins show variation in only 10 - 15% of the primary structure, in the C-terminal portion denominated hyper-variant region. When in the oncogenic form, the p21 proteins remain active, providing continuous stimuli to the cellular proliferation. Among the RAS genes, K-RAS ones have been the most studied for presenting more frequent mutations and for being present in more aggressive tumors, implying the patients’ shorter survival time. Due to these facts and relative bibliography lack in the Portuguese language on this family, we presented in this work a systematized and updated review on the RAS genes. Os proto-oncogenes desempenham importante papel na regulação do ciclo celular, e são críticos à tumorigênese. Nessa categoria se encontra a família RAS, que, devido ao elevado potencial transformante dos genes que a compõem, é uma das mais bem descritas e estudadas. É formada pelos genes H-, K- e N-RAS, que codificam proteínas altamente relacionadas expressas em vários tipos de células, denominadas p21. Estas atuam na transdução de sinal da membrana ao núcleo, estão envolvidas no controle da proliferação, diferenciação e morte celular e são reguladas pela interação com GDP (inativa e GTP (ativa. As proteínas p21 diferem em apenas 10-15% da sua estrutura primária, na porção C

  14. Analysis of Activated Platelet-Derived Growth Factor β Receptor and Ras-MAP Kinase Pathway in Equine Sarcoid Fibroblasts

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    Gennaro Altamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine sarcoids are skin tumours of fibroblastic origin affecting equids worldwide. Bovine papillomavirus type-1 (BPV-1 and, less commonly, type-2 are recognized as etiological factors of sarcoids. The transforming activity of BPV is related to the functions of its major oncoprotein E5 which binds to the platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR causing its phosphorylation and activation. In this study, we demonstrate, by coimmunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, that in equine sarcoid derived cell lines PDGFβR is phosphorylated and binds downstream molecules related to Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase-ERK pathway thus resulting in Ras activation. Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase receptors inhibitor which selectively inhibits the activation of PDGFβR in the treatment of several human and animal cancers. Here we show that imatinib inhibits receptor phosphorylation, and cell viability assays demonstrate that this drug decreases sarcoid fibroblasts viability in a dose-dependent manner. This study contributes to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathology of sarcoids and paves the way to a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of this common equine skin neoplasm.

  15. Functional significance of the novel H-RAS gene mutation M72I in a patient with medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barollo, S; Pezzani, R; Cristiani, A; Bertazza, L; Rubin, B; Bulfone, A; Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Mantero, F; Pennelli, G; Moro, S; Mian, C

    2013-10-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts for around 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. Though usually sporadic, 1 in 4 cases are of genetic origin, with germinal mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in familial forms and somatic mutations both in RET and in the RAS family genes in sporadic ones.This study aimed to characterize a rare H-RAS sequence variant -M72I- in a patient with sporadic MTC, focusing on its functional significance.Mutation analysis was performed for the RET, N-RAS, K-RAS and H-RAS genes by direct sequencing. Western blot analysis was done on 4 thyroid tissues from 1 patient carrying the M72I mutation in H-RAS, 1 with the Q61R mutation in H-RAS, 1 with no RET, H-RAS, K-RAS or N-RAS gene mutations, and 1 normal thyroid, using different antibodies against Erk1/2, phospho-Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), Akt and phospho-Akt (Ser473). Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were completed for H-RAS wt and H-RAS M72I.Western blot analysis demonstrated that both MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways were activated in the MTC patient carrying the M72I variant. In silico results showed conformational changes in H-RAS that could influence its activation by Sos and phosphate binding. Results of molecular dynamics were consistent with Western blot experiments.The M72I mutation may contribute effectively to proliferation and survival signaling throughout the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. This work underscores the importance of studying genetic alterations that may lead to carcinogenesis.

  16. Isolation of two novel ras genes in Dictyostelium discoideum; evidence for a complex, developmentally regulated ras gene subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J; Bush, J; Cardelli, J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1994-02-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, three ras genes (rasD, rasG and rasB) and one ras-related gene (rap1) have been previously isolated and characterized, and the deduced amino acid sequence of their predicted protein products share at least 50% sequence identity with the human H-Ras protein. We have now cloned and characterized two additional members of the ras gene subfamily in Dictyostelium, rasC and rasS. These genes are developmentally regulated and unlike the previously isolated Dictyostelium ras genes, maximum levels of their transcripts were detected during aggregation, suggesting that the encoded proteins have distinct functions during aggregation. The rasC cDNA encodes a 189 amino acid protein that is 65% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 56% identical to the human H-Ras protein. The predicted 194 amino acid gene product encoded by rasS is 60% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 54% identical to the human H-Ras protein. Whereas RasD, RasG, RasB and Rap1 are totally conserved in their putative effector domains relative to H-Ras, RasC and RasS have single amino acid substitutions in their effector domains, consistent with the idea that they have unique functions. In RasC, aspartic acid-38 has been replaced by asparagine (D38N), and in RasS, isoleucine-36 has been replaced by leucine (I36L). In addition, both proteins have several differences in the effector-proximal domain, a domain which is believed to play a role in Ras target activation. In RasC, there is a single conservative amino acid change in the canonical sequence of the binding site for the Ras-specific monoclonal antibody Y13-259, and consequently, RasC is less immunoreactive with the antibody than either of the Dictyostelium RasD or RasG proteins. In contrast, RasS, which has three substitutions in the Y13-259 binding site, does not react with the Y13-259 antibody.

  17. RAS/MAPK activation is associated with reduced tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in triple-negative breast cancer: therapeutic cooperation between MEK and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Sherene; Dushyanthen, Sathana; Beavis, Paul A; Salgado, Roberto; Denkert, Carsten; Savas, Peter; Combs, Susan; Rimm, David L.; Giltnane, Jennifer M.; Estrada, Monica V.; Sánchez, Violeta; Sanders, Melinda E.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Pilkinton, Mark A.; Mallal, Simon A.; Wang, Kai; Miller, Vincent A.; Stephens, Phil J.; Yelensky, Roman; Doimi, Franco D.; Gómez, Henry; Ryzhov, Sergey V.; Darcy, Phillip K.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Balko, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the residual disease (RD) of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) are associated with improved survival, but insight into tumor cell-autonomous molecular pathways affecting these features are lacking. Experimental Design We analyzed TILs in the RD of clinically and molecularly characterized TNBCs after NAC and explored therapeutic strategies targeting combinations of MEK inhibitors with PD-1/PD-L1-targeted immunotherapy in mouse models of breast cancer. Results Presence of TILs in the RD was significantly associated with improved prognosis. Genetic or transcriptomic alterations in Ras/MAPK signaling were significantly correlated with lower TILs. MEK inhibition up-regulated cell-surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression and PD-L1 in TNBC cells both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, combined MEK and PDL-1/PD-1 inhibition enhanced anti-tumor immune responses in mouse models of breast cancer. Conclusions These data suggest the possibility that Ras/MAPK pathway activation promotes immune-evasion in TNBC, and support clinical trials combining MEK- and PD-L1-targeted therapies. Furthermore, Ras/MAPK activation and MHC expression may be predictive biomarkers of response to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26515496

  18. Oncogenic Ras pushes (and pulls) cell cycle progression through ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is capable of channeling a wide variety of extracellular signals into control of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and death. Because aberrant regulation at all steps of this signaling axis is observed in cancer, it remains an area of great interest in the field of tumor biology. Here we present evidence of the intricate and delicate levels of control of this pathway as it pertains to cell cycle regulation and illustrate how this control is not simply a rheostat.

  19. The pro-apoptotic K-Ras 4A proto-oncoprotein does not affect tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ mouse small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Patek (Charles); M.J. Arends (Mark); L. Rose (Lorraine); F. Luo (Feijun); M.R. Walker (Marion); P.S. Devenney (Paul); R.L. Berry (Rachel); N.J. Lawrence (Nicola); R.A. Ridgway (Rachel); O.J. Sansom (Owen); M.L. Hooper (Martin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Alterations in gene splicing occur in human sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) and may contribute to tumour progression. The K-ras proto-oncogene encodes two splice variants, Kras 4A and 4B, and K-ras activating mutations which jointly affect both isoforms are prevalent in CRC.

  20. Increased OXPHOS activity precedes rise in glycolytic rate in H-RasV12/E1A transformed fibroblasts that develop a Warburg phenotype

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    Pluk Helma

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Warburg phenotype in cancer cells has been long recognized, but there is still limited insight in the consecutive metabolic alterations that characterize its establishment. We obtained better understanding of the coupling between metabolism and malignant transformation by studying mouse embryonic fibroblast-derived cells with loss-of-senescence or H-RasV12/E1A-transformed phenotypes at different stages of oncogenic progression. Results Spontaneous immortalization or induction of senescence-bypass had only marginal effects on metabolic profiles and viability. In contrast, H-RasV12/E1A transformation initially caused a steep increase in oxygen consumption and superoxide production, accompanied by massive cell death. During prolonged culture in vitro, cell growth rate increased gradually, along with tumor forming potential in in vitro anchorage-independent growth assays and in vivo tumor formation assays in immuno-deficient mice. Notably, glucose-to-lactic acid flux increased with passage number, while cellular oxygen consumption decreased. This conversion in metabolic properties was associated with a change in mitochondrial NAD+/NADH redox, indicative of decreased mitochondrial tricarboxic acid cycle and OXPHOS activity. Conclusion The high rate of oxidative metabolism in newly transformed cells is in marked contrast with the high glycolytic rate in cells in the later tumor stage. In our experimental system, with cells growing under ambient oxygen conditions in nutrient-rich media, the shift towards this Warburg phenotype occurred as a step-wise adaptation process associated with augmented tumorigenic capacity and improved survival characteristics of the transformed cells. We hypothesize that early-transformed cells, which potentially serve as founders for new tumor masses may escape therapies aimed at metabolic inhibition of tumors with a fully developed Warburg phenotype.

  1. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  2. Genetic Alterations in K-ras and p53 Cancer Genes in Lung Neoplasms From B6C3F1 Mice Exposed to Cumene

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hue-Hua L.; Ton, Thai-Vu T.; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P.; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C.; Lahousse, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the controls. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87 % cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 c...

  3. Methylation associated inactivation of RASSF1A and its synergistic effect with activated K-Ras in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

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    Yu Jing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes associated with promoter methylation is considered to be a hallmark of oncogenesis. RASSF1A is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which was found to be inactivated in many human cancers. Although we have had a prelimilary cognition about the function of RASSF1A, the exact mechanisms about how RASSF1A functions in human cancers were largely unknown. Moreover, the effect of mutated K-Ras gene on the function of RASSF1A is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile and methylation status of RASSF1A gene, and to explore its concrete mechanisms as a tumor suppressor gene in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. Methods We examined the expression profile and methylation status of RASSF1A in two NPC cell lines, 38 primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 14 normal nasopharyngeal epithelia using RT-PCR and methylated specific PCR(MSP respectively. 5-aza-dC was then added to confirm the correlation between hypermethylation status and inactivation of RASSF1A. The NPC cell line CNE-2 was transfected with exogenous pcDNA3.1(+/RASSF1A plasmid in the presence or absence of mutated K-Ras by liposome-mediated gene transfer method. Flow cytometry was used to examine the effect of RASSF1A on cell cycle modulation and apoptosis. Meanwhile, trypan blue dye exclusion assays was used to detect the effect of RASSF1A transfection alone and the co-transfection of RASSF1A and K-Ras on cell proliferation. Results Promoter methylation of RASSF1A could be detected in 71.05% (27/38 of NPC samples, but not in normal nasopharyngeal epithelia. RASSF1A expression in NPC primary tumors was lower than that in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial (p p p p Conclusion Expression of RASSF1A is down-regulated in NPC due to the hypermethylation of promoter. Exogenous expression of RASSF1A is able to induce growth inhibition effect and apoptosis in tumor cell lines, and this effect could be enhanced by activated

  4. R-Ras regulates migration through an interaction with filamin A in melanoma cells.

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    Joanna E Gawecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified Filamin A (FLNa as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin beta1, beta2 and beta7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaDelta3 abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaDelta3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration.

  5. p53 and H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability in renal pelvic carcinomas of NON / Shi mice treated with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine: different genetic alteration from urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gen, H; Yamamoto, S; Morimura, K; Min, W; Mitsuhashi, M; Murai, T; Mori, S; Hosono, M; Oohara, T; Makino, S; Wanibuchi, H; Fukushima, S

    2001-12-01

    We previously reported p53 mutations to be frequent (greater than 70%), whereas both H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability (MSI) were infrequent (about 10%), in urinary bladder carcinomas (UBCs) and their metastatic foci in the N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced mouse urothelial carcinogenesis model. In the present study, an analysis of p53 and H-ras mutations as well as MSI was performed on 12 renal pelvic carcinomas (RPCs) and 8 metastatic or invading foci produced by the same experimental procedure. Histologically, 10 of the RPCs were transitional cell carcinomas and the remaining 2 were squamous cell carcinomas. p53 mutations were infrequent and only found in one primary RPC (8%), its metastatic foci and an invading lesion in another animal (in a total 2 of 12; 17%). H-ras mutations were slightly more frequent (found in 3 of 12 animals; 25%), 4 of 5 involving codon 44, GTG to GCG, not a hot-spot reported for human cancers. In two cases, H-ras mutations were confined to lung metastasis and not detectable in their primary RPCs. MSI analysis was available for 6 pairs of primary RPCs and their metastatic foci, and 4 animals (67%) had MSI at one or more microsatellite loci. Overall, the distribution of genetic alterations differed from that in UBCs produced by the same experimental protocol. The results thus suggest that different genetic pathways may participate in carcinogenesis of the upper and lower urinary tract due to BBN.

  6. Inhibitors of Ras-SOS Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-19

    Activating Ras mutations are found in about 30 % of human cancers. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, such as the son of sevenless (SOS), which form protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with Ras and catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP. This is the rate-limiting step in Ras activation. However, Ras surfaces lack any evident suitable pockets where a molecule might bind tightly, rendering Ras proteins still 'undruggable' for over 30 years. Among the alternative approaches is the design of inhibitors that target the Ras-SOS PPI interface, a strategy that is gaining increasing recognition for treating Ras mutant cancers. Herein we focus on data that has accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the design of small-molecule modulators or peptide mimetics aimed at the interface of the Ras-SOS PPI. We emphasize, however, that even if such Ras-SOS therapeutics are potent, drug resistance may emerge. To counteract this development, we propose "pathway drug cocktails", that is, drug combinations aimed at parallel (or compensatory) pathways. A repertoire of classified cancer, cell/tissue, and pathway/protein combinations would be beneficial toward this goal.

  7. Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 cancer genes in lung neoplasms from B6C3F1 mice exposed to cumene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the control animals. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87% of cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56% of cumene-induced neoplasms, and mutations were detected in 52% of neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions, and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutations and one of seven (14%) K-ras mutations were detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13%) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12%). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene.

  8. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

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    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  9. New insight into the dynamic properties and the active site architecture of H-Ras p21 revealed by X-ray crystallography at very high resolution

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    Klink Björn U

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In kinetic crystallography, the usually static method of X-ray diffraction is expanded to allow time-resolved analysis of conformational rearrangements in protein structures. To achieve this, reactions have to be triggered within the protein crystals of interest, and optical spectroscopy can be used to monitor the reaction state. For this approach, a modified form of H-Ras p21 was designed which allows reaction initiation and fluorescence readout of the initiated GTPase reaction within the crystalline state. Rearrangements within the crystallized protein due to the progressing reaction and associated heterogeneity in the protein conformations have to be considered in the subsequent refinement processes. Results X-ray diffraction experiments on H-Ras p21 in different states along the reaction pathway provide detailed information about the kinetics and mechanism of the GTPase reaction. In addition, a very high data quality of up to 1.0 Å resolution allowed distinguishing two discrete subconformations of H-Ras p21, expanding the knowledge about the intrinsic flexibility of Ras-like proteins, which is important for their function. In a complex of H-Ras•GppNHp (guanosine-5'-(β,γ-imido-triphosphate, a second Mg2+ ion was found to be coordinated to the γ-phosphate group of GppNHp, which positions the hydrolytically active water molecule very close to the attacked γ-phosphorous atom. Conclusion For the structural analysis of very high-resolution data we have used a new 'two-chain-isotropic-refinement' strategy. This refinement provides an alternative and easy to interpret strategy to reflect the conformational variability within crystal structures of biological macromolecules. The presented fluorescent form of H-Ras p21 will be advantageous for fluorescence studies on H-Ras p21 in which the use of fluorescent nucleotides is not feasible.

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N;

    2000-01-01

    , inhibitors of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn), PLC, PKC and MEK and an activator of PKC, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). MEK2 transfection rescued cells treated with all inhibitors. The same was found for PMA treatment, except when cells concomitantly were treated with the MEK inhibitor....... Arachidonic acid rescued cells treated with antibodies to the FGF receptor or the PLC inhibitor, but not cells in which the activity of PKC, p59(fyn), FAK, Ras, or MEK was inhibited. Interaction of NCAM with a synthetic NCAM peptide ligand, known to induce neurite outgrowth, was shown to stimulate...

  11. Loss of RASAL1:a new mechanism of ras activation in cancers%RASAL1蛋白丢失——恶性肿瘤中ras活化的新机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晴; 钱程佳

    2009-01-01

    ras 是一类与恶性肿瘤密切相关的蛋白,其持续活化可促进肿瘤的发生发展.RASAL1蛋白是一种钙离子介导的 ras GTP 酶活化蛋白,其表达下降或缺失,可使 ras 活化,从而导致肿瘤的发生发展.本文综述 ras 活性调节机制、RASAL1 与恶性肿瘤的关系以及RASAL1的表达下调的相关机制.%Ras is a kind of protein closely related to neoplasms,the persistent activation of which would induce tumorigenesis and progression.RASAL1 is a Ca~(2+) regulated ras GTPase-activating-like protein, the loss or decreased expression of RASAL1 induces ras activation, then results in tumongenesis and progression.In this review we sum up the mechanism of ras activation, the relationship between neoplasms and RASAL1 and the mechanism of RASAL1 expression decreasing.

  12. Phosphotyrosine-mediated LAT assembly on membranes drives kinetic bifurcation in recruitment dynamics of the Ras activator SOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, William Y C; Yan, Qingrong; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chung, Jean K; Hansen, Scott D; Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T

    2016-07-19

    The assembly of cell surface receptors with downstream signaling molecules is a commonly occurring theme in multiple signaling systems. However, little is known about how these assemblies modulate reaction kinetics and the ultimate propagation of signals. Here, we reconstitute phosphotyrosine-mediated assembly of extended linker for the activation of T cells (LAT):growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2):Son of Sevenless (SOS) networks, derived from the T-cell receptor signaling system, on supported membranes. Single-molecule dwell time distributions reveal two, well-differentiated kinetic species for both Grb2 and SOS on the LAT assemblies. The majority fraction of membrane-recruited Grb2 and SOS both exhibit fast kinetics and single exponential dwell time distributions, with average dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. The minor fraction exhibits much slower kinetics, extending the dwell times to tens of seconds. Considering this result in the context of the multistep process by which the Ras GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) activity of SOS is activated indicates that kinetic stabilization from the LAT assembly may be important. This kinetic proofreading effect would additionally serve as a stochastic noise filter by reducing the relative probability of spontaneous SOS activation in the absence of receptor triggering. The generality of receptor-mediated assembly suggests that such effects may play a role in multiple receptor proximal signaling processes.

  13. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mutRAS

  14. 肿瘤中k-ras基因异常激活及其临床意义%The active mechanism of k -ras in cancers and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓宇; 贾晓艳

    2015-01-01

    k -ras 作为一种原癌基因,在调控细胞增殖方面起着重要作用。k -ras 基因被多种因素激活后,可产生一系列生物学效应,导致多种肿瘤的发生与演进。k -ras 异常激活还可影响肿瘤分子靶向治疗的疗效。本文对肿瘤中 k -ras 基因的激活机制异常激活及其对临床药物疗效的影响作一综述。%k -ras,which was known as an important proto -oncogene,plays an important role in cell proliferation. The active k -ras could lead series of biological effects,which can cause the progression of cancer.Activated k -ras also has influence on the targeted therapy of cancer.The active mechanism of k -ras and how does it affect clinical medication were summarized.

  15. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  16. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  17. The role of wild type RAS isoforms in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingying; Der, Channing J; Cox, Adrienne D

    2016-10-01

    Mutationally activated RAS proteins are critical oncogenic drivers in nearly 30% of all human cancers. As with mutant RAS, the role of wild type RAS proteins in oncogenesis, tumour maintenance and metastasis is context-dependent. Complexity is introduced by the existence of multiple RAS genes (HRAS, KRAS, NRAS) and protein "isoforms" (KRAS4A, KRAS4B), by the ever more complicated network of RAS signaling, and by the increasing identification of numerous genetic aberrations in cancers that do and do not harbour mutant RAS. Numerous mouse model carcinogenesis studies and examination of patient tumours reveal that, in RAS-mutant cancers, wild type RAS proteins are likely to serve as tumour suppressors when the mutant RAS is of the same isoform. This evidence is particularly robust in KRAS mutant cancers, which often display suppression or loss of wild type KRAS, but is not as strong for NRAS. In contrast, although not yet fully elucidated, the preponderance of evidence indicates that wild type RAS proteins play a tumour promoting role when the mutant RAS is of a different isoform. In non-RAS mutant cancers, wild type RAS is recognized as a mediator of oncogenic signaling due to chronic activation of upstream receptor tyrosine kinases that feed through RAS. Additionally, in the absence of mutant RAS, activation of wild type RAS may drive cancer upon the loss of negative RAS regulators such as NF1 GAP or SPRY proteins. Here we explore the current state of knowledge with respect to the roles of wild type RAS proteins in human cancers.

  18. Activated Ras signaling pathways and reovirus oncolysis: an update on the mechanism of preferential reovirus replication in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of wild-type, unmodified Type 3 Dearing (T3D strain reovirus as an anticancer agent has currently expanded to 32 clinical trials (both completed and ongoing involving reovirus in the treatment of cancer. It has been more than 30 years since the potential of reovirus as an anticancer agent was first identified in studies that demonstrated the preferential replication of reovirus in transformed cell lines but not in normal cells. Later investigations have revealed the involvement of activated Ras signaling pathways (both upstream and downstream and key steps of the reovirus infectious cycle in promoting preferential replication in cancer cells with reovirus-induced cancer cell death occurring through necrotic, apoptotic, and autophagic pathways. There is increasing evidence that reovirus-induced antitumor immunity involving both innate and adaptive responses also contributes to therapeutic efficacy though this discussion is beyond the scope of this article. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanism of oncolysis contributing to the broad anticancer activity of reovirus. Further understanding of reovirus oncolysis is critical in enhancing the clinical development and efficacy of reovirus.

  19. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that Gα2βγ cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for Gα2 in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both Gα2 and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized Gα2*, the activated GTP-bearing form of Gα2, leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient ‘memory’ to eliminate the ‘back-of-the wave’ problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since the signal pathways we study are highly conserved between Dicty

  20. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that [Formula: see text] cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for [Formula: see text] in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both [Formula: see text] and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized [Formula: see text], the activated GTP-bearing form of [Formula: see text], leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient 'memory' to eliminate the 'back-of-the wave' problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since

  1. cis-Active Ras G2-like sequence implicated in the heterotropic activation of the deoxyadenosine kinase of Lactobacillus acidophilus R-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S; Ma, N; Ives, D H

    1997-03-14

    Deoxyadenosine kinase (dAK) forms a heterodimer with either deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) or deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), and is heterotropically activated 3-5 times by dGuo or dCyd. Expressed alone, dAK is inactive and exhibits no response to dGuo or dCyd; activity and heterotropic response are fully restored upon reassociation with dGK or dCK. However, turnover of independently expressed dGK or dCK is nearly maximal, being further activated only 50-100% upon reassociation with dAK. In neither case is the heterotropic activation due to ligand-induced heterodimer formation. A proline/alanine substitution within a dAK segment homologous to loop G2 of Ras proteins yielded a heterodimer with dAK permanently cis-activated 2-fold, with a corresponding reduction in heterotropic activation by dGuo. A chimeric dAK, with 25% of its C terminus substituted by the homologous sequence from dGK, was inactive alone, and its characteristics were unchanged in the reconstituted heterodimer. Superimposing the Pro/Ala substitution on this chimera also reduced heterotropic activation by half. Cross-linking the dimer by 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene was inhibited by ATP, dATP, dGTP, and dAdo, suggesting the proximity of the active site(s) to the interface. These data suggest that dAK depends on dGK or dCK in a manner resembling the reliance of Ras upon GTPase activating protein.

  2. Raf activation by Ras and promotion of cellular metastasis require phosphorylation of prohibitin in the raft domain of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C-F; Ho, M-Y; Peng, J-M; Hung, S-W; Lee, W-H; Liang, C-M; Liang, S-M

    2013-02-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) is indispensable for Ras-induced Raf-1 activation, cell migration and growth; however, the exact role of PHB in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer metastasis remains largely unexamined. Here, we found a positive correlation between plasma membrane-associated PHB and the clinical stages of cancer. The level of PHB phosphorylated at threonine 258 (T258) and tyrosine 259 (Y259) in human cancer-cell membranes correlated with the invasiveness of cancer cells. Overexpression of phosphorylated PHB (phospho-PHB) in the lipid-raft domain of the cell membrane enhanced cell migration/invasion through PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK activation. It also enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro. Immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that phospho-PHB associated with Raf-1, Akt and Ras in the membrane and was essential for the activation of Raf-1 signaling by Ras. Mice implanted with cancer cells stably overexpressing PHB in the plasma membrane showed enlarged cervical tumors, enhanced metastasis and shorter survival time compared with mice implanted with cancer cells without PHB overexpression. Dephosphorylation of PHB at T258 by site-directed mutagenesis diminished the in vitro and in vivo effects of PHB. These results suggest that increase in phospho-PHB T258 in the raft domain of the plasma membrane has a role in the Ras-driven activation of PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK-signaling cascades and results in the promotion of cancer metastasis.

  3. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Chen, Qingfeng;

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of ...

  4. The pro-apoptotic K-Ras 4A proto-oncoprotein does not affect tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ mouse small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berry Rachel L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in gene splicing occur in human sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC and may contribute to tumour progression. The K-ras proto-oncogene encodes two splice variants, K-ras 4A and 4B, and K-ras activating mutations which jointly affect both isoforms are prevalent in CRC. Past studies have established that splicing of both the K-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene is altered in CRC in favour of K-ras 4B. The present study addressed whether the K-Ras 4A proto-oncoprotein can suppress tumour development in the absence of its oncogenic allele, utilising the ApcMin/+ (Min mouse that spontaneously develops intestinal tumours that do not harbour K-ras activating mutations, and the K-rastmΔ4A/tmΔ4A mouse that can express the K-ras 4B splice variant only. By this means tumorigenesis in the small intestine was compared between ApcMin/+, K-ras+/+ and ApcMin/+, K-rastmΔ4A/tmΔ4A mice that can, and cannot, express the K-ras 4A proto-oncoprotein respectively. Methods The relative levels of expression of the K-ras splice variants in normal small intestine and small intestinal tumours were quantified by real-time RT-qPCR analysis. Inbred (C57BL/6 ApcMin/+, K-ras+/+ and ApcMin/+, K-rastmΔ4A/tmΔ4A mice were generated and the genotypes confirmed by PCR analysis. Survival of stocks was compared by the Mantel-Haenszel test, and tumour number and area compared by Student's t-test in outwardly healthy mice at approximately 106 and 152 days of age. DNA sequencing of codons 12, 13 and 61 was performed to confirm the intestinal tumours did not harbour a K-ras activating mutation. Results The K-ras 4A transcript accounted for about 50% of K-ras expressed in the small intestine of both wild-type and Min mice. Tumours in the small intestine of Min mice showed increased levels of K-ras 4B transcript expression, but no appreciable change in K-ras 4A transcript levels. No K-ras activating mutations were detected in 27 intestinal tumours derived from

  5. Ifenprodil attenuates the acquisition and expression of methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization and activation of Ras-ERK1/2 cascade in the caudate putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Qiao, Chuchu; Chen, Gang; Qian, Hongyan; Hou, Ying; Li, Tao; Liu, Xinshe

    2016-10-29

    Chronic discontinuous use of many psychomotor stimulants leads to behavioral sensitization and, owing to it shares common mechanisms with relapse, most researchers use its animal model to explore the neurobiological mechanisms of addiction. Recent studies have proved that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are implicated in psychomotor stimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the function of GluN2B-containing NMDARs and their potential downstream cascade(s) in the acquisition and expression of behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine (METH) have not been explored. In this study, 2.5, 5, and 10mg/kg ifenprodil, the specific inhibitor of GluN2B, was used to explore the function of these receptors in distinct phases of behavioral sensitization to METH in mice. Then, using western blot, Ras, pERK1/2/ERK1/2, and ΔFosB levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFc), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and caudate putamen (CPu) were detected. Behavioral results showed that low-dose ifenprodil attenuated the acquisition and expression of behavioral sensitization to METH significantly. Western blot analysis revealed that pre-injection of low-dose ifenprodil in the acquisition markedly attenuated METH-induced ascent of Ras, pERK1/2/ERK1/2, and ΔFosB protein levels in the CPu. However, pre-treatment in the expression only affected the alterations of Ras and pERK1/2/ERK1/2 levels in the CPu. Moreover, chronic METH administration increased pERK1/2/ERK1/2 level in the NAc. In conclusion, GluN2B-containing NMDARs contribute to both the acquisition and expression of behavioral sensitization to METH in mice. Furthermore, the acquisition phase might be mediated by the Ras-ERK1/2-ΔFosB cascade in the CPu while the expression phase may be regulated by the Ras-ERK1/2 cascade in the CPu.

  6. SodC modulates ras and PKB signaling in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Boris; Kim, Seon-Hee; Sharief, Mujataba; Sun, Tong; Kim, Lou W

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the basal RasG activity is aberrantly high in cells lacking Superoxide dismutase C (SodC). Here we report that other Ras proteins such as RasC and RasD activities are not affected in sodC(-) cells and mutagenesis studies showed that the presence of the Cys(118) in the Ras proteins is essential for the superoxide-mediated activation of Ras proteins in Dictyostelium. In addition to the loss of SodC, lack of extracellular magnesium ions increased the level of intracellular superoxide and active RasG proteins. Aberrantly active Ras proteins in sodC(-) cells persistently localized at the plasma membrane, but those in wild type cells under magnesium deficient medium exhibited intracellular vesicular localization. Interestingly, the aberrantly activated Ras proteins in wild type cells were largely insulated from their normal downstream events such as Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-P3 (PIP3) accumulation, Protein Kinase B (PKB) activation, and PKBs substrates phosphorylation. Intriguingly, however, aberrantly activated Ras proteins in sodC(-) cells were still engaged in signaling to their downstream targets, and thus excessive PKBs substrates phosphorylation persisted. In summary, we suggest that SodC and RasG proteins are essential part of a novel inhibitory mechanism that discourages oxidatively stressed cells from chemotaxis and thus inhibits the delivery of potentially damaged genome to the next generation.

  7. Publishing Activity of RAS Economic Institutes amid New Challenges of Science Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tret’yakova Ol’ga Valentinovna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New challenges of science policy in Russia have determined a number of objectives which require scientific institutions to implement specific solutions aimed at improving research quality and efficiency. Since the evaluation of research results requires the use of different metrics, including bibliometrics, the main issue lies in the choice of indicators which can be used to conduct multi-analysis. The aim of this study is to implement the holistic approach to bibliometric assessment of scientific institutions and to analyze the performance of academic activity of economic institutions on the basis of the proposed criteria. The article summarizes the results of scientometric indicators monitoring, conducted at the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The analysis is based on a large set of publications of academic economic institutions for the period 2011–2015. The informational basis of the research includes data of the Russian Science Citation Index (RSCI. The institutions were ranked by a number of criteria: total number of publications in the RSCI and journals from the VAK list of Publications, number of citations. The author analyses the h-index value dynamics and indicators characterizing the number of publications considered as most-cited for the reference group in question. Conclusions and data obtained during analysis may be useful for studying development trends of economic science in Russia and assessing the performance of scientific organizations based on researching the dynamics of individual publication indicators and their comparison by reference group

  8. RASAL1 expression and ras activity with gastrointestinal tumors: a review%RASAL1表达及ras活性与胃肠道肿瘤临床关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕成余; 谢洪虎; 樊红

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20% of human tumors are associated with mutations of ras genes. Ras proteins control cellular signaling pathways responsible for cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. Ras proteins belong to the large family of small GTPases, which are activated in response-to various extracellular stimuli. RASAL1, as a ras GTPase activating protein, inhibits ras activation. Regulation of ras and RASAL1 activities may lead the direction of target treatment of tumors. Detection of ras and RASAL1 activities can provide more relevant information about diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal tumors. In this paper, we reviewed the structure, the biochemical properties of ras proteins, and the role of its mutations in tumors. We further discussed the inhibitive effects of RASAL1 on ras activities. Finally, we commented the correlation of ras and RASAL1 with gastrointestinal tumors.%大约有20%的人类肿瘤与ras的突变有关.ras蛋白调控细胞的一系列生物学行为,包括细胞增殖、分化、生存及凋亡等.ras蛋白属于小GTP结合蛋白,通过响应细胞外信号产生活性.RASAL1是一种ras GTP酶激活蛋白,可以抑制ras的活性.调节ras以及RASAL1的活性,可能是肿瘤靶向治疗的方向之一.检测ras以及RASAL1的活性有助于胃肠道肿瘤的早期诊断以及预后的判断.本文从ras的结构、功能及突变与肿瘤的关系,RASALl作为ras的效应分子抑制ras的活性,ras、RASAL1与胃肠道肿瘤的关系三方面来综述了RASAL1表达及ras活性与胃肠道肿瘤临床关系的研究进展.

  9. The Pore-Forming α-Toxin from Clostridium septicum Activates the MAPK Pathway in a Ras-c-Raf-Dependent and Independent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Chakravorty

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of atraumatic gas gangrene, with α-toxin, an extracellular pore-forming toxin, essential for disease. How C. septicum modulates the host’s innate immune response is poorly defined, although α-toxin-intoxicated muscle cells undergo cellular oncosis, characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction and release of reactive oxygen species. Nonetheless, the signalling events that occur prior to the initiation of oncosis are poorly characterised. Our aims were to characterise the ability of α-toxin to activate the host mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Vero cells with purified α-toxin activated the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 arms of the MAPK pathway and stimulated the release of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Studies using inhibitors of all three MAPK components suggested that activation of ERK occurred in a Ras-c-Raf dependent manner, whereas activation of JNK and p38 occurred by a Ras-independent mechanism. Toxin-mediated activation was dependent on efficient receptor binding and pore formation and on an influx of extracellular calcium ions. In the mouse myonecrosis model we showed that the MAPK pathway was activated in tissues of infected mice, implying that it has an important role in the disease process.

  10. The pore-forming α-toxin from clostridium septicum activates the MAPK pathway in a Ras-c-Raf-dependent and independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Anjana; Awad, Milena M; Cheung, Jackie K; Hiscox, Thomas J; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-02-10

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of atraumatic gas gangrene, with α-toxin, an extracellular pore-forming toxin, essential for disease. How C. septicum modulates the host's innate immune response is poorly defined, although α-toxin-intoxicated muscle cells undergo cellular oncosis, characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction and release of reactive oxygen species. Nonetheless, the signalling events that occur prior to the initiation of oncosis are poorly characterised. Our aims were to characterise the ability of α-toxin to activate the host mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Vero cells with purified α-toxin activated the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 arms of the MAPK pathway and stimulated the release of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Studies using inhibitors of all three MAPK components suggested that activation of ERK occurred in a Ras-c-Raf dependent manner, whereas activation of JNK and p38 occurred by a Ras-independent mechanism. Toxin-mediated activation was dependent on efficient receptor binding and pore formation and on an influx of extracellular calcium ions. In the mouse myonecrosis model we showed that the MAPK pathway was activated in tissues of infected mice, implying that it has an important role in the disease process.

  11. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  12. Acquisition of contextual discrimination involves the appearance of a RAS-GRF1/p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-mediated signaling pathway that promotes long term potentiation (LTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shan-Xue; Arai, Junko; Tian, Xuejun; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra; Feig, Larry A

    2013-07-26

    RAS-GRF1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with the ability to activate RAS and RAC GTPases in response to elevated calcium levels. We previously showed that beginning at 1 month of age, RAS-GRF1 mediates NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-induction of long term depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of mice. Here we show that beginning at 2 months of age, when mice first acquire the ability to discriminate between closely related contexts, RAS-GRF1 begins to contribute to the induction of long term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampus by mediating the action of calcium-permeable, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs). Surprisingly, LTP induction by CP-AMPARs through RAS-GRF1 occurs via activation of p38 MAP kinase rather than ERK MAP kinase, which has more frequently been linked to LTP. Moreover, contextual discrimination is blocked by knockdown of Ras-Grf1 expression specifically in the CA1 hippocampus, infusion of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor into the CA1 hippocampus, or the injection of an inhibitor of CP-AMPARs. These findings implicate the CA1 hippocampus in the developmentally dependent capacity to distinguish closely related contexts through the appearance of a novel LTP-supporting signaling pathway.

  13. The RAS-Effector Interaction as a Drug Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Adam B; Salter, E Alan; Piazza, Gary A

    2017-01-15

    About a third of all human cancers harbor mutations in one of the K-, N-, or HRAS genes that encode an abnormal RAS protein locked in a constitutively activated state to drive malignant transformation and tumor growth. Despite more than three decades of intensive research aimed at the discovery of RAS-directed therapeutics, there are no FDA-approved drugs that are broadly effective against RAS-driven cancers. Although RAS proteins are often said to be "undruggable," there is mounting evidence suggesting it may be feasible to develop direct inhibitors of RAS proteins. Here, we review this evidence with a focus on compounds capable of inhibiting the interaction of RAS proteins with their effectors that transduce the signals of RAS and that drive and sustain malignant transformation and tumor growth. These reports of direct-acting RAS inhibitors provide valuable insight for further discovery and development of clinical candidates for RAS-driven cancers involving mutations in RAS genes or otherwise activated RAS proteins. Cancer Res; 77(2); 221-6. ©2017 AACR.

  14. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  15. K-Ras(V14I) -induced Noonan syndrome predisposes to tumour development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Garcia-Medina, Raquel; Jiménez, Beatriz; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Guerra, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and congenital heart defects. A significant proportion of NS patients may also develop myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML). Surprisingly, scarce information is available in relation to other tumour types in these patients. We have previously developed and characterized a knock-in mouse model that carries one of the most frequent KRAS-NS-related mutations, the K-Ras(V14I) substitution, which recapitulates most of the alterations described in NS patients, including MPDs. The K-Ras(V14I) mutation is a mild activating K-Ras protein; thus, we have used this model to study tumour susceptibility in comparison with mice expressing the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene. Interestingly, our studies have shown that these mice display a generalized tumour predisposition and not just MPDs. In fact, we have observed that the K-Ras(V14I) mutation is capable of cooperating with the p16Ink4a/p19Arf and Trp53 tumour suppressors, as well as with other risk factors such as pancreatitis, thereby leading to a higher cancer incidence. In conclusion, our results illustrate that the K-Ras(V14I) activating protein is able to induce cancer, although at a much lower level than the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene, and that it can be significantly modulated by both genetic and non-genetic events. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. XRP44X, an Inhibitor of Ras/Erk Activation of the Transcription Factor Elk3, Inhibits Tumour Growth and Metastasis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Henry; Tourrette, Yves; Maas, Peter; Schalken, Jack A; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have an important role in cancer but are difficult targets for the development of tumour therapies. These factors include the Ets family, and in this study Elk3 that is activated by Ras oncogene /Erk signalling, and is involved in angiogenesis, malignant progression and epithelial-mesenchymal type processes. We previously described the identification and in-vitro characterisation of an inhibitor of Ras / Erk activation of Elk3 that also affects microtubules, XRP44X. We now report an initial characterisation of the effects of XRP44X in-vivo on tumour growth and metastasis in three preclinical models mouse models, subcutaneous xenografts, intra-cardiac injection-bone metastasis and the TRAMP transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer progression. XRP44X inhibits tumour growth and metastasis, with limited toxicity. Tumours from XRP44X-treated animals have decreased expression of genes containing Elk3-like binding motifs in their promoters, Elk3 protein and phosphorylated Elk3, suggesting that perhaps XRP44X acts in part by inhibiting the activity of Elk3. Further studies are now warranted to develop XRP44X for tumour therapy. PMID:27427904

  17. The activity of Mblk-1, a mushroom body-selective transcription factor from the honeybee, is modulated by the ras/MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Min; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2003-05-16

    We previously identified a gene, termed Mblk-1, that encodes a putative transcription factor with two DNA-binding motifs expressed preferentially in the mushroom body of the honeybee brain, and its preferred binding sequence, termed Mblk-1-binding element (MBE) (Takeuchi, H., Kage, E., Sawata, M., Kamikouchi, A., Ohashi, K., Ohara, M., Fujiyuki, T., Kunieda, T., Sekimizu, K., Natori, S., and Kubo, T. (2001) Insect Mol Biol 10, 487-494; Park, J.-M., Kunieda. T., Takeuchi, H., and Kubo, T. (2002) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 291, 23-28). In the present study, the effect of Mblk-1 on transcription of genes containing MBE in Drosophila Schneider's Line 2 cells was examined using a luciferase assay. Mblk-1 expression transactivated promoters containing MBEs approximately 2-7-fold. Deletion experiments revealed that RHF2, the second DNA-binding domain of Mblk-1, was necessary for the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylated Mblk-1 at Ser-444 in vitro, and the Mblk-1-induced transactivation was stimulated by phosphorylation of Ser-444 by the Ras/MAPK pathway in the luciferase assay. These results suggest that Mblk-1 is a transcription factor that might function in the mushroom body neuronal circuits downstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway in the honeybee brain.

  18. Chemical biology tools for regulating RAS signaling complexity in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattum, Hilde; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-09-18

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) family members are small GTPases that control a number of signaling pathways important for normal cellular proliferation. Therefore, it is no surprise that a significant portion of human tumors express constitutively active mutated RAS proteins, which leads to deregulation of RAS signaling pathways, resulting in pathological perturbations of cell growth and death. Although the molecular details of RAS signaling cascades are well understood, there is still a largely unmet need for small molecule probes to control RAS signaling in space and time. More broadly, given the prevalence of mutated RAS in cancer, the need to translate the insights obtained from using small molecule probes into clinically useful drugs is also significant. In this review, we introduce RAS proteins and the signaling pathways they are involved in, and discuss some of the innovative chemical biology approaches to regulate RAS signaling, which include the exploitation of newly identified binding pockets, covalent inhibitors for mutated RAS, and RAS localization impairment.

  19. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Keith A.; Voong, K. Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B.; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor α was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. PMID:17460778

  20. Oncogenic K-Ras signals through epidermal growth factor receptor and wild-type H-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Keith A; Voong, K Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D; McKenna, W Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor alpha was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  1. Oncogenic and RASopathy-associated K-RAS mutations relieve membrane-dependent occlusion of the effector-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Marshall, Christopher B; Smith, Matthew J; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Stathopulos, Peter B; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kay, Lewis E; Neel, Benjamin G; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-05-26

    K-RAS4B (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 4B) is a prenylated, membrane-associated GTPase protein that is a critical switch for the propagation of growth factor signaling pathways to diverse effector proteins, including rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) kinases and RAS-related protein guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RALGDS) proteins. Gain-of-function KRAS mutations occur frequently in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome, whereas germ-line mutations are associated with developmental syndromes. However, it is not known how these mutations affect K-RAS association with biological membranes or whether this impacts signal transduction. Here, we used solution NMR studies of K-RAS4B tethered to nanodiscs to investigate lipid bilayer-anchored K-RAS4B and its interactions with effector protein RAS-binding domains (RBDs). Unexpectedly, we found that the effector-binding region of activated K-RAS4B is occluded by interaction with the membrane in one of the NMR-observable, and thus highly populated, conformational states. Binding of the RAF isoform ARAF and RALGDS RBDs induced marked reorientation of K-RAS4B from the occluded state to RBD-specific effector-bound states. Importantly, we found that two Noonan syndrome-associated mutations, K5N and D153V, which do not affect the GTPase cycle, relieve the occluded orientation by directly altering the electrostatics of two membrane interaction surfaces. Similarly, the most frequent KRAS oncogenic mutation G12D also drives K-RAS4B toward an exposed configuration. Further, the D153V and G12D mutations increase the rate of association of ARAF-RBD with lipid bilayer-tethered K-RAS4B. We revealed a mechanism of K-RAS4B autoinhibition by membrane sequestration of its effector-binding site, which can be disrupted by disease-associated mutations. Stabilizing the autoinhibitory interactions between K-RAS4B and the membrane could be an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery.

  2. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillan, C; Costales, M; Vijande, M; Arguelles, J

    2007-11-23

    Perillan, C., Costales, M., Vijande, M., and J. Arguelles. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst. Physiol Behav XX (X) 000-000, 2006. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an altered ambiance in utero, on the development of thirst mechanisms in the offspring. Female rats underwent a partial ligature of the aorta (PAL), which induces an intrinsic activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), thirst and sodium appetite. A second group of female rats was treated with desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) which depresses the RAS. The offspring of these two groups were tested for their responses to several thirst stimuli at 2, 4 and 6 days of age. The offspring from PAL mothers responded like their controls to cellular dehydration (NaCl hypertonic injection) at 2 days of age, and also did to extracellular dehydration by polyethyleneglycol at 4 days. Nevertheless, they responded more to isoproterenol at 6 days of age in comparison to their control group. The offspring from DOCA treated mothers did not show statistically significant responses (in comparison with vehicle injected pups) to hypertonic NaCl at two days nor to polyethyleneglycol at four days. Water intake at 6 days of age after isoproterenol administration in DOCA was statistically enhanced, but not differently from the response obtained from pseudo-DOCA treated pups. In particular, rats developed in a hypereninemic ambiance (O-PAL) during gestation, responded with higher water intake when treated with a strong RAS and thirst activator (isoproterenol) but responded normally to a more gentle and complex stimulus (PG). Therefore it seems that in utero conditions can determine the chronology and intensity of thirst responses in offspring.

  3. Functional overlap of the dictyostelium RasG, RasD and RasB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Insall, R; Weeks, G

    2000-04-01

    Disruption of the rasG gene in Dictyostelium discoideum results in several distinct phenotypes: a defect in cytokinesis, reduced motility and reduced growth. Reintroduction of the rasG gene restores all of the properties of the rasG(-) cells to those of the wild type. To determine whether the defects are due to impaired interactions with a single or multiple downstream effectors, we tested the ability of the highly related but non identical Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD and rasB, to rescue the defects. Introduction of the rasD gene under the control of the rasG promoter into rasG null (rasG(-)) cells corrected all phenotypes except the motility defect, suggesting that motility is regulated by a RasG mediated pathway that is different to those regulating growth or cytokinesis. Western blot analysis of RasD protein levels revealed that vegetative rasG(- )cells contained considerably more protein than the parental AX-3 cells, suggesting that RasD protein levels are negatively regulated in vegetative cells by RasG. The level of RasD was enhanced when the rasD gene was introduced under the control of the rasG promoter, and this increase in protein is presumably responsible for the reversal of the growth and cytokinesis defects of the rasG(- )cells. Thus, RasD protein levels are controlled by the level of RasG, but not by the level of RasD. Introduction of the rasB gene under the control of the rasG promoter into rasG(-) cells produced a complex phenotype. The transformants were extremely small and mononucleate and exhibited enhanced motility. However, the growth of these cells was considerably slower than the growth of the rasG(-) cells, suggesting the possibility that high levels of RasB inhibit an essential process. This was confirmed by expressing rasB in wild-type cells; the resulting transformants exhibited severely impaired growth. When RasB protein levels were determined by western blot analysis, it was found that levels were higher in the rasG(- )cells than they

  4. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Cengel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor o was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFRactivated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  5. Association between GRB2/Sos and insulin receptor substrate 1 is not sufficient for activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases by interleukin-4: implications for Ras activation by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, W; Yuan, Y; Rose, E; Batzer, A G; Harada, N; Skolnik, E Y

    1995-03-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) mediates the activation of a variety of signaling pathways by the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors by serving as a docking protein for signaling molecules with SH2 domains. We and others have shown that in response to insulin stimulation IRS-1 binds GRB2/Sos and have proposed that this interaction is important in mediating Ras activation by the insulin receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the interleukin (IL)-4 receptor also phosphorylates IRS-1 and an IRS-1-related molecule, 4PS. Unlike insulin, however, IL-4 fails to activate Ras, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), or mitogen-activated protein kinases. We have reconstituted the IL-4 receptor into an insulin-responsive L6 myoblast cell line and have shown that IRS-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated to similar degrees in response to insulin and IL-4 stimulation in this cell line. In agreement with previous findings, IL-4 failed to activate the ERKs in this cell line or to stimulate DNA synthesis, whereas the same responses were activated by insulin. Surprisingly, IL-4's failure to activate ERKs was not due to a failure to stimulate the association of tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS-1 with GRB2/Sos; the amounts of GRB2/Sos associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. Moreover, the amounts of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. In contrast to insulin, however, IL-4 failed to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc or association of Shc with GRB2. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Previous studies have indicated that activation of ERks in this cell line is dependent upon Ras since a dominant-negative Ras (Asn-17) blocks ERK activation by insulin. Our findings, taken in the context

  6. Point mutations of K-ras and H-ras genes in forestomach neoplasms from control B6C3F1 mice and following exposure to 1,3-butadiene, isoprene or chloroprene for up to 2-years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, R C; Hong, H L; Boorman, G A; Devereux, T R; Melnick, R L

    2001-06-01

    1,3 Butadiene (BD), isoprene (IP) and chloroprene (CP) are structural analogs. There were significantly increased incidences of forestomach neoplasms in B6C3F1 mice exposed to BD, IP or CP by inhalation for up to 2-years. The present study was designed to characterize genetic alterations in K- and H-ras proto-oncogenes in a total of 52 spontaneous and chemically induced forestomach neoplasms. ras mutations were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, single strand conformational polymorphism analysis, and cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded forestomach neoplasms. A higher frequency of K- and H-ras mutations was identified in BD-, IP- and CP-induced forestomach neoplasms (83, 70 and 57%, respectively, or combined 31/41, 76%) when compared to spontaneous forestomach neoplasms (4/11, 36%). Also a high frequency of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->CTA transversions (10/41, 24%) was detected in chemically induced forestomach neoplasms, but none were present in the spontaneous forestomach neoplasms examined. Furthermore, an increased frequency (treated 13/41, 32% versus untreated 1/11, 9%) of GGC-->CGC transversion at K-ras codon 13 was seen in BD-, and IP-induced forestomach neoplasms, similar to the predominant K-ras mutation pattern observed in BD-induced mouse lung neoplasms. These data suggest that the epoxide intermediates of the structurally related chemicals (BD, IP, and CP) may cause DNA damage in K-ras and H-ras proto-oncogenes of B6C3F1 mice following inhalation exposure and that mutational activation of these genes may be critical events in the pathogenesis of forestomach neoplasms induced in the B6C3F1 mouse.

  7. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hooi Cheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-03-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization.

  8. Anti-tumor effect of CTLs activated by dendritic cells pulsed with K-ras mutant peptide and whole tumor antigen on pancreatic cancer%K-ras突变多肽与全细胞抗原致敏DCs诱导CTLs对胰腺癌的杀伤活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Tan; Zhongyu Wang; Xin Zhang; Zhengang Cai; Junkai Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Objective:We studied the role of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes(CTLs)activated by dendritic cells(DCs)presenting cationic nanoparticles with the K-ras(12-Val)mutant peptide and whole tumor antigen in the killing of different pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and in vitro.Methods:Peripheral blood DCs were induced by rhGM-CSF and IL-4 and cultured.DCs were sensitized by whole antigen of a pancreatic cancer cell line(PANC-1)with expression of K-ras mutant,K-ras mutant peptide(K-ras+peptide)and cationic nanoparticles with K-ras mutant peptide(K-ras+peptide-CNP),respectively.Cell surface markers were measured by flow cytometry.Lymphocyte proliferation was detected by the 3H-TdR test,and ELISA was performed to detect IFN-γ secretion.125I-UdR was used to measure the killing effect of CTLs.We also evaluated the antitumor activity of CTLs in vivo in a tumor-bearing nude mouse model prepared with the PANC-1(K-ras+)and SW1990(K-ras-)cell lines.Results:Compared with K-ras+peptide,low concentration K-ras+peptide-CNP can be effectively presented by DCs(P0.05)on SW1990 cell lines(P>0.05).Conclusion:Cationic nanoparticles with K-res(12-Val)mutant peptide can be effectively presented by DCs at a low concentration in a short time.CTLs induced by K-ras+peptide-CNP had specific killing activity for the pancreatic cancer cell line with the K-ras(12-Val)mutant and could significantly inhibit tumor growth and increase the survival time of tumor-bearing nude mice.

  9. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  10. Regulation of H-Ras-driven MAPK signaling, transformation and tumorigenesis, but not PI3K signaling and tumor progression, by plasma membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, J V; Wurtzel, J G T; Goldfinger, L E

    2016-05-30

    In this study, we assessed the contributions of plasma membrane (PM) microdomain targeting to the functions of H-Ras and R-Ras. These paralogs have identical effector-binding regions, but variant C-terminal targeting domains (tDs) which are responsible for lateral microdomain distribution: activated H-Ras targets to lipid ordered/disordered (Lo/Ld) domain borders, and R-Ras to Lo domains (rafts). We hypothesized that PM distribution regulates Ras-effector interactions and downstream signaling. We used tD swap mutants, and assessed effects on signal transduction, cell proliferation, transformation and tumorigenesis. R-Ras harboring the H-Ras tD (R-Ras-tH) interacted with Raf, and induced Raf and ERK phosphorylation similar to H-Ras. R-Ras-tH stimulated proliferation and transformation in vitro, and these effects were blocked by both MEK and PI3K inhibition. Conversely, the R-Ras tD suppressed H-Ras-mediated Raf activation and ERK phosphorylation, proliferation and transformation. Thus, Ras access to Raf at the PM is sufficient for MAPK activation and is a principal component of Ras mitogenesis and transformation. Fusion of the R-Ras extended N-terminal domain to H-Ras had no effect on proliferation, but inhibited transformation and tumor progression, indicating that the R-Ras N-terminus also contributes negative regulation to these Ras functions. PI3K activation was tD independent; however, H-Ras was a stronger activator of PI3K than R-Ras, with either tD. PI3K inhibition nearly ablated transformation by R-Ras-tH, H-Ras and H-Ras-tR, whereas MEK inhibition had a modest effect on Ras-tH-driven transformation but no effect on H-Ras-tR transformation. R-Ras-tH supported tumor initiation, but not tumor progression. While H-Ras-tR-induced transformation was reduced relative to H-Ras, tumor progression was robust and similar to H-Ras. H-Ras tumor growth was moderately suppressed by MEK inhibition, which had no effect on H-Ras-tR tumor growth. In contrast, PI3K inhibition

  11. Ras signalling regulates differentiation and UCP1 expression in models of brown adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Hansen, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    on two unrelated models of mouse brown adipocyte differentiation. RESULTS: A constitutively active H-Ras mutant (Ras V12) caused a complete block of adipose conversion, as manifested by a lack of both lipid accumulation and induction of adipocyte gene expression. The Ras V12-mediated impediment......-Ras mutant (Ras N17) did not inhibit differentiation, but led to increased expression of genes important for energy dissipation in brown fat cells, including UCP1. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that the intensity of Ras signalling is important for differentiation and UCP1 expression in models...

  12. Cellular and subcellular localization of Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Vallée, A; Mechawar, N; Dower, N A; Stone, J C; Richardson, P M; Dunn, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) is a recently discovered Ras guanyl nucleotide exchange factor that is expressed in selected regions of the rodent CNS, with high levels of expression in the hippocampus. Biochemical studies suggest that RasGRP can activate the Ras signal pathway in response to changes in diacylglycerol and possibly calcium. To investigate potential sites for RasGRP signaling, we have determined the cellular and subcellular localization of RasGRP protein in adult rat hippocampus, and have also examined the appearance of RasGRP mRNA and protein during hippocampal development. RasGRP immunoreactivity is predominately localized to those neurons participating in the direct cortico-hippocampo-cortical loop. In both hippocampal and entorhinal neurons, RasGRP protein appeared to be localized to both dendrites and somata, but not to axons. Electron microscopy of hippocampal pyramidal cells confirmed RasGRP immunoreactivity in neuronal cell bodies and dendrites, where it appeared to be associated with microtubules. The localization of RasGRP to dendrites suggests a role for this pathway in the regulation of dendritic function. Examination of developing hippocampal structures indicated that RasGRP mRNA and protein appear synchronously during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development as these neurons become fully mature. This result indicates that the RasGRP signal transduction pathway is not required during early hippocampal development, but is a feature of mature neurons during the later stages of development.

  13. Signal integration by lipid-mediated spatial cross talk between Ras nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Rodkey, Travis; Ariotti, Nicholas; Parton, Robert G; Hancock, John F

    2014-03-01

    Lipid-anchored Ras GTPases form transient, spatially segregated nanoclusters on the plasma membrane that are essential for high-fidelity signal transmission. The lipid composition of Ras nanoclusters, however, has not previously been investigated. High-resolution spatial mapping shows that different Ras nanoclusters have distinct lipid compositions, indicating that Ras proteins engage in isoform-selective lipid sorting and accounting for different signal outputs from different Ras isoforms. Phosphatidylserine is a common constituent of all Ras nanoclusters but is only an obligate structural component of K-Ras nanoclusters. Segregation of K-Ras and H-Ras into spatially and compositionally distinct lipid assemblies is exquisitely sensitive to plasma membrane phosphatidylserine levels. Phosphatidylserine spatial organization is also modified by Ras nanocluster formation. In consequence, Ras nanoclusters engage in remote lipid-mediated communication, whereby activated H-Ras disrupts the assembly and operation of spatially segregated K-Ras nanoclusters. Computational modeling and experimentation reveal that complex effects of caveolin and cortical actin on Ras nanoclustering are similarly mediated through regulation of phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that phosphatidylserine maintains the lateral segregation of diverse lipid-based assemblies on the plasma membrane and that lateral connectivity between spatially remote lipid assemblies offers important previously unexplored opportunities for signal integration and signal processing.

  14. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  15. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  16. Lack of noncanonical RAS mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Christoph W M; Krauter, Jürgen; Onono, Fredrick O; Bunke, Tania; Damm, Frederik; Thol, Felicitas; Wagner, Katharina; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Heuser, Michael; Ganser, Arnold; Morgan, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Transforming mutations in RAS genes are commonly found in human malignancies, including myeloid leukemias. To investigate the incidence, spectrum, and distribution of activating K- and N-RAS mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients, 204 CN-AML patients were screened. Activating K- and N-RAS mutations were detected in 3 of 204 (1.5 %) and 22 of 204 (10.8 %) CN-AML samples, respectively. RAS mutated patients presented with a lower percentage of bone marrow blasts (65 vs 80 %, P = 0.022). RAS mutations tended to occur with nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) mutations (P = 0.079), and all three samples containing K-RAS mutations had concomitant NPM1 mutations. There was no significant overlap between K-RAS mutations and N-RAS, FLT3, CEBPA, IDH1/2, WT1 or MLL mutations. RAS mutation status did not impact relapse-free or overall survival of CN-AML patients. In contrast to reports of noncanonical RAS mutations in other cancers, including some leukemia subtypes, we only observed K- and N-RAS mutations in codons 12, 13, or 61 in CN-AML samples. Our findings suggest that while K-RAS mutations are infrequent in CN-AML, activating K-RAS mutations may cooperate with mutated NPM1 to induce leukemia.

  17. Altered myoelectric activity in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, P G; Fernandez, A; Martin, J L; King, C E; Toskes, P P; Mathias, J R

    1983-09-01

    Nutrient malabsorption and diarrhea are characteristic of the blind loop syndrome. Alterations in motility have been implicated as a cause of bacterial overgrowth, but the possibility that altered motility may result from alterations in the flora has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to characterize the myoelectric activity of the small intestine in the blind loop rat model. Eight groups of rats were studied: rats with self-filling blind loops, which develop bacterial overgrowth; rats with self-emptying blind loops, which are surgical controls that do not develop overgrowth; unoperated litter mates; rats with self-filling blind loops and unoperated controls treated with chloramphenicol, 200 mg/d i.p.; rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; operated control rats; and gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops. In the untreated rats with self-filling blind loops, there was altered myoelectric activity characterized by an increased percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and by organized activity similar to the migrating action potential complex. Migrating action potential complex activity and percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials were significantly decreased with chloramphenicol therapy; that decrease correlated with a decrease in aerobes and anaerobes. Migrating action potential complex activity was abolished in rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; they also showed a significant decrease in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials. Gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops showed no alteration in myoelectric activity. These data indicate: (a) bacterial overgrowth is associated with a significant increase in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; (b) chloramphenicol significantly reduced both percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; and (c

  18. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F;

    1986-01-01

    transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic...... domain that were dispensable for transformation and six other segments that were required for transformation. Segments that were necessary for guanosine nucleotide (GDP) binding corresponded to three of the segments that were essential for transformation; two of the three segments share strong sequence...... localization. We speculate that this latter region interacts with the putative cellular target of ras. The results suggest that transforming ras proteins require membrane localization, guanosine nucleotide binding, and an additional undefined function that may represent interaction with their target....

  19. VPS35 binds farnesylated N-Ras in the cytosol to regulate N-Ras trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Heidi; Su, Wenjuan; Liot, Caroline; Hancock, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Ras guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) regulate signaling pathways only when associated with cellular membranes through their C-terminal prenylated regions. Ras proteins move between membrane compartments in part via diffusion-limited, fluid phase transfer through the cytosol, suggesting that chaperones sequester the polyisoprene lipid from the aqueous environment. In this study, we analyze the nature of the pool of endogenous Ras proteins found in the cytosol. The majority of the pool consists of farnesylated, but not palmitoylated, N-Ras that is associated with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex. Affinity purification and mass spectrographic identification revealed that among the proteins found in the HMW fraction is VPS35, a latent cytosolic component of the retromer coat. VPS35 bound to N-Ras in a farnesyl-dependent, but neither palmitoyl- nor guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–dependent, fashion. Silencing VPS35 increased N-Ras’s association with cytoplasmic vesicles, diminished GTP loading of Ras, and inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and growth of N-Ras–dependent melanoma cells. PMID:27502489

  20. Silencing of SPRY1 Triggers Complete Regression of Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors Carrying a Mutated RAS Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Schaaf; M. Hamdi; D. Zwijnenburg; A. Lakeman; D. Geerts; R. Versteeg; M. Kool

    2010-01-01

    RAS oncogenes are among the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer, but effective strategies for therapeutic inhibition of the RAS pathway have been elusive. Sprouty1 (SPRY1) is an upstream antagonist of RAS that is activated by extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), providing a negative

  1. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  2. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  3. K-Ras protein as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank

    2016-03-01

    K-Ras proteins are major drivers of human cancers, playing a direct causal role in about one million cancer cases/year. In cancers driven by mutant K-Ras, the protein is locked in the active, GTP-bound state constitutively, through a defect in the off-switch mechanism. As such, the mutant protein resembles the normal K-Ras protein from a structural perspective, making therapeutic attack extremely challenging. K-Ras is a member of a large family of related proteins, which share very similar GDP/GTP-binding domains, making specific therapies more difficult. Furthermore, Ras proteins lack pockets to which small molecules can bind with high affinity, with a few interesting exceptions. However, new insights into the structure and function of K-Ras proteins reveal opportunities for intervention that were not appreciated many years ago, when efforts were launched to develop K-Ras therapies. Furthermore, K-Ras undergoes post-translational modification and interactions with cellular signaling proteins that present additional therapeutic opportunities, such as specific binding to calmodulin and regulation of non-canonical Wnt signaling.

  4. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States))

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  5. Expression of val-12 mutant ras p21 in an IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell line is associated with loss of serum-dependence and increases in membrane PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, M T; Boswell, H S; English, D; Gabig, T G

    1991-01-01

    We previously showed that the proliferative response of a serum- and interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine myeloid cell line, NFS/N1-H7, was partially inhibited by pertussis toxin as a result of toxin-induced increased adenylate cyclase activity. In the present studies, we examined the role of the phosphoinositide cycle in the proliferative response of these cells and demonstrated that there was no change in PIP (phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate)-specific phospholipase C activity in response to IL-3 alone. However, serum caused a pertussis toxin-insensitive increase in PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity as reflected by decreased cellular levels of 32P-labelled PIP2. Proliferation of a subline selected from val-12-mutant H-ras-transfected NFS-H7 cells, clone E5, was insensitive to pertussis toxin, occurred in the absence of serum but remained serum-stimulatable and absolutely dependent on IL-3. This val-12 mutant ras-expressing cell line showed an increase in 32P-labelled PIP (phosphatidylinositol phosphate) in response to serum whereas the parent cell line did not. Membrane fractions from 32P-labelled ras-transfected cells displayed higher GTP gamma S-, GTP-, or F(-)-stimulated PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity compared to membranes from the parent cell line. Thus serum-dependence and adenylate cyclase-mediated pertussis toxin-sensitivity of the parent cell line was bypassed by val-12 mutant ras p21, possibly as a result of increased PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

  6. Liposomal encapsulation of deguelin: evidence for enhanced antitumor activity in tobacco carcinogen-induced and oncogenic K-ras-induced lung tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong K; Choi, Dong Soon; Tran, Hai T; Gilbert, Brian E; Hong, Waun Ki; Lee, Ho-Young

    2009-04-01

    Deguelin has shown promising chemopreventive and therapeutic activities in diverse types of cancers. However, the potential side effect of deguelin over a certain dose could be the substantial hurdle in the practical application of the drug. One of the successful strategies for the use of deguelin in clinical trials could be lung-specific delivery of the drug. The present study evaluates the efficacy of liposome-encapsulated deguelin with a dose of 0.4 mg/kg, which is 10 times less than the dose (4 mg/kg) for preventive and therapeutic activities validated in previous in vivo studies. Liposomal deguelin revealed cytotoxic activity in vitro in premalignant and malignant human bronchial epithelial cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells through the same mechanistic pathway previously reported for deguelin (i.e., suppression of the heat shock protein 90 chaperone function and induction of apoptosis). Delivery of liposomal deguelin at a dose of 0.4 mg/kg by intranasal instillation resulted in markedly increased drug partitioning to the lungs compared with that of 4 mg/kg deguelin or 0.4 mg/kg liposomal deguelin administered by oral gavage. Lung-specific delivery of deguelin (0.4 mg/kg) via nasal or intratracheal instillation in a liposomal formulation also showed significant chemopreventive and therapeutic activities in 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone/benzo(a)pyrene-treated A/J mice and K-rasLAC57Bl6/129/sv F1 mice with no detectable toxicity. Our findings support the potential use of deguelin in a liposomal formulation via lung-specific delivery to improve efficacy and to reduce the potential side effects of the agent.

  7. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  8. EMT-induced stemness and tumorigenicity are fueled by the EGFR/Ras pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Chih-Cheng Voon

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that differentiated epithelial cells would acquire stem cell-like and tumorigenic properties following an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. However, the signaling pathways that participate in this novel mechanism of tumorigenesis have not been fully characterized. In Runx3 (-/- p53 (-/- murine gastric epithelial (GIF-14 cells, EMT-induced plasticity is reflected in the expression of the embryonal proto-oncogene Hmga2 and Lgr5, an exclusive gastrointestinal stem cell marker. Here, we report the concurrent activation of an EGFR/Ras gene expression signature during TGF-β1-induced EMT in GIF-14 cells. Amongst the altered genes was the induction of Egfr, which corresponded with a delayed sensitization to EGF treatment in GIF-14. Co-treatment with TGF-β1 and EGF or the expression of exogenous KRas led to increased Hmga2 or Lgr5 expression, sphere initiation and colony formation in soft agar assay. Interestingly, the gain in cellular plasticity/tumorigenicity was not accompanied by increased EMT. This uncoupling of EMT and the induction of plasticity reveals an involvement of distinct signaling cues, whereby the EGFR/Ras pathway specifically promotes stemness and tumorigenicity in EMT-altered GIF-14 cells. These data show that the EGFR/Ras pathway requisite for the sustenance of gastric stem cells in vivo and in vitro is involved in the genesis and promotion of EMT-induced tumor-initiating cells.

  9. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27Kip Cdk-complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells...... response to contact inhibition, a separate back-up mechanism enforced cell cycle arrest at higher cell density....... ceased to grow exponentially, to reveal the molecular basis for Ras-dependent focus formation. As normal cells entered density-dependent arrest, cyclin D1 decreased while cyclin D2 was induced and replaced D1 in Cdk4 complexes. Concomitantly, p27Kip1 levels rose and the inhibitor accumulated in both Cdk4...

  10. Rasputin, the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP SH3 binding protein, functions in ras- and Rho-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazman, C; Mayes, C A; Fanto, M; Haynes, S R; Mlodzik, M

    2000-04-01

    The small GTPase Ras plays an important role in many cellular signaling processes. Ras activity is negatively regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). It has been proposed that RasGAP may also function as an effector of Ras activity. We have identified and characterized the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP-binding protein G3BP encoded by rasputin (rin). rin mutants are viable and display defects in photoreceptor recruitment and ommatidial polarity in the eye. Mutations in rin/G3BP genetically interact with components of the Ras signaling pathway that function at the level of Ras and above, but not with Raf/MAPK pathway components. These interactions suggest that Rin is required as an effector in Ras signaling during eye development, supporting an effector role for RasGAP. The ommatidial polarity phenotypes of rin are similar to those of RhoA and the polarity genes, e.g. fz and dsh. Although rin/G3BP interacts genetically with RhoA, affecting both photoreceptor differentiation and polarity, it does not interact with the gain-of-function genotypes of fz and dsh. These data suggest that Rin is not a general component of polarity generation, but serves a function specific to Ras and RhoA signaling pathways.

  11. Transcriptional activation of the Axl and PDGFR-α by c-Met through a ras- and Src-independent mechanism in human bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Vincent S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cross-talk between different receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs plays an important role in the pathogenesis of human cancers. Methods Both NIH-Met5 and T24-Met3 cell lines harboring an inducible human c-Met gene were established. C-Met-related RTKs were screened by RTK microarray analysis. The cross-talk of RTKs was demonstrated by Western blotting and confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA silencing, followed by elucidation of the underlying mechanism. The impact of this cross-talk on biological function was demonstrated by Trans-well migration assay. Finally, the potential clinical importance was examined in a cohort of 65 cases of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer patients. Results A positive association of Axl or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFR-α with c-Met expression was demonstrated at translational level, and confirmed by specific siRNA knock-down. The transactivation of c-Met on Axl or PDGFR-α in vitro was through a ras- and Src-independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK pathway. In human bladder cancer, co-expression of these RTKs was associated with poor patient survival (p p Conclusions In addition to c-Met, the cross-talk with Axl and/or PDGFR-α also contributes to the progression of human bladder cancer. Evaluation of Axl and PDGFR-α expression status may identify a subset of c-Met-positive bladder cancer patients who may require co-targeting therapy.

  12. Altering the activation mechanism in Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Jakob; Vind, Jesper; Svendsen, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    It is shown by rational site-directed mutagenesis of the lid region in Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase that it is possible to generate lipase variants with attractive features, e.g., high lipase activity, fast activation at the lipid interface, ability to act on water-soluble substrates......, and enhanced calcium independence. The rational design was based on the lid residue composition in Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase (FAEA). Five constructs included lipase variants containing the full FAEA lid, a FAEA-like lid, an intermediate lid of FAEA and TlL character, and the entire lid region...... from Aspergillus terreus lipase (AtL). To investigate an altered activation mechanism for each variant compared to that of TlL, a combination of activity- and spectroscopic-based measurements were applied. The engineered variant with a lid from AtL displayed interfacial activation comparable...

  13. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  14. Increased conversion of phosphatidylinositol to phosphatidylinositol phosphate in Dictyostelium cells expressing a mutated ras gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaay, Jeroen van der; Draijer, Richard; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells that overexpress a ras gene with a Gly12 → Thr12 mutation (Dd-ras-Thr12) have an altered phenotype. These cells were labeled with [3H]inositol and the incorporation of radioactivity into inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] was analyzed and found to be higher th

  15. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone assignments of GDP-bound human H-Ras mutant G12V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nader; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Coyle, Joe; Nietlispach, Daniel; Williams, Glyn

    2016-04-01

    Harvey Ras (H-Ras) is a membrane-associated GTPase with critical functions in cell proliferation and differentiation. The G12V mutant of H-Ras is one of the most commonly encountered oncoproteins in human cancer. This mutation disrupts the GTPase activity of H-Ras, leading to constitutive activation and aberrant downstream signalling. Here we report the backbone resonance assignments of human H-Ras mutant G12V lacking the C-terminal membrane attachment domain.

  16. RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT Signaling in Malignant Melanoma Progression and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yajima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is one of the most serious skin cancers and is highly invasive and markedly resistant to conventional therapy. Melanomagenesis is initially triggered by environmental agents including ultraviolet (UV, which induces genetic/epigenetic alterations in the chromosomes of melanocytes. In human melanomas, the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK and the PI3K/PTEN/AKT (AKT signaling pathways are two major signaling pathways and are constitutively activated through genetic alterations. Mutations of RAF, RAS, and PTEN contribute to antiapoptosis, abnormal proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion for melanoma development and progression. To find better approaches to therapies for patients, understanding these MAPK and AKT signaling mechanisms of melanoma development and progression is important. Here, we review MAPK and AKT signaling networks associated with melanoma development and progression.

  17. Ras dependent paracrine secretion of osteopontin by Nf1+/- osteoblasts promote osteoclast activation in a neurofibromatosis type I murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijie; Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Qi; Jing, Yongmin; Chen, Shi; Song, Zhaohui; Yan, Jincheng; Li, Yan; Wu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xianghong; Zhang, Yingze; Case, Jamie; Yu, Menggang; Ingram, David A; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2009-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a pandemic genetic disorder characterized by malignant and nonmalignant manifestations, including skeletal abnormalities, such as osteoporosis, scoliosis, short stature, and pseudarthrosis. Recent studies in genetically inbred mice and from human patients with NF1 have identified multiple gains in osteoclast (OCL) functions both in vitro and in vivo. Given that osteoblasts secrete cytokines that promote OCL maturation/activation, we sought to identify whether haploinsufficiency of Nf1 (Nf1+/-) osteoblasts and their precursors secrete cytokines that have a central role in this process. Osteoblast conditioned media (OBCM) from Nf1+/- osteoblasts promoted OCL migration and bone resorption compared with WT OBCM. Osteopontin (OPN), a matrix protein found in mineralized tissues and pivotal in modulating OCL functions, was present in increased concentrations in Nf1+/- osteoblasts. Addition of OPN neutralizing antibody to Nf1+/- OBCM diminished the gain in bioactivity on OCL functions, including OCL migration and bone resorption. Our study identifies an important paracrine loop whereby elevated secretion of OPN by osteoblasts activate Nf1+/- OCLs that already have an intrinsic propensity for bone resorption leading to osteopenia and osteoporosis.

  18. RAS AND p53 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN THYROID CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible interaction between the ras and p53 genes over-expression in thyroid carcinoma, and whether there is a correlation between the ras and p53 over-expression and clinicopathological criteria. Methods: Eighty patients with thyroid lesions were examined for expression of ras and p53 genes by the labeled streptavidin biotin peroxidase (LSAB) method. Of these patients, 54 were diagnosed (average age: 39.9± 15.9 years) with malignant lesions. Of those included in the study, 31 has papillary carcinoma, 13 had follicular carcinoma, 7 had medullary carcinoma, 3 had undifferentiated carcinoma and 19 were stratified to stage I, 28 to stage II, 2 to stage III and 5 to stage IV according to TNM staging system. Twenty-six benign nodular thyroid disorders were studied as control. Results: Positive immunostain results for ras and p53 genes were statistically significant between thyroid carcinomas and benign disorders (90.7% vs 23%, 55.5% vs 30.7%, P<0.05). Both p53 and ras overexpressions coexisted in 30 thyroid carcinomas, and of these, 3 died and 5 had recurrences within 4 years. Conclusions: Activation of ras gene and inactivation of p53 gene were cooperatively associated in thyroid tumorigenesis. The concurrent overexpressions of ras and p53 could result in a poor prognosis.

  19. Regulation of Ras signaling and function by plasma membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Michael, James V

    2017-02-07

    Together H-, N- and KRAS mutations are major contributors to ~30% of all human cancers. Thus, Ras inhibition remains an important anti-cancer strategy. The molecular mechanisms of isotypic Ras oncogenesis are still not completely understood. Monopharmacological therapeutics have not been successful in the clinic. These disappointing outcomes have led to attempts to target elements downstream of Ras, mainly targeting either the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. While several such approaches are moderately effective, recent efforts have focused on preclinical evaluation of combination therapies to improve efficacies. This review will detail current understanding of the contributions of plasma membrane microdomain targeting of Ras to mitogenic and tumorigenic signaling and tumor progression. Moreover, this review will outline novel approaches to target Ras in cancers, including targeting schemes for new drug development, as well as putative re-purposing of drugs in current use to take advantage of blunting Ras signaling by interfering with Ras plasma membrane microdomain targeting and retention.

  20. Environmental noise alters gastric myoelectrical activity: Effect of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James S Castle; Jin-Hong Xing; Mark R Warner; Mark A Korsten

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of age and acoustic stress on gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and autonomic nervous system function,METHODS: Twenty-one male subjects (age range 22-71years, mean 44 years) were recruited and exposed, in random order, to three auditory stimuli (Hospital noise,conversation babble and traffic noise) after a 20-min baseline. All periods lasted 20 min and were interspersed with a 10 min of recovery. GMA was obtained using a Synectics Microdigitrapper. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate using an automatic recording device.RESULTS: Dominant power tended to decrease with increase of age (P<0.05). The overall percentage of three cycle per minute (CPM) activity decreased during exposure to hospital noise (12.0%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (13.9%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(7.1%). The subjects in the younger group (< 50 years)showed a consistent reduction in the percentage of 3CPM activity during hospital noise (22.9%, P < 0.05),traffic noise (19.0%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(15.5%). These observations were accompanied by a significant increase in bradygastria: hospital noise (P< 0.05) and traffic noise (P < 0.05). In contrast, the subjects over 50 years of age did not exhibit a significant decrease in 3 CPM activity. Regardless of age, noise did not alter blood pressure or heart rate.CONCLUSION: GMA changes with age. Loud noise can alter GMA, especially in younger individuals. Our data indicate that even short-term exposure to noise may alter the contractility of the stomach.

  1. Protein kinase C alpha-CARMA3 signaling axis links Ras to NF-kappa B for lysophosphatidic acid-induced urokinase plasminogen activator expression in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanivong, C; Chen, H M; Yee, S W; Pan, Z K; Dong, Z; Huang, S

    2008-02-21

    We reported previously that a signaling pathway consisting of G(i)-Ras-NF-kappaB mediates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. However, it is not clear what signaling components link Ras to nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB for this LPA-induced event. In the present study, we found that treatment of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors including conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor Gö6976 abolished LPA-induced uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cell lines tested, indicating the importance of cPKC activity in this LPA-induced event. Indeed, LPA stimulation led to the activation of PKCalpha and Ras-PKCalpha interaction. Although constitutively active mutants of PKCalpha (a cPKC), PKCtheta (a novel PKC (nPKC)) and PKCzeta (an atypical PKC (aPKC)) were all able to activate NF-kappaB and upregulate uPA expression, only dominant-negative PKCalpha mutant attenuated LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation. These results suggest that PKCalpha, rather than PKC isoforms in other PKC classes, participates in LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. To determine the signaling components downstream of PKCalpha mediating LPA-induced uPA upregulation, we showed that forced expression of dominant-negative CARMA3 or silencing CARMA3, Bcl10 and MALT1 with specific siRNAs diminished these LPA-induced events. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PKCalpha/CARMA3 signaling axis is important in LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell in vitro invasion.

  2. Altered brain activity for phonological manipulation in dyslexic Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Hisako; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-12-01

    Because of unique linguistic characteristics, the prevalence rate of developmental dyslexia is relatively low in the Japanese language. Paradoxically, Japanese children have serious difficulty analysing phonological processes when they have dyslexia. Neurobiological deficits in Japanese dyslexia remain unclear and need to be identified, and may lead to better understanding of the commonality and diversity in the disorder among different linguistic systems. The present study investigated brain activity that underlies deficits in phonological awareness in Japanese dyslexic children using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed and conducted a phonological manipulation task to extract phonological processing skills and to minimize the influence of auditory working memory on healthy adults, typically developing children, and dyslexic children. Current experiments revealed that several brain regions participated in manipulating the phonological information including left inferior and middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and bilateral basal ganglia. Moreover, dyslexic children showed altered activity in two brain regions. They showed hyperactivity in the basal ganglia compared with the two other groups, which reflects inefficient phonological processing. Hypoactivity in the left superior temporal gyrus was also found, suggesting difficulty in composing and processing phonological information. The altered brain activity shares similarity with those of dyslexic children in countries speaking alphabetical languages, but disparity also occurs between these two populations. These are initial findings concerning the neurobiological impairments in dyslexic Japanese children.

  3. Ketogenic diet alters dopaminergic activity in the mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, William H; Adams, Ryan E; Wyss, Livia S

    2014-06-13

    The present study was conducted to determine if the ketogenic diet altered basal levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice. The catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norephinephrine (NE) and the indolamine serotonin (5HT) were quantified postmortem in six different brain regions of adult mice fed a ketogenic diet for 3 weeks. The dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also measured. Tissue punches were collected bilaterally from the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior caudate-putamen, posterior caudate-putamen and the midbrain. Dopaminergic activity, as measured by the dopamine metabolites to dopamine content ratio - ([DOPAC]+[HVA])/[DA] - was significantly increased in the motor and somatosensory cortex regions of mice fed the ketogenic diet when compared to those same areas in brains of mice fed a normal diet. These results indicate that the ketogenic diet alters the activity of the meso-cortical dopaminergic system, which may contribute to the diet's therapeutic effect in reducing epileptic seizure activity.

  4. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Thalidomide combined with irradiation alters the activity of two proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra; Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Fişkın, Kayahan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thalidomide, a drug known for its anti‑angiogenic and antitumor properties, at its cytotoxic dose previously determined as 40 µg/ml (according to four cytotoxic test results). The effect of the drug alone and in combination with radiotherapy using Cobalt 60 (60Co) at 45 Gy on the enzymatic activity of substance‑P degrading A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and neprilysin (NEP) was investigated in the mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1 and 4T1 heart metastases post‑capsaicin (4THMpc). Thalidomide (40 µg/ml) exerted differing effects on the activities of ADAM10 and NEP enzymes. In 4T1 cells, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone did not alter ADAM10 enzyme activity. 60Co irradiation at 45 Gy alone caused a 42% inhibition in ADAM10 activity, however, the inhibition increased to 89% when combined therapy was used. By contrast, in the 4THMpc cell line, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone induced a 66.6% increase in ADAM10 enzyme activity. Radiotherapy alone and thalidomide with 60Co combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 40% inhibition of ADAM10 activity, respectively. In 4T1 cells, thalidomide alone caused a 40.9% increase in NEP activity. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with the drug caused a 40.7% increase in NEP activity. In more aggressive 4THMpc cells, thalidomide alone caused a 26.6% increase in NEP activity. Radiotherapy alone and combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 37% increase in enzyme activity, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that thalidomide alone or in combination with radiotherapy exhibits significant cytotoxic effects on 4T1 and 4THMpc mouse breast cancer cell lines indicating that this drug affects the enzymatic activity of ADAM10 and NEP in vitro.

  6. Society News: PhD theses could win prizes; Last chance for IYA2009 grants; New Fellows; RAS Fellows win prizes; Need a job? Need staff? RAS Library Saturdays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Fellows who are PhD student supervisors should be on the lookout for exceptionally good work from research students submitting their theses this year, for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston Astronomy Prize and the RAS Keith Runcorn Prize. The RAS is offering one last chance to apply for grants towards International Year of Astronomy activities, but you'll have to apply soon. The Society sends congratulations to Fellows of the RAS who have recently received prestigious awards for their work.

  7. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  8. Mice lacking Ras-GRF1 show contextual fear conditioning but not spatial memory impairments: convergent evidence from two independently generated mouse mutant lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele ed'Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning the Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53 in which a nonsense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in the Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdalar functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to

  9. Low HDL cholesterol, aggression and altered central serotonergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydens-Branchey, L; Branchey, M; Hudson, J; Fergeson, P

    2000-03-01

    Many studies support a significant relation between low cholesterol levels and poor impulse, aggression and mood control. Evidence exists also for a causal link between low brain serotonin (5-HT) activity and these behaviors. Mechanisms linking cholesterol and hostile or self-destructive behavior are unknown, but it has been suggested that low cholesterol influences 5-HT function. This study was designed to explore the relationship between plasma cholesterol, measures of impulsivity and aggression, and indices of 5-HT function in personality disordered cocaine addicts. Thirty-eight hospitalized male patients (age 36.8+/-7.1) were assessed with the DSM-III-R, the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and the Brown-Goodwin Assessment for Life History of Aggression. Fasting basal cholesterol (total, LDL and HDL) was determined 2 weeks after cocaine discontinuation. On the same day 5-HT function was assessed by neuroendocrine (cortisol and prolactin) and psychological (NIMH and 'high' self-rating scales) responses following meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) challenges. Reduced neuroendocrine responses, 'high' feelings and increased 'activation-euphoria' following m-CPP have been interpreted as indicating 5-HT alterations in a variety of psychiatric conditions. Significantly lower levels of HDL cholesterol were found in patients who had a history of aggression (P=0.005). Lower levels of HDL cholesterol were also found to be significantly associated with more intense 'high' and 'activation-euphoria' responses as well as with blunted cortisol responses to m-CPP (P=0.033, P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). This study gives further support to existing evidence indicating that in some individuals, the probability of exhibiting impulsive and violent behaviors may be increased when cholesterol is low. It also suggests that low cholesterol and alterations in 5-HT activity may be causally related.

  10. Flavopiridol Synergizes with Sorafenib to Induce Cytotoxicity and Potentiate Antitumorigenic Activity in EGFR/HER-2 and Mutant RAS/RAF Breast Cancer Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy S Nagaria

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signaling through the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk (Ras-MAPK pathway is implicated in a wide array of carcinomas, including those of the breast. The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are implicated in regulating proliferative and survival signaling downstream of this pathway. Here, we show that CDK inhibitors exhibit an order of magnitude greater cytotoxic potency than a suite of inhibitors targeting RTK and Ras-MAPK signaling in cell lines representative of clinically recognized breast cancer (BC subtypes. Drug combination studies show that the pan-CDK inhibitor, flavopiridol (FPD, synergistically potentiated cytotoxicity induced by the Raf inhibitor, sorafenib (SFN. This synergy was most pronounced at sub-EC50 SFN concentrations in MDA-MB-231 (KRAS-G13D and BRAF-G464V mutations, MDA-MB-468 [epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression], and SKBR3 [ErbB2/EGFR2 (HER-2 overexpression] cells but not in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T47D cells. Potentiation of SFN cytotoxicity by FPD correlated with enhanced apoptosis, suppression of retinoblastoma (Rb signaling, and reduced Mcl-1 expression. SFN and FPD were also tested in an MDA-MB-231 mammary fat pad engraftment model of tumorigenesis. Mice treated with both drugs exhibited reduced primary tumor growth rates and metastatic tumor load in the lungs compared to treatment with either drug alone, and this correlated with greater reductions in Rb signaling and Mcl-1 expression in resected tumors. These findings support the development of CDK and Raf co-targeting strategies in EGFR/HER-2-overexpressing or RAS/RAF mutant BCs.

  11. RAS-RAF-MEK-dependent oxidative cell death involving voltage-dependent anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoda, Nicholas; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Zaganjor, Elma; Bauer, Andras J; Yang, Wan Seok; Fridman, Daniel J; Wolpaw, Adam J; Smukste, Inese; Peltier, John M; Boniface, J Jay; Smith, Richard; Lessnick, Stephen L; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Stockwell, Brent R

    2007-06-14

    Therapeutics that discriminate between the genetic makeup of normal cells and tumour cells are valuable for treating and understanding cancer. Small molecules with oncogene-selective lethality may reveal novel functions of oncoproteins and enable the creation of more selective drugs. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the selective anti-tumour agent erastin, involving the RAS-RAF-MEK signalling pathway functioning in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Erastin exhibits greater lethality in human tumour cells harbouring mutations in the oncogenes HRAS, KRAS or BRAF. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we discovered that erastin acts through mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs)--a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. We show that erastin treatment of cells harbouring oncogenic RAS causes the appearance of oxidative species and subsequent death through an oxidative, non-apoptotic mechanism. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of VDAC2 or VDAC3 caused resistance to erastin, implicating these two VDAC isoforms in the mechanism of action of erastin. Moreover, using purified mitochondria expressing a single VDAC isoform, we found that erastin alters the permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Finally, using a radiolabelled analogue and a filter-binding assay, we show that erastin binds directly to VDAC2. These results demonstrate that ligands to VDAC proteins can induce non-apoptotic cell death selectively in some tumour cells harbouring activating mutations in the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway.

  12. The efficacy of Raf kinase recruitment to the GTPase H-ras depends on H-ras membrane conformer-specific nanoclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Andrade, Débora M; Reymond, Luc; Eggeling, Christian; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Solution structures and biochemical data have provided a wealth of mechanistic insight into Ras GTPases. However, information on how much the membrane organization of these lipid-modified proteins impacts on their signaling is still scarce. Ras proteins are organized into membrane nanoclusters, which are necessary for Ras-MAPK signaling. Using quantitative conventional and super-resolution fluorescence methods, as well as mathematical modeling, we investigated nanoclustering of H-ras helix α4 and hypervariable region mutants that have different bona fide conformations on the membrane. By following the emergence of conformer-specific nanoclusters in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells, we found that conformers impart distinct nanoclustering responses depending on the cytoplasmic levels of the nanocluster scaffold galectin-1. Computational modeling revealed that complexes containing H-ras conformers and galectin-1 affect both the number and lifetime of nanoclusters and thus determine the specific Raf effector recruitment. Our results show that mutations in Ras can affect its nanoclustering response and thus allosterically effector recruitment and downstream signaling. We postulate that cancer- and developmental disease-linked mutations that are associated with the Ras membrane conformation may exhibit so far unrecognized Ras nanoclustering and therefore signaling alterations.

  13. Anthropogenic noise alters bat activity levels and echolocation calls

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    Jessie P. Bunkley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts from anthropogenic noise are well documented for many wildlife taxa. Investigations of the effects of noise on bats however, have not been conducted outside of the laboratory. Bats that hunt arthropods rely on auditory information to forage. Part of this acoustic information can fall within the spectrum of anthropogenic noise, which can potentially interfere with signal reception and processing. Compressor stations associated with natural gas extraction produce broadband noise 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. With over half a million producing gas wells in the U.S. this infrastructure is a major source of noise pollution across the landscape. We conducted a ‘natural experiment’ in the second largest gas extraction field in the U.S. to investigate the potential effects of gas compressor station noise on the activity levels of the local bat assemblage. We used acoustic monitoring to compare the activity level (number of minutes in a night with a bat call of the bat assemblage at sites with compressor stations to sites lacking this infrastructure. We found that activity levels for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis were 40% lower at loud compressor sites compared to quieter well pads, whereas the activity levels of four other species (Myotis californicus, M. cillolabrum, M. lucifugus, Parastrellus hesperus were not affected by noise. Furthermore, our results reveal that the assemblage of bat species emitting low frequency (35 kHz echolocation did not exhibit altered activity levels in noise. Lower activity levels of Brazilian free-tailed bats at loud sites indicate a potential reduction in habitat for this species. Additionally, a comparison of echolocation search calls produced by free-tailed bats at sites with and without compressor stations reveal that this species modifies its echolocation search calls in noise—producing longer calls with a narrower bandwidth. Call alterations might affect prey

  14. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  15. A novel role for flotillin-1 in H-Ras-regulated breast cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Minsoo; Yong, Hae-Young; Kim, Eun-Sook; Son, Hwajin; Jeon, You Rim; Hwang, Jin-Sun; Kim, Myeong-Ok; Cha, Yujin; Choi, Wahn Soo; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Kyung-Min; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Hong-Hee; Kim, Eun Joo; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Hoe Suk; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi Kim, Hyeong-Reh; Moon, Aree

    2016-03-01

    Elevated expression and aberrant activation of Ras have been implicated in breast cancer aggressiveness. H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces breast cell invasion. A crucial link between lipid rafts and H-Ras function has been suggested. This study sought to identify the lipid raft protein(s) responsible for H-Ras-induced tumorigenicity and invasiveness of breast cancer. We conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of lipid raft proteins from invasive MCF10A human breast epithelial cells engineered to express active H-Ras and non-invasive cells expressing active N-Ras. Here, we identified a lipid raft protein flotillin-1 as an important regulator of H-Ras activation and breast cell invasion. Flotillin-1 was required for epidermal growth factor-induced activation of H-Ras, but not that of N-Ras, in MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Flotillin-1 knockdown inhibited the invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T TNBC cells in vitro and in vivo. In xenograft mouse tumor models of these TNBC cell lines, we showed that flotillin-1 played a critical role in tumor growth. Using human breast cancer samples, we provided clinical evidence for the metastatic potential of flotillin-1. Membrane staining of flotillin-1 was positively correlated with metastatic spread (p = 0.013) and inversely correlated with patient disease-free survival rates (p = 0.005). Expression of flotillin-1 was associated with H-Ras in breast cancer, especially in TNBC (p < 0.001). Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of Ras isoform-specific interplay with flotillin-1, leading to tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of breast cancer.

  16. K-ras/PI3K-Akt signaling is essential for zebrafish hematopoiesis and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Liu

    Full Text Available The RAS small GTPases orchestrate multiple cellular processes. Studies on knock-out mice showed the essential and sufficient role of K-RAS, but not N-RAS and H-RAS in embryonic development. However, many physiological functions of K-RAS in vivo remain unclear. Using wild-type and fli1:GFP transgenic zebrafish, we showed that K-ras-knockdown resulted in specific hematopoietic and angiogenic defects, including the impaired expression of erythroid-specific gene gata1 and sse3-hemoglobin, reduced blood circulation and disorganized blood vessels. Expression of either K-rasC40 that links to phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activation, or Akt2 that acts downstream of PI3K, could rescue both hematopoietic and angiogenic defects in the K-ras knockdown. Consistently, the functional rescue by k-ras mRNA was significantly suppressed by wortmannin, a PI3K-specific inhibitor. Our results provide direct evidence that PI3K-Akt plays a crucial role in mediating K-ras signaling during hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in vivo, thus offering new targets and alternative vertebrate model for studying these processes and their related diseases.

  17. Pseudorabies virus infection alters neuronal activity and connectivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M McCarthy

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV, infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural

  18. Physical activity alters antioxidant status in exercising elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Margaritis, Irène; Arnaud, Josiane; Faure, Henri; Roussel, Anne-Marie

    2006-07-01

    Nutritional adequacy and physical activity are two aspects of a health-promoting lifestyle. Not much is known about antioxidant nutrient requirements for exercising elderly (EE) subjects. The question of whether exercise training alters the status of antioxidant vitamins as well as trace elements in elderly subjects and fails to balance the age-related increase in oxidative stress is addressed in this study. There were 18 EE (68.1+/-3.1 years), 7 sedentary elderly (SE; 70.4+/-5.0 years), 17 exercising young (EY; 31.2+/-7.1 years) and 8 sedentary young (SY; 27.1+/-5.8 years) subjects who completed 7-day food and activity records. Each subject's blood was sampled on Day 8. A similar selenium (Se) status but a higher erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were found in EE subjects as compared with EY and SE subjects. Blood oxidized glutathione was higher and plasma total thiol was lower in EE subjects as compared with EY subjects. Mean vitamin C (167 vs. 106 mg/day), vitamin E (11.7 vs. 8.3 mg/day) and beta-carotene (4 vs. 2.4 mg/day) intakes were higher in EE subjects as compared with EY subjects. However, EE subjects exhibited the lowest plasma carotenoid concentrations, especially in beta-carotene, which was not related to intakes. Despite high intakes of antioxidant micronutrients, no adaptive mechanism able to counteract the increased oxidative stress in aging was found in EE subjects. Results on GSH-Px activity illustrate that the nature of the regulation of this biomarker of Se status is different in response to training and aging. These data also strongly suggest specific antioxidant requirements for athletes with advancing age, with a special attention to carotenoids.

  19. Ras proteins have multiple functions in vegetative cells of Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG⁻ cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG⁻, rasC⁻, and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells.

  20. Ifenprodil Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Behavioral Sensitization and Activation of Ras-ERK-∆FosB Pathway in the Caudate Putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Liu, Xinshe; Qiao, Chuchu; Chen, Gang; Li, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Addiction is a debilitating, chronic psychiatric disorder that is difficult to cure completely owing to the high rate of relapse. Behavioral sensitization is considered to may underlie behavioral changes, such as relapse, caused by chronic abuse of psychomotor stimulants. Thus, its animal models have been widely used to explore the etiology of addiction. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play an important role in addiction to psychomotor stimulants. However, the role of GluN2B-containing receptors and their downstream signaling pathway(s) in behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine (METH) have not been investigated yet. In this study, we used different doses of ifenprodil (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg), a selective antagonist of the GluN2B subunit, to investigate the role of GluN2B-containing NMDARs in METH-induced behavioral sensitization. We then examined changes in the levels of Ras, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)/ERK, and ∆FosB in the caudate putamen (CPu) by western blot. We found that 2.5 or 10 mg/kg ifenprodil significantly attenuated METH-induced behavioral sensitization, whereas the mice treated with a moderate dose of ifenprodil (5 mg/kg) displayed no significant changes. Further results of western blot experiments showed that repeated administration of METH caused the increases in the levels of Ras, pERK/ERK and ∆FosB in the CPu, and these changes were inhibited by only the 2.5 mg/kg dose of ifenprodil. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that 2.5 mg/kg ifenprodil could attenuate METH-induced behavioral sensitization. Moreover, GluN2B-containing NMDARs and their downstream Ras-ERK-∆FosB signaling pathway in the CPu might be involved in METH-induced behavioral sensitization.

  1. Reduced signaling of PI3K-Akt and RAS-MAPK pathways is the key target for weight-loss-induced cancer prevention by dietary calorie restriction and/or physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard, Joseph; Jiang, Yu; Yu, Miao; Su, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Zhihui; Xu, Jianteng; Chen, Jie; King, Brenee; Lu, Lizhi; Tomich, John; Baybutt, Richard; Wang, Weiqun

    2014-12-01

    Weight control through either dietary calorie restriction (DCR) or exercise has been associated with cancer prevention in animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully defined. Bioinformatics using genomics, proteomics and lipidomics was employed to elucidate the molecular targets of weight control in a mouse skin cancer model. SENCAR mice were randomly assigned into four groups for 10 weeks: ad-libitum-fed sedentary control, ad-libitum-fed exercise (AE), exercise but pair-fed isocaloric amount of control (PE) and 20% DCR. Two hours after topical TPA treatment, skin epidermis was analyzed by Affymetrix for gene expression, DIGE for proteomics and lipidomics for phospholipids. Body weights were significantly reduced in both DCR and PE but not AE mice versus the control. Among 39,000 transcripts, 411, 67 and 110 genes were significantly changed in DCR, PE and AE, respectively. The expression of genes relevant to PI3K-Akt and Ras-MAPK signaling was effectively reduced by DCR and PE but not AE as measured through GenMAPP software. Proteomics analysis identified ~120 proteins, with 27 proteins significantly changed by DCR, including up-regulated apolipoprotein A-1, a key antioxidant protein that decreases Ras-MAPK activity. Of the total 338 phospholipids analyzed by lipidomics, 57 decreased by PE including 5 phophatidylinositol species that serve as PI3K substrates. Although a full impact has not been determined yet, it appears that the reduction of both Ras-MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways is a cancer preventive target that has been consistently demonstrated by three bioinformatics approaches.

  2. Regulation of Raf-1 and Raf-1 mutants by Ras-dependent and Ras-independent mechanisms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, P; Reardon, D B; Morrison, D K; Sturgill, T W

    1995-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Raf-1 functions downstream from Ras to activate mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, but the mechanisms of Raf-1 activation are incompletely understood. To dissect these mechanisms, wild-type and mutant Raf-1 proteins were studied in an in vitro system with purified plasma membranes from v-Ras- and v-Src-transformed cells (transformed membranes). Wild-type (His)6- and FLAG-Raf-1 were activated in a Ras- and ATP-dependent manner by transformed membranes; however, Raf-1 proteins that are kinase defective (K375M), that lack an in vivo site(s) of regulatory tyrosine (YY340/341FF) or constitutive serine (S621A) phosphorylation, that do not bind Ras (R89L), or that lack an intact zinc finger (CC165/168SS) were not. Raf-1 proteins lacking putative regulatory sites for an unidentified kinase (S259A) or protein kinase C (S499A) were activated but with apparently reduced efficiency. The kinase(s) responsible for activation by Ras or Src may reside in the plasma membrane, since GTP loading of plasma membranes from quiescent NIH 3T3 cells (parental membranes) induced de novo capacity to activate Raf-1. Wild-type Raf-1, possessing only basal activity, was not activated by parental membranes in the absence of GTP loading. In contrast, Raf-1 Y340D, possessing significant activity, was, surprisingly, stimulated by parental membranes in a Ras-independent manner. The results suggest that activation of Raf-1 by phosphorylation may be permissive for further modulation by another membrane factor, such as a lipid. A factor(s) extracted with methanol-chloroform from transformed membranes or membranes from Sf9 cells coexpressing Ras and SrcY527F significantly enhanced the activity of Raf-1 Y340D or active Raf-1 but not that of inactive Raf-1. Our findings suggest a model for activation of Raf-1, wherein (i) Raf-1 associates with Ras-GTP, (ii) Raf-1 is activated by tyrosine and/or serine phosphorylation, and (iii) Raf-1 activity is further increased by a

  3. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  4. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-12-18

    Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, was found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppress SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibit SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity.

  5. Effect of warm sparse-dense wave on RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in chondro-cytes of knee osteoarthritis rat models%温热疏密波对膝骨关节炎模型大鼠软骨细胞RAS/丝裂原活化蛋白激酶信号通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林木南; 陈立典; 林艳红; 刘献祥; 张朝春; 曾西明; 李西海; 秦茵; 郭健红; 高晖

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察温热疏密波对膝骨关节炎(knee osteoarthritis,KOA)模型大鼠软骨细胞RAS/丝裂原活化蛋白激酶(mitogen-activated protein kinase,MAPK)信号通路的影响。方法:将120只2月龄SPF级健康SD大鼠随机分为空白组、模型组、对照组、实验1组、实验2组、实验3组,每组20只。除空白组外,其余各组大鼠均通过在右后膝关节腔内注射4﹪木瓜蛋白酶建立KOA模型。造模结束后,空白组和模型组不进行干预;对照组以KJ-6200C微波治疗仪照射右后膝关节,每日1次,每次30 min;实验1组、实验2组和实验3组大鼠均以膝关节炎治疗仪进行温热疏密波治疗,分别选择疏密波1∶1模式、疏密波2∶1模式、疏密波1∶2模式,每日1次,每次30 min。分别于实验干预开始4、8周后,从各组随机选取10只大鼠,切取右后肢股骨内髁负重面和胫骨平台软骨,分别采用Western Blot法和Real-time PCR法测定软骨中ERK、P38、P53、RAS蛋白和mRNA含量。结果:干预4周后,模型组、对照组及实验组软骨中ERK mRNA、P53 mRNA、RAS mRNA含量比较,组间差异均无统计学意义;对照组、实验2组、实验3组软骨中P38 mRNA含量均低于模型组(P=0.024,P=0.024,P=0.006),其余各组间两两比较,组间差异均无统计学意义。对照组、实验3组软骨中ERK蛋白含量均低于模型组(P=0.047,P=0.020);实验3组软骨中P38蛋白含量低于模型组、实验1组和实验2组(P=0.018,P=0.035,P=0.026);对照组、实验1组、实验2组、实验3组软骨中P53蛋白含量均低于模型组(P=0.029,P=0.012,P=0.003,P=0.002);对照组、实验1组、实验2组、实验3组软骨中RAS蛋白含量均低于模型组(P=0.002, P=0.000,P=0.001,P=0.000)。干预8周后,各组软骨中ERK mRNA含量比较,差异无统计学意义;实验2组、实验3组软骨中P38 mRNA含量均低于模型组(P=0.020,P=0.024)

  6. A primary cardiac leiomyosarcoma with mutation at H-ras codon 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parissis, J; Arvanitis, D; Sourvinos, G; Spandidos, D

    1997-01-01

    The presence of activating ras mutations in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma which occurred in the right atrium of the heart of a female patient was examined. The tumor had the appearance of leiomyosarcoma in rutine histopathological examination and the definite diagnosis was confirmed by a positive immunohistochemical reaction to smooth muscle actin. Molecular analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique showed a point mutation of H-ras gene at codon 12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing ras gene mutation in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma implying a role for the ras oncogenes in the development of this tumor.

  7. Specificity in Ras and Rap signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.H.; Bos, Johannes L.

    2009-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small GTPases. Whereas Ras is known for its role in cell proliferation and survival, Rap1 is predominantly involved in cell adhesion and cell junction formation. Ras and Rap are regulated by different sets of guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-act

  8. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruïne Adriaan P

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1 and Ras (K-ras pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. Methods In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Results Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45 in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656 and 36% (235/656, respectively. Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656. Nine percent of all tumours (58/656 lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. Conclusion CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency.

  9. Inhibition of RAF Isoforms and Active Dimers by LY3009120 Leads to Anti-tumor Activities in RAS or BRAF Mutant Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng-Bin; Henry, James R; Kaufman, Michael D; Lu, Wei-Ping; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Subha; Rutkoski, Thomas J; Wise, Scott; Chun, Lawrence; Zhang, Youyan; Van Horn, Robert D; Yin, Tinggui; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Yadav, Vipin; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Gong, Xueqian; Ma, Xiwen; Webster, Yue; Buchanan, Sean; Mochalkin, Igor; Huber, Lysiane; Kays, Lisa; Donoho, Gregory P; Walgren, Jennie; McCann, Denis; Patel, Phenil; Conti, Ilaria; Plowman, Gregory D; Starling, James J; Flynn, Daniel L

    2015-09-14

    LY3009120 is a pan-RAF and RAF dimer inhibitor that inhibits all RAF isoforms and occupies both protomers in RAF dimers. Biochemical and cellular analyses revealed that LY3009120 inhibits ARAF, BRAF, and CRAF isoforms with similar affinity, while vemurafenib or dabrafenib have little or modest CRAF activity compared to their BRAF activities. LY3009120 induces BRAF-CRAF dimerization but inhibits the phosphorylation of downstream MEK and ERK, suggesting that it effectively inhibits the kinase activity of BRAF-CRAF heterodimers. Further analyses demonstrated that LY3009120 also inhibits various forms of RAF dimers including BRAF or CRAF homodimers. Due to these unique properties, LY3009120 demonstrates minimal paradoxical activation, inhibits MEK1/2 phosphorylation, and exhibits anti-tumor activities across multiple models carrying KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutation.

  10. The greedy nature of mutant RAS: a boon for drug discovery targeting cancer metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jing; Wang, Jieqiong; Chang, Siyu; Liu, Mingyao; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    RAS oncogene mutations are frequently detected in human cancers. Among RAS-mediated tumorigenesis, KRAS-driven cancers are the most frequently diagnosed and resistant to current therapies. Despite more than three decades of intensive efforts, there are still no specific therapies for mutant RAS proteins. While trying to block those well-established downstream pathways, such as the RAF-MAPK pathway and the PI3K-AKT pathway, attentions have been paid to potential effects of RAS on metabolic pathways and the feasibility for targeting these pathways. Recent studies have proved that RAS not only promotes aerobic glycolysis and glutamine metabolism reprograming to provide energy, but it also facilitates branched metabolism pathways, autophagy, and macropinocytosis. These alterations generate building blocks for tumor growth and strengthen antioxidant defense in tumor cells. All of these metabolic changes meet different demands of RAS-driven cancers, making them distinct from normal cells. Indeed, some achievements have been made to inhibit tumor growth through targeting specific metabolism rewiring in preclinical models. Although there is still a long way to elucidate the landscape of altered metabolism, we believe that specific metabolic enzymes or pathways could be therapeutically targeted for selective inhibition of RAS-driven cancers.

  11. Liver tumors induced in B6C3F{sub 1} mice by benz[a]anthracene and two of its halogenated derivatives contain K-RAS oncogene mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, O.; Yi, P.; Zhan, D. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated PAHs are genotoxic environmental contaminants. We previously examined the tumorigenicity of benz[a]anthracene (BA), 7-Cl-BA, and 7-Br-BA in the neonatal mouse tumorigenicity bioassay. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered i.p. injections at a total dose of 400 nmol per mouse on 1, 8, and 15 days after birth. BA, 7-Cl-BA, and 7-Br-BA induced hepatocellular adenoma in 67, 92, and 96% of the mice, respectively, and induced hepatocellular carcinoma in 15, 100 and 83% of the mice, respectively. In the present study, mRNA was isolated from each of the liver tumors induced by the three compounds, reversed-transcribed to cDNA, and portions of the K- and H-ras oncogene coding sequences were amplified and analyzed for DNA sequence alterations. 92% (11/12) of BA-induced, 79% (19/24) of 7-Cl-BA-induced and 86% (19/22) of 7-Br-BA-induced liver tumors had activated ras protooncogenes. In contrast to the general finding of H-ras mutations in B6C3F{sub 1} mouse liver tumors, all the mutations were at the first base of K-ras codon 13, resulting in a pattern of GGC{yields}CGC. No other ras oncogene mutations were detected. Our results clearly demonstrate that these chemicals induce a unique type of ras (K-ras) oncogene activation in the liver tumors of B6C3F{sub 1} mice.

  12. A G4-DNA/B-DNA junction at codon 12 of c-Ha-ras is actively and asymmetrically methylated by DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S S; Baker, D J; Jardines, L A

    1989-05-15

    Oligodeoxynucleotides spanning codon 12 of the human c-Ha-ras gene were found to be exceptionally good substrates for de novo methylation by human DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase. In the complex formed by two complementary 30mers, only the C-rich strand was methylated by the enzyme. Guanines at the 3' end of the G-rich strand of the complex could not be completely modified by dimethyl sulfate [corrected] suggesting tetrameric bonding at these G-residues. An eight-stranded structure, composed of four duplex DNAs at one end, joined to a G4-DNA segment at the other with the junction between the two DNA forms at codon 12, can account for our results.

  13. PAQR10 and PAQR11 mediate Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ting; Ding, Qiurong; Huang, Heng; Xu, Daqian; Jiang, Yuhui; Zhou, Ben; Li, Zhenghu; Jiang, Xiaomeng; He, Jing; Liu, Weizhong; Zhang, Yixuan; Pan, Yi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Thomas, Walter G; Chen, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Ras plays a pivotal role in many cellular activities, and its subcellular compartmentalization provides spatial and temporal selectivity. Here we report a mode of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by two highly homologous proteins PAQR10 and PAQR11 of the progestin and AdipoQ receptors family. PAQR10 and PAQR11 are exclusively localized in the Golgi apparatus. Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 stimulates basal and EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and increases the expression of ERK target genes in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 markedly elevates Golgi localization of HRas, NRas and KRas4A, but not KRas4B. PAQR10 and PAQR11 can also interact with HRas, NRas and KRas4A, but not KRas4B. The increased Ras protein at the Golgi apparatus by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 is in an active state. Consistently, knockdown of PAQR10 and PAQR11 reduces EGF-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and Ras activation at the Golgi apparatus. Intriguingly, PAQR10 and PAQR11 are able to interact with RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide exchange protein of Ras, and increase Golgi localization of RasGRP1. The C1 domain of RasGRP1 is both necessary and sufficient for the interaction of RasGRP1 with PAQR10/PAQR11. The simulation of ERK phosphorylation by overexpressed PAQR10/PAQR11 is abrogated by downregulation of RasGRP1. Furthermore, differentiation of PC12 cells is significantly enhanced by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11. Collectively, this study uncovers a new paradigm of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by PAQR10 and PAQR11.

  14. PAQR10 and PAQR11 mediate Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Jin; Weizhong Liu; Yixuan Zhang; Yi Pan; Zhenzhen Wang; Walter G Thomas; Yan Chen; Qiurong Ding; Heng Huang; Daqian Xu; Yuhui Jiang; Ben Zhou; Zhenghu Li; Xiaomeng Jiang; Jing He

    2012-01-01

    Ras plays a pivotal role in many cellular activities,and its subcellular compartmentalization provides spatial and temporal selectivity.Here we report a mode of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by two highly homologous proteins PAQR10 and PAQR11 of the progestin and AdipoQ receptors family.PAQR10 and PAQR11 are exclusively localized in the Golgi apparatus.Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 stimulates basal and EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and increases the expression of ERK target genes in a dose-dependent manner.Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 markedly elevates Golgi localization of HRas,NRas and KRas4A,but not KRas4B.PAQR10 and PAQR11 can also interact with HRas,NRas and KRas4A,but not KRas4B.The increased Ras protein at the Golgi apparatus by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 is in an active state.Consistently,knockdown of PAQR10 and PAQR11 reduces EGF-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and Ras activation at the Golgi apparatus.Intriguingly,PAQR10 and PAQR11 are able to interact with RasGRP1,a guanine nucleotide exchange protein of Ras,and increase Golgi localization of RasGRP1.The C1 domain of RasGRP1 is both necessary and sufficient for the interaction of RasGRP1 with PAQR10/PAQR11.The simulation of ERK phosphorylation by overexpressed PAQR10/PAQR11 is abrogated by downregulation of RasGRP1.Furthermore,differentiation of PC12 cells is significantly enhanced by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11.Collectively,this study uncovers a new paradigm of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by PAQR10 and PAQR11.

  15. RasGRP1 stimulation enhances ubiquitination and endocytosis of the sodium-chloride cotransporter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, B.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Cooke, L.L.; Moddes, L.N.; Deen, P.M.T.; Hoover, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) is the principal salt-absorptive pathway in the distal convoluted tubule. Recently, we described a novel pathway of NCC regulation in which phorbol esters (PE) stimulate Ras guanyl-releasing protein 1 (RasGRP1), triggering a cascade ultimately activating ERK1/

  16. MUTASI K RAS PADA KARSINOGENESIS KANKER KOLOREKTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Sriwidyani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Karsinogenesis kanker kolorektal merupakan proses multi-step, melibatkan berbagai abnormalitasgenetik. Mutasi gen K RAS sering ditemukan pada tumor ini. K RAS adalah gen yang menyandi proteinK ras, suatu produk proto-onkogen yang merupakan komponen penting pada jalur pensignalan darireseptor permukaan sel untuk mengontrol proliferasi, diferensiasi, dan kematian sel. Kebanyakanmutasi terjadi pada kodon 12 dan 13 dari ekson 1. Protein K ras mutan akan menyebabkan aktivasipersisten dari banyak signal downstream dari pertumbuhan dan survival sel. Pemeriksaan adanyamutasi pada gen K RAS memegang peranan penting pada prognosis dan terapi dari kanker kolorektal.[MEDICINA 2013;44:97-100].

  17. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  18. B- and C-RAF display essential differences in their binding to Ras: the isotype-specific N terminus of B-RAF facilitates Ras binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Hekman, Mirko; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Rubio, Ignacio; Wiese, Stefan; Rapp, Ulf R

    2007-09-01

    Recruitment of RAF kinases to the plasma membrane was initially proposed to be mediated by Ras proteins via interaction with the RAF Ras binding domain (RBD). Data reporting that RAF kinases possess high affinities for particular membrane lipids support a new model in which Ras-RAF interactions may be spatially restricted to the plane of the membrane. Although the coupling features of Ras binding to the isolated RAF RBD were investigated in great detail, little is known about the interactions of the processed Ras with the functional and full-length RAF kinases. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the binding properties of farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras to both full-length B- and C-RAF in the presence and absence of lipid environment. Although isolated RBD fragments associate with high affinity to both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras, the full-length RAF kinases revealed fundamental differences with respect to Ras binding. In contrast to C-RAF that requires farnesylated H-Ras, cytosolic B-RAF associates effectively and with significantly higher affinity with both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras. To investigate the potential farnesyl binding site(s) we prepared several N-terminal fragments of C-RAF and found that in the presence of cysteine-rich domain only the farnesylated form of H-Ras binds with high association rates. The extreme N terminus of B-RAF turned out to be responsible for the facilitation of lipid independent Ras binding to B-RAF, since truncation of this region resulted in a protein that changed its kinase properties and resembles C-RAF. In vivo studies using PC12 and COS7 cells support in vitro results. Co-localization measurements using labeled Ras and RAF documented essential differences between B- and C-RAF with respect to association with Ras. Taken together, these data suggest that the activation of B-RAF, in contrast to C-RAF, may take place both at the plasma membrane and in the cytosolic environment.

  19. Coexistence of K-ras mutations and HPV infection in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezol Ayda

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the ras genes or association with human papillomavirus infection have been extensively studied in colorectal cancer. However, the correlation between K-ras mutations and HPV in colorectal cancer has not been investigated yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the presence of K-ras mutations and their correlation with HPV infection in colon cancer. Methods K-ras mutations were analyzed by a mutagenic PCR assay and digestion with specific restriction enzymes to distinguish the wild-type and mutant codons. HPV infection was analyzed by PCR amplification and hybridization with specific probes by Southern blotting. Stattistical analyses were performed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests Results HPV gene fragments were detected in 43 tumors and 17 normal tissue samples. HPV 18 was the prevalent type in the tumor tissue. A mutation at codon 12 of the K-ras gene was present in 31 patients. 56% of the HPV-positive tumors also harbored a K-ras mutation. Codon 13 mutations were not observed. These data indicate that infection with high risk HPV types and mutational activation of the K-ras gene are frequent events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mutational activation of the K-ras gene is a common event in colon carcinogenesis and that HPV infection may represent an important factor in the development of the premalignant lesions leading to the neoplastic phenotype.

  20. Expression of renin–angiotensin system (RAS components in endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Delforce

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A dysfunctional endometrial renin–angiotensin system (RAS could aid the growth and spread of endometrial cancer. To determine if the RAS is altered in endometrial cancer, we measured RAS gene expression and protein levels in 30 human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE endometrioid carcinomas and their adjacent endometrium. All components of the RAS were expressed in most tumours and in adjacent endometrium; mRNA levels of (prorenin receptor (ATP6AP2, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE1 and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 mRNA levels were greater in tumour tissue than adjacent non-cancerous endometrium (P = 0.023, 0.008, 0.004 and 0.046, respectively. Prorenin, ATP6AP2, AGTR1, AGTR2 and ACE2 proteins were abundantly expressed in both cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous endometrium. Staining was most intense in cancerous glandular epithelium. One potential target of the endometrial RAS, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1, which is essential for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, was also upregulated in endometrial cancer tissue (P = 0.001. Interestingly, TGFB1 was strongly correlated with RAS expression and was upregulated in tumour tissue. This study is the first to characterise the mRNA and protein expression of all RAS components in cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous endometrium. The greater expression of ATP6AP2, AGTR1 and ACE1, key elements of the pro-angiogenic/proliferative arm of the RAS, suggests that the RAS plays a role in the growth and spread of endometrial cancer. Therefore, existing drugs that inhibit the RAS and which are used to treat hypertension may have potential as treatments for endometrial cancer.

  1. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M;

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...... sequences were reconstructed as an oligonucleotide cassette. Based upon the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, a range of phenotypes from virtually full activity to none (null mutants) was seen. Three classes of codons were present in this segment: one which could...

  2. The linker domain of the Ha-Ras hypervariable region regulates interactions with exchange factors, Raf-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumot, Montserrat; Yan, Jun; Clyde-Smith, Jodi; Sluimer, Judith; Hancock, John F

    2002-01-01

    Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras have different distributions across plasma membrane microdomains. The Ras C-terminal anchors are primarily responsible for membrane micro-localization, but recent work has shown that the interaction of Ha-Ras with lipid rafts is modulated by GTP loading via a mechanism that requires the hypervariable region (HVR). We have now identified two regions in the HVR linker domain that regulate Ha-Ras raft association. Release of activated Ha-Ras from lipid rafts is blocked by deleting amino acids 173-179 or 166-172. Alanine replacement of amino acids 173-179 but not 166-172 restores wild type micro-localization, indicating that specific N-terminal sequences of the linker domain operate in concert with a more C-terminal spacer domain to regulate Ha-Ras raft association. Mutations in the linker domain that confine activated Ha-RasG12V to lipid rafts abrogate Raf-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and Akt activation and inhibit PC12 cell differentiation. N-Myristoylation also prevents the release of activated Ha-Ras from lipid rafts and inhibits Raf-1 activation. These results demonstrate that the correct modulation of Ha-Ras lateral segregation is critical for downstream signaling. Mutations in the linker domain also suppress the dominant negative phenotype of Ha-RasS17N, indicating that HVR sequences are essential for efficient interaction of Ha-Ras with exchange factors in intact cells.

  3. Altered expression of retinoic acid (RA) receptor mRNAs in the fetal mouse secondary palate by all-trans and 13-cis RAs: implications for RA-induced teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, H; Mori, C; Nishimura, Y; Shiota, K

    1998-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is mandatory for various biological processes and normal embryonic development but is teratogenic at high concentrations. In rodents, one of the major malformations induced by RA is cleft palate (CP). RA mediates its effects by RA receptors (RARs), but the expression patterns of RARs in the developing palate are still unclear. We investigated the normal expression of RAR alpha, beta, and gamma messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the fetal mouse secondary palate and the effects of all-trans and 13-cis RAs on the expression of RAR mRNAs by Northern blot analysis. RAR alpha (2.8, 3.8 kb), RAR beta (3.3 kb), and RAR gamma (3.7 kb) mRNAs were detected in the fetal palate on gestational days (GD) 12.5-14.5. The expression of RAR alpha and gamma mRNAs did not show apparent sequential changes, but that of RAR beta mRNA increased at GD 13.5. Treatment of pregnant mice with 100 mg/kg all-trans RA induced CP in 94% of the fetuses and elevated the levels of RAR beta and gamma mRNAs in the fetal palate. The up-regulation of RAR beta mRNA by all-trans RA was more marked than that of RAR gamma mRNA. Treatment with 100 mg/kg 13-cis RA induced CP in only 19% of the fetuses. Although 13-cis RA elevated the RAR beta and gamma mRNA levels in fetal palates, its up-regulation was slower and less marked than that induced by all-trans RA. These findings indicate that the induction of RAR beta mRNA in the fetal palate correlates well with the tissue concentration of all-trans RA after RA treatment, and RAR beta may be one of the most influential candidate molecules for RA-induced teratogenesis.

  4. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical composit

  5. PRC2 loss amplifies Ras-driven transcription and confers sensitivity to BRD4-based therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Raedt, Thomas; Beert, Eline; Pasmant, Eric

    2014-01-01

    genomic, cellular, and mouse modelling data demonstrating that the polycomb group gene SUZ12 functions as tumour suppressor in PNS tumours, high-grade gliomas and melanomas by cooperating with mutations in NF1. NF1 encodes a Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP) and its loss drives cancer by activating...... Ras. We show that SUZ12 loss potentiates the effects of NF1 mutations by amplifying Ras-driven transcription through effects on chromatin. Importantly, however, SUZ12 inactivation also triggers an epigenetic switch that sensitizes these cancers to bromodomain inhibitors. Collectively, these studies...... not only reveal an unexpected connection between the PRC2 complex, NF1 and Ras, but also identify a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy that may be exploited for a variety of cancers....

  6. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162.

  7. Altered expression of the IQGAP1 gene in human lung cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.E.; Palmisano, W.A.; Lechner, J.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    IQGAP1 is a GTPase activation protein that accelerates GTP hydrolysis by normal p21 ras proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 could act as an upstream affector of p21 ras activity by convert in excess amounts of active GTP-21 ras to inactive GDP-21 ras. IQGAP1 displays extensive sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of all previously reported ras GAPs, including the tumor suppressor gene protein neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It has been shown that abnormal NF1 protein cannot negatively regulate the activity of ras proteins in neuroblast cells. This observation supports the hypothesis that NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene whose product acts upstream of ras. IQGAP1 is primarily expressed in lung, where it may play a role similar to NF1 in regulating the activity of H-ras or K-ras proteins. IQGAP1 functions as other GAPs by controlling the activity of ras.

  8. Effect of Boschniakia rossica on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras)proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and its anti-inflammatory activities in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zong-Zhu; Jin, Hai-Ling; Yin, Xue-Zhe; Li, Tian-Zhu; Quan, Ji-Shu; Jin, Zeng-Nan

    2000-12-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of Boschniakia rossica (BR) extract on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras) proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and its anti-inflammatory activities.METHODS:The expression of tumor marker-placental form glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), p53 and p21(ras) proteins were investigated by immunohisto-chemical techniques and ABC method. Anti-inflammatory activities of BR were studied by xylene and croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced rat pow edema, adjuvant-induced rat arthritis and cotton pellet induced mouse granuloma formation methods.RESULTS:The 500mg/kg of BR-H2O extract frac-tionated from BR-Methanol extract had inhibitory effect on the formation of DEN-induced GST-P-positive foci in rat liver (GST-P staining was 78% positive in DEN+AAF group vs 20% positive in DEN+AAF+BR group, Panti-inflamatory effect in xylene and crotonoil induced mouse ear edema (inhibitory rates were 26%-29% and 35%-59%, respectively). BR H(2)O extract exhibited inhibitory effect in carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced hind paw edema and adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in mice.CONCLUSION:BR extract exhibited inhibitory effect on formation of preneoplastic hepatic foci in early stage of rat chemical hepato-carcinogenesis.Both CH(2)Cl(2) and H(2)O extracts from BR exerted anti-inflammatory effect in rats and mice.

  9. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  10. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  11. Senescence-associated secretory phenotypes reveal cell-nonautonomous functions of oncogenic RAS and the p53 tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  12. ANALYSIS OF C-HA-RAS GENE AMPLIFICATION AND MUTATION IN LARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘世喜; 林代诚; 洪邦泰; 黄光琦

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the ahered molecular events during laryngeal carcinogenesis and elucidate the role of Ha-ras oncogene amplification and mutation, we have examined their profile by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and selective oligonucleoride hybridization. We analyzed the mutational status of codon 12 of Ha-ras in 22 laryngeal carcinomas and 10 normal tissues, and found that 7 of 22 laryngeal carcinomas con-tained a Ha-ras mutation at codon 12. The frequency of mutation was 32%. None of the normal tissues re-vealed mutation. Moreover, no amplification was found in cancers when compared to the normal. Our findings indicated that the aefivmed Ha-ras gene existed in laryngeal carcinoma, and activation of the Ha-ras gene by mutation at codon 12 might play a key role in laryngeal carcinogenesis.

  13. Reduced Expression of the Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR Is Associated with Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS to Promote Vascular Remodeling in the Pathogenesis of Essential Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Qu

    Full Text Available The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, remodeling of the vasculature, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS play important roles in the development of essential hypertension (EH, which is defined as high blood pressure (BP in which secondary causes, such as renovascular disease, are absent. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is involved in the regulation of BP. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the CaSR regulates BP are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of the CaSR in EH was investigated using male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs and rat and human plasma samples. The percentages of medial wall thickness to external diameter (WT%, total vessel wall cross-sectional area to the total area (WA% of thoracic arteries, as well as the percentage of wall area occupied by collagen to total vessel wall area (CA% were determined. Tissue protein expression and plasma concentrations of the CaSR, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, renin, and angiotensin II (Ang II were additionally assessed. WT%, WA%, and CA% were found to increase with increasing BP, whereas the plasma concentration of CaSR was found to decrease. With increasing BP, the levels of smooth muscle actin and calponin decreased, whereas those of osteopontin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen increased. The CaSR level negatively correlated with the levels of cAMP and Ang II, but positively correlated with those of renin. Our data suggest that reduced expression of the CaSR is correlated with activation of the RAS, which induces increased vascular remodeling and VSMC proliferation, and thereby associated with EH in the SHR model and in the Han Chinese population. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of EH.

  14. A RAS renaissance: emerging targeted therapies for KRAS-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Neil; Boyer, Julie L; Herbst, Roy S

    2014-08-01

    Of the numerous oncogenes implicated in human cancer, the most common and perhaps the most elusive to target pharmacologically is RAS. Since the discovery of RAS in the 1960s, numerous studies have elucidated the mechanism of activity, regulation, and intracellular trafficking of the RAS gene products, and of its regulatory pathways. These pathways yielded druggable targets, such as farnesyltransferase, during the 1980s to 1990s. Unfortunately, early clinical trials investigating farnesyltransferase inhibitors yielded disappointing results, and subsequent interest by pharmaceutical companies in targeting RAS waned. However, recent advances including the identification of novel regulatory enzymes (e.g., Rce1, Icmt, Pdeδ), siRNA-based synthetic lethality screens, and fragment-based small-molecule screens, have resulted in a "Ras renaissance," signified by new Ras and Ras pathway-targeted therapies that have led to new clinical trials of patients with Ras-driven cancers. This review gives an overview of KRas signaling pathways with an emphasis on novel targets and targeted therapies, using non-small cell lung cancer as a case example.

  15. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D inhibits glutamine metabolism in Harvey-ras transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuanzhu; Zheng, Wei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Donkin, Shawn S; Bequette, Brian; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the US. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), is proposed to inhibit cellular processes and to prevent breast cancer. The current studies investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on glutamine metabolism during cancer progression employing Harvey-ras oncogene transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A-ras). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced intracellular glutamine and glutamate levels measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by 23±2% each. Further, 1,25(OH)2D treatment reduced glutamine and glutamate flux, determined by [U-(13)C5] glutamine tracer kinetics, into the TCA cycle by 31±0.2% and 17±0.4%, respectively. The relative levels of mRNA and protein abundance of the major glutamine transporter, solute linked carrier family 1 member A5 (SLC1A5), was significantly decreased by 1,25(OH)2D treatment in both MCF10A-ras cells and MCF10A which overexpress ErbB2 (HER-2/neu). Consistent with these results, glutamine uptake was reduced by 1,25(OH)2D treatment and the impact was eliminated with the SLC1A5 inhibitor L-γ-Glutamyl-p-nitroanilide (GPNA). A consensus sequence to the vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified in silico in the SLC1A5 gene promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses with reporter gene studies demonstrate a functional negative VDRE in the promoter of the SLC1A5 gene. siRNA-SLC1A5 transfection in MCF10A-ras cells significantly reduced SLC1A5 mRNA expression as well as decreased viable cell number similar to 1,25(OH)2D treatment. SLC1A5 knockdown also induced an increase in apoptotic cells in MCF10A-ras cells. These results suggest 1,25(OH)2D alters glutamine metabolism in MCF10A-ras cells by inhibiting glutamine uptake and utilization, in part through down-regulation of SLC1A5 transcript abundance. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D down-regulation of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, may facilitate vitamin D prevention of breast

  16. Across the universe of K-RAS mutations in non-small-cell-lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Sheila; Ganzinelli, Monica; Garassino, Marina Chiara; Caiola, Elisa; Farina, Gabriella; Broggini, Massimo; Marabese, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    RAS family proteins are important signaling molecules that regulate cell growth, survival and differentiation by coupling receptor activation to downstream effector pathways. Three distinct genes encode for the three different proteins H-, K-, and N- RAS. These proteins share high sequence homology, particularly at the N-Terminal domain. Among them, K-RAS is one of the most frequently mutated in human cancer. The majority of the mutations present in K-RAS are at codon 12 (from 80 to 100%) followed by codon 13 and 61. In all cases, aminoacid change leads to a constitutively activated protein. K-RAS mutations have a role in tumor development as well as in tumor progression and resistance. Despite the various studies which have been published, the prognostic and predictive role of K-RAS mutations is still under debate. Keeping in mind that the glycine present at position 12 can be substituted by valine, aspartic acid or cysteine, it could be well understood that each different substitution plays a different role in K-RAS-dependent processes. The present article focuses on the molecular and biological characteristics of K-RAS protein, its role in NSCLC tumor development and progression. We also present an overview of the preclinical models both in vitro and in vivo available to determine the role of K-RAS in tumor progression and response to treatment and on the recent results obtained in this field. Finally, we have considered the impact of KRAS mutations in clinical practice, analyzing the different recent trials that have taken into consideration K-RAS.

  17. Peroxiredoxin I is important for cancer-cell survival in Ras-induced hepatic tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Shin, Hye-Jun; Bak, In Seon; Bak, Yesol; Jeong, Ye-Lin; Kwon, Taeho; Park, Young-Ho; Sun, Hu-Nan; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2016-10-18

    Peroxiredoxin I (Prx I), an antioxidant enzyme, has multiple functions in human cancer. However, the role of Prx I in hepatic tumorigenesis has not been characterized. Here we investigated the relevance and underlying mechanism of Prx I in hepatic tumorigenesis. Prx I increased in tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients that aligned with overexpression of oncogenic H-ras. Prx I also increased in H-rasG12V transfected HCC cells and liver tumors of H-rasG12V transgenic (Tg) mice, indicating that Prx I may be involved in Ras-induced hepatic tumorigenesis. When Prx I was knocked down or deleted in HCC-H-rasG12V cells or H-rasG12V Tg mice, cell colony or tumor formation was significantly reduced that was associated with downregulation of pERK pathway as well as increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage and cell death. Overexpressing Prx I markedly increased Ras downstream pERK/FoxM1/Nrf2 signaling pathway and inhibited oxidative damage in HCC cells and H-rasG12V Tg mice. In this study, we found Nrf2 was transcriptionally activated by FoxM1, and Prx I was activated by the H-rasG12V/pERK/FoxM1/Nrf2 pathway and suppressed ROS-induced hepatic cancer-cell death along with formation of a positive feedback loop with Ras/ERK/FoxM1/Nrf2 to promote hepatic tumorigenesis.

  18. Loss of RASSF1A Expression in Colorectal Cancer and Its Association with K-ras Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The RAS-association domain family 1 A (RASSF1A is a classical member of RAS effectors regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Loss of RASSF1A expression may shift the balance towards a growth-promoting effect without the necessity of activating K-ras mutations. Its potential association with K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC is unclear. Methods. RASSF1A expression was examined in normal mucosa, adenoma, and tumor tissues of colon and rectum, respectively. We examined the association of RASSF1A expression, mutations of K-ras, and EGFR status in 76 primary CRCs. The relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and RASSF1A expression was also analyzed. Results. RASSF1A expression level decreased progressively in normal mucosa, adenoma and, tumor tissues, and the loss of RASSF1A expression occurred more frequently in tumor tissues. Of 76 primary CRCs, loss of RASSF1A expression and/or K-ras mutations were detected in 77% cases. Loss of RASSF1A expression was more frequent in K-ras wild-type than in mutation cases (63% versus 32%, . Conclusions. Our study indicates that loss of RASSF1A may be involved in pathogenesis of CRC, its expression was found predominantly in K-ras wild-type CRCs, suggesting that it may be another way of affecting RAS signaling, in addition to K-ras mutations.

  19. Genetic and pharmacological suppression of oncogenic mutations in RAS genes of yeast and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, W.R.; Sterne, R.; Thorner, J.; Rine, J.; Kim, R.; Kim, S.H. (Lawrece Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-07-28

    The activity of an oncoprotein and the secretion of a pheromone can be affected by an unusual protein modification. Specifically, posttranslational modification of yeast-a-factor and Ras protein requires an intermediate of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. This modification is apparently essential for biological activity. Studies of yeast mutants blocked in sterol biosynthesis demonstrated that the membrane association and biological activation of the yeast Ras2 protein require mevalonate, a precursor of sterols and other isoprenes such as farnesyl pyrophosphate. Furthermore, drugs that inhibit mevalonate biosynthesis blocked the in vivo action of oncogenic derivatives of human Ras protein in the Xenopus oocyte assay. The same drugs and mutations also prevented the posttranslational processing and secretion of yeast a-factor, a peptide that is farnesylated. Thus, the mevalonate requirement for Ras activation may indicate that attachment of a mevalonate-derived (isoprenoid) moiety to Ras proteins is necessary for membrane association and biological function. These observations establish a connection between the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and transformation by the ras oncogene and offer a novel pharmacological approach to investigating, and possibly controlling, ras-mediated malignant transformations. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions.

  1. RasGRPs are targets of the anti-cancer agent ingenol-3-angelate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    Full Text Available Ingenol-3-angelate (I3A is a non-tumor promoting phorbol ester-like compound identified in the sap of Euphoria peplus. Similar to tumor promoting phorbol esters, I3A is a diacylglycerol (DAG analogue that binds with high affinity to the C1 domains of PKCs, recruits PKCs to cellular membranes and promotes enzyme activation. Numerous anti-cancer activities have been attributed to I3A and ascribed to I3A's effects on PKCs. We show here that I3A also binds to and activates members of the RasGRP family of Ras activators leading to robust elevation of Ras-GTP and engagement of the Raf-Mek-Erk kinase cascade. In response to I3A, recombinant proteins consisting of GFP fused separately to full-length RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 were rapidly recruited to cell membranes, consistent with direct binding of the compound to RasGRP's C1 domain. In the case of RasGRP3, IA3 treatment led to positive regulatory phosphorylation on T133 and activation of the candidate regulatory kinase PKCδ. I3A treatment of select B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines resulted in quantitative and qualitative changes in Bcl-2 family member proteins and induction of apoptosis, as previously demonstrated with the DAG analogue bryostatin 1 and its synthetic analogue pico. Our results offer further insights into the anticancer properties of I3A, support the idea that RasGRPs represent potential cancer therapeutic targets along with PKC, and expand the known range of ligands for RasGRP regulation.

  2. Amygdala kindling alters protein kinase C activity in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S J; Desai, M A; Klann, E; Winder, D G; Sweatt, J D; Conn, P J

    1992-11-01

    Kindling is a use-dependent form of synaptic plasticity and a widely used model of epilepsy. Although kindling has been widely studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying induction of this phenomenon are not well understood. We determined the effect of amygdala kindling on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in various regions of rat brain. Kindling stimulation markedly elevated basal (Ca(2+)-independent) and Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation of an endogenous PKC substrate (which we have termed P17) in homogenates of dentate gyrus, assayed 2 h after kindling stimulation. The increase in P17 phosphorylation appeared to be due at least in part to persistent PKC activation, as basal PKC activity assayed in vitro using an exogenous peptide substrate was increased in kindled dentate gyrus 2 h after the last kindling stimulation. A similar increase in basal PKC activity was observed in dentate gyrus 2 h after the first kindling stimulation. These results document a kindling-associated persistent PKC activation and suggest that the increased activity of PKC could play a role in the induction of the kindling effect.

  3. Optimizing depuration of salmon in RAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish cultured within water recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) can acquire "earthy" or "musty" off-flavors due to bioaccumulation of the compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively, which are produced by certain bacterial species present in RAS biosolids and microbial biofilms. ...

  4. Ras transformation uncouples the kinesin-coordinated cellular nutrient response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaganjor, Elma; Weil, Lauren M.; Gonzales, Joshua X.; Minna, John D.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    The kinesin family members (KIFs) KIF2A and KIF2C depolymerize microtubules, unlike the majority of other kinesins, which transport cargo along microtubules. KIF2A regulates the localization of lysosomes in the cytoplasm, which assists in activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal surface. We find that the closely related kinesin KIF2C also influences lysosomal organization in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). Expression of KIF2C and, to a lesser extent, KIF2A in untransformed and mutant K-Ras–transformed cells is regulated by ERK1/2. Prolonged inhibition of ERK1/2 activation with PD0325901 mimics nutrient deprivation by disrupting lysosome organization and decreasing mTORC1 activity in HBEC, suggesting a long-term mechanism for optimization of mTORC1 activity by ERK1/2. We tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of KIF2C and KIF2A by ERK1/2 caused aberrant lysosomal positioning and mTORC1 activity in a mutant K-Ras–dependent cancer and cancer model. In Ras-transformed cells, however, mTORC1 activity and lysosome organization appear independent of ERK1/2 and these kinesins although ERK1/2 activity and the kinesins are required for Ras-dependent proliferation and migration. We conclude that mutant K-Ras repurposes these signaling and regulatory proteins to support the transformed phenotype. PMID:25002494

  5. A RAS oncogene imparts growth factor independence to myeloid cells that abnormally regulate protein kinase C: a nonautocrine transformation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, H S; Nahreini, T S; Burgess, G S; Srivastava, A; Gabig, T G; Inhorn, L; Srour, E F; Harrington, M A

    1990-06-01

    The factor-dependent cell line FDC-P1 has been utilized as a model of interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent myeloid cell proliferation. However, it has been recently observed that active phorbol esters (e.g., phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) may entirely replace IL-3 to promote its proliferation. These observations reveal abnormal regulation of protein kinase C (pkC) (absence of downregulation or overexpression). This property allowed a test of the hypothesis that the T24 RAS (codon 12) oncogene acts by constitutive and persistent pkC activation, driving proliferation. FDC-P1 cells were transfected by electroporation with the T24 RAS-containing vector pAL 8, or with a control vector pSVX Zip Neo, and neomycin-resistant clones were selected. Multiple RAS-transfectant clones were categorized for their growth factor requirement and incorporation of the 6.6-kb human mutant H-RAS genome. IL-3-independent clones had incorporated multiple (more than two) copies of the entire 6.6-kb RAS genome. The incorporation of multiple 6.6-kb RAS genomes was correlated with high-level p21 RAS expression. No evidence for autostimulatory growth factor production by clones containing the RAS oncogene was observed. Thus, acquisition of growth factor independence in myeloid cells by abundant expression of a RAS oncogene is linked, in part, to abnormal regulation of pkC, which acts as a collaborating oncogene.

  6. Altered Error-Related Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kathrin; Wagner, Gerd; Schultz, Christoph; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Nenadic, Igor; Axer, Martina; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.; Sauer, Heinrich; Schlosser, Ralf G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in working memory (WM) and executive cognitive control are core features of schizophrenia. However, findings regarding functional activation strengths are heterogeneous, partly due to differences in task demands and behavioral performance. Previous investigators proposed integrating these heterogeneous findings into a comprehensive model…

  7. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  8. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speshock Janice

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  9. ALTERED ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY OF LYSOZYMES BOUND TO VARIOUSLY SULFATED CHITOSANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-wei Wang; Lin Yuan; Tie-liang Zhao; He Huang; Hong Chen; Di Wu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effects of the variously sulfated chitosans on lysozyme activity and structure.It was shown that the specific enzymatic activity of lysozyme remained almost similar to the native protein after being bound to 6-O-sulfated chitosan (6S-chitosan) and 3,6-O-sulfated chitosan (3,6S-chitosan),but decreased greatly after being bound to 2-N-6-O-sulfated chitosan (2,6S-chitosan).Meanwhile,among these sulfated chitosans,2,6S-chitosan induced the greatest conformational change in lysozyme as indicated by the fluorescence spectra.These findings demonstrated that when sulfated chitosans of different structures bind to lysozyme,lysozyme undergoes conformational change of different magnitudes,which results in corresponding levels of lysozyme activity.Further study on the interaction of sulfated chitosans with lysozyme by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) suggested that their affinities might be determined by their molecular structures.

  10. Ha-ras(val12) induces HSP70b transcription via the HSE/HSF1 system, but HSP70b expression is suppressed in Ha-ras(val12)-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhill, A; Levin, V; Hendel, A; Shachar, I; Kazanov, D; Arber, N; Kaminski, N; Engelberg, D

    2006-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are overexpressed in many tumors, but are downregulated in some tumors. To check for a direct effect of Ha-Ras(val12) on HSP70 transcription, we transiently expressed the oncoprotein in Rat1 fibroblasts and monitored its effect on HSP70b promoter-driven reporter gene. We show that expression of Ha-Ras(val12) induced this promoter. Promoter analysis via systematic deletions and point mutations revealed that Ha-Ras(val12) induces HSP70b transcription via heat shock elements (HSEs). Also, Ha-Ras(val12) induction of HSE-mediated transcription was dramatically reduced in HSF1-/- cells. Yet, residual effect of Ha-Ras(val12) that was still measured in HSF1-/- cells suggests that some of the Ha-Ras(val12) effect is Hsf1-independent. When HSF1-/- cells, stably expressing Ha-Ras(val12), were grown on soft agar only small colonies were formed suggesting a role for heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) in Ha-Ras(val12)-mediated transformation. Although Ha-ras(Val12) seems to be an inducer of HSP70's expression, we found that in Ha-ras(Val12-)transformed fibroblasts expression of this gene is suppressed. This suppression is correlated with higher sensitivity of Ha-ras(val12)-transformed cells to heat shock. We suggest that Ha-ras(Val12) is involved in Hsf1 activation, thereby inducing the cellular protective response. Cells that repress this response are perhaps those that acquire the capability to further proliferate and become transformed clones.

  11. Ras1CA overexpression in the posterior silk gland improves silk yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ma; Hanfu Xu; Jinqi Zhu; Sanyuan Ma; Yan Liu; Rong-Jing Jiang; Qingyou Xia; Sheng Li

    2011-01-01

    Sericulture has been greatly advanced by applying hybrid breeding techniques to the domesticated silkworm,Bombyx mori,but has reached a plateau during the last decades. For the first time,we report improved silk yield in a GAL4/UAS transgenic silkworm. Overexpression of the Ras1CA oncogene specifically in the posterior silk gland improved fibroin production and silk yield by 60%,while increasing food consumption by only 20%. Ras activation by Ras1CA overexpression in the posterior silk gland enhanced phosphorylation levels of Ras downstream effector proteins,up-regulated fibroin mRNA levels,increased total DNA content,and stimulated endoreplication. Moreover,Rasl activation increased cell and nuclei sizes,enriched subcellular organelles related to protein synthesis,and stimulated ribosome biogenesis for mRNA translation. We conclude that Rasl activation increases cell size and protein synthesis in the posterior silk gland,leading to silk yield improvement.

  12. BACE1 deficiency causes altered neuronal activity and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiangyou; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yang, Jun; Xiong, Wenchen; Wong, Philip; Wilson, Christopher G.; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    BACE1 is required for the release of β–amyloid (Aβ) in vivo, and inhibition of BACE1 activity is targeted for reducing Aβ generation in Alzheimer's patients. In order to further our understanding of the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients, we aimed to study the physiological functions of BACE1 by characterizing BACE1–null mice. Here we report the finding of spontaneous behavioral seizures in BACE1–null mice. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed abnormal spike-wave discharges...

  13. Altered Activities of Antioxidant Enzymes in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vávrová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, an increase of oxidative stress could play an important role which is closely linked with insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess several parameters of the antioxidant status in MetS. Methods: 40 subjects with MetS and 40 age- and sex-matched volunteers without MetS were examined for activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1, glutathione reductase (GR, paraoxonase1 (PON1, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, and conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (CD-LDL. Results: Subjects with MetS had higher activities of CuZnSOD (p Conclusions: Our results implicated an increased oxidative stress in MetS and a decreased antioxidative defense that correlated with some laboratory (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and clinical (waist circumference, blood pressure components of MetS.

  14. Alterations in electrodermal activity and cardiac parasympathetic tone during hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekecs, Zoltán; Szekely, Anna; Varga, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Exploring autonomic nervous system (ANS) changes during hypnosis is critical for understanding the nature and extent of the hypnotic phenomenon and for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypnosis in different medical conditions. To assess ANS changes during hypnosis, electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability (PRV) were measured in 121 young adults. Participants either received hypnotic induction (hypnosis condition) or listened to music (control condition), and both groups were exposed to test suggestions. Blocks of silence and experimental sound stimuli were presented at baseline, after induction, and after de-induction. Skin conductance level (SCL) and high frequency (HF) power of PRV measured at each phase were compared between groups. Hypnosis decreased SCL compared to the control condition; however, there were no group differences in HF power. Furthermore, hypnotic suggestibility did not moderate ANS changes in the hypnosis group. These findings indicate that hypnosis reduces tonic sympathetic nervous system activity, which might explain why hypnosis is effective in the treatment of disorders with strong sympathetic nervous system involvement, such as rheumatoid arthritis, hot flashes, hypertension, and chronic pain. Further studies with different control conditions are required to examine the specificity of the sympathetic effects of hypnosis.

  15. The Ras-Erk-ETS-Signaling Pathway Is a Drug Target for Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Cathy; Alic, Nazif; Foley, Andrea; Cabecinha, Melissa; Hoddinott, Matthew P; Partridge, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms that underlie aging and their pharmacological manipulation are key aims for improving lifelong human health. Here, we identify a critical role for Ras-Erk-ETS signaling in aging in Drosophila. We show that inhibition of Ras is sufficient for lifespan extension downstream of reduced insulin/IGF-1 (IIS) signaling. Moreover, direct reduction of Ras or Erk activity leads to increased lifespan. We identify the E-twenty six (ETS) transcriptional repressor, Anterior open (Aop), as central to lifespan extension caused by reduced IIS or Ras attenuation. Importantly, we demonstrate that adult-onset administration of the drug trametinib, a highly specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk-ETS signaling, can extend lifespan. This discovery of the Ras-Erk-ETS pathway as a pharmacological target for animal aging, together with the high degree of evolutionary conservation of the pathway, suggests that inhibition of Ras-Erk-ETS signaling may provide an effective target for anti-aging interventions in mammals.

  16. Facilitated geranylgeranylation of shrimp ras-encoded p25 fusion protein by the binding with guanosine diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C F; Chuang, N N

    1999-05-01

    A cDNA was isolated from the shrimp Penaeus japonicus by homology cloning. Similar to the mammalian Ras proteins, this shrimp hepatopancreas cDNA encodes a 187-residue polypeptide whose predicted amino acid sequence shares 85% homology with mammalian KB-Ras proteins and demonstrates identity in the guanine nucleotide binding domains. Expression of the cDNA of shrimp in Escherichia coli yielded a 25-kDa polypeptide with positive reactivity toward the monoclonal antibodies against Ras of mammals. As judged by nitrocellulose filtration assay, the specific GTP binding activity of ras-encoded p25 fusion protein was approximately 30,000 units/mg of protein, whereas that of GDP was 5,000 units/mg of protein. In other words, the GTP bound form of ras-encoded p25 fusion protein prevails. Fluorography analysis demonstrated that the prenylation of both shrimp Ras-GDP and shrimp Ras-GTP by protein geranylgeranyltransferase I of shrimp Penaeus japonicus exceeded that of nucleotide-free form of Ras by 10-fold and four-fold, respectively. That is, the protein geranylgeranyl transferase I prefers to react with ras-encoded p25 fusion protein in the GDP bound form.

  17. Leukotriene B(4) BLT receptor signaling regulates the level and stability of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA through restricted activation of Ras/Raf/ERK/p42 AUF1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Beibei; Yang, Huiqing; Mancini, Arturo; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2010-07-30

    Recent studies suggest that active resolution of the inflammatory response in animal models of arthritis may involve leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))-dependent stimulation of "intermediate" prostaglandin production, which in turn favors the synthesis of "downstream" anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins. We explored a putative mechanism involving LTB(4)-dependent control of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, the rate-limiting step in inflammatory prostaglandin biosynthesis. Indeed, LTB(4) potently up-regulated/stabilized interleukin-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression under conditions of COX-2 inhibitor-dependent blockade of PGE(2) release in human synovial fibroblasts (EC(50) = 16.5 + or - 1.7 nm for mRNA; 19 + or - 2.4 nm for protein, n = 4). The latter response was pertussis toxin-sensitive, and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the quantitative predominance of the BLT2 receptor. Transfection experiments, using human COX-2 promoter plasmids and chimeric luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) reporter constructs, revealed that LTB(4) exerted its stabilizing effect at the post-transcriptional level through a 116-bp adenylate/uridylate-rich sequence in the proximal region of the COX-2 3'-UTR. Using luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-UTR reporter constructs and Ras/c-Raf expression and mutant constructs, we showed that the Ras/c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway mediated LTB(4)-dependent COX-2 mRNA stabilization. Knockdown experiments with specific short hairpin RNAs confirmed that LTB(4) stabilization of COX-2 mRNA was apparently mediated through the RNA-binding protein, p42 AUF1. The nuclear export of p42 AUF1 was driven by c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and sensitive to leptomycin B treatment, suggesting a CRM1-dependent mechanism. We conclude that LTB(4) may support the resolution phase of the inflammatory response by stabilizing COX-2, ensuring a reservoir of ambient pro-resolution lipid

  18. Altered behavior in spotted hyenas associated with increased human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Erin E.; Kapheim, Karen M.; Watts, Heather E.; Szykman, Micaela; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate how anthropogenic activity might affect large carnivores, we studied the behaviour of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) during two time periods. From 1996 to 1998, we documented the ecological correlates of space utilization patterns exhibited by adult female hyenas defending a territory at the edge of a wildlife reserve in Kenya. Hyenas preferred areas near dense vegetation but appeared to avoid areas containing the greatest abundance of prey, perhaps because these were also the areas of most intensive livestock grazing. We then compared hyena behaviour observed in 1996–98 with that observed several years earlier and found many differences. Female hyenas in 1996–98 were found farther from dens, but closer to dense vegetation and to the edges of their territory, than in 1988–90. Recent females also had larger home ranges, travelled farther between consecutive sightings, and were more nocturnal than in 1988–90. Finally, hyenas occurred in smaller groups in 1996–98 than in 1988–90. We also found several changes in hyena demography between periods. We next attempted to explain differences observed between time periods by testing predictions of hypotheses invoking prey abundance, climate, interactions with lions, tourism and livestock grazing. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that increased reliance on the reserve for livestock grazing was responsible for observed changes. That behavioural changes were not associated with decreased hyena population density suggests the behavioural plasticity typical of this species may protect it from extinction.

  19. Colon cancer and gene alterations: their immunological implications and suggestions for prognostic indices and improvements in biotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Berghella, Anna Maria; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Studies have shown that changes occur in c-Ki-ras, p53, and Bcl2 gene structure and function during the various stages of human colon carcinogenesis. Alterations of these genes are responsible for the establishment of a state of continuous stimulus for cell division and apoptotic inhibition at physiological and pharmacological levels. This paper focuses on the results of our research aimed at investigating how these gene alterations influence tumoral mechanisms on an immunological level and how immunological parameters can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. Overall, our data suggest that an alteration in the c-Ki-ras gene results in a switch to a suppressive type of immune response, determining an impairment of immune cell activation at both antigen- presenting-cell and T-cell levels. c-Ki-ras gene mutations, p53 deletions, and Bc12 expression, on the other hand, can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. The p53 oncogene does not appear to impair patients' immunological response further. In conclusion, an evaluation of c-Ki-ras, rather than p53 gene alterations, would seem to be more relevant in colon cancer prevention programs and biotherapy improvement.

  20. Identification of cancer initiating cells in K-Ras driven lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Sara; Mijimolle, Nieves; Francoz, Sarah; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Barbacid, Mariano

    2014-01-07

    Ubiquitous expression of a resident K-Ras(G12V) oncogene in adult mice revealed that most tissues are resistant to K-Ras oncogenic signals. Indeed, K-Ras(G12V) expression only induced overt tumors in lungs. To identify these transformation-permissive cells, we induced K-Ras(G12V) expression in a very limited number of adult lung cells (0.2%) and monitored their fate by X-Gal staining, a surrogate marker coexpressed with the K-Ras(G12V) oncoprotein. Four weeks later, 30% of these cells had proliferated to form small clusters. However, only SPC(+) alveolar type II (ATII) cells were able to form hyperplastic lesions, some of which progressed to adenomas and adenocarcinomas. In contrast, induction of K-Ras(G12V) expression in lung cells by intratracheal infection with adenoviral-Cre particles generated hyperplasias in all regions except the proximal airways. Bronchiolar and bronchioalveolar duct junction hyperplasias were primarily made of CC10(+) Clara cells. Some of them progressed to form benign adenomas. However, only alveolar hyperplasias, exclusively made up of SPC(+) ATII cells, progressed to yield malignant adenocarcinomas. Adenoviral infection induced inflammatory infiltrates primarily made of T and B cells. This inflammatory response was essential for the development of K-Ras(G12V)-driven bronchiolar hyperplasias and adenomas, but not for the generation of SPC(+) ATII lesions. Finally, activation of K-Ras(G12V) during embryonic development under the control of a Sca1 promoter yielded CC10(+), but not SPC(+), hyperplasias, and adenomas. These results, taken together, illustrate that different types of lung cells can generate benign lesions in response to K-Ras oncogenic signals. However, in adult mice, only SPC(+) ATII cells were able to yield malignant adenocarcinomas.

  1. Dependence on phosphoinositide 3-kinase and RAS-RAF pathways drive the activity of RAF265, a novel RAF/VEGFR2 inhibitor, and RAD001 (Everolimus) in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordant, Pierre; Loriot, Yohann; Leteur, Céline; Calderaro, Julien; Bourhis, Jean; Wislez, Marie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Deutsch, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS) can induce cellular immortalization, proliferation, and resistance to anticancer therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors or chemotherapy. This study assessed the consequences of inhibiting these two pathways in tumor cells with activation of KRAS, PI3K-AKT, or both. We investigated whether the combination of a novel RAF/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, RAF265, with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, RAD001 (everolimus), could lead to enhanced antitumoral effects in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, we used cell lines with different status regarding KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations, using immunoblotting to evaluate the inhibitors, and MTT and clonogenic assays for effects on cell viability and proliferation. Subcutaneous xenografts were used to assess the activity of the combination in vivo. RAD001 inhibited mTOR downstream signaling in all cell lines, whereas RAF265 inhibited RAF downstream signaling only in BRAF mutant cells. In vitro, addition of RAF265 to RAD001 led to decreased AKT, S6, and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In vitro and in vivo, RAD001 addition enhanced the antitumoral effect of RAF265 in HCT116 and H460 cells (both KRAS mut, PIK3CA mut); in contrast, the combination of RAF265 and RAD001 yielded no additional activity in A549 and MDAMB231 cells. The combination of RAF and mTOR inhibitors is effective for enhancing antitumoral effects in cells with deregulation of both RAS-RAF and PI3K, possibly through the cross-inhibition of 4E binding protein 1 and S6 protein.

  2. H-Ras and K-Ras Oncoproteins Induce Different Tumor Spectra When Driven by the Same Regulatory Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Lechuga, Carmen G; Blasco, María T; Jacob, Harrys K C; Fabbiano, Salvatore; Potenza, Nicoletta; Bustelo, Xosé R; Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano

    2017-02-01

    Genetic studies in mice have provided evidence that H-Ras and K-Ras proteins are bioequivalent. However, human tumors display marked differences in the association of RAS oncogenes with tumor type. Thus, to further assess the bioequivalence of oncogenic H-Ras and K-Ras, we replaced the coding region of the murine K-Ras locus with H-Ras(G12V) oncogene sequences. Germline expression of H-Ras(G12V) or K-Ras(G12V) from the K-Ras locus resulted in embryonic lethality. However, expression of these genes in adult mice led to different tumor phenotypes. Whereas H-Ras(G12V) elicited papillomas and hematopoietic tumors, K-Ras(G12V) induced lung tumors and gastric lesions. Pulmonary expression of H-Ras(G12V) created a senescence-like state caused by excessive MAPK signaling. Likewise, H-Ras(G12V) but not K-Ras(G12V) induced senescence in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Label-free quantitative analysis revealed that minor differences in H-Ras(G12V) expression levels led to drastically different biological outputs, suggesting that subtle differences in MAPK signaling confer nonequivalent functions that influence tumor spectra induced by RAS oncoproteins. Cancer Res; 77(3); 707-18. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Transcriptional Profile of Ki-Ras-Induced Transformation of Thyroid Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visconti, Roberta; Federico, Antonella; Coppola, Valeria

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In the last years, an increasing number of experiments has provided compelling evidence for a casual role of Ras protein mutations, resulting in their constitutive activation, in thyroid carcinogenesis. However, despite the clear involvement of Ras proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis, the...... in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and tumor samples, our results, therefore, providing a new molecular profile of the genes involved in thyroid neoplastic transformation....

  4. The bovine papillomavirus E5 oncogene can cooperate with ras: identification of p21 amino acids critical for transformation by c-rasH but not v-rasH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Vass, W C; Velu, T J;

    1991-01-01

    We have previously used a series of insertion-deletion mutants of the mutationally activated v-rasH gene to identify several regions of the encoded protein that are dispensable for cellular transformation (B. M. Willumsen, A. G. Papageorge, H.-F. Kung, E. Bekesi, T. Robins, M. Johnsen, W. C. Vass......, and D. R. Lowy, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2646-2654, 1986). To determine if some of these amino acids are more important for the biological activity of c-rasH, we have now tested many of the same insertion-deletion mutants in the c-rasH form for their ability to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Since the transforming...... activity of c-rasH is low, we have used cotransfection with the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) genome to develop a more sensitive transformation assay for c-rasH mutants. The increased sensitivity of the assay, which is seen both in focal transformation and in anchorage-independent growth, is mediated...

  5. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fieldsIntroductionCalcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  6. Oncogenic K-ras confers SAHA resistance by up-regulating HDAC6 and c-myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Tan, Rong; Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Zhiping; Su, Bing; Li, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) represent a new class of anticancer drugs. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the first HDI approved for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), is currently being tested in clinical trials for other cancers. However, SAHA has been ineffective against solid tumors in many clinical trials. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms of SAHA resistance may provide the basis for improved patient selection and the enhancement of clinical efficacy. Here we demonstrate that oncogenic K-ras contributes to SAHA resistance by upregulating HDAC6 and c-myc expression. We find that the high levels of HDAC6 expression are associated with activated K-ras mutant in colon cancer patients. And expressions of HDAC6 and c-myc are increased in fibroblasts transformed with activated K-ras. Surprisingly, we find that activated K-ras transformed cells are more resistant to SAHA inhibition on cell growth and anchorage-independent colony formation. We show that a K-ras inhibitor sensitizes K-ras mutated lung cancer cells to SAHA induced growth inhibition. We also find that mutant K-ras induces HDAC6 expression by a MAP kinase dependent pathway. Our study suggests that combined treatment with SAHA and K-ras inhibitors may represent an effective strategy to overcome SAHA resistance.

  7. Low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide or nitrite induced of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cell proliferation in a Ras-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Coronel Janu Haniu

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, should be able to adapt to dramatic environmental changes inside the infected host after inhalation of air-borne conidia and transition to pathogenic yeasts. Proteins with antioxidant functions may protect fungal cells against reactive oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS species generated by phagocytic cells, thus acting as potential virulence factors. Ras GTPases are involved in stress responses, cell morphology, and differentiation in a range of organisms. Ras, in its activated form, interacts with effector proteins and can initiate a kinase cascade. In lower eukaryotes, Byr2 kinase represents a Ras target. The present study investigated the role of Ras in P. brasiliensis after in vitro stimulus with ROS or RNS. We have demonstrated that low concentrations of H2O2 (0.1 mM or NO2 (0.1-0.25 µM stimulated P. brasiliensis yeast cell proliferation and that was not observed when yeast cells were pre-incubated with farnesyltransferase inhibitor. We constructed an expression plasmid containing the Byr2 Ras-binding domain (RBD fused with GST (RBD-Byr2-GST to detect the Ras active form. After stimulation with low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2, the Ras active form was observed in fungal extracts. Besides, NO2 induced a rapid increase in S-nitrosylated Ras levels. This alternative posttranslational modification of Ras, probably in residue Cys123, would lead to an exchange of GDP for GTP and consequent GTPase activation in P. brasiliensis. In conclusion, low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2 stimulated P. brasiliensis proliferation through Ras activation.

  8. Characterization of a third ras gene, rasB, that is expressed throughout the growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1993-04-01

    Previous reports have indicated that the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum possesses two ras genes (rasG and rasD) and one rap gene (rap1). All three genes are developmentally regulated, with each showing a different pattern of transcription during the Dictyostelium life cycle. To establish whether there are additional ras or rap genes in Dictyostelium, we used degenerate oligonucleotide primers to the highly conserved GTP-binding domains and both ras- and rap-unique sequences to amplify products from cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). No additional rap genes were amplified, but a fragment whose nucleotide sequence predicted a novel ras gene was isolated. Using this PCR product as a probe, a full-length cDNA clone was isolated and sequenced. Its deduced amino acid sequence predicted a 197 amino acid protein that is 71% and 68% identical to RasG and RasD respectively. The new ras gene contains the conserved Ras-specific effector domain, the conserved binding site for the Ras-specific Y13-259 monoclonal antibody, and shows greater sequence similarity to the human H-Ras protein than to any other mammalian Ras protein. In view of this high level of identity to the ras gene subfamily, we have designated this gene rasB. Northern blot analysis has shown that rasB is developmentally regulated with maximum levels of a single 950-bp message detected during vegetative growth and the first 8 h of development.

  9. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N;

    2016-01-01

    . Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity....... Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  10. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  11. NAM: The 2004 RAS National Astronomy Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie; Norton, Andrew

    2004-06-01

    This year's RAS National Astronomy Meeting was held at the Open University's Milton Keynes campus from 29 March to 2 April. The event was organized by members of the OU Physics & Astronomy Department and Planetary & Space Science Research Institute. Around 450 people attended the meeting, at which more than 220 talks were presented, along with around 90 posters. Co-chairs of RAS NAM04, Barrie Jones and Andrew Norton, summarize.

  12. Gene expression profiling of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts to identify genes required for tumour development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagorn Jean

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer, cellular transformation is followed by tumour development. Knowledge on the mechanisms of transformation, involving activation of proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumour-suppressor genes has considerably improved whereas tumour development remains poorly understood. An interesting way of gaining information on tumour progression mechanisms would be to identify genes whose expression is altered during tumour formation. We used the Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology to analyze gene expression profiles of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts in order to identify the genes that could be involved in tumour development. Results Among the 12,000 genes analyzed in this study, only 489 showed altered expression during tumour development, 213 being up-regulated and 276 down-regulated. The genes differentially expressed are involved in a variety of cellular functions, including control of transcription, regulation of mRNA maturation and processing, regulation of protein translation, activation of interferon-induced genes, intracellular signalling, apoptosis, cell growth, angiogenesis, cytoskeleton, cell-to-cell interaction, extracellular matrix formation, metabolism and production of secretory factors. Conclusions Some of the genes identified in this work, whose expression is altered upon rasV12/E1A transformation of MEFs, could be new cancer therapeutic targets.

  13. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londino, James D; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F; Noah, James W; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-05-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl(-)) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H(+)) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H(+), did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection.

  14. Peroxiredoxin II promotes hepatic tumorigenesis through cooperation with Ras/Forkhead box M1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y-H; Kim, S-U; Kwon, T-H; Kim, J-M; Song, I-S; Shin, H-J; Lee, B-K; Bang, D-H; Lee, S-J; Lee, D-S; Chang, K-T; Kim, B-Y; Yu, D-Y

    2016-07-07

    The current study was carried out to define the involvement of Peroxiredoxin (Prx) II in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Expression and function of Prx II in HCC was determined using H-ras(G12V)-transformed HCC cells (H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells) and the tumor livers from H-ras(G12V)-transgenic (Tg) mice and HCC patients. Prx II was upregulated in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg mouse tumor livers, the expression pattern of which highly similar to that of forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1). Moreover, either knockdown of FoxM1 or site-directed mutagenesis of FoxM1-binding site of Prx II promoter significantly reduced Prx II levels in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells, indicating FoxM1 as a direct transcription factor of Prx II in HCC. Interestingly, the null mutation of Prx II markedly decreased the number and size of tumors in H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Consistent with this, knockdown of Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells reduced the expression of cyclin D1, cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in athymic nude mice, whereas overexpression of Prx II increased or aggravated the tumor phenotypes. Importantly, the expression of Prx II was correlated with that of FoxM1 in HCC patients. The activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway and the expression of FoxM1 and cyclin D1 were highly dependent on Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Prx II is FoxM1-dependently-expressed antioxidant in HCC and function as an enhancer of Ras(G12V) oncogenic potential in hepatic tumorigenesis through activation of ERK/FoxM1/cyclin D1 cascade.

  15. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, C.S. [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I. [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  16. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Bitencourt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3, propylthiouracil (PTU or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg. Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01. In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32% were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  17. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  18. Ribozyme对癌基因ki-rasG12V mRNA的剪切及其特异性%Cleavage of Oncogene ki-rasG12V mRNA by Ribozyme and It' s Specificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国祥; 方裕强; 许国铭; 李兆申; 陆德如

    2000-01-01

    目的:设计切割ki-rasG12vmRNA的特异性ribozyme(Rz217),明确其对癌基因ki-rasG12VmRNA的细胞内外切割活性,为以ki-rasG12VmRNA为特异性靶分子的基因治疗及癌基因ki-ras的功能研究提拱一种新的途径。方法:依Symons总结的"锤头结构"原理,设计一种能特异性切割ki-rasG12VmRNA的ribozyme,利用DNA重组技术构建ki-rasG12V外显子1和ri-bozyme Rz217的体外转录质粒及ribozyme Rz217的真核表达质粒,体外转录获得ribozyme Rz217及ki-rasG12V外显子1 mRNA,在含Mg2+溶液中ribozyme Rz217对其靶RNA分子进行切割。以RT-PCR对转染ribozyme Rz217真核表达质粒的细胞ki-rasG12VmRNA进行半定量分析。结果:ki-rasG12V外显子1体外转录mRNA分子,能被ribozyme Rz217定点切割而野生型ki-ras外显子1体外转录mRNA则不被切割;转染ribozyme Rz217的胰癌细胞ki-rasG12VmRNA含量减少,而转染ribozyme Re217的肝癌细胞其内源性ki-ras mRNA含量无明显变化。结论:ribozyme Rz217无论在细胞内外均能剪切突变型ki-ras mRNA(G12V)而且其切割作用为突变型ki-rasG12VmRNA特异性的。%Objective: To design and confirm the cleavage activity of ribozyme Rz217 to oncogene ki-rasG12V messenger RNA and search for a new method for gene therapy targeting oncogene ki-ras. Methods: According to Symon' s principle,design an ribozyme specific for ki-rasc12v mRNA, both the constructs for transcription in vitro of ribozyme Rz217 and ki-ras exonl and the mammalian expression constructs of ribozyme Rz217 were constructed by DNA recombinant technique,ribozyme Rz217 and ki-ras exonl mRNA was obtained by transcription in vitro with T7 and SP6 RNA polymerase. Pancre atic carcinoma cell line PaTu8988 and human hepatocellular carcinomacell line BEL7404 were transfected with Rz217 mammalian expression constructs and the level of endogenous ki-rasG12V mRNA or ki-ras mRNA was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results: Not only in vitro

  19. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function.

  20. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  1. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan AAK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Akbar Ali Khan Pathan,1,2,* Bhavana Panthi,3,* Zahid Khan,1 Purushotham Reddy Koppula,4–6 Mohammed Saud Alanazi,1 Sachchidanand,3 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Mukesh Chourasia3,* 1Genome Research Chair (GRC, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, 2Integrated Gulf Biosystems, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Pharmacoinformatics, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Hajipur, India; 4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 5Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital, 6Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras protein is a member of Ras family belonging to the small guanosine triphosphatases superfamily. The members of this family share a conserved structure and biochemical properties, acting as binary molecular switches. The guanosine triphosphate-bound active K-Ras interacts with a range of effectors, resulting in the stimulation of downstream signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Efforts to target K-Ras have been unsuccessful until now, placing it among high-value molecules against which developing a therapy would have an enormous impact. K-Ras transduces signals when it binds to guanosine triphosphate by directly binding to downstream effector proteins, but in case of guanosine diphosphate-bound conformation, these interactions get disrupted. Methods: In the present study, we targeted the nucleotide-binding site in the “on” and “off” state conformations of the K-Ras protein to find out suitable lead compounds. A structure-based virtual screening approach has been used to screen compounds from different databases, followed by a combinatorial fragment-based approach to design the apposite lead for the K-Ras protein. Results: Interestingly, the designed compounds exhibit a binding preference for the

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans SOS-1 is necessary for multiple RAS-mediated developmental signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chieh; Hopper, Neil A.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2000-01-01

    Vulval induction in Caenorhabditis elegans has helped define an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) through the adaptor protein SEM-5 to RAS. One component present in other organisms, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras, has been missing in C.elegans. To understand the regulation of this pathway it is crucial to have all positive-acting components in hand. Here we describe the identification, cloning and genetic characterization of C.elegans SOS-1, a putative guanine nucleotide exchanger for LET-60 RAS. RNA interference experiments suggest that SOS-1 participates in RAS-dependent signaling events downstream of LET-23 EGFR, EGL-15 FGFR and an unknown RTK. We demonstrate that the previously identified let-341 gene encodes SOS-1. Analyzing vulval development in a let-341 null mutant, we find an SOS-1-independent pathway involved in the activation of RAS signaling. This SOS-1-independent signaling is not inhibited by SLI-1/Cbl and is not mediated by PTP-2/SHP, raising the possibility that there could be another RasGEF. PMID:10880441

  3. Ras, Raf, and MAP kinase in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solus, Jason F; Kraft, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    A growing understanding of the biology and molecular mechanisms of melanoma has led to the identification of a number of driver mutations for this aggressive tumor. The most common mutations affect signaling of the Ras/Raf/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. This review will focus on mutations in genes encoding proteins that play a role in the MAPK pathway and that have been implicated in melanoma biology, such as BRAF, NRAS, and MEK (MAPK kinase), and detail the current understanding of their role in melanoma progression from a molecular biology perspective. Furthermore, this review will also consider some additional mutations in genes such as KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, which can be seen in certain subtypes of melanoma and whose gene products interact with the MAPK pathway. In addition, the association of these molecular changes with clinical and classical histopathologic characteristics of melanoma will be outlined and their role in diagnosis of melanocytic lesions discussed. Finally, a basic overview of the current targeted therapy landscape, as far as relevant to the pathologist, will be provided.

  4. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kiebala

    Full Text Available Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders.

  5. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y

    2015-08-17

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays.

  6. Galectin-3 mediates cross-talk between K-Ras and Let-7c tumor suppressor microRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Galectin-3 (Gal-3 and active (GTP-bound K-Ras contribute to the malignant phenotype of many human tumors by increasing the rate of cell proliferation, survival, and migration. These Gal-3-mediated effects result from a selective binding to K-Ras.GTP, causing increased nanoclustering in the cell membrane and leading to robust Ras signaling. Regulation of the interactions between Gal-3 and active K-Ras is not fully understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To gain a better understanding of what regulates the critical interactions between these two proteins, we examined the role of Gal-3 in the regulation of K-Ras by using Gal-3-knockout mouse embryonic-fibroblasts (Gal-3-/- MEFs and/or Gal-3/Gal-1 double-knockout MEFs. We found that knockout of Gal-3 induced strong downregulation (∼60% of K-Ras and K-Ras.GTP. The downregulation was somewhat more marked in the double-knockout MEFs, in which we also detected robust inhibition(∼50% of ERK and Akt activation. These additional effects are probably attributable to inhibition of the weak interactions of K-Ras.GTP with Gal-1. Re-expression of Gal-3 reversed the phenotype of the Gal-3-/- MEFs and dramatically reduced the disappearance of K-Ras in the presence of cycloheximide to the levels seen in wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Gal-3 by casein kinase-1 (CK-1 induced translocation of Gal-3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, leading to K-Ras stabilization accompanied by downregulation of the tumor suppressor miRNA let-7c, known to negatively control K-Ras transcription. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a novel cross-talk between Gal-3-mediated downregulation of let 7c microRNA (which in turn negatively regulates K-Ras transcription and elucidates the association among Gal-3 let-7c and K-Ras transcription/translation, cellular compartmentalization and activity.

  7. Ras Proteins Have Multiple Functions in Vegetative Cells of Dictyostelium ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG− cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC−/rasG− cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG−, rasC−, and rasC−/rasG− cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG− and rasC−/rasG− cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG− and rasC−/rasG− cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells. PMID:20833893

  8. Non-enzymatic Glycation of Almond Cystatin Leads to Conformational Changes and Altered Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Azad A; Sohail, Aamir; Bhat, Sheraz A; Rehman, Md T; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and reducing sugars, known as glycation, leads to the formation of inter and intramolecular cross-links of proteins. Stable end products called as advanced Maillard products or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received tremendous attention since last decades. It was suggested that the formation of AGEs not only modify the conformation of proteins but also induces altered biological activity. In this study, cystatin purified from almond was incubated with three different sugars namely D-ribose, fructose and lactose to monitor the glycation process. Structural changes induced in cystatin on glycation were studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD and FTIR techniques. Glycated cystatin was found to migrate slower on electrophoresis as compared to control cystatin. Biological activity data of glycated cystatin showed that D-ribose was most effective in inducing conformational changes with maximum altered activity.

  9. Cortisol's effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Heather C; Jahn, Allison L; Davidson, Richard J; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered hippocampal response to exogenous administration of cortisol, and 2) altered effects of cortisol on learning. In a repeated-measures design, 19 unmedicated depressed and 41 healthy individuals completed two fMRI scans. Fifteen mg oral hydrocortisone (i.e., cortisol) or placebo (order randomized and double-blind) was administered 1 h prior to encoding of emotional and neutral words during fMRI scans. Data analysis examined the effects of cortisol administration on 1) brain activation during encoding, and 2) subsequent free recall for words. Cortisol affected subsequent recall performance in depressed but not healthy individuals. We found alterations in hippocampal response to cortisol in depressed women, but not in depressed men (who showed altered response to cortisol in other regions, including subgenual prefrontal cortex). In both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function were positively correlated with its effects on recall performance assessed days later. Our data provide evidence that in depressed compared to healthy women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function are altered. Our data also show that in both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on emotional memory formation and hippocampal function are related.

  10. Evidence for altered amygdala activation in schizophrenia in an adaptive emotion recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Daniela; Lis, Stefanie; Zygrodnik, Karina; Sauer, Carina; Ulferts, Jens; Gallhofer, Bernd; Kirsch, Peter

    2014-03-30

    Deficits in social cognition seem to present an intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia, and are known to be associated with an altered amygdala response to faces. However, current results are heterogeneous with respect to whether this altered amygdala response in schizophrenia is hypoactive or hyperactive in nature. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate emotion-specific amygdala activation in schizophrenia using a novel adaptive emotion recognition paradigm. Participants comprised 11 schizophrenia outpatients and 16 healthy controls who viewed face stimuli expressing emotions of anger, fear, happiness, and disgust, as well as neutral expressions. The adaptive emotion recognition approach allows the assessment of group differences in both emotion recognition performance and associated neuronal activity while also ensuring a comparable number of correctly recognized emotions between groups. Schizophrenia participants were slower and had a negative bias in emotion recognition. In addition, they showed reduced differential activation during recognition of emotional compared with neutral expressions. Correlation analyses revealed an association of a negative bias with amygdala activation for neutral facial expressions that was specific to the patient group. We replicated previous findings of affected emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that altered amygdala activation in the patient group was associated with the occurrence of a negative bias. These results provide further evidence for impaired social cognition in schizophrenia and point to a central role of the amygdala in negative misperceptions of facial stimuli in schizophrenia.

  11. K-Ras and mitochondria: Dangerous liaisons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiri Neuzil; Jakub Rohlena; Lan-Feng Dong

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that the KRAS oncogene efficiently transforms non-malignant cells,and there is some evidence for the role of mitochondria in this process.Now Peng Huang and colleagues show that K-Ras induction results early on in mitochondria assuming the phenotype consistent with the so-called Warburg effect,i.e.,increased glycolysis and attenuated oxidative phosphorylation.Thus the K-Ras protein capable of swift induction of phenotypic changes typical of cancer cells,yet these changes are reversible,and for cells to irreversibly reach their full malignant potential a much longer K-Ras expression is required,implicating mitochondria in the longer-term effects of the oncogene.

  12. An Increase in N-Ras Expression is Associated with Development of Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer in a Subset of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Traynor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein expression of H, K and N-Ras was assessed in hormone sensitive and hormone refractory prostate tumour pairs from 61 patients by immunohistochemistry. Expression of H-Ras and K- Ras was not associated with any known clinical parameters. In contrast an increase in N-Ras membrane expression in the transition from hormone sensitive to hormone refractory prostate cancer was associated with shorter time to relapse (p = 0.01 and shorter disease specific survival (p = 0.008. In addition, patients with an increase in N-Ras membrane expression had lower levels of PSA at relapse (p = 0.02 and expression correlated with phosphorylated MAP kinase (p = 0.010 and proliferation index (Ki67, p = 0.02. These results suggest that in a subgroup patients N-Ras expression is associated with development of hormone refractory prostate cancer via activation of the MAP kinase cascade.

  13. A transforming ras gene can provide an essential function ordinarily supplied by an endogenous ras gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papageorge, A G; Willumsen, B M; Johnsen, M;

    1986-01-01

    Microinjection of monoclonal antibody Y13-259, which reacts with all known mammalian and yeast ras-encoded proteins, has previously been shown to prevent NIH 3T3 cells from entering the S phase (L. S. Mulcahy, M. R. Smith, and D. W. Stacey, Nature [London] 313:241-243, 1985). We have now found...... several transformation-competent mutant v-rasH genes whose protein products in transformed NIH 3T3 cells are not immunoprecipitated by this monoclonal antibody. These mutant proteins are, however, precipitated by a different anti-ras antibody. Each of these mutants lacks Met-72 of v-rasH. In contrast...... to the result for cells transformed by wild-type v-rasH, Y13-259 microinjection of NIH 3T3 cells transformed by these mutant ras genes did not prevent the cells from entering the S phase. These results imply that a transformation-competent ras gene can supply a normal essential function for NIH 3T3 cells. When...

  14. Increased Association of Dynamin Ⅱ with Myosin Ⅱ in Ras Transformed NIH3T3 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soon-Jeong JEONG; Su-Gwan KIM; Jiyun YOO; Mi-Young HAN; Joo-Cheol PARK; Heung-Joong KIM; Seong Soo KANG; Baik-Dong CHOI; Moon-Jin JEONG

    2006-01-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin Ⅱ has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ. The dynamin Ⅱ expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin Ⅱ in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells.Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins.The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin Ⅱ interacted with myosin Ⅱ. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway,was found to be associated with dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin Ⅱ acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  15. RAS in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia and Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a common disease of pregnancy characterized by the presence of hypertension and commitment of many organs, including the brain, secondary to generalized endothelial dysfunction. Its etiology is not known precisely, but it involved several factors, highlighting the renin angiotensin system (RAS, which would have an important role in the origin of multisystem involvement. This paper reviews the evidence supporting the involvement of RAS in triggering the disease, in addition to the components of this system that would be involved and how it eventually produces brain engagement.

  16. Byzantine seals from the Ras fortress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanišević Vujadin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, seals found at the location of the Ras fortress (Tvrđava Ras have been published. Inscriptions on these seals show that they used to belong to persons which could be identified with certain military commanders who served under Alexios I Komnenos. The seals in question are: the seals of protonobelissimos Eustathios Kamytzes, Constantine Dalassenos Doukas, protoproedros and doux Constantine Kekaumenos and a certain person called Alexios. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177021 i br. 177032

  17. Experimenting with Request Assignment Simulator (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokia Paul Rajan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is no existence of dedicated simulators on the Internet that studies the impact of load balancing principles of the cloud architectures. Request Assignment Simulator (RAS is a customizable, visual tool that helps to understand the request assignment to the resources based on the load balancing principles. We have designed this simulator to fit into Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS cloud model. In this paper, we present a working manual useful for the conduct of experiment with RAS. The objective of this paper is to instill the user to understand the pertinent parameters in the cloud, their metrics, load balancing principles, and their impact on the performance.

  18. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between the Notch and Ras signaling pathways in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Ana; Buff, Eugene; Halfon, Marc S; Gisselbrecht, Stephen; Jiménez, Fernando; Baylies, Mary K; Michelson, Alan M

    2002-04-15

    Convergent intercellular signals must be precisely integrated in order to elicit specific biological responses. During specification of muscle and cardiac progenitors from clusters of equivalent cells in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm, the Ras/MAPK pathway--activated by both epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptors--functions as an inductive cellular determination signal, while lateral inhibition mediated by Notch antagonizes this activity. A critical balance between these signals must be achieved to enable one cell of an equivalence group to segregate as a progenitor while its neighbors assume a nonprogenitor identity. We have investigated whether these opposing signals directly interact with each other, and we have examined how they are integrated by the responding cells to specify their unique fates. Our findings reveal that Ras and Notch do not function independently; rather, we have uncovered several modes of cross-talk between these pathways. Ras induces Notch, its ligand Delta, and the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist, Argos. We show that Delta and Argos then synergize to nonautonomously block a positive autoregulatory feedback loop that amplifies a fate-inducing Ras signal. This feedback loop is characterized by Ras-mediated upregulation of proximal components of both the epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. In turn, Notch activation in nonprogenitors induces its own expression and simultaneously suppresses both Delta and Argos levels, thereby reinforcing a unidirectional inhibitory response. These reciprocal interactions combine to generate the signal thresholds that are essential for proper specification of progenitors and nonprogenitors from groups of initially equivalent cells.

  19. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  20. The RAS Problem: Turning Off a Broken Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS gene is commonly mutated in cancer and researchers are working to better understand how to develop drugs that can target the RAS protein, which for many years has been considered to be “undruggable.”

  1. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  2. Altered cortical activation from the hand after facial Botulinum Toxin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Haenzi, Sara; Stefanics, Gabor; Lanaras, Tatjana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Ghosh, Arko

    2014-01-01

    Plastic interactions between face and hand cortical tactile circuits occur after severe injuries that affect the hand such as in amputation or spinal cord injury. However, whether loss of facial movements alters the cortical circuits involved in processing tactile inputs from the hand remains unknown. In this prospective observational study we used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure cortical activity evoked by tactile stimulation of the hands before and after botulinum toxin-A-induced fa...

  3. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  4. Alteration in the phagocyte activity of crevicular leucocytes regarding diabetic patients with periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Colchado Carhuavilca, Jorge R.; Departamento Académico Medico quirúrgico. Facultad Odontología. UNMSM. Lima Perú.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to find out the alterations in the phagocyte activity of crevicular leucocytes regarding to diabetic patients with periodontal disease. For that reason, 56 patients with periodontal disease were selected: 42 of them with a diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus - Type 2, and 14 patients without it (control group), from 35 to 74 years old. To performed the study, crevicular fluid of the mentioned patients was analyzed. By means of sequential washings the samples were...

  5. The ras1 protein of S. pombe mediates pheromone-induced transcription. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Davey, John; Egel, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Differentiering, signaltransduktion, parringstype feromon, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras homolog, Transkription......Differentiering, signaltransduktion, parringstype feromon, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras homolog, Transkription...

  6. Molecular cloning and chromosome assignment of murine N-ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, J.; Hart, C P; Ruddle, F H

    1984-01-01

    The murine N-ras gene was cloned by screening an EMBL-3 recombinant phage library with a human N-ras specific probe. Hybridization of two separate unique sequence N-ras probes, isolated from the 5' and 3' flanking sequences of the murine gene, to a mouse-Chinese hamster hybrid mapping panel assigns the N-ras locus to mouse chromosome three.

  7. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  8. H-ras expression in immortalized keratinocytes produces an invasive epithelium in cultured skin equivalents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melville B Vaughan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ras proteins affect both proliferation and expression of collagen-degrading enzymes, two important processes in cancer progression. Normal skin architecture is dependent both on the coordinated proliferation and stratification of keratinocytes, as well as the maintenance of a collagen-rich basement membrane. In the present studies we sought to determine whether expression of H-ras in skin keratinocytes would affect these parameters during the establishment and maintenance of an in vitro skin equivalent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously described cdk4 and hTERT immortalized foreskin keratinocytes were engineered to express ectopically introduced H-ras. Skin equivalents, composed of normal fibroblast-contracted collagen gels overlaid with keratinocytes (immortal or immortal expressing H-ras, were prepared and incubated for 3 weeks. Harvested tissues were processed and sectioned for histology and antibody staining. Antigens specific to differentiation (involucrin, keratin-14, p63, basement-membrane formation (collagen IV, laminin-5, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT; e-cadherin, vimentin were studied. Results showed that H-ras keratinocytes produced an invasive, disorganized epithelium most apparent in the lower strata while immortalized keratinocytes fully stratified without invasive properties. The superficial strata retained morphologically normal characteristics. Vimentin and p63 co-localization increased with H-ras overexpression, similar to basal wound-healing keratinocytes. In contrast, the cdk4 and hTERT immortalized keratinocytes differentiated similarly to normal unimmortalized keratinocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The use of isogenic derivatives of stable immortalized keratinocytes with specified genetic alterations may be helpful in developing more robust in vitro models of cancer progression.

  9. Hemin/G-quadruplex structure and activity alteration induced by magnesium cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosman, J; Juskowiak, B

    2016-04-01

    The influence of metal cations on G-quadruplex structure and peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme activity was investigated. Experiments revealed a significant role of magnesium ion, which in the presence of potassium cation influenced DNAzyme activity. This ability has been associated with alteration of G-quadruplex topology and consequently affinity to bind hemin molecule. It has been demonstrated that G-quadruplex based on PS2.M sequence under these conditions formed parallel topology, which exhibited lower activity than that observed in standard potassium-containing solution. On the other hand DNAzyme/magnesium ion system based on telomeric sequence, which did not undergo significant structural changes, exhibited higher peroxidase activity upon magnesium ion addition. In both cases, the stabilization effect of magnesium cations on G-quadruplex structure was observed. The mechanism of DNAzyme activity alteration by magnesium ion can be explained by its influence on the pKa value of DNAzyme. Magnesium ion decreased pKa for PS2.M based system but increased it for telomeric DNAzyme. Magnesium cation effect on G-quadruplex structure as well as DNAzyme activity is particularly important since this ion is one of the most common metal cations in biological samples.

  10. Alterations of prolyl endopeptidase activity in the plasma of children with autistic spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avarseji Hassan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolyl Endopeptidase (PEP, EC 3.4.21.26, a cytosolic endopeptidase, hydrolyses peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of proline residue in proteins with a relatively small molecular weight. It has been shown that altered PEP activity is associated with various psychological diseases such as schizophrenia, mania and depression. Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD are neuropsychiatric and behavioural syndromes affecting social behaviours and communication development. They are classified as developmental disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that PEP activity is also associated with ASDs. Methods Fluorometric assay was used to measure PEP activity in EDTA plasma in children with ASD (n = 18 aged 4–12 years (mean ± SD: 7.9 ± 2.5. These results were then compared to PEP activity in a control group of non-ASD children (n = 15 aged 2–10 years (mean ± SD: 6.4 ± 2.2. Results An alteration in PEP activity was found in the children with ASD compared to the control group. There was much greater variation of PEP activity in the group of ASD children when compared to the controls (SD= 39.9 and SD 9.6, respectively. This variation was significant (p Conclusion Our preliminary finding suggests a role for PEP enzyme in the pathophysiology of autism but further research should be conducted to establish its role in the aetiology of psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism and related spectrum disorders.

  11. EGFR-ras-raf signaling in epidermal stem cells: roles in hair follicle development, regeneration, tissue remodeling and epidermal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Eszter; Rupp, Christian; Baccarini, Manuela

    2013-09-25

    The mammalian skin is the largest organ of the body and its outermost layer, the epidermis, undergoes dynamic lifetime renewal through the activity of somatic stem cell populations. The EGFR-Ras-Raf pathway has a well-described role in skin development and tumor formation. While research mainly focuses on its role in cutaneous tumor initiation and maintenance, much less is known about Ras signaling in the epidermal stem cells, which are the main targets of skin carcinogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the properties of the epidermal stem cells and review the role of EGFR-Ras-Raf signaling in keratinocyte stem cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions.

  12. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves-Pinto A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ana Alves-Pinto,1,* Tobias Blumenstein,1,* Varvara Turova,1 Renée Lampe1,2 1Research Unit of the Buhl-Strohmaier Foundation for Cerebral Palsy and Paediatric Neuroorthopaedics, Orthopaedic Department, Klinikum rechts der Isar, 2Markus Würth Professorship, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP. However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility.Methods: Electromyographic (EMG recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions.Results: Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation

  13. Status of neutron complex of INR RAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grachev, M.I.; Koptelov, E.A.; Kravchuk, L.V.; Matveev, V.A.; Perekrestenko, A.D.; Sidorkin, S.F. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stavissky, Y.Y.

    2001-03-01

    The neutron complex of INR RAS consists of two sources of neutrons, beam stop, lead slowing down spectrometer and solid state spectrometers. The description of objects and their condition, the program of planned researches, co-operation with other institutes of the Moscow Region, progress reached for last two years are introduced in the article. (author)

  14. Role of the YAP Oncoprotein in Priming Ras-Driven Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine K Slemmons

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a cancer characterized by features of skeletal muscle histogenesis, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Survival for high-risk groups is less than 30% at 5 years. RMS also occurs during adulthood, with a lower incidence but higher mortality. Recently, mutational profiling has revealed a correlation between activating Ras mutations in the embryonal (eRMS and pleomorphic (pRMS histologic variants of RMS, and a poorer outcome for those patients. Independently, the YAP transcriptional coactivator, an oncoprotein kept in check by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, is upregulated in eRMS. Here we show that YAP promotes cell proliferation and antagonizes apoptosis and myogenic differentiation of human RMS cells bearing oncogenic Ras mutations in cell culture studies in vitro and in murine xenografts in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of YAP by the benzoporphyrin derivative verteporfin decreased cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. To interrogate the temporal contribution of YAP in eRMS tumorigenesis, we used a primary human cell-based genetic model of Ras-driven RMS. Constitutively active YAP functioned as an early genetic lesion, permitting bypass of senescence and priming myoblasts to tolerate subsequent expression of hTERT and oncogenic Ras, which were necessary and sufficient to generate murine xenograft tumors mimicking RMS in vivo. This work provides evidence for cooperation between YAP and oncogenic Ras in RMS tumorigenesis, laying the foundation for preclinical co-targeting of these pathways.

  15. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J.; Christou, Evangelos A.

    2014-01-01

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapi...

  16. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Pan

    Full Text Available Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway. This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1. A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05, while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  17. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Audemard, Eric [McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rak, Janusz, E-mail: janusz.rak@mcgill.ca [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  18. Altered cortical activation from the hand after facial botulinum toxin treatment.

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    Haenzi, Sara; Stefanics, Gabor; Lanaras, Tatjana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Ghosh, Arko

    2014-01-01

    Plastic interactions between face and hand cortical tactile circuits occur after severe injuries that affect the hand such as in amputation or spinal cord injury. However, whether loss of facial movements alters the cortical circuits involved in processing tactile inputs from the hand remains unknown. In this prospective observational study we used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure cortical activity evoked by tactile stimulation of the hands before and after botulinum toxin-A-induced facial paralysis. We found a reduction in the tactile event-related potentials (ERPs) 6 weeks after the treatment. This suggests that the limited paralysis of facial muscles induced during cosmetic interventions designed to smooth lines and wrinkles on the face is sufficient to alter the cortical processing of tactile inputs from the hand.

  19. Complete denture base assessments using holograms: dimensional alterations after different activation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dughir, Ciprian; Popovschi, Ana Maria; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; de Sabata, Aldo; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    Holography is a well-developed method with a large range of applications, including dentistry. This study uses holographic methods for the study of total dental prosthesis. The issue is that the transformation of wax denture base in polymethylacrylate causes dimensional alterations and retractions in the final dental constructs. These could cause the failure of the stability of the complete denture in the oral cavity. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine and to compare using holography, total prosthesis obtained using three different manufacturing methods: pressing, injection, and polymerization. Each of the three types of dentures thus produced were recorded over the previously wax complete base holographic plates. The dimensional alterations that appear after using the different activation methods were thus determined. The most significant modification was remarked in the custom press technology, while the smallest variations were detected in the injection alternative.

  20. Design, Evaluation and GCM-Performance of a New Parameterization for Microphysics of Clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    A prognostic cloud scheme named McRAS (Microphysics of clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme) was developed with the aim of improving cloud-microphysics, and cloud-radiation interactions in GCMs. McRAS distinguishes convective, stratiform, and boundary-layer clouds. The convective clouds merge into stratiform clouds on an hourly time-scale, while the boundary-layer clouds do so instantly. The cloud condensate transforms into precipitation following the auto-conversion relations of Sundqvist that contain a parametric adaptation for the Bergeron-Findeisen process of ice crystal growth and collection of cloud condensate by precipitation. All clouds convect, advect, and diffuse both horizontally and vertically with a fully active cloud-microphysics throughout its life-cycle, while the optical properties of clouds are derived from the statistical distribution of hydrometeors and idealized cloud geometry. An evaluation of McRAS in a single column model (SCM) with the GATE Phase III data has shown that McRAS can simulate the observed temperature, humidity, and precipitation without discernible systematic errors. An evaluation with the ARM-CART SCM data in a cloud model intercomparison exercise shows reasonable but not an outstanding accurate simulation. Such a discrepancy is common to almost all models and is related, in part, to the input data quality. McRAS was implemented in the GEOS II GCM. A 50 month integration that was initialized with the ECMWF analysis of observations for January 1, 1987 and forced with the observed sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice distribution and vegetation properties (biomes, and soils), with prognostic soil moisture, snow-cover, and hydrology showed a very realistic simulation of cloud process, incloud water and ice, and cloud-radiative forcing (CRF). The simulated ITCZ showed a realistic time-mean structure and seasonal cycle, while the simulated CRF showed sensitivity to vertical distribution of cloud water which can be easily

  1. Involvement of MINK, a Ste20 Family Kinase, in Ras Oncogene-Induced Growth Arrest in Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicke, B.; Bastien, J.; Khanna, S.J.; Warne, P.H.; Cowling, V.; Cook, S.J.; Peters, G.; Delpuech, O.; Schulze, A.; Berns, K.; Mullenders, J.; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.; Ganesan, T.S.; Downward, J.; Hancock, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of activated Ras to induce growth arrest of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells via induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 has been used to screen for Ras pathway signaling components using a library of RNA interference (RNAi) vectors targeting the kino

  2. Altered muscular activation during prone hip extension in women with and without low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab Amir M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered movement pattern has been associated with the development of low back pain (LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity pattern of the ipsilateral erector spinae (IES and contralateral erectorspinae (CES, gluteus maximus (GM and hamstring (HAM muscles during prone hip extension (PHE test in women with and without LBP. A cross-sectional non-experimental design was used. Methods Convenience sample of 20 female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 10 and without LBP (n = 10. The electromyography (EMG signal amplitude of the tested muscles during PHE (normalized to maximum voluntary electrical activity (MVE was measured in the dominant lower extremity in all subjects. Results Statistical analysis revealed greater normalized EMG signal amplitude in women with LBP compared to non-LBP women. There was significant difference in EMG activity of the IES (P = 0.03 and CES (P = 0.03 between two groups. However, no significant difference was found in EMG signals of the GM (P = 0.11 and HAM (P = 0.14 among two groups. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrated altered activation pattern of the lumbo-pelvic muscles during PHE in the women with chronic LBP. This information is important for investigators using PHE as either an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  3. Imidacloprid induced alterations in enzyme activities and energy reserves of the land snail, Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M A; Mohamed, M S

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo sublethal toxic effects (0.2 and 0.6 LD50) of topically applied imidacloprid on biochemical biomarkers in the land snail, Helix aspersa was examined. Biochemical perturbations were assessed by measuring the three enzymatic (Acetylcholinesterase, AChE; catalase, CAT and glutathione-S-transferase, GST) activities and three energy reserves (protein, glycogen and lipids) in the snails. Snail samples were taken from each sublethal dose and control groups at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. The results revealed that there were overall decrease in AChE activity as well as depletion of lipids and glycogen contents in the imidacloprid-treated snails compared to control groups. The CAT and GST activities of treated snails with the sublethal doses of imidacloprid were significantly higher than those of untreated controls along the three times of exposure. Moreover, an increase in the level of total proteins was observed in animals treated with 0.6 LD50 imidacloprid compared to control groups. The alterations in all tested biochemical perturbations were most pronounced with the 0.6 LD50 than 0.2 LD50. This study suggests that alterations of the enzyme activities and energy reserves in this species that could be useful as biomarkers of imidacloprid exposure in the evaluation of terrestrial impacts of this insecticide.

  4. NLRP3 INFLAMMASOME ACTIVATION CONTRIBUTES TO LONG-TERM BEHAVIORAL ALTERATIONS IN MICE INJECTED WITH LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHU, WEI; CAO, FENG-SHENG; FENG, JUN; CHEN, HUA-WENG; WAN, JIE-RU; LU, QING; WANG, JIAN

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) might affect the central nervous system by causing neuroinflammation, which subsequently leads to brain damage and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated the role of nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in long-term behavioral alterations of 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice injected intraperitoneally with LPS (5 mg/kg). At different time points after injection, we assessed locomotor function with a 24-point neurologic deficit scoring system and the rotarod test; assessed recognition memory with the novel object recognition test; and assessed emotional abnormality (anhedonia and behavioral despair) with the tail suspension test, forced swim test, and sucrose preference test. We also assessed protein expression of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1 p10 in hippocampus by Western blotting; measured levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and IL-10 in hippocampus; measured TNFα and IL-1β in serum by ELISA; and evaluated microglial activity in hippocampus by Iba1 immunofluorescence. We found that LPS-injected mice displayed long-term depression-like behaviors and recognition memory deficit; elevated expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 p10; increased levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and TNFα; decreased levels of IL-10; and increased microglial activation. These effects were blocked by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor Ac-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-chloromethylketone. The results demonstrate proof of concept that NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to long-term behavioral alterations in LPS-exposed mice, probably through enhanced inflammation, and that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition might alleviate peripheral and brain inflammation and thereby ameliorate long-term behavioral alterations in LPS-exposed mice. PMID:27923741

  5. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  6. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  7. CYP1B1 polymorphisms and k-ras mutations in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous-Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Porta, Miquel; Pumarega, José A; López, Tomàs; Alguacil, Joan; Morales, Eva; Malats, Núria; Rifà, Juli; Hunter, David J; Real, Francisco X

    2008-05-01

    The frequency of CYP1B1 polymorphisms in pancreatic cancer has never been reported. There is also no evidence on the relationship between CYP1B1 variants and mutations in ras genes (K-, H- or N-ras) in any human neoplasm. We analyzed the following CYP1B1 polymorphisms in 129 incident cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA): the m1 allele (Val to Leu at codon 432) and the m2 allele (Asn to Ser at codon 453). The calculated frequencies for the m1 Val and m2 Asn alleles were 0.45 and 0.68, respectively. CYP1B1 genotypes were out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; this was largely due to K-ras mutated PDA cases. The Val/Val genotype was over five times more frequent in PDA cases with a K-ras mutation than in wild-type cases (OR = 5.25; P = 0.121). In PDA, polymorphisms in CYP1B1 might be related with K-ras activation pathways.

  8. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  9. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation.

  10. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hauling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12, both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria, which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity.

  11. Impact of antibiotic treatments on the expression of the R plasmid tra genes and on the host innate immune activity during pRAS1 bearing Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantas Leon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transfer of R plasmids between bacteria has been well studied under laboratory conditions and the transfer frequency has been found to vary between plasmids and under various physical conditions. For the first time, we here study the expression of the selected plasmid mobility genes traD, virB11 and virD4 in the 45 kb IncU plasmid, pRAS1, conferring resistance to tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulphonamide, using an in vivo zebrafish infection- treatment model. Results Three days after oral infection of adult zebrafish with Aeromonas hydrophila harboring pRAS1, elevated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF α, IL-1β and IL-8 and complement C3 genes in the intestine coincided with disease symptoms. Tetracycline, trimethoprim and an ineffective concentration of flumequine given 48 h prior to sampling, strongly increased expression of plasmid mobility genes, whereas an effective dosage of flumequine resulted in lower levels of mRNA copies of these genes relative to placebo treatment. Following effective treatment with flumequine, and ineffective treatments with a low concentration of flumequine, with trimethoprim or with sulphonamide, the intestinal expression of immune genes was strongly induced compared to placebo treated control fish. Conclusions Treatment of zebrafish infected with an antibiotic resistant (TcR, TmR, SuR A. hydrophila with ineffective concentrations of flumequine or the ineffective antimicrobials tetracycline and trimethoprim strongly induced expression of genes mediating conjugative transfer of the R-plasmid pRAS1. Simultaneously, there was a strong induction of selected inflammatory and immune response genes, which was again evident in fish subjected to ineffective treatment protocols. Our findings point to the essential role of therapeutic practices in escalation or control of antibiotic resistance transfer, and suggest that antibiotic substances, even in sub-inhibitory concentrations, may

  12. Mutations in the catalytic loop HRD motif alter the activity and function of Drosophila Src64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C Strong

    Full Text Available The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele.

  13. Plant adaptation to extreme environments: the example of Cistus salviifolius of an active geothermal alteration field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Giacomo; Bottega, Stefania; Forino, Laura M C; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Spanò, Carmelina

    2014-02-01

    Cistus salviifolius is able to colonise one of the most extreme active geothermal alteration fields in terms of both soil acidity and hot temperatures. The analyses of morpho-functional and physiological characters, investigated in leaves of plants growing around fumaroles (G leaves) and in leaves developed by the same plants after transfer into growth chamber under controlled conditions (C leaves) evidenced the main adaptive traits developed by this pioneer plant in a stressful environment. These traits involved leaf shape and thickness, mesophyll compactness, stomatal and trichome densities, chloroplast size. Changes of functional and physiological traits concerned dry matter content, peroxide and lipid peroxidation, leaf area, relative water and pigment contents. A higher reducing power and antioxidant enzymatic activity were typical of G leaves. Though the high levels of stress parameters, G leaves showed stress-induced specific morphogenic and physiological responses putatively involved in their surviving in active geothermal habitats.

  14. Administration of memantine and imipramine alters mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Stringari, Roberto B; Rezin, Gislaine T; Fraga, Daiane B; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Scaini, Giselli; Benedet, Joana; Rochi, Natália; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have appointed for a role of glutamatergic system and/or mitochondrial function in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the creatine kinase and mitochondrial respiratory chain activities after acute and chronic treatments with memantine (N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor antagonist) and imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) in rats. To this aim, rats were acutely or chronically treated for 14 days once a day with saline, memantine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg). After acute or chronic treatments, we evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) and creatine kinase activities in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our results showed that both acute and chronic treatments with memantine or imipramine altered respiratory chain complexes and creatine kinase activities in rat brain; however, these alterations were different with relation to protocols (acute or chronic), complex, dose and brain area. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that the effects of imipramine and memantine could be involve mitochondrial function modulation.

  15. Altered spontaneous neural activity in the occipital face area reflects behavioral deficits in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanfang; Li, Jingguang; Liu, Xiqin; Song, Yiying; Wang, Ruosi; Yang, Zetian; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) exhibit severe difficulties in recognizing faces and to a lesser extent, also exhibit difficulties in recognizing non-face objects. We used fMRI to investigate whether these behavioral deficits could be accounted for by altered spontaneous neural activity. Two aspects of spontaneous neural activity were measured: the intensity of neural activity in a voxel indexed by the fractional amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF), and the connectivity of a voxel to neighboring voxels indexed by regional homogeneity (ReHo). Compared with normal adults, both the fALFF and ReHo values within the right occipital face area (rOFA) were significantly reduced in DP subjects. Follow-up studies on the normal adults revealed that these two measures indicated further functional division of labor within the rOFA. The fALFF in the rOFA was positively correlated with behavioral performance in recognition of non-face objects, whereas ReHo in the rOFA was positively correlated with processing of faces. When considered together, the altered fALFF and ReHo within the same region (rOFA) may account for the comorbid deficits in both face and object recognition in DPs, whereas the functional division of labor in these two measures helps to explain the relative independency of deficits in face recognition and object recognition in DP.

  16. Bioinformatics of non small cell lung cancer and the ras proto-oncogene

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, Amita; Babu M, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is initiated by activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene are responsible for 10–30% of adenocarcinomas. Clinical Findings point to a wide variety of other cancers contributing to lung cancer incidence. Such a scenario makes identification of lung cancer difficult and thus identifying its mechanisms can contribute to the society. Identifying unique conserved patterns common to contributing proto-oncogenes may further be a boon to Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoinformatics. This calls for ab initio/de novo drug discovery that in turn will require a comprehensive in silico approach of Sequence, Domain, Phylogenetic and Structural analysis of the receptors, ligand screening and optimization and detailed Docking studies. This brief involves extensive role of the RAS subfamily that includes a set of proteins, which cause an over expression of cancer-causing genes like M-ras and initiate tumour formation in lungs. SNP Studies and Structure based ...

  17. Ets Factors Regulate Neural Stem Cell Depletion and Gliogenesis in Ras Pathway Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Joshua J; Levy, Rachelle; Antonuk, C Danielle; Molina, Jessica; Dutra-Clarke, Marina; Park, Hannah; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Kim, Gi Bum; Hu, Xin; Bannykh, Serguei I; Verhaak, Roel G W; Danielpour, Moise

    2015-07-14

    As the list of putative driver mutations in glioma grows, we are just beginning to elucidate the effects of dysregulated developmental signaling pathways on the transformation of neural cells. We have employed a postnatal, mosaic, autochthonous glioma model that captures the first hours and days of gliomagenesis in more resolution than conventional genetically engineered mouse models of cancer. We provide evidence that disruption of the Nf1-Ras pathway in the ventricular zone at multiple signaling nodes uniformly results in rapid neural stem cell depletion, progenitor hyperproliferation, and gliogenic lineage restriction. Abolishing Ets subfamily activity, which is upregulated downstream of Ras, rescues these phenotypes and blocks glioma initiation. Thus, the Nf1-Ras-Ets axis might be one of the select molecular pathways that are perturbed for initiation and maintenance in glioma.

  18. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis.

  19. NF1 Is a Direct G Protein Effector Essential for Opioid Signaling to Ras in the Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Keqiang; Colgan, Lesley A; Dao, Maria T; Muntean, Brian S; Sutton, Laurie P; Orlandi, Cesare; Boye, Sanford L; Boye, Shannon E; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Baoji; Smith, Roy G; Yasuda, Ryohei; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-11-21

    It is well recognized that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can activate Ras-regulated kinase pathways to produce lasting changes in neuronal function. Mechanisms by which GPCRs transduce these signals and their relevance to brain disorders are not well understood. Here, we identify a major Ras regulator, neurofibromin 1 (NF1), as a direct effector of GPCR signaling via Gβγ subunits in the striatum. We find that binding of Gβγ to NF1 inhibits its ability to inactivate Ras. Deletion of NF1 in striatal neurons prevents the opioid-receptor-induced activation of Ras and eliminates its coupling to Akt-mTOR-signaling pathway. By acting in the striatal medium spiny neurons of the direct pathway, NF1 regulates opioid-induced changes in Ras activity, thereby sensitizing mice to psychomotor and rewarding effects of morphine. These results delineate a novel mechanism of GPCR signaling to Ras pathways and establish a critical role of NF1 in opioid addiction.

  20. A mechanism of catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Ras protein through magnesium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Nassar, Nicolas; Wang, Jin

    2011-11-01

    The hydrolysis by Ras plays pivotal roles in the activation of signaling pathways that lead to cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Despite their significant role in human cancer, the hydrolysis mechanism remains unclear. In the present Letter, we propose a GTP hydrolysis mechanism in which the γ phosphate is cut off primarily by magnesium ion. We studied both normal and mutated Ras and the cause of the malfunction of these mutants, compared the effect of Mg2+ and Mn2+. The simulation results are consistent with the experiments and support the new hydrolysis mechanism. This work will benefit both GTPases and ATPases hydrolysis studies.

  1. Alterations in Daytime and Nighttime Activity in Piglets after Focal and Diffuse Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Emily; Badder, Carlie; Sullivan, Sarah; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-04-15

    We have developed and implemented a noninvasive, objective neurofunctional assessment for evaluating the sustained effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in piglets with both diffuse and focal injury types. Derived from commercial actigraphy methods in humans, this assessment continuously monitors the day/night activity of piglets using close-fitting jackets equipped with tri-axial accelerometers to monitor movements of the thorax. Acceleration metrics were correlated (N = 7 naïve piglets) with video images to define values associated with a range of activities, from recumbancy (rest) to running. Both focal (N = 8) and diffuse brain injury (N = 9) produced alterations in activity that were significant 4 days post-TBI. Compared to shams (N = 6) who acclimated to the animal facility 4 days after an anesthesia experience by blurring the distinction between day and night activity, post-TBI time-matched animals had larger fractions of inactive periods during the daytime than nighttime, and larger fractions of active time in the night were spent in high activity (e.g., constant walking, intermittent running) than during the day. These persistent disturbances in rest and activity are similar to those observed in human adults and children post-TBI, establishing actigraphy as a translational metric, used in both humans and large animals, for assessment of injury severity, progressions, and intervention.

  2. Chemotaxis: new role for Ras revealed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianshe Yan; Dale Hereld; Tian Jin

    2010-01-01

    @@ A recent study of chemotaxis revealed a new role for the proto-oncogene Ras in the social ameba Dictyostelium discoideum.Chemotaxis,the directional movement of cells toward chemokines and other chemoattractants,plays critical roles in diverse physiological processes,such as mobilization of immune cells to fight invading microorganisms,targeting of metastatic cancer cells to specific tissues,and guidance of sperm cells to ova during fertilization.This work,published in the July 26 issue of The Journal of Cell Biology,was conducted in Dr.Devreotes' lab at John Hopkins University and Dr.Parent's lab at National Cancer Institute.This research team demonstrated that RasC functions as an upstream regulator of TORC2 and thereby governs the effects of TORC2-PKB signaling on the cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  3. The Tumor-suppressive Small GTPase DiRas1 Binds the Noncanonical Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SmgGDS and Antagonizes SmgGDS Interactions with Oncogenic Small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergom, Carmen; Hauser, Andrew D; Rymaszewski, Amy; Gonyo, Patrick; Prokop, Jeremy W; Jennings, Benjamin C; Lawton, Alexis J; Frei, Anne; Lorimer, Ellen L; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Noon, Kathleen; Fierke, Carol A; Williams, Carol L

    2016-03-18

    The small GTPase DiRas1 has tumor-suppressive activities, unlike the oncogenic properties more common to small GTPases such as K-Ras and RhoA. Although DiRas1 has been found to be a tumor suppressor in gliomas and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the mechanisms by which it inhibits malignant phenotypes have not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS, a protein that promotes the activation of several oncogenic GTPases. In silico docking studies predict that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS in a manner similar to other small GTPases. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA, but we report here that SmgGDS does not mediate GDP/GTP exchange on DiRas1. Intriguingly, DiRas1 acts similarly to a dominant-negative small GTPase, binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting SmgGDS binding to other small GTPases, including K-Ras4B, RhoA, and Rap1A. DiRas1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, but its expression is decreased in most breast cancers, similar to its family member DiRas3 (ARHI). DiRas1 inhibits RhoA- and SmgGDS-mediated NF-κB transcriptional activity in HEK293T cells. We also report that DiRas1 suppresses basal NF-κB activation in breast cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Taken together, our data support a model in which DiRas1 expression inhibits malignant features of cancers in part by nonproductively binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting the binding of other small GTPases to SmgGDS.

  4. Altered differentiation and paracrine stimulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation by conditionally activated Smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Adriana P; LaMarca, Heather L; Villanueva, Hugo; Toneff, Michael J; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling network is critical for patterning and organogenesis in mammals, and has been implicated in a variety of cancers. Smoothened (Smo), the gene encoding the principal signal transducer, is overexpressed frequently in breast cancer, and constitutive activation in MMTV-SmoM2 transgenic mice caused alterations in mammary gland morphology, increased proliferation, and changes in stem/progenitor cell number. Both in transgenic mice and in clinical specimens, proliferative cells did not usually express detectable Smo, suggesting the hypothesis that Smo functioned in a non-cell autonomous manner to stimulate proliferation. Here, we employed a genetically tagged mouse model carrying a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditional allele of constitutively active Smo (SmoM2) to test this hypothesis. MMTV-Cre- or adenoviral-Cre-mediated SmoM2 expression in the luminal epithelium, but not in the myoepithelium, was required for the hyper-proliferative phenotypes. High levels of proliferation were observed in cells adjacent or in close-proximity to Smo expressing cells demonstrating that SmoM2 expressing cells were stimulating proliferation via a paracrine or juxtacrine mechanism. In contrast, Smo expression altered luminal cell differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. SmoM2 expressing cells, purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) via the genetic fluorescent tag, expressed high levels of Ptch2, Gli1, Gli2, Jag2 and Dll-1, and lower levels of Notch4 and Hes6, in comparison to wildtype cells. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of Smo activation in the mammary gland and its possible roles in breast tumorigenesis. In addition, these results also have potential implications for the interpretation of proliferative phenotypes commonly observed in other organs as a consequence of hedgehog signaling activation.

  5. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Zavala, A.; Del Razo, L.M.; Garcia-Vargas, G.G.; Aguilar, C.; Borja, V.H.; Albores, A.; Cebrian, M.E. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico (Mexico). Dept. de Farmacologia y Toxicologica

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 {mu}g As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 20 refs.

  6. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zavala, A; Del Razo, L M; García-Vargas, G G; Aguilar, C; Borja, V H; Albores, A; Cebrián, M E

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 microg As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized.

  7. Deep brain stimulation during early adolescence prevents microglial alterations in a model of maternal immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Ravit; Dong, Le; Del-Valle-Anton, Lucia; Guneykaya, Dilansu; Voget, Mareike; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Schweibold, Regina; Djodari-Irani, Anais; Goetz, Thomas; Ewing, Samuel; Kettenmann, Helmut; Wolf, Susanne A; Winter, Christine

    2016-12-07

    In recent years schizophrenia has been recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder likely involving a perinatal insult progressively affecting brain development. The poly I:C maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent model is considered as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Using this model we and others demonstrated the association between neuroinflammation in the form of altered microglia and a schizophrenia-like endophenotype. Therapeutic intervention using the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline affected altered microglia activation and was successful in the adult offspring. However, less is known about the effect of preventive therapeutic strategies on microglia properties. Previously we found that deep brain stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex applied pre-symptomatically to adolescence MIA rats prevented the manifestation of behavioral and structural deficits in adult rats. We here studied the effects of deep brain stimulation during adolescence on microglia properties in adulthood. We found that in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex, microglial density and soma size were increased in MIA rats. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was unchanged in all brain areas before and after implantation and stimulation. Stimulation of either the medial prefrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens normalized microglia density and soma size in main projection areas including the hippocampus and in the area around the electrode implantation. We conclude that in parallel to an alleviation of the symptoms in the rat MIA model, deep brain stimulation has the potential to prevent the neuroinflammatory component in this disease.

  8. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  9. Stat1 activation attenuates IL-6 induced Stat3 activity but does not alter apoptosis sensitivity in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimberg Lina Y

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple myeloma (MM is at present an incurable malignancy, characterized by apoptosis-resistant tumor cells. Interferon (IFN treatment sensitizes MM cells to Fas-induced apoptosis and is associated with an increased activation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat1. The role of Stat1 in MM has not been elucidated, but Stat1 has in several studies been ascribed a pro-apoptotic role. Conversely, IL-6 induction of Stat3 is known to confer resistance to apoptosis in MM. Methods To delineate the role of Stat1 in IFN mediated sensitization to apoptosis, sub-lines of the U-266-1970 MM cell line with a stable expression of the active mutant Stat1C were utilized. The influence of Stat1C constitutive transcriptional activation on endogenous Stat3 expression and activation, and the expression of apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. To determine whether Stat1 alone would be an important determinant in sensitizing MM cells to apoptosis, the U-266-1970-Stat1C cell line and control cells were exposed to high throughput compound screening (HTS. Results To explore the role of Stat1 in IFN mediated apoptosis sensitization of MM, we established sublines of the MM cell line U-266-1970 constitutively expressing the active mutant Stat1C. We found that constitutive nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of Stat1 was associated with an attenuation of IL-6-induced Stat3 activation and up-regulation of mRNA for the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family genes Harakiri, the short form of Mcl-1 and Noxa. However, Stat1 activation alone was not sufficient to sensitize cells to Fas-induced apoptosis. In a screening of > 3000 compounds including bortezomib, dexamethasone, etoposide, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, geldanamycin (17-AAG, doxorubicin and thalidomide, we found that the drug response and IC50 in cells constitutively expressing active Stat1 was mainly unaltered. Conclusion We conclude that Stat1 alters IL-6

  10. Vitamin D3 alters microglia immune activation by an IL-10 dependent SOCS3 mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boontanrart, Mandy; Hall, Samuel D; Spanier, Justin A; Hayes, Colleen E; Olson, Julie K

    2016-03-15

    Microglia become activated immune cells during infection or disease in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanisms that downregulate activated microglia to prevent immune-mediated damage are not completely understood. Vitamin D3 has been suggested to have immunomodulatory affects, and high levels of vitamin D3 have been correlated with a decreased risk for developing some neurological diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated the synthesis of active vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, within the CNS, but its cellular source and neuroprotective actions remain unknown. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether microglia can respond to vitamin D3 and whether vitamin D3 alters immune activation of microglia. We have previously shown that microglia become activated by IFNγ or LPS or by infection with virus to express pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules. In this study, activated microglia increased the expression of the vitamin D receptor and Cyp27b1, which encodes the enzyme for converting vitamin D3 into its active form, thereby enhancing their responsiveness to vitamin D3. Most importantly, the activated microglia exposed to vitamin D3 had reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-12, and TNFα, and increased expression of IL-10. The reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines was dependent on IL-10 induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Therefore, vitamin D3 increases the expression of IL-10 creating a feedback loop via SOCS3 that downregulates the pro-inflammatory immune response by activated microglia which would likewise prevent immune mediated damage in the CNS.

  11. Severe craniosynostosis with Noonan syndrome phenotype associated with SHOC2 mutation: clinical evidence of crosslink between FGFR and RAS signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Tomoru; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Kishi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-11-01

    Dysregulation in the RAS signaling cascade results in a family of malformation syndromes called RASopathies. Meanwhile, alterations in FGFR signaling cascade are responsible for various syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. In general, the phenotypic spectra of RASopathies and craniosynostosis syndromes do not overlap. Recently, however, mutations in ERF, a downstream molecule of the RAS signaling cascade, have been identified as a cause of complex craniosynostosis, suggesting that the RAS and FGFR signaling pathways can interact in the pathogenesis of malformation syndromes. Here, we document a boy with short stature, developmental delay, and severe craniosynostosis involving right coronal, bilateral lambdoid, and sagittal sutures with a de novo mutation in exon1 of SHOC2 (c.4A>G p.Ser2Gly). This observation further supports the existence of a crosslink between the RAS signaling cascade and craniosynostosis. In retrospect, the propositus had physical features suggestive of a dysregulated RAS signaling cascade, such as fetal pleural effusion, fetal hydrops, and atrial tachycardia. In addition to an abnormal cranial shape, which has been reported for this specific mutation, craniosynostosis might be a novel associated phenotype. In conclusion, the phenotypic combination of severe craniosynostosis and RASopathy features observed in the propositus suggests an interaction between the RAS and FGFR signaling cascades. Patients with craniosynostosis in combination with any RASopathy feature may require mutation screening for molecules in the FGFR-RAS signaling cascade.

  12. Regulation and activity of secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) is altered in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca N; Letang, Blanche D; Brighton, Luisa; Thompson, Elizabeth; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Bonner, James; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of cigarette smoking is a shift in the protease/antiprotease balance, in favor of protease activity. However, it has recently been shown that smokers have increased expression of a key antiprotease, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), yet the mechanisms involved in SLPI transcriptional regulation and functional activity of SLPI remain unclear. We examined SLPI mRNA and protein secretion in differentiated nasal epithelial cells (NECs) and nasal lavage fluid (NLF) from nonsmokers and smokers and demonstrated that SLPI expression is increased in NECs and NLF from smokers. Transcriptional regulation of SLPI expression was confirmed using SLPI promoter reporter assays followed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The role of STAT1 in regulating SLPI expression was further elucidated using WT and stat1(-/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that STAT1 regulates SLPI transcription in epithelial cells and slpi protein in the lungs of mice. Additionally, we reveal that NECs from smokers have increased STAT1 mRNA/protein expression. Finally, we demonstrate that SLPI contained in the nasal mucosa of smokers is proteolytically cleaved but retains functional activity against neutrophil elastase. These results demonstrate that smoking enhances expression of SLPI in NECs in vitro and in vivo, and that this response is regulated by STAT1. In addition, despite posttranslational cleavage of SLPI, antiprotease activity against neutrophil elastase is enhanced in smokers. Together, our findings show that SLPI regulation and activity is altered in the nasal mucosa of smokers, which could have broad implications in the context of respiratory inflammation and infection.

  13. Ras-Mek-Erk signaling regulates Nf1 heterozygous neointima formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon D; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results from mutations in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, which encodes neurofibromin, a negative regulator of diverse Ras signaling cascades. Arterial stenosis is a nonneoplastic manifestation of NF1 that predisposes some patients to debilitating morbidity and sudden death. Recent murine studies demonstrate that Nf1 heterozygosity (Nf1(+/-)) in monocytes/macrophages significantly enhances intimal proliferation after arterial injury. However, the downstream Ras effector pathway responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Based on in vitro assays demonstrating enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) signaling in Nf1(+/-) macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo evidence of Erk amplification without alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in Nf1(+/-) neointimas, we tested the hypothesis that Ras-Erk signaling regulates intimal proliferation in a murine model of NF1 arterial stenosis. By using a well-established in vivo model of inflammatory cell migration and standard cell culture, neurofibromin-deficient macrophages demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to growth factor stimulation in vivo and in vitro, which is significantly diminished in the presence of PD0325901, a specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk signaling in phase 2 clinical trials for cancer. After carotid artery injury, Nf1(+/-) mice demonstrated increased intimal proliferation compared with wild-type mice. Daily administration of PD0325901 significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation to levels of wild-type mice. These studies identify the Ras-Erk pathway in neurofibromin-deficient macrophages as the aberrant pathway responsible for enhanced neointima formation.

  14. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. Results: At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Discussion: Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set. PMID:26384309

  15. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  16. Altered activity of the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of an active avoidance task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilu eJiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and amygdala function is associated with anxiety-related disorders. While the mPFC-amygdala pathway has a clear role in fear conditioning, these structures are also involved in active avoidance. Given that avoidance perseveration represents a core symptom of anxiety disorders, the neural substrate of avoidance, especially its extinction, requires better understanding. The present study was designed to investigate the activity of mPFC and amygdala neurons during acquisition and extinction of lever-press avoidance in rats. In particular, neural activity was examined in the mPFC, intercalated cell clusters (ITCs, lateral (LA, basal (BA and central (CeA amygdala, at various time points during acquisition and extinction, using induction of the immediate early gene product, c-Fos. Neural activity was greater in the mPFC, LA, BA, and ITC during the extinction phase as compared to the acquisition phase. In contrast, the CeA was the only region that was more activated during acquisition than during extinction. Our results indicate that elevated activity in the mPFC, BA, LA and ITCs, and reduced CeA activity is associated with extinction of active avoidance. Moreover, inhibitory neurons are activated differently in the mPFC and BA during early and late phase of acquisition and extinction, suggesting their dynamic involvement in the development of avoidance response. Together, these data start to identify the key brain regions important in active avoidance behavior, areas that could be associated with avoidance perseveration in anxiety disorders.

  17. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  18. Mutational spectrum of myeloid malignancies with inv(3)/t(3;3) reveals a predominant involvement of RAS/RTK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Havermans, Marije; Erpelinck, Claudia; Bindels, Eric M J; Beverloo, H Berna; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Döhner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J M

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies bearing chromosomal inv(3)/t(3;3) abnormalities are among the most therapy-resistant leukemias. Deregulated expression of EVI1 is the molecular hallmark of this disease; however, the genome-wide spectrum of cooperating mutations in this disease subset has not been systematically elucidated. Here, we show that 98% of inv(3)/t(3;3) myeloid malignancies harbor mutations in genes activating RAS/receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways. In addition, hemizygous mutations in GATA2, as well as heterozygous alterations in RUNX1, SF3B1, and genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, frequently co-occur with the inv(3)/t(3;3) aberration. Notably, neither mutational patterns nor gene expression profiles differ across inv(3)/t(3;3) acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome cases, suggesting recognition of inv(3)/t(3;3) myeloid malignancies as a single disease entity irrespective of blast count. The high incidence of activating RAS/RTK signaling mutations may provide a target for a rational treatment strategy in this high-risk patient group.

  19. Psychoneuroendocrine immunology: perception of stress can alter body temperature and natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, R N; Solvason, H B; Hsueh, C M; Rogers, C F; Demissie, S; Hiramoto, N S; Gauthier, D K; Lorden, J F; Ghanta, V K

    1999-01-01

    Psychoimmunology has been credited with using the mind as a way to alter immunity. The problem with this concept is that many of the current psychoimmunology techniques in use are aimed at alleviating stress effects on the immune system rather than at direct augmentation of immunity by the brain. Studies in animals provide a model that permits us to approach the difficulties associated with gaining an understanding of the CNS-immune system connection. A particular advantage of using animals over humans is that psychological and social contributions play a less prominent role for animals than for human subjects, since the animals are all inbred and reared under identical controlled conditions. If the insightful information provided by animal studies is correct, then psychotherapy for the treatment of diseases might be made more effective if some aspect of this knowledge is included in the design of the treatment. We emphasize conditioning as a regimen and an acceptable way to train the brain to remember an output pathway to raise immunity. We propose that a specific drug or perception (mild stress, represented by rotation, total body heating or handling) could substitute and kindle the same output pathway without the need for conditioning. If this view is correct, then instead of using conditioning, it may be possible to use an antigen to activate desired immune cells, and substitute a drug or an external environmental sensory stimulus (perception) to energize the output pathway to these cells. Alternatively, monitoring alterations of body temperature in response to a drug or perception might allow us to follow how effectively the brain is performing in altering immunity. Studies with animals suggest that there are alternative ways to use the mind to raise natural or acquired immunity in man.

  20. Upregulated Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway:a new hope in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Liu; Fu-jiang Cao; Dong-dong Xu; Yun-qiang Xu; Shi-qing Feng

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies report that the Ras/Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway has a death-promoting apoptotic function in neural cells. We hypothesized that the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway may be abnormally regulated in rat injured spinal cord models. The weight drop method was used to establish rat spinal cord injury at T9. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining revealed Ras expression was dramatically elevated, and the phosphorylations of A-Raf, B-Raf and C-Raf were all upregulated in the injured spinal cord. Both mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and ERK1/2, which belong to the Ras/Raf signaling kinases, were upregulated. These results indicate that Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling may be upregulated in injured spinal cord and are involved in recovery after spinal cord injury.

  1. The Ras antagonist, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS, decreases fibrosis and improves muscle strength in dy/dy mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoram Nevo

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily of guanosine-triphosphate (GTP-binding proteins regulates a diverse spectrum of intracellular processes involved in inflammation and fibrosis. Farnesythiosalicylic acid (FTS is a unique and potent Ras inhibitor which decreased inflammation and fibrosis in experimentally induced liver cirrhosis and ameliorated inflammatory processes in systemic lupus erythematosus, neuritis and nephritis animal models. FTS effect on Ras expression and activity, muscle strength and fibrosis was evaluated in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. The dy(2J/dy(2J mice had significantly increased RAS expression and activity compared with the wild type mice. FTS treatment significantly decreased RAS expression and activity. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK, a Ras downstream protein, was significantly decreased following FTS treatment in the dy(2J/dy(2J mice. Clinically, FTS treated mice showed significant improvement in hind limb muscle strength measured by electronic grip strength meter. Significant reduction of fibrosis was demonstrated in the treated group by quantitative Sirius Red staining and lower muscle collagen content. FTS effect was associated with significantly inhibition of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. We conclude that active RAS inhibition by FTS was associated with attenuated fibrosis and improved muscle strength in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  2. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  3. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  4. THE 65TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE INSTITUTE OF THE EARTH’S CRUST OF SB RAS: CURRENT STATUS AND LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Gladkochub

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  In February 2014, the Institute of the Earth’s Crust of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences celebrated its 65th anniversary. As of 01 January 2014, there are 300 employees in its staff, including one Full Member of RAS, one Corresponding Member of RAS, 27 Doctors and 74 Candidates of Sciences. Postgraduate courses are taken by 33 young researchers. The Institute has 13 laboratories and the Analytical Centre to research recent endo- and exogeodynamics, geological environment and seismicity, mineral resources, underground water dynamics and geoecology, internal structure, paleogeodynamics, endogenic processes and fluid dynamics of the continental lithosphere. From 2009 to 2013, the Institute has published 775 scientific papers in Russia and abroad, implemented 145 projects supported by grants from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, 21 projects under the Fundamental Research Program of the RAS Presidium and the Earth Sciences Section of RAS, 27 integration projects of SB RAS, and 22 programs of fundamental studies of RAS. The Institute fulfilled more than 50 scientific research contracts with industrial companies in Siberia and several state contracts with governments of the RF regions. Educational research, science organization and international activities are successfully implemented. Renovation and retrofit replacement of equipment, instruments and tools is ensured. A fitting testimony to scientific achievements of IEC SB RAS is that it ranks among leading research institutes in the Earth sciences in Russia and abroad, as confirmed by all the RAS performance indicators.  

  5. Ras Proteins Have Multiple Functions in Vegetative Cells of Dictyostelium ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG− cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC−/rasG− cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetat...

  6. Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaohu [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China) and Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: xhzhao999@263.net; Wang Peijun [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: tongjipjwang@vip.sina.com; Li Chunbo [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: licb@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Hu Zhenghui [Department of Electrical and Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: eezhhu@ust.hk; Xi Qian [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: 96125007@sina.com.cn; Wu Wenyuan [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: wuwy@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Tang Xiaowei [Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: tangxw@zju.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    Anxiety disorder, a common mental disorder in our clinical practice, is characterized by unprovoked anxiety. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which closely involved in emotional processing, are critical regions in the default mode network. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether default mode network activity is altered in patients with anxiety disorder. Ten anxiety patients and 10 healthy controls underwent fMRI while listening to emotionally neutral words alternating with rest (Experiment 1) and threat-related words alternating with emotionally neutral words (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, regions of deactivation were observed in patients and controls. In Experiment 2, regions of deactivation were observed only in patients. The observed deactivation patterns in the two experiments, which included MPFC, PCC, and inferior parietal cortex, were similar and consistent with the default model network. Less deactivation in MPFC and greater deactivation in PCC were observed for patients group comparing to controls in Experiment 1. Our observations suggest that the default model network is altered in anxiety patients and dysfunction in MPFC and PCC may play an important role in anxiety psychopathology.

  7. Activation of secretion and surface alteration of cytolytic T-lymphocytes interacting with target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskaya, S N; Shevelev, A A; Kupriyanova, T A

    1988-01-01

    Cells obtained in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and memory cells adsorbed on the surface of target cells (TC) were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy depending on the time of interaction with TC. Three types of lymphocytes were revealed: type I - cells of spherical shape with a smooth surface or an insignificant amount of microvilli; predominantly small and medium-sized lymphocytes contacting TC with non significant involvement of their surface or by several microvilli; type II - oval or round-shaped lymphocytes evenly covered with microvilli with considerably enlarged region of contact; type III cells - predominantly large lymphocytes and lymphoblasts flattened (spread) on TC, with multiple microvilli, ridge-like projections, and ruffles on their surface. TEM revealed activation of the secretory apparatus in the cytoplasm of such lymphocytes. With increased time of interaction, type III cells increase in number (from 8.6% after 10 min to 90.2% after 60 min of incubation). Memory cells show no morphologic signs of secretion in correlation with the absence of lysis of TC on which they are adsorbed. The surface of the lymphocytes adsorbed on the substrate with poly-L-lysin is not noticeably altered. It is suggested that 3 morphological types of lymphocytes correspond to 3 stages of secretion activation. Lymphocyte contact with TC surface is evidently a specific stimulus for activating secretory apparatus of CTL. SEM can be used for quantitation of activated lymphocytes.

  8. Guanidination of notexin alters its membrane-damaging activity in response to sphingomyelin and cholesterol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pei-Hsiu Kao; Yi-Ling Chiou; Shinne-Ren Lin; Long-Sen Chang

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the contribution of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of notexin to its ability to perturb membranes, comparative studies on the interaction of notexin and guanidinated notexin (Gu-notexin) with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC), EYPC/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) and EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles were conducted. EYSM notably reduced the membrane-damaging activity of notexin against EYPC vesicles, but had an insignificant influence on that of Gu-notexin. Unlike the effects noted with notexin, inactivation of PLA2 activity by EDTA led to a reduction in the ability of Gu-notexin to induce EYPC/EYSM vesicle leakage and to increase Gu-notexin-induced membrane permeability of EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles. The geometrical arrangement of notexin and Gu-notexin in contact with either EYPC/EYSM vesicles or EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles differed. Moreover, global conformation of notexin and Gu-notexin differed in either Ca2+-bound or metal-free states. These results indicate that notexin and Gu-notexin could induce membrane permeability without the involvement of PLA2 activity, and suggest that guanidination alters the membrane-bound mode of notexin on damaging phospholipid vesicles containing sphingomyelin and cholesterol.

  9. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela K. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Methods: Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. Results: The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Conclusions: Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  10. Functional insights into modulation of BKCa channel activity to alter myometrial contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A Lorca

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa is an important regulator of membrane excitability in a wide variety of cells and tissues. In myometrial smooth muscle, activation of BKCa plays essential roles in buffering contractility to maintain uterine quiescence during pregnancy and in the transition to a more contractile state at the onset of labor. Multiple mechanisms of modulation have been described to alter BKCa channel activity, expression, and cellular localization. In the myometrium, BKCa is regulated by alternative splicing, protein targeting to the plasma membrane, compartmentation in membrane microdomains, and posttranslational modifications. In addition, interaction with auxiliary proteins (i.e., β1- and β2-subunits, association with G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways, such as those activated by adrenergic and oxytocin receptors, and hormonal regulation provide further mechanisms of variable modulation of BKCa channel function in myometrial smooth muscle. Here, we provide an overview of these mechanisms of BKCa channel modulation and provide a context for them in relation to myometrial function.

  11. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-08-15

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapid goal-directed task with ankle dorsiflexion and were tested 1 day later with elbow flexion (transfer). The rest did not perform any ankle practice and only performed the task with elbow flexion. The goal-directed task consisted of rapid movement (180 ms) to match a spatiotemporal target. For each limb, we recorded the EMG burst activity of the primary agonist and antagonist muscles. The rate of improvement during task acquisition (practice) was similar for young and older adults (P > 0.3). In contrast, only young adults were able to transfer the task to the upper limb. Specifically, young adults who practiced ankle dorsiflexion exhibited ∼30% (P movement error and ∼60% (P adults who received equal practice and young adults who did not receive any ankle dorsiflexion practice. These results provide novel evidence that the deficient motor learning in older adults may be related to a differential activation of the antagonist muscle, which compromises their ability to acquire the task during practice.

  12. Acrylamide alters glycogen content and enzyme activities in the liver of juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Renata; Rajkovic, Vesna; Koledin, Ivana; Matavulj, Milica

    2015-10-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is spontaneously formed in carbohydrate-rich food during high-temperature processing. It is neurotoxic and potentially cancer causing chemical. Its harmful effects on the liver, especially in a young organism, are still to be elucidated. The study aimed to examine main liver histology, its glycogen content and enzyme activities in juvenile rats treated with 25 or 50mg/kg bw of AA for 3 weeks. Liver samples were fixed in formalin, routinely processed for paraffin embedding, sectioning and histochemical staining. Examination of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections showed an increase in the volume of hepatocytes, their nuclei and cytoplasm in both AA-treated groups compared to the control. In Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained sections in low-dose group was noticed glycogen reduction, while in high-dose group was present its accumulation compared to the control, respectively. Serum analysis showed increased activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decreased activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in both AA-treated groups, while the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was increased in low-dose, but decreased in high-dose group compared to the control, respectively. Present results suggest a prominent hepatotoxic potential of AA which might alter the microstructural features and functional status in hepatocytes of immature liver.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS)-Related Gene Expression Between Hypertensive and Normotensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Chad R.; Khurana, Sandhya; Nguyen, Phong; Byrne, Collin J.; Tai, T.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is physiologically important for blood pressure regulation. Altered regulation of RAS-related genes has been observed in an animal model of hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats – SHRs). The current understanding of certain RAS-related gene expression differences between Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and SHRs is either limited or has not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare the regulation of key RAS-related genes in the kidneys of adult WKYs and SHRs. Material/Methods Coronal sections were dissected through the hilus of kidneys from 16-week-old male WKYs and SHRs. RT-PCR analysis was performed for Ace, Ace2, Agt, Agtr1a, Agtr1b, Agtr2, Atp6ap2 (PRR), Mas1, Ren, Rnls, and Slc12a3 (NCC). Results Increased mRNA expression was observed for Ace, Ace2, Agt, Agtr1a, Agtr1b, and Atp6ap2 in SHRs compared to WKYs. Mas1, Ren, Slc12a3, and Rnls showed no difference in expression between animal types. Conclusions This study shows that the upregulation of several key RAS-related genes in the kidney may account for the increased blood pressure of adult SHRs. PMID:28138124

  14. Latest Advances Towards Ras Inhibition: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautier, Brice; Nising, Carl F; Wortmann, Lars

    2016-12-23

    Owing to their high occurrence rate across many human cancers and their lack of druggability so far, mutant forms of the signaling protein Ras are currently among the most attractive (and elusive) oncology targets. This strong appeal explains the sustained effort in the field, and the ensuing progress has rekindled optimism regarding the discovery of Ras inhibitors. In this Minireview, we discuss the most recent advances towards irreversible inhibitors, and highlight approaches to inhibitors of Ras-effector interactions that have been overshadowed by the current focus on direct Ras inhibition. At the same time, we provide a critical assessment from a medicinal chemistry perspective.

  15. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  16. Genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Chul; Kang, Tae Woong; Lee, Jin Oh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studied the alteration of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. We found that alteration of Rb gene, APC were 33 %, 13 % respectively. But alterations of oncogenes such as myc, ras and mdm2 were rarely found. Our results suggests that HBV may act as oncogenic role in hepatocarcinogenesis instead of oncogenes. 6 figs, 2 tabs. (Author).

  17. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  18. Protein phosphatases 1 and 2A promote Raf-1 activation by regulating 14-3-3 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumot, M; Hancock, J F

    2001-07-01

    Raf-1 activation is a complex process which involves plasma membrane recruitment, phosphorylation, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions. We now show that PP1 and PP2A serine-threonine phosphatases also have a positive role in Ras dependent Raf-1 activation. General serine-threonine phosphatase inhibitors such sodium fluoride, or ss-glycerophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate, or specific PP1 and PP2A inhibitors including microcystin-LR, protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor I(1) or protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 all abrogate H-Ras and K-Ras dependent Raf-1 activation in vitro. A critical Raf-1 target residue for PP1 and PP2A is S259. Serine phosphatase inhibitors block the dephosphorylation of S259, which accompanies Raf-1 activation, and Ras dependent activation of mutant Raf259A is relatively resistant to serine phosphatase inhibitors. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrates that serine phosphatase inhibition increases the total amount of 14-3-3 and Raf-1 associated with the plasma membrane and significantly alters the distribution of 14-3-3 and Raf-1 across different plasma membrane microdomains. These observations suggest that dephosphorylation of S259 is a critical early step in Ras dependent Raf-1 activation which facilitates 14-3-3 displacement. Inhibition of PP1 and PP2A therefore causes plasma membrane accumulation of Raf-1/14-3-3 complexes which cannot be activated.

  19. Altered activation patterns by triceps surae stretch reflex pathways in acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2011-10-01

    Spinal reflexes are modified by spinal cord injury (SCI) due the loss of excitatory inputs from supraspinal structures and changes within the spinal cord. The stretch reflex is one of the simplest pathways of the central nervous system and was used presently to evaluate how inputs from primary and secondary muscle spindles interact with spinal circuits before and after spinal transection (i.e., spinalization) in 12 adult decerebrate cats. Seven cats were spinalized and allowed to recover for 1 mo (i.e., chronic spinal state), whereas 5 cats were evaluated before (i.e., intact state) and after acute spinalization (i.e., acute spinal state). Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae (TS) muscles. The force evoked by TS muscles was recorded along with the activity of several hindlimb muscles. Stretch reflexes were abolished in the acute spinal state due to an inability to activate TS muscles, such as soleus (Sol) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). In chronic spinal cats, reflex force had partly recovered but Sol and LG activity remained considerably depressed, despite the fact that injecting clonidine could recruit these muscles during locomotor-like activity. In contrast, other muscles not recruited in the intact state, most notably semitendinosus and sartorius, were strongly activated by stretching TS muscles in chronic spinal cats. Therefore, stretch reflex pathways from TS muscles to multiple hindlimb muscles undergo functional reorganization following spinalization, both acute and chronic. Altered activation patterns by stretch reflex pathways could explain some sensorimotor deficits observed during locomotion and postural corrections after SCI.

  20. Prenatal stress is a vulnerability factor for altered morphology and biological activity of microglia cells.

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    Joanna eŚlusarczyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the dysregulation of the immune system is an important factor in the development of depression. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system and a key player in innate immunity of the brain. We hypothesized that prenatal stress (an animal model of depression as a priming factor could affect microglial cells and might lead to depressive-like disturbances in adult male rat offspring. We investigated the behavioral changes (sucrose preference test, Porsolt test, the expression of C1q and CD40 mRNA and the level of microglia (Iba1 positive in 3 month old control and prenatally stressed male offspring rats. In addition, we characterized the morphological and biochemical parameters of potentially harmful (NO, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL12, CCR2, CXCR4 and beneficial (IGF-1, BDNF phenotypes in cultures of microglia obtained from the cortices of 1-2 days old control and prenatally stressed pups. The adult prenatally stressed rats showed behavioral (anhedonic- and depression-like disturbances, enhanced expression of microglial activation markers and an increased number of Iba1-immunopositive cells in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The morphology of glia was altered in cultures from prenatally stressed rats, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Moreover, in these cultures, we observed enhanced expression of CD40 and MHC II and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6. Prenatal stress significantly up-regulated levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL12 and altered expression of their receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4 while IGF-1 production was suppressed in cultures of microglia from prenatally stressed rats.Our results suggest that prenatal stress may lead to excessive microglia activation and contribute to the behavioral changes observed in depression in adulthood.

  1. A functional screen reveals an extensive layer of transcriptional and splicing control underlying RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila.

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    Dariel Ashton-Beaucage

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase RAS is among the most prevalent oncogenes. The evolutionarily conserved RAF-MEK-MAPK module that lies downstream of RAS is one of the main conduits through which RAS transmits proliferative signals in normal and cancer cells. Genetic and biochemical studies conducted over the last two decades uncovered a small set of factors regulating RAS/MAPK signaling. Interestingly, most of these were found to control RAF activation, thus suggesting a central regulatory role for this event. Whether additional factors are required at this level or further downstream remains an open question. To obtain a comprehensive view of the elements functionally linked to the RAS/MAPK cascade, we used a quantitative assay in Drosophila S2 cells to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors impacting RAS-mediated MAPK activation. The screen led to the identification of 101 validated hits, including most of the previously known factors associated to this pathway. Epistasis experiments were then carried out on individual candidates to determine their position relative to core pathway components. While this revealed several new factors acting at different steps along the pathway--including a new protein complex modulating RAF activation--we found that most hits unexpectedly work downstream of MEK and specifically influence MAPK expression. These hits mainly consist of constitutive splicing factors and thereby suggest that splicing plays a specific role in establishing MAPK levels. We further characterized two representative members of this group and surprisingly found that they act by regulating mapk alternative splicing. This study provides an unprecedented assessment of the factors modulating RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila. In addition, it suggests that pathway output does not solely rely on classical signaling events, such as those controlling RAF activation, but also on the regulation of MAPK levels. Finally, it indicates that core splicing

  2. OA01.48. Prativish chincha ras in the management of Dhatura poising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dhatura is an important deliriant poison grouped under sthavara upavisha and phalavisha. It affects the Central Nervous system. Dhatura is important ingredient of large number of medicinal formulations. In the Ayurvedic text,, Basavarajeeyam, Chincha Rasa (Tamarind) has been described to be possessing antidote action to counter toxicity of Dhatura. This study attempts to establish the activity and mechanism of action of chincha rasa against toxic effects of Dhatura by means of chemical analysis. Method: 1) Collection of drugs, 2) Authentication of three drugs in Govt. authorised institute, 3) i) Preparation of Chincha rasa (According to charaka), ii) Preparation of Chincha pakwa phal (According to Sharangdhar), 4) Physical and Chemical study of Dhatur seed, i) Preparation of Dhatur Churna (According to Sharangdhar) and Analytical Study of three drugs, 5) Methods of determination of an antidote. Result: Laboratory experiments were carried out to obtain values of specific parameters for Dhatur seeds, chincha patra ras (tamarind leafe juice) and chincha pakwa phal (ripe tamarind fruit). Conclusion: On the basis of observations and results found in chemical study and reported literature, the study came with the following conclusions. 1) The chincha patra rasa and Chincha pakwa phal rasa both contain Hordenine which has the antibacterial activity and stimulates the central nervous system providing relief from unquenchable thirst, muttering and delirium (indistinct and inaudible words unsteady gait) 2) Because of tannins, Chinchapatra ras and Chincha pakwaphal ras have astringent property, which counteract the toxic symptoms of Dhatur like dermatitis, rash and exfoliation of the skin. 3) Because of glycosides and tannins, chincha patra rasa and chincha pakwaphal have diuretic property which counteract the toxic symptoms of dhatura like urinary retention and inability to pass urine. 4) The tartaric acid present in chincha patra ras and chincha pakwaphal ras

  3. BRAF, K-ras and BAT26 mutations in colorectal polyps and stool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Min Jin; Bao-Jie Li; Bo Qu; Ya-Ju Du

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility of using BRAF, K-ras and BAT26 genes as stool-based molecular markers for detection of colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs).METHODS: We applied PCR-SSCP and direct sequencing to detect BRAF mutations of polyps and paired stool samples. Primer-mediated restriction fragment lengthpolymorphism (RFLP) analysis and mutant-enriched PCR were used in detection of K-ras mutations of polyp tissues and paired stool samples respectively. BAT26, a microsatellite instability marker was examined by detection of small unstable alleles in a poly (A) repeat. RESULTS: No genetic alterations were detected in the 36 colonoscopically normal patients in either tissues or stools. BRAF, K-ras and BAT26 mutations were found in 4 (16%), 10 (40%) and 3 (12%) of 25 adenoma tissues and among them, 75%, 80% and 100% of patients were observed to contain the same mutations in their corresponding stool samples. In HPs, mutations of BRAF and K-fas were detected in the tumor DNA of 2 (11.1%) and 8 (33.3%) of 18 patients respectively, all of whom had identical alterations in their stools. Taken together, the three genetic markers detected 15 (60%) of 25 adenomas and 8 (44.4%) of 18 HPs. The sensitivity of stool detection was 80% for adenomas and 100% for HPs with an overall specificity of 92% for adenomas and 100% for HPs. CONCLUSION: BRAF, K-ras and BAT26 genes have the potential to be molecular markers for colorectal adenomas and HPs, and can be used as non-invasive screening markers for colorectal polyps.

  4. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Emanuele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein (αSyn interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  5. Activating Akt1 mutations alter DNA double strand break repair and radiosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeck, S.; Al-Refae, K.; Riffkin, H.; Wiel, G.; Handrick, R.; Klein, D.; Iliakis, G.; Jendrossek, V.

    2017-01-01

    The survival kinase Akt has clinical relevance to radioresistance. However, its contributions to the DNA damage response, DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis remain poorly defined and often contradictory. We used a genetic approach to explore the consequences of genetic alterations of Akt1 for the cellular radiation response. While two activation-associated mutants with prominent nuclear access, the phospho-mimicking Akt1-TDSD and the clinically relevant PH-domain mutation Akt1-E17K, accelerated DSB repair and improved survival of irradiated Tramp-C1 murine prostate cancer cells and Akt1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts in vitro, the classical constitutively active membrane-targeted myrAkt1 mutant had the opposite effects. Interestingly, DNA-PKcs directly phosphorylated Akt1 at S473 in an in vitro kinase assay but not vice-versa. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PKcs or Akt restored radiosensitivity in tumour cells expressing Akt1-E17K or Akt1-TDSD. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated radioresistance depends on its activation state and nuclear localization and is accessible to pharmacologic inhibition. PMID:28209968

  6. Interleukin-15 modulates adipose tissue by altering mitochondrial mass and activity.

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    Nicole G Barra

    Full Text Available Interleukin-15 (IL-15 is an immunomodulatory cytokine that affects body mass regulation independent of lymphocytes; however, the underlying mechanism(s involved remains unknown. In an effort to investigate these mechanisms, we performed metabolic cage studies, assessed intestinal bacterial diversity and macronutrient absorption, and examined adipose mitochondrial activity in cultured adipocytes and in lean IL-15 transgenic (IL-15tg, overweight IL-15 deficient (IL-15-/-, and control C57Bl/6 (B6 mice. Here we show that differences in body weight are not the result of differential activity level, food intake, or respiratory exchange ratio. Although intestinal microbiota differences between obese and lean individuals are known to impact macronutrient absorption, differing gut bacteria profiles in these murine strains does not translate to differences in body weight in colonized germ free animals and macronutrient absorption. Due to its contribution to body weight variation, we examined mitochondrial factors and found that IL-15 treatment in cultured adipocytes resulted in increased mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased lipid deposition. Lastly, IL-15tg mice have significantly elevated mitochondrial activity and mass in adipose tissue compared to B6 and IL-15-/- mice. Altogether, these results suggest that IL-15 is involved in adipose tissue regulation and linked to altered mitochondrial function.

  7. Lidocaine alters the input resistance and evokes neural activity in crayfish sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keceli, M B; Purali, N

    2007-03-01

    Lidocaine, a use-dependent Na(+) channel blocker, paradoxically evokes neural activation in the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish at 5-10 mmol/l concentration. For elucidating the underlying mechanisms of this paradoxical effect, a series of conventional electrophysiological experiments were performed in the stretch receptor neurons of crayfish. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, lidocaine did not evoke impulse activity, however, a slowly developing and dose-dependent depolarization occurred in both the rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors. Similar effects were observed by perfusion of equivalent concentrations of benzocaine but not of procaine or prilocaine. Lidocaine did not evoke neural activity in the rapidly adapting neuron which fires action potential(s) in response to rapid changes in membrane potential. Slowly developing mode of the depolarization indicated the reason why only depolarization but not action potential responses were observed in the rapidly adapting neuron. The depolarizing effect of lidocaine was independent from any ionic channel or exchanger system. However, lidocaine and benzocaine but not procaine and prilocaine evoked a dose-dependent alteration in the input resistance of the neuron. It was proposed that the principal mechanism of the effect could stem from a change in the physical properties of the neuronal membrane.

  8. Ablation of p120-Catenin Altering the Activity of Small GTPase in Human Lung Cancer Cells

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    Nan LIU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective p120-catenin (p120ctn, a member of the Armadillo gene family, has emerged as an important modulator of small GTPase activities. Therefore, it plays novel roles in tumor malignant phenotype, such as invasion and metastasis, whose mechanism are not well clarified yet. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of p120ctn on the regulation of small GTP family members in lung cancer and the effects to lung cancer invasions andmetastasis. Methods After p120ctn was knocked down by siRNA, in vivo and in vitro analysis was applied to investigate the role and possible mechanism of p120ctn in lung cancer, such as Western Blot, pull-down analysis, and nude mice models. Results p120ctn depletion inactivated RhoA, with the the activity of Cdc42 and Rac1 increased, the invasiveness of lung cancer cells was promoted both in vitro and in vivo . Conclusion p120ctn gene knockdown enhances the metastasis of lung cancer cells, probably by altering expression of small GTPase, such as inactivation of RhoA and activation of Cdc42/Rac1.

  9. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Marco; Esposito, Alessandro; Camerini, Serena; Antonucci, Flavia; Ferrara, Silvia; Seghezza, Silvia; Catelani, Tiziano; Crescenzi, Marco; Marotta, Roberto; Canale, Claudio; Matteoli, Michela; Menna, Elisabetta; Chieregatti, Evelina

    2016-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein (αSyn) interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  10. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  11. Elimination of Rubisco alters the regulation of nitrogenase activity and increases hydrogen production in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yaoping [State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Welch, Emily; Roberts, Gary P. [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Li, Jilun [State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Nitrogenase not only reduces atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, but also reduces protons to hydrogen (H{sub 2}). The nitrogenase system is the primary means of H{sub 2} production under photosynthetic and nitrogen-limiting conditions in many photosynthetic bacteria, including Rhodospirillum rubrum. The efficiency of this biological H{sub 2} production largely depends on the nitrogenase enzyme and the availability of ATP and electrons in the cell. Previous studies showed that blockage of the CO{sub 2} fixation pathway in R. rubrum induced nitrogenase activity even in the presence of ammonium, presumably to remove excess reductant in the cell. We report here the re-characterization of cbbM mutants in R. rubrum to study the effect of Rubisco on H{sub 2} production. Our newly constructed cbbM mutants grew poorly in malate medium under anaerobic conditions. However, the introduction of constitutively active NifA (NifA*), the transcriptional activator of the nitrogen fixation (nif) genes, allows cbbM mutants to dissipate the excess reductant through the nitrogenase system and improves their growth. Interestingly, we found that the deletion of cbbM alters the posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase activity, resulting in partially active nitrogenase in the presence of ammonium. The combination of mutations in nifA, draT and cbbM greatly increased H{sub 2} production of R. rubrum, especially in the presence of excess of ammonium. Furthermore, these mutants are able to produce H{sub 2} over a much longer time frame than the wild type, increasing the potential of these recombinant strains for the biological production of H{sub 2}. (author)

  12. Altered frontocingulate activation during aversive interoceptive processing in young adults transitioning to problem stimulant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lorraine Stewart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with stimulant use have been linked to frontocingulate, insular, and thalamic dysfunction during decision-making and alterations in interoceptive processing. However, little is known about how interoception and decision-making interact and contribute to dysfunctions that promote the transition from recreational drug use to abuse or dependence. Here, we investigate brain activation in response to reward, punishment, and uncertainty during an aversive interoceptive challenge in current and former stimulant (cocaine and amphetamine users using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Young adults previously identified as recreational users (n=184 were followed up three years later. Of these, 18 individuals progressed to problem stimulant use (PSU, whereas 15 desisted stimulant use (DSU. PSU, DSU, and 14 healthy comparison subjects (CTL performed a two-choice prediction task at three fixed error rates (20%=reward, 50%=uncertainty, 80%=punishment during which they anticipated and experienced episodes of inspiratory breathing load. Although groups did not differ in insula activation or subjective breathing load ratings, PSU exhibited lower right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and bilateral anterior cingulate (ACC activation than DSU and CTL during aversive interoceptive processing as well as lower right IFG in response to decision making involving uncertainty. However, PSU exhibited greater bilateral IFG activation than DSU and CTL while making choices within the context of punishing feedback, and both PSU and DSU showed lower thalamic activation during breathing load than CTL. Findings suggest that frontocingulate attenuation, reflecting reduced resources devoted to goal maintenance and action selection in the presence of uncertainty and interoceptive perturbations, may be a biomarker for susceptibility to problem stimulant use.

  13. Cortisol’s effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, Heather C.; Jahn, Allison L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered...

  14. SCD1 Expression is dispensable for hepatocarcinogenesis induced by AKT and Ras oncogenes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Increased de novo lipogenesis is one of the major metabolic events in cancer. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, de novo lipogenesis has been found to be increased and associated with the activation of AKT/mTOR signaling. In mice, overexpression of an activated form of AKT results in increased lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis, ultimately leading to liver tumor development. Hepatocarcinogenesis is dramatically accelerated when AKT is co-expressed with an oncogenic form of N-Ras. SCD1, the major isoform of stearoyl-CoA desaturases, catalyzing the conversion of saturated fatty acids (SFA into monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, is a key enzyme involved in de novo lipogenesis. While many studies demonstrated the requirement of SCD1 for tumor cell growth in vitro, whether SCD1 is necessary for tumor development in vivo has not been previously investigated. Here, we show that genetic ablation of SCD1 neither inhibits lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis in AKT-overexpressing mice nor affects liver tumor development in mice co-expressing AKT and Ras oncogenes. Molecular analysis showed that SCD2 was strongly upregulated in liver tumors from AKT/Ras injected SCD1(-/- mice. Noticeably, concomitant silencing of SCD1 and SCD2 genes was highly detrimental for the growth of AKT/Ras cells in vitro. Altogether, our study provides the evidence, for the first time, that SCD1 expression is dispensable for AKT/mTOR-dependent hepatic steatosis and AKT/Ras-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Complete inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity may be required to efficiently suppress liver tumor development.

  15. Combination of a Selective HSP90α/β Inhibitor and a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitor Triggers Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

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    Rikio Suzuki

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein (HSP90 inhibitors have shown significant anti-tumor activities in preclinical settings in both solid and hematological tumors. We previously reported that the novel, orally available HSP90α/β inhibitor TAS-116 shows significant anti-MM activities. In this study, we further examined the combination effect of TAS-116 with a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitor in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM cell lines. TAS-116 monotherapy significantly inhibited growth of RAS-mutated MM cell lines and was associated with decreased expression of downstream target proteins of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, TAS-116 showed synergistic growth inhibitory effects with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib, the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor selumetinib. Importantly, treatment with these inhibitors paradoxically enhanced p-C-Raf, p-MEK, and p-ERK activity, which was abrogated by TAS-116. TAS-116 also enhanced dabrafenib-induced MM cytotoxicity associated with mitochondrial damage-induced apoptosis, even in the BRAF-mutated U266 MM cell line. This enhanced apoptosis in RAS-mutated MM triggered by combination treatment was observed even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. Taken together, our results provide the rationale for novel combination treatment with HSP90α/β inhibitor and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitors to improve outcomes in patients with in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM.

  16. Combination of a Selective HSP90α/β Inhibitor and a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitor Triggers Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Rikio; Kikuchi, Shohei; Harada, Takeshi; Mimura, Naoya; Minami, Jiro; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sagawa, Morihiko; Gorgun, Gullu; Cirstea, Diana; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Chauhan, Dharminder; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil; Ando, Kiyoshi; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitors have shown significant anti-tumor activities in preclinical settings in both solid and hematological tumors. We previously reported that the novel, orally available HSP90α/β inhibitor TAS-116 shows significant anti-MM activities. In this study, we further examined the combination effect of TAS-116 with a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitor in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM cell lines. TAS-116 monotherapy significantly inhibited growth of RAS-mutated MM cell lines and was associated with decreased expression of downstream target proteins of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, TAS-116 showed synergistic growth inhibitory effects with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib, the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor selumetinib. Importantly, treatment with these inhibitors paradoxically enhanced p-C-Raf, p-MEK, and p-ERK activity, which was abrogated by TAS-116. TAS-116 also enhanced dabrafenib-induced MM cytotoxicity associated with mitochondrial damage-induced apoptosis, even in the BRAF-mutated U266 MM cell line. This enhanced apoptosis in RAS-mutated MM triggered by combination treatment was observed even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. Taken together, our results provide the rationale for novel combination treatment with HSP90α/β inhibitor and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitors to improve outcomes in patients with in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM.

  17. A Functional Screen Reveals an Extensive Layer of Transcriptional and Splicing Control Underlying RAS/MAPK Signaling in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton-Beaucage, Dariel; Udell, Christian M.; Gendron, Patrick; Sahmi, Malha; Lefrançois, Martin; Baril, Caroline; Guenier, Anne-Sophie; Duchaine, Jean; Lamarre, Daniel; Lemieux, Sébastien; Therrien, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase RAS is among the most prevalent oncogenes. The evolutionarily conserved RAF-MEK-MAPK module that lies downstream of RAS is one of the main conduits through which RAS transmits proliferative signals in normal and cancer cells. Genetic and biochemical studies conducted over the last two decades uncovered a small set of factors regulating RAS/MAPK signaling. Interestingly, most of these were found to control RAF activation, thus suggesting a central regulatory role for this event. Whether additional factors are required at this level or further downstream remains an open question. To obtain a comprehensive view of the elements functionally linked to the RAS/MAPK cascade, we used a quantitative assay in Drosophila S2 cells to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors impacting RAS-mediated MAPK activation. The screen led to the identification of 101 validated hits, including most of the previously known factors associated to this pathway. Epistasis experiments were then carried out on individual candidates to determine their position relative to core pathway components. While this revealed several new factors acting at different steps along the pathway—including a new protein complex modulating RAF activation—we found that most hits unexpectedly work downstream of MEK and specifically influence MAPK expression. These hits mainly consist of constitutive splicing factors and thereby suggest that splicing plays a specific role in establishing MAPK levels. We further characterized two representative members of this group and surprisingly found that they act by regulating mapk alternative splicing. This study provides an unprecedented assessment of the factors modulating RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila. In addition, it suggests that pathway output does not solely rely on classical signaling events, such as those controlling RAF activation, but also on the regulation of MAPK levels. Finally, it indicates that core splicing components can also

  18. Defined spatiotemporal features of RAS-ERK signals dictate cell fate in MCF-7 mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana; Casar, Berta; Colón-Bolea, Paula; Agudo-Ibáñez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Signals conveyed through the RAS-ERK pathway are essential for the determination of cell fate. It is well established that signal variability is achieved in the different microenvironments in which signals unfold. It is also known that signal duration is critical for decisions concerning cell commitment. However, it is unclear how RAS-ERK signals integrate time and space in order to elicit a given biological response. To investigate this, we used MCF-7 cells, in which EGF-induced transient ERK activation triggers proliferation, whereas sustained ERK activation in response to heregulin leads to adipocytic differentiation. We found that both proliferative and differentiating signals emanate exclusively from plasma membrane–disordered microdomains. Of interest, the EGF signal can be transformed into a differentiating stimulus by HRAS overexpression, which prolongs ERK activation, but only if HRAS localizes at disordered membrane. On the other hand, HRAS signals emanating from the Golgi complex induce apoptosis and can prevent heregulin-induced differentiation. Our results indicate that within the same cellular context, RAS can exert different, even antagonistic, effects, depending on its sublocalization. Thus cell destiny is defined by the ability of a stimulus to activate RAS at the appropriate sublocalization for an adequate period while avoiding switching on opposing RAS signals. PMID:27099370

  19. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suyeon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Quignard-Boulange, Annie [Centre Biomedical des Cordeliers, Paris, France; Massiera, Florence [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Teboul, Michele [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Ailhaud, Gerard [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Kim, Jung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moustaid-Moussa, Naima [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Voy, Brynn H [ORNL

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  20. Stabilization of dendritic spine clusters and hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling predict enhanced motor learning in an autistic savant mouse model

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    Ryan Thomas Ash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available That both prominent behavioral inflexibility and exceptional learning abilities are seen occasionally in autistic patients is a mystery. We hypothesize that these altered patterns of learning and memory can arise from a pathological imbalance between the stability and plasticity of internal neural representations. We evaluated this hypothesis in the mouse model of MECP2 duplication syndrome, which demonstrates enhanced motor learning, stereotyped behaviors, and social avoidance. Learning-associated structural plasticity was measured in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice by 2-photon imaging (Fig. 1A. An increased stabilization rate of learning-associated dendritic spines was observed in mutants, and this correlated with rotarod performance. Analysis of the spatial distribution of stabilized spines revealed that the mutant’s increased spine stabilization was due to a specific increase in the stability of spines jointly formed in ~9-micron clusters. Clustered spine stabilization but not isolated spine stabilization predicted enhanced motor performance in MECP2 duplication mice (Fig. 1B. Biochemical assays of Ras-MAPK and mTOR pathway activation demonstrated profound hyperphosphorylation of MAPK in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice with motor training (Fig. 1C. Taken together these data suggest that a pathological bias towards hyperstability of learning-associated dendritic spine clusters driven by hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling could contribute to neurobehavioral phenotypes in this form of syndromic autism.

  1. Alteration of phospholipase D activity in the rat tissues by irradiation

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    Choi, M. S. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, Y. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Choi, M. U. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Natural Sciences

    1997-09-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline. Recently, PLD has been drawing much attentions and considered to be associated with cancer process since it is involved in cellular signal transduction. In this experiment, oleate-PLD activities were measured in various tissues of the living rats after whole body irradiation. The reaction mixture for the PLD assay contained 0.1{mu}Ci 1,2-di[1-{sup 14}C]palmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, 0.5mM phosphatidylcholine, 5mM sodium oleate, 0.2% taurodeoxycholate, 50mM HEPES buffer(pH 6.5), 10mM CaCl{sub 2}, and 25mM KF. phosphatidic acid, the reaction product, was separated by TLC and its radioactivity was measured with a scintillation counter. The whole body irradiation was given to the female Wistar rats via Cobalt 60 Teletherapy with field size of 10cm x 10cm and an exposure of 2.7Gy per minute to the total doses of 10Gy and 25Gy. Among the tissues examined, PLD activity in lung was the highest one and was followed by kidney, skeletal muscle, brain, spleen, bone marrow, thymus, and liver. Upon irradiation, alteration of PLD activity was observed in thymus, spleen, lung, and bone marrow. Especially PLD activities of the spleen and thymus revealed the highest sensitivity toward {gamma}-ray with more than two times amplification in their activities. In contrast, the PLD activity of bone marrow appears to be reduced to nearly 30%. Irradiation effect was hardly detected in liver which showed the lowest PLD activity. The PLD activities affected most sensitively by the whole-body irradiation seem to be associated with organs involved in immunity and hematopoiesis. This observation strongly indicates that the PLD is closely related to the physiological function of these organs. Furthermore, radiation stress could offer an important means to explore the phenomena covering from cell proliferation to cell death on these organs. (author).

  2. Reproductive experience alters neural and behavioural responses to acute oestrogen receptor α activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, E M; Casey, K; Carini, L M; Bridges, R S

    2013-12-01

    demonstrate that reproductive experience alters the behavioural response to acute ERα activation. Moreover, the findings suggest that central regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis is modified as a consequence of reproductive experience.

  3. Lingual muscle activity across sleep-wake states in rats with surgically altered upper airway

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    Irma eRukhadze

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG, geniohyoid (GH and hyoglossus (HG. This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (EMG and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied 5 rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during SWS was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway (8.6% ±0.7(SE vs. 6.2% ±0.7 of the mean during wakefulness; p=0.012. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway.

  4. Paracetamol Supplementation Does Not Alter The Antitumor Activity and Lung Toxicity of Bleomycin

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    Ghada M. Suddek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin (BLM is well known by its antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, pulmonary fibrosis has been considered the dose limiting toxicity of the drug. Hyperpyrexia following injection of BLM was reported thus, paracetamol is sometimes administered with BLM as antipyretic drug. Actually, paracetamol was found to interfere with cytotoxicity of some drugs. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of paracetamol administration on the antitumor and lung toxicity of BLM. The antitumor activity was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC cells. Paracetamol did not alter the antitumor effect of BLM in vitro or in vivo. The lung toxicity of BLM was evidenced by decrease in the body weight, increase in the lung/body weight ratio, decrease in the response of pulmonary arterial rings to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and increase in the contractility of tracheal smooth muscles induced by acetylcholine (ACh. The toxicity was also confirmed biochemically by marked increases in hydroxyproline and lipid peroxidation in rat lung and the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH level. Pretreatment with paracetamol did not significantly change lipid peroxidation, GSH level, percent survival of rats or the response of pulmonary arterial rings and tracheal smooth muscles to 5-HT and ACh respectively. The results of the present study indicated that paracetamol neither modified the antitumor effect of BLM nor changed drug-induced lung toxicity.

  5. The impact of initiation: Early onset marijuana smokers demonstrate altered Stroop performance and brain activation

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    K.A. Sagar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana (MJ use is on the rise, particularly among teens and emerging adults. This poses serious public health concern, given the potential deleterious effects of MJ on the developing brain. We examined 50 chronic MJ smokers divided into early onset (regular MJ use prior to age 16; n = 24 and late onset (age 16 or later; n = 26, and 34 healthy control participants (HCs. All completed a modified Stroop Color Word Test during fMRI. Results demonstrated that MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance on the Interference subtest of the Stroop, as well as altered patterns of activation in the cingulate cortex relative to HCs. Further, early onset MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance relative to both HCs and late onset smokers. Additionally, earlier age of MJ onset as well as increased frequency and magnitude (grams/week of MJ use were predictive of poorer Stroop performance. fMRI results revealed that while late onset smokers demonstrated a more similar pattern of activation to the control group, a different pattern was evident in the early onset group. These findings underscore the importance of assessing age of onset and patterns of MJ use and support the need for widespread education and intervention efforts among youth.

  6. Altering the interfacial activation mechanism of a lipase by solid-phase selective chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Abian, Olga; Guisán, Jose Manuel

    2012-09-04

    This study presents a combined protein immobilization, directed mutagenesis, and site-selective chemical modification approach, which was used to create a hyperactivated semisynthetic variant of BTL2. Various alkane chains were tethered at three different positions in order to mimic the lipase interfacial activation exogenously triggered by detergents. Optimum results were obtained when a dodecane chain was introduced at position 320 by solid-phase site-selective chemical modification. The resulting semisynthetic variant showed a 2.5-fold higher activity than the wild-type nonmodified variant in aqueous conditions. Remarkably, this is the maximum hyperactivation ever observed for BTL2 in the presence of detergents such as Triton X-100. We present evidence to suggest that the endogenous dodecane chain hyperactivates the enzyme in a similar fashion as an exogenous detergent molecule. In this way, we also observe a faster irreversible enzyme inhibition and an altered detergent sensitivity profile promoted by the site-selective chemical modification. These findings are also supported by fluorescence studies, which reveal that the structural conformation changes of the semisynthetic variant are different to those of the wild type, an effect that is more pronounced in the presence of detergent. Finally, the optimal immobilized semisynthetic variant was successfully applied to the selective synthesis of oxiran-2-yl butyrate. Significantly, this biocatalyst is 12-fold more efficient than the immobilized wild-type enzyme, producing the S-enantiomer with higher enantiospecificity (ee = 92%).

  7. Altered protoxin activation by midgut enzymes from a Bacillus thuringiensis resistant strain of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D E; MacIntosh, S C; McGaughey, W H

    1994-02-15

    Processing of Bacillus thuringiensis protoxins to toxins by midgut proteinases from a strain of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner), resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies entomocidus (HD-198) was slower than that by midgut proteinases from the susceptible parent strain or a strain resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1, Dipel). Midgut extracts from entomocidus-resistant insects exhibited five-fold lower activity toward the synthetic substrate alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine rho-nitroanilide than extracts from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects. Midgut enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects converted the 133 kDa CryIA(c) protoxin to 61-63 kDa proteins, while incubations with entomocidus-resistant enzymes resulted in predominantly products of intermediate size, even with increased amounts of midgut extract. The 61-63 kDa proteins were only produced by entomocidus-resistant midgut extracts after long term incubations with the protoxin. The data suggest that altered protoxin activation by midgut proteinases is involved in some types of insect resistance to B. thuringiensis.

  8. Altered regional and circuit resting-state activity associated with unilateral hearing loss.

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    Xingchao Wang

    Full Text Available The deprivation of sensory input after hearing damage results in functional reorganization of the brain including cross-modal plasticity in the sensory cortex and changes in cognitive processing. However, it remains unclear whether partial deprivation from unilateral auditory loss (UHL would similarly affect the neural circuitry of cognitive processes in addition to the functional organization of sensory cortex. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate intrinsic activity in 34 participants with UHL from acoustic neuroma in comparison with 22 matched normal controls. In sensory regions, we found decreased regional homogeneity (ReHo in the bilateral calcarine cortices in UHL. However, there was an increase of ReHo in the right anterior insular cortex (rAI, the key node of cognitive control network (CCN and multimodal sensory integration, as well as in the left parahippocampal cortex (lPHC, a key node in the default mode network (DMN. Moreover, seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis showed an enhanced relationship between rAI and several key regions of the DMN. Meanwhile, lPHC showed more negative relationship with components in the CCN and greater positive relationship in the DMN. Such reorganizations of functional connectivity within the DMN and between the DMN and CCN were confirmed by a graph theory analysis. These results suggest that unilateral sensory input damage not only alters the activity of the sensory areas but also reshapes the regional and circuit functional organization of the cognitive control network.

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists (GLP-1RAs) in the Brain-Adipocyte Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloneze, Bruno; de Lima-Júnior, José Carlos; Velloso, Lício A

    2017-02-23

    The complexity of neural circuits that control food intake and energy balance in the hypothalamic nuclei explains some of the constraints involved in the prevention and treatment of obesity. Two major neuronal populations present in the arcuate nucleus control caloric intake and energy expenditure: one population co-expresses orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y and the other expresses the anorexigenic anorectic neuropeptides proopiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (POMC/CART). In addition to integrating signals from neurotransmitters and hormones, the hypothalamic systems that regulate energy homeostasis are affected by nutrients. Fat-rich diets, for instance, elicit hypothalamic inflammation (reactive activation and proliferation of microglia, a condition named gliosis). This process generates resistance to the anorexigenic hormones leptin and insulin, contributing to the genesis of obesity. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) have increasingly been used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. One compound (liraglutide) was recently approved for the treatment of obesity. Although most studies suggest that GLP-1RAs promote weight loss mainly due to their inhibitory effect on food intake, other central effects that have been described for native GLP-1 and some GLP-1RAs in rodents and humans encourage future clinical trials to explore additional mechanisms that potentially underlie the beneficial effects observed with this drug class. In this article we review the most relevant data exploring the mechanisms involved in the effects of GLP-1RAs in the brain-adipocyte axis.

  10. Parental exposure to medications and hydrocarbons and ras mutations in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, X.O.; Perentesis, J.P.; Wen, W.Q.; Buckley, J.D.; Boyle, E.; Ross, J.A.; Robison, L.L. [Childrens Oncology Group, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Using data from a large case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; age < 15 years), we used a case-case comparison approach to examine whether reported parental exposure to hydrocarbons at work or use of specific medications are related to ras gene mutations in the leukemia cells of children with ALL. We examined mutations in K-ras and N-ras genes atcodons 12, 13, and 61 by PCR and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and confirmed them by DNA sequencing. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from logistic regression to examine the association of parental exposures with ras mutations. A total of 127 (15.2%) cases had ras mutations (K-ras 4.7% and N-ras 10.68%). Both maternal (OR 3.2,95% CI 1.7-6.1) and paternal (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7) reported use of mind-altering drugs were associated with N-ras mutations. Paternal use of amphetamines or diet pills was associated with N-ras mutations (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.1-15.0). Maternal exposure to solvents (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.0-9.7) and plastic materials (OR 6.9, 95% CI 1.2-39.7) during pregnancy and plastic materials after pregnancy (OR 8.3, 95% CI 1.4-48.8) were related to K-ras mutation. Maternal over exposure to oil and coal products before case diagnosis (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.8) and during the postnatal period (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-5.5) and paternal exposure to plastic materials before index pregnancy (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.1) and other hydrocarbons during the postnatal period (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-1.3) were associated with N-ras mutations. This study suggests that parental exposure to specific chemicals may be associated with distinct ras mutations in children who develop ALL.

  11. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Fanelli, Francesca

    2011-03-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP) and S(GTP), respectively). For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP) was higher than that of S(GTP), suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP) of Gα(t), is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins), compared to GTP.

  12. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

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    Francesco Raimondi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP and S(GTP, respectively. For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP was higher than that of S(GTP, suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP of Gα(t, is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins, compared to GTP.

  13. PUF-8 negatively regulates RAS/MAPK signalling to promote differentiation of C. elegans germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Samir; Ariz, Mohd; Chaturbedi, Amaresh; Kumar, Ganga Anil; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2013-04-01

    Signals that promote germ cell self-renewal by preventing premature meiotic entry are well understood. However, signals that control mitotic proliferation to promote meiotic differentiation have not been well characterized. In Caenorhabditis elegans, GLP-1 Notch signalling promotes the proliferative fate by preventing premature meiotic entry. The germline niche cell, which is the source of the ligand for GLP-1, spatially restricts GLP-1 signalling and thus enables the germ cells that have moved away from the niche to enter meiosis. Here, we show that the suppression of RAS/MAP kinase signalling in the mitotic and meiotic-entry regions is essential for the regulation of the mitosis-meiosis switch by niche signalling. We provide evidence that the conserved PUF family RNA-binding protein PUF-8 and the RAS GAP protein GAP-3 function redundantly to suppress the LET-60 RAS in the mitotic and meiotic entry regions. Germ cells missing both PUF-8 and GAP-3 proliferate in an uncontrolled fashion and fail to undergo meiotic development. MPK-1, the MAP kinase downstream of the LET-60 RAS, is prematurely activated in these cells; downregulation of MPK-1 activation eliminates tumours and restores differentiation. Our results further reveal that PUF-8 negatively regulates LET-60 expression at a post-transcriptional step. LET-60 is misexpressed in the puf-8(-) mutant germlines and PUF-8 physically interacts with the let-60 3' UTR. Furthermore, PUF-8 suppresses let-60 3' UTR-mediated expression in the germ cells that are transitioning from the mitotic to meiotic fate. These results reveal that PUF-8-mediated inhibition of the RAS/MAPK pathway is essential for mitotic-to-meiotic fate transition.

  14. The LIM-only protein FHL2 mediates ras-induced transformation through cyclin D1 and p53 pathways.

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    Charlotte Labalette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2 has been implicated in multiple signaling pathways that regulate cell growth and tissue homeostasis. We reported previously that FHL2 regulates cyclin D1 expression and that immortalized FHL2-null mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs display reduced levels of cyclin D1 and low proliferative activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we address the contribution of FHL2 in cell transformation by investigating the effects of oncogenic Ras in FHL2-null context. We show that H-RasV12 provokes cell cycle arrest accompanied by accumulation of p53 and p16(INK4a in immortalized FHL2(-/- MEFs. These features contrast sharply with Ras transforming activity in wild type cell lines. We further show that establishment of FHL2-null cell lines differs from conventional immortalization scheme by retaining functional p19(ARF/p53 checkpoint that is required for cell cycle arrest imposed by Ras. However, after serial passages of Ras-expressing FHL2(-/- cells, dramatic increase in the levels of D-type cyclins and Rb phosphorylation correlates with the onset of cell proliferation and transformation without disrupting the p19(ARF/p53 pathway. Interestingly, primary FHL2-null cells overexpressing cyclin D1 undergo a classical immortalization process leading to loss of the p19(ARF/p53 checkpoint and susceptibility to Ras transformation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings uncover a novel aspect of cellular responses to mitogenic stimulation and illustrate a critical role of FHL2 in the signalling network that implicates Ras, cyclin D1 and p53.

  15. Cambios en el porcentaje de sodio intercambiable (PSI) y la relación de absorción de sodio (RAS) de un suelo y su influencia en la actividad y biomasa microbiana Changes specific absortion rate (SAR) and exchange sodium percentaje (ESP) of a soil and its influence on microbial activity and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A Gasca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar los cambios en el PSI, la RAS y su influencia en la actividad y biomasa microbiana del suelo, se aplicaron diversas concentraciones de vinaza como enmienda procedente de la industria de alcohol carburante, sobre un suelo afectado por sodicidad con severas limitaciones en las condiciones físicas, químicas y biológicas. Se aplicó un diseño en bloques completos al azar que incluye cuatro tratamientos y tres repeticiones, y muestreos de suelo al inicio y final del proceso a tres profundidades (0-20, 20-40 y 40-60 cm), cuyas variables de respuesta a medir fueron la respiración, C- biomasa microbiana, MO%, pH, CIC, CE, RAS y PSI. La actividad biológica (CO2) y el C-biomasa microbiana mostraron incrementos significativos en el rango ideal para el establecimento del cultivo de caña.To evaluate changes in ESP, SAR and its influence on the activity and soil microbial biomass, different concentrations of vinasse from the fuel ethanol industry as an amendment were applied on a soil affected by sodicity with strong physical, chemical and biological limitations. A randomized complete block design was used involving four treatments and three replications, which included soil sampling at the beginning and the end of the process at three different depths (0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm). Variables measured were respiration, microbial biomass C, OM%, pH, CIC, EC, SAR and ESP. Biological activity (CO2) and microbial biomass, C showed a significant increase in the ideal range for planting of sugar cane crop.

  16. Comparison of the Conformations of KRAS Isoforms, K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B, Points to Similarities and Significant Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Jang, Hyunbum; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    Human HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS genes encode four isoforms of Ras, a p21 GTPase. Mutations in KRAS account for the majority of RAS-driven cancers. The KRAS has two splice variants, K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B. Due to their reversible palmitoylation, K-Ras4A and N-Ras have bimodal signaling states. K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B differ in four catalytic domain residues (G151R/D153E/K165Q/H166Y) and in their disordered C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR). In K-Ras4A, the HVR is not as strongly positively charged as in K-Ras4B (+6e vs +9e). Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate isoform-specific differences between the two splice variants. We observe that the catalytic domain of GDP-bound K-Ras4A has a more exposed nucleotide binding pocket than K-Ras4B, and the dynamic fluctuations in switch I and II regions also differ; both factors may influence guanine-nucleotide exchange. We further observe that like K-Kas4B, full-length K-Ras4A exhibits nucleotide-dependent HVR fluctuations; however, these fluctuations differ between the GDP-bound forms of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B. Unlike K-Ras4B where the HVR tends to cover the effector binding region, in K-Ras4A, autoinhibited states are unstable. With lesser charge, the K-Ras4A HVR collapses on itself, making it less available for binding the catalytic domain. Since the HVRs of N- and H-Ras are weakly charged (+1e and +2e, respectively), autoinhibition may be a unique feature of K-Ras4B.

  17. Mechanism of E1A-mediated escape from ras-induced senescence in human fibraobIasts%E1A阻断ras诱导人成纤维细胞衰老机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亦蕾; 余乐

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of binding activities of the NH2 terminus of E1A to the proteins regulating cell growth on ras-induced cell senescence and explore the mechanism of ElA-mediated escape from ras-induced senescence by E1A in human fibroblast. Methods In primary human fibroblasts, the proteins regulating cell growth in association with E1A NH2 terminus, including the Rb family proteins, p300/CBP, and p400, were inactivated or interfered. The effect of alterations in the binding activities of these proteins on cell senescence bypass mediated by E1A was evaluated by cell growth curve. Results Inactivation of Rb family proteins alone was not sufficient to rescue ras-induced cell senescence, whereas inactivation of both the Rb proteins and p300/CBP blocked ras-induced senescence of human fibroblasts. Conclusion Rb and p300/CBP binding activities are both required for E1A to bypass ras-induced senescence in human fibroblasts.%目的 通过研究ElA氨基端细胞生长调节蛋白结合活性对其阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的影响,以明确在人类成纤维细胞ElA阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的机制.方法 采用原代培养的人类成纤维细胞,通过灭活或干扰与ElA氨基端相关的细胞生长调节蛋白,包括Rb家族蛋白、p300/CBP、p400,利用细胞生长曲线确定这些蛋白结合活性对于ElA阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的作用.结果 单纯灭活Rb家族蛋白不能阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老,而同时灭活Rb和p300/CBP即可阻断r弱诱导的细胞衰老.结论 Rb和p300/CBP的结合活性均是EIA阻断ras诱导的人成纤维细胞细胞衰老所必需的.

  18. Frequency of climbing behavior as a predictor of altered motor activity in rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Cíntia; De Lima, Thereza C M; Carobrez, Antonio de Pádua; Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene

    2008-11-14

    Previous work has shown that the frequency of climbing behavior in rats submitted to the forced swimming test (FST) correlated to the section's crosses in the open field test, which suggest it might be taken as a predictor of motor activity in rat FST. To investigate this proposal, the frequency, duration, as well as the ratio duration/frequency for each behavior expressed in the FST (immobility, swimming and climbing) were compared in animals treated with a motor stimulant, caffeine (CAF), and the antidepressant, clomipramine (CLM). Male Wistar rats were submitted to 15min of forced swimming (pre-test) and 24h later received saline (SAL, 1ml/kg, i.p.) or CAF (6.5mg/kg, i.p.) 30min prior a 5-min session (test) of FST. To validate experimental procedures, an additional group of rats received three injections of SAL (1ml/kg, i.p.) or clomipramine (CLM, 10mg/kg, i.p.) between the pre-test and test sessions. The results of the present study showed that both drugs, CLM and CAF, significantly reduced the duration of immobility and significantly increased the duration of swimming. In addition, CAF significantly decreased the ratio of immobility, and CLM significantly increased the ratio of swimming and climbing. Moreover, CLM significantly increased the duration of climbing but only CAF increased the frequency of climbing. Thus, it seems that the frequency of climbing could be a predictor of altered motor activity scored directly in the FST. Further, we believe that this parameter could be useful for fast and reliable discrimination between antidepressant drugs and stimulants of motor activity.

  19. The time course of altered brain activity during 7-day simulated microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity causes multiple changes in physical and mental levels in humans, which can induce performance deficiency among astronauts. Studying the variations in brain activity that occur during microgravity would help astronauts to deal with these changes. In the current study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI was used to observe the variations in brain activity during a 7-day head down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a common and reliable model for simulated microgravity. The amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of twenty subjects were recorded pre-head down tilt (pre-HDT, during a bed rest period (HDT0, and then each day in the HDT period (HDT1–HDT7. One-way analysis of variance of the ALFF values over these 8 days was used to test the variation across time period (P<0.05, corrected. Compared to HDT0, subjects presented lower ALFF values in the posterior cingulate cortex and higher ALFF values in the anterior cingulate cortex during the HDT period, which may partially account for the lack of cognitive flexibility and alterations in autonomic nervous system seen among astronauts in microgravity. Additionally, the observed improvement in function in CPL during the HDT period may play a compensatory role to the functional decline in the paracentral lobule to sustain normal levels of fine motor control for astronauts in a microgravity environment. Above all, those floating brain activities during 7 days of simulated microgravity may indicate that the brain self-adapts to help astronauts adjust to the multiple negative stressors encountered in a microgravity environment.

  20. Regulation of calpain activity in rat brain with altered Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averna, Monica; Stifanese, Roberto; De Tullio, Roberta; Passalacqua, Mario; Defranchi, Enrico; Salamino, Franca; Melloni, Edon; Pontremoli, Sandro

    2007-01-26

    Activation of calpain occurs as an early event in correlation with an increase in [Ca2+]i induced in rat brain upon treatment with a high salt diet for a prolonged period of time. The resulting sequential events have been monitored in the brain of normal and hypertensive rats of the Milan strain, diverging for a constitutive alteration in the level of [Ca2+]i found to be present in nerve cells of hypertensive animals. After 2 weeks of treatment, the levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase and of native calpastatin are profoundly decreased. These degradative processes, more pronounced in the brain of hypertensive rats, are progressively and efficiently compensated in the brain of both rat strains by different incoming mechanisms. Along with calpastatin degradation, 15-kDa still-active inhibitory fragments are accumulated, capable of efficiently replacing the loss of native inhibitor molecules. A partial return to a more efficient control of Ca2+ homeostasis occurs in parallel, assured by an early increase in the expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of calpastatin, both producing, after 12 weeks of a high salt (sodium) diet, the restoration of almost original levels of the Ca2+ pump and of significant amounts of native inhibitor molecules. Thus, conservative calpastatin fragmentation, associated with an increased expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of the calpain natural inhibitor, has been demonstrated to occur in vivo in rat brain. This represents a sequential adaptive response capable of overcoming the effects of calpain activation induced by a moderate long term elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  1. Molecular alterations in skeletal muscle in rheumatoid arthritis are related to disease activity, physical inactivity, and disability

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Kim M.; Jessee, Ryan; Andonian, Brian; Davis, Brittany N.; Narowski, Rachel; Huebner, Janet L; Kraus, Virginia B.; McCracken, Julie; Gilmore, Brian F.; Tune, K. Noelle; Campbell, Milton; Koves, Timothy R.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Hubal, Monica J.; Kraus, William E.

    2017-01-01

    Background To identify molecular alterations in skeletal muscle in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that may contribute to ongoing disability in RA. Methods Persons with seropositive or erosive RA (n = 51) and control subjects matched for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity (n = 51) underwent assessment of disease activity, disability, pain, physical activity and thigh muscle biopsies. Muscle tissue was used for measurement of pro-inflammatory markers, transcriptomics, an...

  2. Altered expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor in high-risk soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, M S; Ponticelli, F; Azzoni, E; Gamberi, G; Pazzaglia, L; Chiechi, A; Conti, A; Spessotto, P; Scapolan, M; Pignotti, E; Bacchini, P; Picci, P

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, classification of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) has improved with cytogenetic analyses, but their clinical behavior is still not easily predictable. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in the urokinase-type plasminogen system, involved in tumor growth and invasion, by comparing mRNA levels of its components with those of paired normal tissues, and relating them with patient clinical course. Real-time PCR was performed on human STS cell lines and tissues from highly malignant STS, including leiomyosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas, to evaluate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Immunohistochemistry of gene products was also performed. Median mRNA values of all genes studied were higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues. In agreement with data on STS cell lines, significant up-regulation for uPA and PAI-1 genes compared to reference values was seen. Moreover, different levels of expression were related to histotype and metastatic phenotype. There was accordance between uPA mRNA and protein expression, while immunodetection of PAI-1 product was weak and scattered. Clearly, the controversial role of PAI-1 protein requires further biological analyses, but evident involvement of uPA/PAI-1 gene overexpression in STS malignancy may highlight a molecular defect useful in discriminating STS high-risk patients.

  3. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A.; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells. PMID:26646448

  4. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  5. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Xie

    Full Text Available There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  6. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Canals

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  7. Alteration of transcriptional networks in the entorhinal cortex after maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Sharon L; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Cairns, Murray J

    2016-08-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabinoid exposure (ACE) have both been identified as major environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We examined the effects of these two risk factors alone, and in combination, on gene expression during late adolescence. Pregnant rats were exposed to the viral infection mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day (GD) 15. Adolescent offspring received daily injections of the cannabinoid HU210 for 14days starting on postnatal day (PND) 35. Gene expression was examined in the left entorhinal cortex (EC) using mRNA microarrays. We found prenatal treatment with poly I:C alone, or HU210 alone, produced relatively minor changes in gene expression. However, following combined treatments, offspring displayed significant changes in transcription. This dramatic and persistent alteration of transcriptional networks enriched with genes involved in neurotransmission, cellular signalling and schizophrenia, was associated with a corresponding perturbation in the expression of small non-coding microRNA (miRNA). These results suggest that a combination of environmental exposures during development leads to significant genomic remodeling that disrupts maturation of the EC and its associated circuitry with important implications as the potential antecedents of memory and learning deficits in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. A rare myelin protein zero (MPZ variant alters enhancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Antonellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myelin protein zero (MPZ is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants that affect MPZ expression. METHODOLOGY: We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function.

  9. Maternal High Fat Diet Alters Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Catalytic Activity in Adult Male Rat Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Chantal A.; Hedges, Christopher P.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Markworth, James F.; Durainayagam, Brenan R.; Gray, Clint; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Vickers, Mark H.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Reynolds, Clare M.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    A maternal high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise, such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat) or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat) for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory complex subunits were suppressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%), which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%). Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle. PMID:27917127

  10. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  11. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  12. Differential dynamics of RAS isoforms in GDP- and GTP-bound states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2015-06-01

    RAS subfamily proteins regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Different RAS isoforms, though structurally similar, exhibit functional specificity and are associated with different types of cancers and developmental disorders. Understanding the dynamical differences between the isoforms is crucial for the design of inhibitors that can selectively target a particular malfunctioning isoform. In this study, we provide a comprehensive comparison of the dynamics of all the three RAS isoforms (HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) using extensive molecular dynamics simulations in both the GDP- (total of 3.06 μs) and GTP-bound (total of 2.4 μs) states. We observed significant differences in the dynamics of the isoforms, which rather interestingly, varied depending on the type of the nucleotide bound and the simulation temperature. Both SwitchI (Residues 25-40) and SwitchII (Residues 59-75) differ significantly in their flexibility in the three isoforms. Furthermore, Principal Component Analysis showed that there are differences in the conformational space sampled by the GTP-bound RAS isoforms. We also identified a previously unreported pocket, which opens transiently during MD simulations, and can be targeted to regulate nucleotide exchange reaction or possibly interfere with membrane localization. Further, we present the first simulation study showing GDP destabilization in the wild-type RAS protein. The destabilization of GDP/GTP occurred only in 1/50 simulations, emphasizing the need of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) to accelerate such an extremely unfavorable process. This observation along with the other results presented in this article further support our previously hypothesized mechanism of GEF-assisted nucleotide exchange.

  13. The NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase mimics TCR signalling pathways, inducing NFAT and AP-1 by RAS-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Suzanne D; Yeung, Debra; Hadfield, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expression is associated with the lymphoid malignancy anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and results from a t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. We show that NPM-ALK induces Ras activation and phosphorylation of the ERK MAP Kinase consistent with activation of the Ras-MAP Kinase pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of Ras is necessary for inducing transcription via NFAT/AP-1 composite transcriptional binding sites. This activity is dependent on NPM-ALK forming complexes with proteins that bind to autophosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 156, 567 and 664, associated with binding to IRS-1, Shc and PLCgamma, respectively. Specifically, NPM-ALK activates transcription from the TRE promoter element, an AP-1 binding region, an activity dependent on both Ras and Shc activity. Our results show that NPM-ALK mimics activated T-cell receptor signalling by inducing pathways associated with the activation of NFAT/AP-1 transcription factors that bind to promoter elements found in a broad array of cytokine genes.

  14. RASAL3, a novel hematopoietic RasGAP protein, regulates the number and functions of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Suguru; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yoshita-Takahashi, Manami; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Kanda, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Hiroki; Jiang, Shuying; Naito, Makoto; Yoshizaki, Takumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins negatively regulate the Ras/Erk signaling pathway, thereby playing crucial roles in the proliferation, function, and development of various types of cells. In this study, we identified a novel Ras GTPase-activating proteins protein, RASAL3, which is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic lineages, including NKT, B, and T cells. We established systemic RASAL3-deficient mice, and the mice exhibited a severe decrease in NKT cells in the liver at 8 weeks of age. The treatment of RASAL3-deficient mice with α-GalCer, a specific agonist for NKT cells, induced liver damage, but the level was less severe than that in RASAL3-competent mice, and the attenuated liver damage was accompanied by a reduced production of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ from NKT cells. RASAL3-deficient NKT cells treated with α-GalCer in vitro presented augmented Erk phosphorylation, suggesting that there is dysregulated Ras signaling in the NKT cells of RASAL3-deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that RASAL3 plays an important role in the expansion and functions of NKT cells in the liver by negatively regulating Ras/Erk signaling, and might be a therapeutic target for NKT-associated diseases.

  15. Nerve growth factor alters the sensitivity of rat masseter muscle mechanoreceptors to NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hayes; Dong, Xu-Dong; Cairns, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into rat masseter muscle induces a local mechanical sensitization that is greater in female than in male rats. The duration of NGF-induced sensitization in male and female rats was associated with an increase in peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression by masseter muscle afferent fibers that began 3 days postinjection. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of increased NMDA expression on the response properties of masseter muscle mechanoreceptors. In vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiological recordings of trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the masseter muscle were performed in anesthetized rats 3 days after NGF injection (25 μg/ml, 10 μl) into the masseter muscle. Mechanical activation threshold was assessed before and after intramuscular injection of NMDA. NMDA injection induced mechanical sensitization in both sexes that was increased significantly following NGF injection in the male rats but not in the female rats. However, in female but not male rats, further examination found that preadministration of NGF induced a greater sensitization in slow Aδ-fibers (2-7 m/s) than fast Aδ-fibers (7-12 m/s). This suggests that preadministration of NGF had a different effect on slowly conducting mechanoreceptors in the female rats compared with the male rats. Although previous studies have found an association between estrogenic tone and NMDA activity, no correlation was observed between NMDA-evoked mechanical sensitization and plasma estrogen level. This study suggests NGF alters NMDA-induced mechanical sensitization in the peripheral endings of masseter mechanoreceptors in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  16. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpu, Yannick; Hanoun, Naïma; Lulka, Hubert; Sicard, Flavie; Selves, Janick; Buscail, Louis; Torrisani, Jérôme; Cordelier, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. Despite significant progresses in the last decades, the origin of this cancer remains unclear and no efficient therapy exists. PDAC does not arise de novo: three remarkable different types of pancreatic lesions can evolve towards pancreatic cancer. These precursor lesions include: Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that are microscopic lesions of the pancreas, Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMN) and Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms (MCN) that are both macroscopic lesions. However, the cellular origin of these lesions is still a matter of debate. Classically, neoplasm initiation or progression is driven by several genetic and epigenetic alterations. The aim of this review is to assemble the current information on genetic mutations and epigenetic disorders that affect genes during pancreatic carcinogenesis. We will further discuss the interest of the genetic and epigenetic alterations for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDAC. Large genetic alterations (chromosomal deletion/amplification) and single point mutations are well described for carcinogenesis inducers. Mutations classically occur within key regions of the genome. Consequences are various and include activation of mitogenic pathways or silencing of apoptotic processes. Alterations of K-RAS, P16 and DPC4 genes are frequently observed in PDAC samples and have been described to arise gradually during carcinogenesis. DNA methylation is an epigenetic process involved in imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Alteration of DNA methylation patterns leads to deregulation of gene expression, in the absence of mutation. Both genetic and epigenetic events influence genes and non-coding RNA expression, with dramatic effects on proliferation, survival and invasion. Besides improvement in our fundamental understanding of PDAC development, highlighting the molecular alterations that occur in pancreatic carcinogenesis could

  18. Transforming p21 ras protein: flexibility in the major variable region linking the catalytic and membrane-anchoring domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Hubbert, N;

    1985-01-01

    that is required for post-translational processing, membrane localization and transforming activity of the proteins. We have now used the viral oncogene (v-rasH) of Harvey sarcoma virus to study the major variable region by deleting or duplicating parts of the gene. Reducing this region to five amino acids...... or increasing it to 50 amino acids has relatively little effect on the capacity of the gene to induce morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Assays of GTP binding, GTPase and autophosphorylating activities of such mutant v-rasH-encoded proteins synthesized in bacteria indicated that the sequences...

  19. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples.

  20. Alteration in membrane protein, antioxidant status and hexokinase activity in erythrocytes of CCl4- induced cirrhotic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Doustimotlagh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that hepatocyte membrane composition changes in patients with cholestasis and cirrhosis. These alterations that are because of intracellular oxidative stress are supposed to be reflected in erythrocyte membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate the modification of erythrocyte membrane along with hexokinase and antioxidant enzymes during development of cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of CCl4 in male Wistar rats. The test groups were: baseline, cholestatic, early cirrhotic and advanced cirrhotic along with an equal number of sham-control animals. The erythrocyte membrane modifications (protein sulfhydryl, protein carbonyl, and lipid peroxidation, as well as NO metabolites, were assessed. Activities of GPX, CAT, SOD and HK were also measured. Protein sulfhydryl content of the erythrocyte membrane (after 2, 6 and 10 weeks of injection had significant progressive decrease. In contrast, protein carbonyls were remarkably increased 2 weeks after injection but significantly decreased after 6 weeks and returned to normal levels after 10 weeks. No significant difference in erythrocyte HK activity or MDA content was observed. Test groups showed significantly lower erythrocyte GPx activity after six weeks and CAT and SOD activities along with NO metabolites content after two weeks (P<0.05. This study indicates that the progression of cirrhosis is accompanied by alterations in antioxidant enzyme and decreased NO metabolites. Protein carbonyl alteration occurs in the early stages of cirrhosis while protein sulfhydryl alterations have a progressive decrease in advanced cirrhosis.

  1. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  2. Removal of visual feedback alters muscle activity and reduces force variability during constant isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Martinkewiz, Julie D; Vu, Julie; Christou, Evangelos A

    2009-07-01

    feedback amplifies force error, it can reduce force variability during constant isometric contractions due to an altered activation of the primary agonist muscle most likely at moderate force levels in young adults.

  3. A mutant RAS gene acts through protein kinase C to augment interleukin-3 dependent proliferation in a fastidious immortal myeloid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, H S; Harrington, M A; Burgess, G S; Nahreini, T L; Derigs, H G; Hodges, T D; English, D; Crean, C D; Gabig, T G

    1989-09-01

    The functional role of a mutant RAS gene in immortal myeloid cell proliferation was examined