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Sample records for activated carbon supported

  1. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  2. Ni supported on activated carbon as catalyst for flue gas desulfurization

    2010-01-01

    A series of Ni supported on activated carbon are prepared by excessive impregnation and the desulfurization activity is investigated. It has been shown that the activated carbon-supported Ni is an efficient solid catalyst for flue gas desulfurization. The activated carbon treated by HNO3 exhibits high desulfurization activity, and different amounts of loaded-Ni on activated carbon significantly influence the desulfurization activity. The catalysts are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of XRD and XPS indicate that the activated carbon treated by HNO3 can increase oxygen-containing functional groups. Ni on activated carbon after calcination at 800 °C shows major Ni phase and minor NiO phase, and with increasing Ni content on activated carbon, Ni phase increases and affects the desulfurization activity of the catalyst, which proves that Ni is the main active phase.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide by carbon monoxide over iron oxide supported on activated carbon

    2014-01-01

    The selective reduction of sulfur dioxide with carbon monoxide to elemental sulfur was studied over AC-supported transition-metal oxide catalysts. According to the study, Fe2O3/AC was the most active catalyst among the 4 AC-supported catalysts tested. By using Fe2O3/AC, the best catalyst, when the feed conditions were properly optimized (CO/SO2 molar ratio = 2:1; sulfidation temperature, 400 °C; Fe content, 20 wt%; GHSV = 7000 mL g-1 h-1), 95.43% sulfur dioxide conversion and 86.59% sulfur yi...

  4. Photocatalytic Characterization of TiO2 Supported on Active Carbon

    2001-01-01

    he Photocatalytic characterization of TiO2 supported on active carbon was investigated for photocatalytic decomposition of dichloroacetic acid. It was found that TiO2 / AC exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2. The reason is that active carbon acting as powerful adsorbent supports makes high concentration environments of organic pollutant molecules around TiO2 particles.

  5. Effect of Activated Carbon as a Support on Metal Dispersion and Activity of Ruthenium Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis

    2002-01-01

    Ten kinds of activated carbon from different raw materials were used as supports to prepare ruthenium catalysts. N2 physisorption and CO chemisorption were carried out to investigate the pore size distribution and the ruthenium dispersion of the catalysts. It was found that the Ru dispersion of the catalyst was closely related to not only the texture of carbon support but also the purity of activated carbon. The activities of a series of the carbon-supported barium-promoted Ru catalysts for ammonia synthesis were measured at 425 ℃, 10.0 MPa and 10 000 h-1. The result shows that the same raw material activated carbon, with a high purity, high surface area, large pore volume and reasonable pore size distribution might disperse ruthenium and promoter sufficiently, which activated carbon as support, could be used to manufacture ruthenium catalyst with a high activity for ammonia synthesis. The different raw material activated carbon as the support would greatly influence the catalytic properties of the ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis. For example, with coconut shell carbon(AC1) as the support, the ammonia concentration in the effluent was 13.17% over 4%Ru-BaO/AC1 catalyst, while with the desulfurized coal carbon(AC10) as the support, that in the effluent was only 1.37% over 4%Ru-BaO/AC10 catalyst.

  6. Coupling dehydrogenation of isobutane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium oxide supported on active carbon

    Jian Fei Ding; Zhang Feng Qin; Xue Kuan Li; Guo Fu Wang; Jian Guo Wang

    2008-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of isobutane (IB) to produce isobutene coupled with reverse water gas shift in the presence of carbon dioxide was investigated over the catalyst Cr2O3 supported on active carbon (Cr2O3/AC). The results illustrated that isobutane c onversion and isobutene yield can be enhanced through the reaction coupling in the presence of carbon dioxide. Moreover, carbon dioxide can partially eliminate carbonaceous deposition on the catalyst and keep the active phase (Cr2O3), which are then helpful to alleviate the catalyst deactivation.

  7. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  8. Hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene on activated carbon supported platinum catalysts

    JIANG Cheng-jun; YIN Hong; CHEN Zhi-rong

    2005-01-01

    Platinum/carbon catalyst is one of the most important catalysts in hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene. The preparation process and the supports of catalysts are studied in this paper. Raw materials and preparation procedure of the activated carbon have great influences on the compositions and surface structure of platinum/carbon catalysts. Platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon with high purity, high surface area, large pore volume and appropriate pore structure usually exhibit higher activities for hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene.The catalyst prepared from H2PtCl6 with pH=3 shows greater catalytic performance than those prepared under other conditions.

  9. Potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon for transesterification of palm oil

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Sulaiman, Nik Meriam Nik [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon was developed for transesterification of palm oil. The Central Composite Design (CCD) of the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst loading and methanol to oil molar ratio on the production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst. The highest yield was obtained at 64.1 C reaction temperature, 30.3 wt.% catalyst loading and 24:1 methanol to oil molar ratio. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel met the standard specifications. This study proves that activated carbon supported potassium hydroxide is an effective catalyst for transesterification of palm oil. (author)

  10. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures....... spectroscopy were applied for determining the carburization temperature and evaluating the composition of the carbide clusters of different samples through determinations of the Mo-C and Mo-Mo coordination numbers....

  11. Catalytic decomposition of low level ozone with gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon

    Pengyi ZHANG; Bo ZHANG; Rui SHI

    2009-01-01

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles were supported on coal-based activated carbon (AC) by a sol immobilization method and were used to investigate their catalytic activity for low-level ozone decomposition at ambient temperature. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts before and after ozone decomposition. The results showed that the supported gold nanoparticles prepared with microwave heating were much smaller and more uniformly dispersed on the activated carbon than those prepared with traditional conduction heating, exhibiting higher catalytic activity for ozone decomposition. The pH values of gold precursor solution significantly influenced the catalytic activity of supported gold for ozone decomposition, and the best pH value was 8. In the case of space velocity of 120000 h-1, inlet ozone concentration of 50mg/m3, and relative humidity of 45%, the Au/AC catalyst maintained the ozone removal ratio at 90.7% after 2500 min. After being used for ozone decomposition, the surface carbon of the catalyst was partly oxidized and the oxygen content increased accordingly, while its specific surface area and pore volume only decreased a little.Ozone was mainly catalytically decomposed by the gold nanoparticles supported on the activated carbon.

  12. A Novel Carbon Nanotube-Supported NiP Amorphous Alloy Catalyst and Its Hydrogenation Activity

    Yan Ju; Fengyi Li

    2006-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-supported NiP amorphous catalyst (NiP/CNT) was prepared by induced reduction. Benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction for the study of catalytic activity. The effects of the support on the activity and thermal stability of the supported catalyst were discussed based on various characterizations, including XRD, TEM, ICP, XPS, H2-TPD, and DTA. In comparison with the NiP amorphous alloy, the benzene conversion on NiP/CNT catalyst was lower, but the specific activity of NiP/CNT was higher, which is attributed to the dispersion produced by the support, an electron-donating effect, and the hydrogen-storage ability of CNT. The NiP/CNT thermal stability was improved because of the dispersion and electronic effects and the good heat-conduction ability of the CNT support.

  13. Surface Properties and Catalytic Performance of Activated Carbon Fibers Supported TiO2 Photocatalyst

    Yang, Huifen; Fu, Pingfeng

    Activated carbon fibers supported TiO2 photocatalyst (TiO2/ACF) in felt-form was successfully prepared with a dip-coating process using organic silicon modified acrylate copolymer as a binder followed by calcination at 500°C in a stream of Ar gas. The photocatalyst was characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and BET surface area. Most of carbon fibers were coated with uniformly distributed TiO2 clusters of nearly 100 nm. The loaded TiO2 layer was particulate for the organic binder in the compact film was carbonized. According to XPS and FTIR analysis, amorphous silica in carbon grains was synthesized after carbonizing organic silicon groups, and the Ti-O-Si bond was formed between the interface of loaded TiO2 and silica. Additionally, the space between adjacent carbon fibers still remained unfilled after TiO2 coating, into which both UV light and polluted solutions could penetrate to form a three-dimensional environment for photocatalytic reactions. While loaded TiO2 amount increased to 456 mg TiO2/1 g ACF, the TiO2/ACF catalyst showed its highest photocatalytic activity, and this activity only dropped about 10% after 12 successive runs, exhibiting its high fixing stability of coated TiO2.

  14. SURFACE PROPERTIES AND CATALYTIC PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS SUPPORTED TiO2 PHOTOCATALYST

    HUIFEN YANG; PINGFENG FU

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon fibers supported TiO2 photocatalyst (TiO2/ACF) in felt-form was successfully prepared with a dip-coating process using organic silicon modified acrylate copolymer as a binder followed by calcination at 500°C in a stream of Ar gas. The photocatalyst was characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and BET surface area. Most of carbon fibers were coated with uniformly distributed TiO2 clusters of nearly 100 nm. The loaded TiO2 layer was particulate for the organic binder in the compac...

  15. Thermally Activated Palm Kernel Based Carbon as a Support for Edible Oil Hydrogenation Catalyst

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon has distinctive properties as a support for hydrogenation catalysts. Thermally activated carbon has been prepared from palm kernel shell at 1073 K and placed under nitrogen flow for 2 h. It was impregnated by palladium using toluene solution of Pd (acac2. The Pd/C was reduced using a water solution of potassium borohydride (KBH4. The Pd-B/C was characterized by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis (BET, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Pd-B/C was applied for sunflower oil hydrogenation at a temperature of 373 K, hydrogen pressure of 413.5 kPa and agitation of 1400 rpm for 1 h. Pd-B/C noticeably exhibited a higher overall catalyst activity in comparison to some recently published palladium catalysts.

  16. Enhanced activity and selectivity of carbon nanofiber supported Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction.

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R; Werth, Charles J

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment.

  17. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. CO(2) adsorption on supported molecular amidine systems on activated carbon.

    Alesi, W Richard; Gray, McMahan; Kitchin, John R

    2010-08-23

    The CO(2) capture capacities for typical flue gas capture and regeneration conditions of two tertiary amidine N-methyltetrahydropyrimidine (MTHP) derivatives supported on activated carbon were determined through temperature-controlled packed-bed reactor experiments. Adsorption-desorption experiments were conducted at initial adsorption temperatures ranging from 29 degrees C to 50 degrees C with temperature-programmed regeneration under an inert purge stream. In addition to the capture capacity of each amine, the efficiencies at which the amidines interact with CO(2) were determined. Capture capacities were obtained for 1,5-diazo-bicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene (DBN) and 1,8-diazobicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) supported on activated carbon at a loading of approximately 2.7 mol amidine per kg of sorbent. Moisture was found to be essential for CO(2) capture on the amidines, but parasitic moisture sorption on the activated carbon ultimately limited the capture capacities. DBN was shown to have a higher capture capacity of 0.8 mol CO(2) per kg of sorbent and an efficiency of 0.30 mol CO(2) per mol of amidine at an adsorption temperature of 29 degrees C compared to DBU. The results of these experiments were then used in conjunction with a single-site adsorption model to derive the Gibbs free energy for the capture reaction, which can provide information about the suitability of the sorbent under different operating conditions.

  19. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  20. Influence of different carbon nanostructures on the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt supported electrocatalysts

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Andersen, Shuang Ma;

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available graphitized carbon nanofibers and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, two carbon materials with very different structure, have been functionalized in a nitric–sulfuric acid mixture. Further on, the materials have been platinized by a microwave assisted polyol method. The relative...... that the functionalization improves the stability for multi-walled carbon nanotubes, at the cost of decreased activity....

  1. Synthesis of acetals and ketals catalyzed by tungstosilicic acid supported on active carbon

    YANG Shui-jin; DU Xin-xian; HE Lan; SUN Ju-tang

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon supported tungstosilicic acidin synthesizing 2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl1,3-dioxolane, 2,4-dimethyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-l,3-dioxolane, cyclohexanone ethylene ketal, cyclohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal, butanone ethylene ketal, butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal, 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane, 4-methyl-2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane,2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane, 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane was reported. It has been demonstrated that activated carbon supported tungstosilicic acid is an excellent catalyst. Various factors involved in these reactions were investigated. The optimum conditions found were: molar ratio of aldehyde/ketone to glycol is 1/1.5, mass ratio of the catalyst used to the reactants is 1.0%, and reaction time is 1.0 h. Under these conditions, the yield of 2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-l,3-dioxolane is 61.5%, of 2,4-dimethyl2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1,3-dioxolane is 69.1%, of cyclohexanone ethylene ketal is 74.6%, of cyclohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal is 80.1%, of butanone ethylene ketal is 69.5%, of butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal is 78.5%, of 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane is 56.7%, of 4-methyl-2-phenyl- 1,3-dioxolane is 86.2%, of 2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane is 87.5%, of 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane is 87.9%.

  2. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction.

  3. Alcohol Synthesis over Pre-Reduced Activated Carbon-Supported Molybdenum-Based Catalysts

    Edwin L. Kugler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC-supported molybdenum catalysts, either with or without a potassium promoter, were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. The materials were characterized using differential thermal analysis (DTA and temperature programmed reduction (TPR, and were used for mixed alcohol synthesis from syngas (CO+H2. DTA results showed that a new phase, related to the interaction between Mo species and the AC support, is formed during the calcination of the Mo/AC catalyst, and the introduction of a K promoter has noticeable effect on the interaction. TPR results indicated that the Mo is more difficult to reduce after being placed onto the AC support, and the addition of a K promoter greatly promotes the formation of Mo species reducible at relatively low temperatures, while it retards the generation of Mo species that are reducible only at higher temperatures. These differences in the reduction behavior of the catalysts are atributed to the interaction between the active components (Mo and K and the support. Potassium-doping significantly promotes the formation of alcohols at the expense of CO conversion, especially to hydrocarbons. It is postulated that Mo species with intermediate valence values (averaged around +3.5 are more likely to be the active phase(s for alcohol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, while those with lower Mo valences are probably responsible for the production of hydrocarbons.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of L-acid by TiO2 supported on the activated carbon

    WANG Yu-ping; WANG Lian-jun; PENG Pan-ying

    2006-01-01

    TiO2 sol was prepared by sol-gel technique with tetrabutyl titanate as precursor. Supported TiO2 catalysts on activated carbon were prepared by soak and sintering method. The aggregation of nano-TiO2 particles can be effectively suppressed by added polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a surface modifier. The average particle diameter of TiO2, specific surface area and absorbability of catalyst can be modified. Based on characteristics of the TiO2 photocatalyst with XRD, specific surface area, adsorption valves of methylene blue and the amount of TiO2 supported on the activated carbon, the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid was studied. The effect of the factors, such as pH of the solution, the initial concentration of L-acid on the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid, were studied also. It was found that when the pH of the solution is 1.95, the amount ofphotocatalyst is 0.5 g, the concentration of the L-acid solution is 1.34 × 10-3 mol/L and the illumination time is 7 h, the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of L-acid can reach 89.88%.The catalyst was reused 6 times and its degradation efficiency hardly changed.

  5. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  6. Photocatalytic Degradation of Humic Acid by Fe-TiO2 Supported on Spherical Activated Carbon with Enhanced Activity

    2013-01-01

    Fe-TiO2 supported on spherical activated carbon (Fe-TiO2/SAC) with different Fe contents was prepared by heat treatment process after ion exchange method. The prepared Fe-TiO2/SAC was characterized by SEM, EDS, and BET. Batch experiments for photocatalytic degradation of humic acid by Fe-TiO2/SAC were carried out in the fluidized bed photoreactor. It was found that 0 wt% Fe-TiO2/SAC had high photocatalytic activity in the wavelength range of 100~280 nm. However, Fe-TiO2/SAC with Fe contents o...

  7. Effect of samarium on methanation resistance of activated carbon supported ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    周春晖; 祝一锋; 刘化章

    2010-01-01

    The effects of samarium(Sm) on carbon-methanation and catalytic activity of the Ba-Ru-K/AC (active carbon) catalyst for ammonia synthesis were investigated. The addition of samarium improved significantly the activity and stability of the catalyst. The results of temperature-programmed desorption (H2-TPD) and in-situ-TPSR FTIR indicated that samarium impeded the adsorption of hydrogen on the catalyst surface, thus leading to the high catalytic activity and resistance to carbon-methanation. XRD patterns reve...

  8. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst.

  9. Stability and activity of carbon nanofiber-supported catalysts in the aqueous phase reforming of ethylene glycol

    van Haasterecht, T.; Ludding, C.C.I.; de Jong, K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel, cobalt, copper and platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon nano-fibers were evaluated with respect to their stability, catalytic activity and selectivity in the aqueous phase reforming of ethylene glycol (230 ◦C, autogenous pressure, batch reactor). The initial surface-specific activities

  10. Stability and activity of carbon nanofiber-supported catalysts in the aqueous phase reforming of ethylene glycol

    Haasterecht, van T.; Ludding, C.C.I.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel, cobalt, copper and platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon nano-fibers were evaluated with respect to their stability, catalytic activity and selectivity in the aqueous phase reforming of ethylene glycol (230 ¿, autogenous pressure, batch reactor). The initial surface-specific activities

  11. Photocatalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite by titanium dioxide supported on granular activated carbon.

    Yao, Shu Hua; Jia, Yong Feng; Zhao, Shan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a worldwide concern. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite, i.e. As(III), to less labile arsenate, i.e. As(V), which then can be removed by adsorption on to various adsorbents. This study investigated the photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite in aqueous solution by granular activated carbon supporting a titanium dioxide photocatalyst (GAC-TiO2). The effects of photocatalyst dosage, solution pH values, initial concentration of As(III) and co-anions (SO4(2-), PO4(3-), SiO3(2-) and Cl-) on the oxidation of As(III) were studied. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) took place in minutes and followed first-order kinetics. The presence of phosphate and silicate significantly decreased As(III) oxidation, while the effect of sulphate, chloride was insignificant. The oxidation efficiency of As(III) was observed to increase with increasing pH. The results suggest that the supported photocatalyst developed in this study is an ideal candidate for pre-oxidation treatment of arsenic-contaminated water.

  12. Simple preparation of tungsten supported carbon nanoreactors for specific applications: Adsorption, catalysis and electrochemical activity

    Mayani, Vishal J.; Mayani, Suranjana V.; Kim, Sang Wook, E-mail: swkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2015-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Tungsten carbon composites have shown great recognition in catalysis and electrochemistry. • W-carbon composites are prepared by template replication and W-doping on carbon cage. • Nanocomposites offer enormous assurance as adsorbent, electrode and heterogeneous catalyst. - Abstract: Porous carbon supported tungsten carbide nanoreactors, two sizes (∼25 and 170 nm), were designed using economical petroleum pitch residue followed by tungsten (W) doping. X-ray diffractions showed both carbon tungsten composites (CTC-25 and CTC-170) contained tungsten subcarbide (W{sub 2}C) and monocarbide (WC) as the major and minor crystalline phases, respectively. The present study provides a multiple perspective of carbon tungsten composites (CTCs) for methanol oxidation (as an electrode), adsorption (as an adsorbent) and degradation (as a solid catalyst) of methylene blue (MB). The operational electrodes were designed from both CTCs and used as a catalyst in an electrocatalysis process. The electrocatalysts exhibited high and stable catalytic performance (CTCE-25 > CTCE-170) in methanol electro-oxidation. The newly synthesized W-doped carbon nanoreactors were used successfully as an adsorbent for MB and a heterogeneous catalyst for MB oxidation. Ordered CTC-25 and CTC-170 exhibited dynamic MB adsorption within 15 min and complete oxidation of MB in 25–40 min. A synergetic effect between tungsten carbide and the carbon cage framework was noted.

  13. Synthesis of TiO2 supported on activated carbon by MOCVD: operation parameters study

    张兴旺; 周明华; 雷乐成; 徐甦

    2004-01-01

    A novel metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique has been applied to the preparation of the photocatalytic titanium dioxide supported on activated carbon. The effects of various condition parameters such as carrier gas flow rate, source temperature and deposition temperature on the deposition rate were investigated. The maximum deposition rate of 8.2 mg/(g.h) was obtained under conditions of carrier gas flow rate of 400 ml/min, source temperature of 423 K and deposition temperature of 913 K. The deposition rate followed Arrhenius behavior at temperature of 753 K to 913 K, corresponding to activation energy Ea of 51.09 kJ/mol. TiO2 existed only in anatase phase when the deposition temperature was 773 K to 973 K. With increase of deposition temperature from 1073 K to 1273 K, the rutile content sharply increased from 7% to 70%. It was found that a deposition temperature of 773 K and a higher source temperature of 448 K resulted in finely dispersed TiO2 particles, which were mainly in the range of 10-20 nm.

  14. Synthesis of TiO2 supported on activated carbon by MOCVD:operation parameters study

    张兴旺; 周明华; 雷乐成; 徐甦

    2004-01-01

    A novel metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique has been applied to the preparation of the photocatalytic titanium dioxide supported on activated carbon. The effects of various condition parameters such as carrier gas flow rate, source temperature and deposition temperature on the deposition rate were investigated. The maximum deposition rate of 8.2 mg/(g.h) was obtained under conditions of carrier gas flow rate of 400 ml/min, source temperature of 423 K and deposition temperature of 913 K. The deposition rate followed Arrhenius behavior at temperature of 753 K to 913 K, corresponding to activation energy Ea of 51.09 kJ/mol. TiO2 existed only in anatase phase when the deposition temperature was 773 K to 973 K. With increase of deposition temperature from 1073 K to 1273 K, the rutile content sharply increased from 7% to 70%. It was found that a deposition temperature of 773 K and a higher source temperature of 448 K resulted in finely dispersed TiO2 particles, which were mainly in the range of 10-20 nm.

  15. EFFECT OF FOREIGN CARBON ON ACTIVITY OF METHANE COMBUSTION OVER SUPPORTED PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Qi Caixia; An Lidun; Wang Hongli

    2001-01-01

    EDTA as precursor of carbon was introduced into Pd(NO3)2 catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3 or 5%MgO/γ-Al2O3. Two kinds of samples,denoted as Pd(NO3)2/[support+EDTA] and [Pd(NO3)2/support]+EDTA, were prepared by changing sequence of impregnating EDTA to the supports. After only being dried they were tested for methane combustion. XPS analyses to the samples at different stages of testing reaction were performed. It was found that the Pd(NO3)2 catalysts became more inactive due to the introduction of EDTA. EDTA in the catalysts was naturally in situ oxidized,partially became into CO2 and escaped, partially coked and deposited on palladium and support with temperature increasing in oxygen-rich atmosphere.Formation of Pd-C solid solution was also confirmed during the reaction. It can be suggested that foreign carbon, in spite of its any existing forms and position in catalysts, inhibits methane combustion largely. The role of carbon on morphological change of palladium during methane combustion was also discussed.

  16. Remediation of actual groundwater polluted with nitrate by the catalytic reduction over copper-palladium supported on active carbon

    Wang, Yi; Sakamoto, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in groundwater over a Cu-Pd catalyst supported on active carbon was investigated in a gas-liquid co-current flow system at 298 K. Although Cu-Pd/active carbon, in which the Cu/Pd molar ratio was more than 0.66, showed high activity, high selectivity for the formation of N2 and N2O (98%), and high durability for the reduction of 100 ppm NO3- in distilled water, the catalytic performance decreased during the reduction of NO3- in groundwater. The catalyst al...

  17. Potassium-decorated active carbon supported Co-Mo-based catalyst for water-gas shift reaction

    Yixin Lian; RuiFen Xiao; Weiping Fang; Yiquan Yang

    2011-01-01

    The effect of potassium-decoration was studied on the activity of water-gas shift(WGS)reaction over the Co-Mo-based catalysts supported on active carbon(AC),which was prepared by incipient wetness co-impregnation method.The decoration of potassium on active carbon in advance enhances the activities of the CoMo-K/AC catalysts for WGS reaction.Highest activity(about 92% conversion)was obtained at250 ℃ for the catalyst with an optimum K2O/AC weight ratio in the range from 0.12 to 0.15.The catalysts were characterized by TPR and EPR,and the results show that activated carbon decorated with potassium makes Co-Mo species highly dispersed,and thus easily reduced and sulfurized.XRD results show that an appropriate content of potassium-decoration on active carbon supports may favors the formation of highly dispersed Co9Ss-type structures which are situated on the edge or a site in contact with MoS2,K-Mo-O-S,Mo-S-K phase.Those active species are responsible for the high activity of CoMo-K/AC catalysts.

  18. Nanoscaled palladium catalysts on activated carbon support "Sibunit" for fine organic synthesis

    Simakova, I.; Koskin, A.; Deliy, I.; Simakov, A.

    2005-08-01

    The application of nanosized palladium catalysts has gained growing importance over the last few years. Palladiumbased catalytic methods for fine organic synthesis permits the replacement of traditional labor-consuming techniques in multi-step organic syntheses and provides an improvement from the standpoint of cost and environmental impact. The use of activated carbon "Sibunit" as a substrate for catalysts has been fostered by the substrate's high surface area, chemical inertness both in acidic and basic media, and at the same time by the absence of very strong acidic centers on its surface which could promote undesirable side reactions during the catalytic run. A conversion of alpha-pinene derivatives to commercial biologically active compounds and fragrances as well as sun screens with ultra violet filtering properties, involves a catalytic hydrogenation as a key intermediate step. The aim of the present work is to clarify the factors favoring the dispersion of Pd metal on carbon. The effect of reduction temperature and pretreatment of the carbon surface on metal size during preparation of Pd on "Sibunit" catalysts for selective verbenol conversion was studied. The electron microscopy method (TEM) was used to show the influence on Pd metal dispersion of carbon surface oxidation by the oxidant H2O2, HNO3. The catalytic activity of Pd/C catalyst samples in verbenol hydrogenation reaction was determined. Kinetic peculiarities of verbenol hydrogenation over the most active catalyst sample were obtained.

  19. Photocatalytic Degradation of Humic Acid by Fe-TiO2 Supported on Spherical Activated Carbon with Enhanced Activity

    Mi-Hwa Baek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-TiO2 supported on spherical activated carbon (Fe-TiO2/SAC with different Fe contents was prepared by heat treatment process after ion exchange method. The prepared Fe-TiO2/SAC was characterized by SEM, EDS, and BET. Batch experiments for photocatalytic degradation of humic acid by Fe-TiO2/SAC were carried out in the fluidized bed photoreactor. It was found that 0 wt% Fe-TiO2/SAC had high photocatalytic activity in the wavelength range of 100~280 nm. However, Fe-TiO2/SAC with Fe contents of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 wt% exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than 0 wt% Fe-TiO2/SAC in the wavelength range of 315~400 nm compared to that of 100~280 nm. The optimum Fe content was 0.6 wt% for maximum photocatalytic degradation of humic acid. Moreover, Fe-TiO2/SAC does not require an additional process step for separation of photocatalyst from treated water after photocatalysis.

  20. On the role of the activation procedure of supported hydrotalcites for base catalyzed reactions: Glycerol to glycerol carbonate and self-condensation of acetone

    Álvarez, M.G.; Frey, A.M.; Bitter, J.H.; Segarra, A.M.; de Jong, K.P.; Medina, F.

    2013-01-01

    Bulk and carbon nanofiber supported MgAl hydrotalcites have been investigated as solid base catalysts for the synthesis of glycerol carbonate and dicarbonate and for the self-condensation of acetone. The supported materials exhibited a 300 times higher activity compared to bulk activated hydrotalcit

  1. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-06-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%.

  2. Effect of reduction method on the performance of Pd catalysts supported on activated carbon for the selective oxidation of glucose

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the reduction method on the catalytic properties of palladium catalysts supported on activated carbon for the oxidation of D-glucose was examined.The reduction methods investigated include argon glow discharge plasma reduction at room temperature,reduction by flowing hydrogen at elevated temperature,and reduction by formaldehyde at room temperature.The plasma-reduced catalyst shows the smallest metal particles with a narrow size distribution that leads to a much higher activity.The catalyst characteristics show that the plasma reduction increases the amount of oxygen-containing functional groups,which significantly enhances the hydrophilic property of the activated carbon and improves the dispersion of the metal.

  3. Foam-structured Activated Carbon-ceramic as TiO2 Supports for Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    LIU Wei-min

    2013-01-01

    An activated foam-structured carbon-ceramic(AFCC) was prepared and investigated as TiO2 support for the photocatalytic degradation of phenol.AFCC and TiO2/AFCC catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorptiondesorption and X-ray diffraction(XRD).The effects of AFCC on the photocatalytic activity and the crystallinity of TiO2 were studied.The results show that the crystallinity and anatase/rutile ratio of TiO2 loaded on AFCC could be significantly influenced by the calcination temperature.The degradation rate of phenol benefited from the synergistic effects of the adsorption of activated carbon(AC) and the photocatalysis of TiO2,which suggests that a high surface area of AC is essential to achieve high degradation rates and efficiencies.It was found that the larger mean cell size of AFCC increased the light transmission within the foam.

  4. A novel route to graphite-like carbon supporting SnO2 with high electron transfer and photocatalytic activity.

    Chen, Xianjie; Liu, Fenglin; Liu, Bing; Tian, Lihong; Hu, Wei; Xia, Qinghua

    2015-04-28

    Mesoporous graphite-like carbon supporting SnO2 (carbon-SnO2) nanocomposites were prepared by a modified solvothermal method combined with a post-calcination at 500°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization, but also provides the carbon source in the process. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show a uniform distribution of SnO2 nanoparticles on the graphite- like carbon surface. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate the presence of strong C-Sn interaction between SnO2 and graphite-like carbon. Photoelectrochemical measurements confirm that the effective separation of electron-hole pairs on the carbon-SnO2 nanocomposite leads to a high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight irradiation. The nanocomposite materials show a potential application in dealing with the environmental and industrial contaminants under sunlight irradiation.

  5. Removal of toluene from water by photocatalytic oxidation with activated carbon supported Fe(3+)-doped TiO2 nanotubes.

    Yuan, Rongfang; Zhou, Beihai; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC)-supported TiO2 containing 1.0% (mass percent) of 1.0 at.% (atomic percent) Fe(3+)-doped TiO2 nanotubes (Fe-TNTs) were successfully synthesized. The catalyst was used to effectively decompose toluene in water under O3/UV conditions, and some properties including the morphology, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns, specific surface area and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were analyzed. A removal efficiency of 90.7% was achieved in the presence of fresh AC-supported Fe-TNTs calcined at 550 °C, with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.038/min. The removal efficiency of toluene was reduced when the catalysts were repeatedly used, since the amount of adsorption sites of the supporting substrates decreased. However, even after AC-supported catalyst was used four times, the removal efficiency of toluene was still sufficient in water treatment. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of AC-supported Fe-TNTs was related to the synergistic effect of AC adsorption and Fe-TNTs photocatalytic ozonation. The water from a petrochemical company in China was used to obtain the removal efficiency of the pollutants, and the toluene and total organic carbon removal efficiencies were 69.9% and 58.3%, respectively.

  6. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Active Metals, Catalyst Supports, and Metal Loading Percentage

    Wei-Wen Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of active metals, catalyst supports, and metal loading percentage on the formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were studied. In particular, iron, cobalt, and nickel were investigated for SWNTs synthesis. Iron was found to grow better-quality SWNTs compared to cobalt and nickel. To study the effect of catalyst supports, magnesium oxide, silicon oxide, and aluminium oxide were chosen for iron. Among the studied supports, MgO was identified to be a suitable support for iron as it produced SWNTs with better graphitisation determined by Raman analysis. Increasing the iron loading decreased the quality of SWNTs due to extensive agglomeration of the iron particles. Thus, lower metal loading percentage is preferred to grow better-quality SWNTs with uniform diameters.

  7. [Reaction of NO with metal oxides and urea supported on activated carbons at low temperature].

    Cui, Hua-Fei; Li, Cai-Ting; Lu, Pei; Peng, Dun-Liang; Guo, Jing; Chen, Ling

    2010-11-01

    The catalysts were prepared by activated carbon fiber (ACF) loaded different contents of NiO and NiO-CeO2, Urea was loaded on the prepared catalysts as reductant. The experiments of selective catalytic reductions (SCR) of NO were carried out from 30 to 120 degrees C. The experiments of SEM, BET and XRD of the samples were also carried out selectively to study the catalysts properties, respectively. The experimental results showed that the loaded mass fraction of NiO could greatly affect the catalytic activity of the catalysts. 10% NiO catalyst activity and activity stability were both higher than that of the others, and it could yield about 50% removal efficiency of NO at 90 degrees C. With the loaded mass increasing, the catalytic activity was obviously decreased. And furthermore, the catalyst of 5% NiO-5% CeO2/ACF had the best catalytic activities on SCR NO and stability among the prepared NiO-CeO2/ACF catalysts, and its NO removal efficiency was over 55% at 110 degrees C. When the loaded mass increased, the similar phenomenon was observed, which was due to the decreasing of specific surface area of the catalysts. The metal oxides, loaded on ACF, were the catalytic centers in this study. Moreover, 5% CeO2-5% NiO/ACF had the highest catalytic activity than 10% CeO2/ACF and 10% NiO/ ACF. Therefore, there should be synergistic effect between CeO2 and NiO. Finally, the catalytic mechanism of SCR on NO at low temperature was discussed.

  8. Carbon supported trimetallic nickel-palladium-gold hollow nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation

    Shang, Changshuai; Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, Ni nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared in an aqueous solution by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. With Ni NPs as the sacrificial template, hollow NiPdAu NPs are successfully prepared via partly galvanic displacement reaction between suitable metal precursors and Ni NPs. The as-synthesized hollow NiPdAu NPs can well dispersed on the carbon substrate. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are taken to analyze the morphology, structure and composition of the as-synthesized catalysts. The prepared catalysts show superior catalytic activity and stability for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline media compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C. Catalysts prepared in this work show great potential to be anode catalysts in direct methanol fuel cells.

  9. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Preparation of diethylene glycol monomethyl ether monolaurate catalyzed by active carbon supported KF/CaO.

    Lou, Shengfeng; Jia, Lihua; Guo, Xiangfeng; Wu, Ping; Gao, Lianbing; Wang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether monolaurate (DGMEML) was synthesized via the reaction of diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DGME) with methyl laurate (ML) by a new solid base catalyst of KF/CaO/AC, which was prepared by impregnation method using active carbon as carrier. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen physisorption-desorption and Hammett indicator methods; the effect of the mole ratio of KF to CaO, DGME to ML molar ratio, amount of catalyst, reaction time and temperature on the yield of DGMEML were studied; and the relationship between the structure of the catalyst and the yield of DGMEML was investigated. The formed KCaF3 and K2O were acting as the main active components in the catalytic transesterification; the highest yield of 96.3 % was obtained as KF-to-CaO molar ratio of 2.0, DGME to ML molar ratio of 4.0, catalyst amount of 5 wt%, and reaction time of 30 min at 75 °C; and the catalyst displayed good stability in the transesterification.

  11. Selective esterification of non-conjugated carboxylic acids in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid

    FENG ZeWang; ZHAO XinQi; BI Hua

    2008-01-01

    Non-conjugated carboxylic acids are selectively esterified in good yields in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids by stirring over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid in dichloromethane at room temperature.

  12. Selective esterification of non-conjugated carboxylic acids in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid

    2008-01-01

    Non-conjugated carboxylic acids are selectively esterified in good yields in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids by stirring over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid in di-chloromethane at room temperature.

  13. HDO of guaiacol over NiMo catalyst supported on activated carbon derived from castor de-oiled cake

    Viviana Ospina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical activation methods were used to prepare two different activated carbons (ACs from castor de-oiled cake. H2O/CO2 mixture was used as the physical activating agent, and for chemical activation potassium carbonate (K2CO3 was used. For both materials, textural and chemical properties were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, thermal programmed reduction (TPR, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The ACs were used as supports for NiMo sulfide catalysts, which were prepared by wetness impregnation and in-situ sulfided for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol (GUA as a model compound of bio-oil. The HDO reaction was carried out in a typical batch reactor at 5 MPa of H2 and 350 °C. Under the same test conditions, commercial catalysts were also tested in the reaction. Although the commercial catalysts displayed higher GUA conversion, the prepared catalysts showed higher activity and non-oxygenated and saturated products yield. 

  14. Highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts based on molybdenum compounds on carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid support.

    Youn, Duck Hyun; Han, Suenghoon; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jae Yul; Park, Hunmin; Choi, Sun Hee; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-05-27

    Highly active and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution have been developed on the basis of molybdenum compounds (Mo2C, Mo2N, and MoS2) on carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid support via a modified urea-glass route. By a simple modification of synthetic variables, the final phases are easily controlled from carbide, nitride to sulfide with homogeneous dispersion of nanocrystals on the CNT-graphene support. Among the prepared catalysts, Mo2C/CNT-graphene shows the highest activity for hydrogen evolution reaction with a small onset overpotential of 62 mV and Tafel slope of 58 mV/dec as well as an excellent stability in acid media. Such enhanced catalytic activity may originate from its low hydrogen binding energy and high conductivity. Moreover, the CNT-graphene hybrid support plays crucial roles to enhance the activity of molybdenum compounds by alleviating aggregation of the nanocrystals, providing a large area to contact with electrolyte, and facilitating the electron transfer.

  15. Inactivated properties of activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles for bacteria and kinetic study.

    Li, Youji; Ma, Mingyuan; Wang, Xiaohu; Wang, Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    The activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2/AC) were prepared by a properly controlled sol-gel method. The effects of activated carbons (AC) support on inactivated properties of TiO2 nanoparticles were evaluated by photocatalytic inactivation experiments of Escherichia coli. The key factors affecting the inactivation efficiency were investigated, including electric power of lamp, temperature, and pH values. The results show that the TiO2/AC composites have high inactivation properties of E. coli in comparison with pure TiO2 powder. The kinetics of photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli was found to follow a pseudo-first order rate law for TiO2/AC composites, and kinetic behavior could be described in terms of a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The values of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the bacteria, K(c), and for the rate constants, k(r), were certainly depended on TiO2 content. At 47 wt.% TiO2 coatings with the highest rate constant, the K(c) and k(r) were 1.17 x 10(-8) L/cfu and 1.43 x 10(6) cfu/(L x min), respectively. The variety of parameters shows significant effects on inactivation rate. The outer layer of bacteria decomposed first resulting in inactivation of cell, and with further illumination, the cells nearly decomposed.

  16. Inactivated properties of activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles for bacteria and kinetic study

    LI Youji; MA Mingyuan; WANG Xiaohu; WANG Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    The activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2/AC) were prepared by a properly controlled sol-gel method. The effects of activated carbons (AC) support on inactivated properties of TiO2 nanoparticles were evaluated by photocatalytic inactivation experiments ofEscherichia coli. The key factors affecting the inactivation efficiency were investigated, including electric power of lamp, temperature, and pH values. The results show that the TiO2/AC composites have high inactivation properties of E. coli in comparison with pure TiO2 powder. The kinetics of photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli was found to follow a pseudo-first order rate law for TiO2/AC composites, and kinetic behavior could be described in terms of a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The values of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the bacteria, Kc, and for the rate constants, kr, were certainly depended on TiO2 content. At 47 variety of parameters shows significant effects on inactivation rate. The outer layer of bacteria decomposed first resulting in inactivation of cell, and with further illumination, the cells nearly decomposed.

  17. In situ adsorption-catalysis system for the removal of o-xylene over an activated carbon supported Pd catalyst

    HUANG Shaoyong; ZHANG Changbin; HE Hong

    2009-01-01

    An activated carbon (AC) supported Pd catalyst was used to develop a highly efficient in situ adsorption-catalysis system for the removal of low concentrations of o-xylene. In this study, three kinds of Pd/AC catalysts were prepared and tested to investigate the synergistic efficiency between adsorption and catalysis for o-xylene removal. The Pd/AC catalyst was first used as an adsorbent to concentrate dilute o-xylene at low temperature. After saturated adsorption, the adsorbed o-xylene was oxidized to CO2 and H2O by raising the temperature of the catalyst bed. The results showed that more than 99% of the adsorbed o-xylene was completely oxidized to CO2 over a 5% Pd/AC catalyst at 140℃. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) were applied to investigate the physical properties of o-xylene adsorption-desorption and the in situ adsorption-catalysis activity of the AC support and Pd/AC catalyst. A synergistic relationship between the AC support and the active Pd species for the removal of low concentrations of o-xylene was established.

  18. Modified Sol-Gel Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Supported Titania Composites with Enhanced Visible Light Induced Photocatalytic Activity

    Quanjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT enhanced MWCNT/TiO2 nanocomposites were synthesized by surface coating of carbon nanotube with mixed phase of anatase and rutile TiO2 through a modified sol-gel approach using tetrabutyl titanate as raw material. The morphological structures and physicochemical properties of the nanocomposites were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, DTA-TG, TEM, and UV-Vis spectra. The results show that TiO2 nanoparticles with size of around 15 nm are closely attached on the sidewall of MWCNT. The nanocomposites possess good absorption properties not only in the ultraviolet but also in the visible light region. Under irradiation of ultraviolet lamp, the prepared composites have the highest photodegradation efficiency of 83% within 4 hours towards the degradation of Methyl Orange (MO aqueous solution. The results indicate that the carbon nanotubes supported TiO2 nanocomposites exhibit high photocatalytic activity and stability, showing great potentials in the treatment of wastewater.

  19. Oxygen reduction at carbon supported ruthenium-selenium catalysts: Selenium as promoter and stabilizer of catalytic activity

    Schulenburg, Hendrik; Hilgendorff, Marcus; Dorbandt, Iris; Radnik, Jörg; Bogdanoff, Peter; Fiechter, Sebastian; Bron, Michael; Tributsch, Helmut

    Carbon supported ruthenium-based catalysts (Ru/C) for the oxygen reduction in acid electrolytes were investigated. A treatment of Ru/C catalysts with selenious acid had a beneficial effect on catalytic activity but no influence on intrinsic kinetic properties, like Tafel slope and hydrogen peroxide generation. Reasons for the increased activity of RuSe x/C catalysts are discussed. Potential step measurements suggest that at potentials around 0.8 V (NHE) a selenium or selenium-oxygen species protects the catalyst from formation of inactive RuO 2-films. This protective effect leads to an enhanced activity of RuSe x/C compared to Ru/C. No evidence was found for a catalytically active stoichiometric selenium compound. The active phase may be described as a ruthenium suboxide RuO x (x RuSe y phase or RuSe yO v (y < 2, v < 2) layer at the particle surface.

  20. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs.

  1. Microwave photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B using TiO2 supported on activated carbon: mechanism implication

    HE Zhong; YANG Shaogui; JU Yongming; SUN Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) was carried out using TiO2 supported on activated carbon (TiO2-AC) under microwave irradiation. Composite catalyst TiO2-AC was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). In the process of microwave-enhanced photocatalysis (MPC), RhB (30 mg/L) was almost completely decoloured in 10 min, and the mineralization efficiency was 96.0% in 20 min. The reaction rate constant of RhB in MPC using TiO2-AC by pseudo first-order reaction kinetics was 4.16 times of that using Degussa P25. Additionally, according to Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS) identification, the major intermediates of RhB in MPC included two kinds of N-de-ethylation intermediates (N,N-diethyl-N'-ethyl-rhodamine (DER)), oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, and phthalic acid, maleic acid, 3-nitrobenzoic acid, et al. The degradation of RhB in MPC was mainly attributed to the destruction of the conjugated structure, and then the intermediates transformed to acid molecules which were mineralized to water and carbon dioxide.

  2. TiO{sub 2} activation by using activated carbon as a support. Part II. Photoreactivity and FTIR study

    Arana, J.; Dona-Rodriguez, J.M.; Tello Rendon, E.; Garriga i Cabo, C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, O.; Herrera-Melian, J.A.; Perez-Pena, J. [Centro Instrumental para el Desarrollo de la Investigacion Aplicada (CIDIA), Parque Cientifico y Tecnologico, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Campus de Tafira, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Colon, G.; Navio, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-08-20

    It has been demonstrated that the modification of the TiO{sub 2} acid-base properties by the presence of activated carbon (AC) considerably modify the interaction of some molecules with the catalyst surface and hence its photocatalytic characteristics. FTIR studies have shown that while phenol interacts with TiO{sub 2} yielding a phenoxide, in the catalyst low AC containing catalysts mixtures the surfacial hydroxylic groups are inserted in the aromatic ring in the symmetric position to the -OH group. Additionally, the 4-aminophenol study shows that the molecule interacts with the TiO{sub 2} surface by means of the amino group, while in the catalyst containing AC the interaction takes place through the hydroxylic group. These results have confirmed the catalyst acid-base properties changes determined by the characterisation studies already performed. Also, it has been observed that catalysts with the lowest AC content show better catalytic behaviour than the untreated TiO{sub 2} and those with higher AC load. Another interesting result is the efficiency of these catalysts under solar irradiation.

  3. TiO{sub 2} activation by using activated carbon as a support. Part I. Surface characterisation and decantability study

    Arana, J.; Dona-Rodriguez, J.M.; Tello Rendon, E.; Garriga i Cabo, C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, O.; Herrera-Melian, J.A.; Perez-Pena, J. [Photocatalysis and Electrochemical Laboratory, Parque Cientifico y Tecnologico, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, E-35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Gran Canaria (Spain); Colon, G.; Navio, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio s/n. 41092, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-08-20

    In the present work, the effect of mixing TiO{sub 2} with different portions of activated carbon (AC) has been studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron micrograph (SEM), laser scattering, FTIR and UV spectrophotometric analysis have shown changes of some of the TiO{sub 2} physico-chemical characteristics in catalysts containing an AC concentration lower than 15% in weight. Changes in the catalyst colour, the vibration bands of the hydroxylic groups from FTIR studies and the UV absorption spectrum have been observed. It seems that these changes correspond with TiO{sub 2} acid-base changes. SEM and TEM studies show a perfect TiO{sub 2} particles distribution on the AC surface in catalysts with lower AC contents, that also yields a homogeneous particle size distribution. One of the most interesting features of the resulting catalysts is their fast decantability in comparison with that of TiO{sub 2}. This way one of the most important drawbacks of photocatalysis, the catalyst separation from the solution, may be overcome.The present study shows that the AC not only exerts a synergistic effect when is combined with TiO{sub 2} as some authors suggest, but it also modifies the catalyst characteristics.

  4. Carbon xerogels as supports for catalysts and electrocatalysts

    Job, Nathalie; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Lambert, Stephanie; Chatenet, Marian; Maillard, Frédéric; Brigaudet, Mathilde; Pirard, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In order to improve mass transport in the pore texture of carbon supported catalysts, the widely used supports (activated carbons or carbon blacks) can be replaced by carbon gels, i.e. texture-tailored materials obtained by drying and pyrolysis of organic gels. Carbon xerogels issued from resorcinol-formaldehyde aqueous gels were used as metal catalyst supports both in gas phase heterogeneous catalysis and in PEM fuel cell electrodes. These materials, composed of very ...

  5. Electrochemical activation of nanostructured carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation

    Martinez-Huerta, M.V., E-mail: mmartinez@icp.csic.e [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Tsiouvaras, N.; Pena, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J.L.; Pastor, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    The factors controlling the behavior and the stability of electrocatalysts based on Pt, Ru and Mo nanoparticles during exhaustive electrochemical treatment are examined. Along this treatment, it has been observed that in the case of ternary catalysts there are pronounced changes in the structure of their surface resulting in electrode activation for methanol and CO electrooxidation, whereas the activity of binary PtRu/C and PtMo/C catalysts decreases. Therefore, the role of both Ru and Mo is crucial for the electrochemical activation of the catalyst, though metal losses do occur during electrochemical process. For the first time a detailed study of this phenomenon is presented, including characterization by HRTEM, TXRF, XRD, electrochemical measurements and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In order to get a deeper insight into the surface structure, chemical state, and stability of the electrocatalyst under reaction conditions, a combination of cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used. By comparing bulk and surface composition, our results point out to the key role of the geometric effect enhanced by previous reduction of the nanoparticles. At the end of the electrochemical treatment, Mo-PtRu/C catalysts surface was restructured with substantial enrichment in Pt and a less pronounced Mo surface enrichment, while Ru is incorporated into the Pt-Mo overlayer. These results underline the possibility of further optimization of the surface structure and composition producing PtRuMo nanoparticles with high methanol and CO oxidation activity.

  6. Operando atomic structure and active sites of TiO2(110)-supported gold nanoparticles during carbon monoxide oxidation.

    Saint-Lager, Marie-Claire; Laoufi, Issam; Bailly, Aude

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that gold nanoparticles supported on TiO2 act as a catalyst for CO oxidation, even below room temperature. Despite extensive studies, the origin of this catalytic activity remains under debate. Indeed, when the particle size decreases, many changes may occur; thus modifying the nanoparticles' electronic properties and consequently their catalytic performances. Thanks to a state-of-the-art home-developed setup, model catalysts can be prepared in ultra-high vacuum and their morphology then studied in operando conditions by Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering, as well as their atomic structure by Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction as a function of their catalytic activity. We previously reported on the existence of a catalytic activity maximum observed for three-dimensional gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm and a height of 6-7 atomic planes. In the present work we correlate this size dependence of the catalytic activity to the nanoparticles' atomic structure. We show that even when their size decreases below the optimum diameter, the gold nanoparticles keep the face-centered cubic structure characteristic of bulk gold. Nevertheless, for these smallest nanoparticles, the lattice parameter presents anisotropic strains with a larger contraction in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Moreover a careful analysis of the atomic-scale morphology around the catalytic activity maximum tends to evidence the role of sites with a specific geometry at the interface between the nanoparticles and the substrate. This argues for models where atoms at the interface periphery act as catalytically active sites for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  7. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths as Catalyst Supports

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  8. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths for Catalyst Supports

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  9. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of La-doped TiO2 supported on activated carbon at the decomposition of methylene orange

    Xing, Jun; Sun, Xiaogang; Qiu, Jingping

    2015-06-01

    A composite photocatalyst (La/TiO2/AC) has been prepared by supporting photoactive La-doped TiO2 (La/TiO2) on activated carbon (AC) via hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate (Ti(OC4H9)4) with La(NO3)3 · 6H2O and Ti(OC4H9)4 as precursors in the presence of activated carbon. The prepared photocatalysts were characterized by BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities of the obtained photocatalysts under UV light are estimated by measuring the degradation rate of methylene orange in aqueous solution. The effect of La-doped content on the photocatalytic activity was studied and the result revealed that 0.2 mol % La/TiO2/AC exhibited highest photoactivity. In addition, the recyclability of the prepared photocatalyst was also confirmed, the photocatalytic activity of La/TiO2/AC remains about 86.5% of its activity as-prepared after being used four times. The photocatalyst therefore may be used as effective catalyst in photooxidation reactions and potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants.

  10. Catalytic hydrothermal treatment of pulping effluent using a mixture of Cu and Mn metals supported on activated carbon as catalyst.

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the performance of activated carbon-supported copper and manganese base catalyst for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of pulping effluent. CWO reaction was performed in a high pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7 l) at temperatures ranging from 120 to 190 °C and oxygen partial pressures of 0.5 to 0.9 MPa with the catalyst concentration of 3 g/l for 3 h duration. With Cu/Mn/AC catalyst at 190 °C temperature and 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressures, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), lignin, and color removals of 73, 71, 86, and 85 %, respectively, were achieved compared to only 52, 51, 53, and 54 % removals during the non-catalytic process. Biodegradability (in terms of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.38 from an initial value of 0.16 after the catalytic reaction. The adsorbed carbonaceous fraction on the used catalyst was also determined which contributed meager TOC reduction of 3-4 %. The leaching test showed dissolution of the metals (i.e., Cu and Mn) from the catalysts in the wastewater during CWO reaction at 190 °C temperature and 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressures. In the future, the investigations should focus on the catalyst reusability.

  11. Photodegradation of Methylene Blue in a Batch Fixed Bed Photoreactor Using Activated Carbon Fibers Supported TiO2 Photocatalyst

    傅平丰; 赵卓; 彭鹏; 戴学刚

    2008-01-01

    A batch fixed bed photoreactor, using felt-form activated carbon fibers (ACF) supported TiO2 photocatalyst(TiO2/ACF), was developed to carry out photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) solution. The effects of TiO2 particle size, loaded TiO2 amount, initial MB concentration, airflow rate and successive run on the decomposition rate were investigated. The results showed that photodegradation process followed a pseudo-first-order reaction kinetic law. The apparent first-order reaction constant kapp was larger than 0.047 min-1 with half reaction time t1/2 shorter than 15 min, which was comparable to reported data using suspended Degussa P-25 TiO2 particles. The high degradation rate was mainly attributed to adsorption of MB molecules onto the surface of TiO2/ACF. The photocatalytic efficiency still remained nearly 90% after 12 successive runs, showing that successive usage of the designed photoreactor was possible. The synergic enhancement effect in combination of adsorption with ACF and photodegradation with TiO2 was proved by comparing MB removal rates in the successive degradation and adsorption runs, respectively.

  12. A novel route to graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} with high electron transfer and photocatalytic activity

    Chen, Xianjie; Liu, Fenglin; Liu, Bing [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Tian, Lihong, E-mail: tian7978@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Wei; Xia, Qinghua [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Mesoporous nanocomposites that graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} are prepared by solvothermal method combined with a post- calcination. • The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization but also provides the carbon source in the process. • The graphite-like carbon hinders the recombination of photogenerated electron and holes efficiently. • The mesoporous carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite shows high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight. - Abstract: Mesoporous graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} (carbon–SnO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were prepared by a modified solvothermal method combined with a post-calcination at 500 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization, but also provides the carbon source in the process. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show a uniform distribution of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the graphite- like carbon surface. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate the presence of strong C–Sn interaction between SnO{sub 2} and graphite-like carbon. Photoelectrochemical measurements confirm that the effective separation of electron–hole pairs on the carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite leads to a high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight irradiation. The nanocomposite materials show a potential application in dealing with the environmental and industrial contaminants under sunlight irradiation.

  13. Influences of species of metals and supports on the hydrogenation activity of carbon-supported metal sulfides catalysts; Tanso biryushi tanji shokubai no suisoka kassei ni taisuru kassei kinzoku oyobi tantaishu no eikyo

    Sakanishi, K.; Hasuo, H.; Taniguchi, H.; Nagamatsu, T.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-10-28

    In order to design catalysts suitable for primary liquefaction stage and secondary upgrading stage respectively in the multi-stage liquefaction process, various carbon-supported catalysts were prepared. Catalytic activities of them were investigated for the hydrogenation of 1-methylnaphthalene, to discuss the influences of metals and carbon species on the catalytic activity. Various water soluble and oil soluble Mo and Ni salts were used for NiMo supported catalysts. Among various carbon supports, Ketjen Black (KB) was effective for preparing the catalyst showing the most excellent hydrogenation activity. The KB and Black Pearl 2000 (BP2000) showing high hydrogenation activity were fine particles having high specific surface area more than 1000 m{sup 2}/g and primary particle diameter around 30 nm. This was inferred to contribute to the high dispersion support of active metals. Since such fine particles of carbon exhibited hydrophobic surface, they were suitable for preparing catalysts from the methanol-soluble metals. Although Ni and Mo added iron-based catalysts provided lower aromatic hydrogenation activity, they exhibited liquefaction activity competing with the NiMo/KB catalyst. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Effect of Zn Content on the physicochemical Characteristics and Photoactivity of ZnO supported Activated Carbon

    Is Fatimah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, synthesis of ZnO dispersed onto activated carbon (ZnO/AC is reported. Synthesis was conducted by using impregnation method by zinc acetate as precursor at varied Zn content. A systematic characterization of ZnO/C materials was performed using XRD, SEM, gas sorption analyzer and diffuse reflectance UV-Visible spectrophotometer. Photoactivity of the materials was studied in phenol removal via photooxidation mechanism. From the study it is confirmed that ZnO dispersion give acceleration of phenol removal refer to surface area contribution. It is no linear correlation of each physical character to the photocatalytic activity.

  15. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-20

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  16. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  17. Removal of 2-ClBP from soil-water system using activated carbon supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Tian; Han, Xiaolin; Ying, Weichi

    2016-09-01

    We explored the feasibility and removal mechanism of removing 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) from soil-water system using granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with nanoscale zerovalent iron (reactive activated carbon or RAC). The RAC samples were successfully synthesized by the liquid precipitation method. The mesoporous GAC based RAC with low iron content (1.32%) exhibited higher 2-ClBP removal efficiency (54.6%) in the water phase. The result of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model implied that the different molecular structures between 2-ClBP and trichloroethylene (TCE) resulted in more difference in dechlorination reaction rates on RAC than adsorption capacities. Compared to removing 2-ClBP in the water phase, RAC removed the 2-ClBP more slowly in the soil phase due to the significant external mass transfer resistance. However, in the soil phase, a better removal capacity of RAC was observed than its base GAC because the chemical dechlorination played a more important role in total removal process for 2-ClBP. This important result verified the effectiveness of RAC for removing 2-ClBP in the soil phase. Although reducing the total RAC removal rate of 2-ClBP, soil organic matter (SOM), especially the soft carbon, also served as an electron transfer medium to promote the dechlorination of 2-ClBP in the long term.

  18. Carbon Supported Engineering NiCo2O4 Hybrid Nanofibers with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Diab Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The design of cheap and efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR electrocatalysts is of a significant importance in sustainable and renewable energy technologies. Therefore, ORR catalysts with superb electrocatalytic activity and durability are becoming a necessity but still remain challenging. Herein, we report C/NiCo2O4 nanocomposite fibers fabricated by a straightforward electrospinning technique followed by a simple sintering process as a promising ORR electrocatalyst in alkaline condition. The mixed-valence oxide can offer numerous accessible active sites. In addition, the as-obtained C/NiCo2O4 hybrid reveals significantly remarkable electrocatalytic performance with a highly positive onset potential of 0.65 V, which is only 50 mV lower than that of commercially available Pt/C catalysts. The analyses indicate that C/NiCo2O4 catalyst can catalyze O2-molecules via direct four electron pathway in a similar behavior as commercial Pt/C catalysts dose. Compared to single NiCo2O4 and carbon free NiCo2O4, the C/NiCo2O4 hybrid displays higher ORR current and more positive half-wave potential. The incorporated carbon matrices are beneficial for fast electron transfer and can significantly impose an outstanding contribution to the electrocatalytic activity. Results indicate that the synthetic strategy hold a potential as efficient route to fabricate highly active nanostructures for practical use in energy technologies.

  19. Preparation of flat carbon support films

    Koning, RI; Oostergetel, GT; Brisson, A

    2003-01-01

    Wrinkling of carbon support films is known to limit the resolution of electron microscopy images of protein two-dimensional crystals. The origin of carbon wrinkling during preparation of the support films was investigated by reflected light microscopy. We observed that carbon films go through severa

  20. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol to Glyceric Acid in Base-Free Aqueous Solution at Room Temperature Catalyzed by Platinum Supported on Carbon Activated with Potassium Hydroxide

    Tan, Hua

    2016-04-18

    Pt supported on KOH-activated mesoporous carbon (K-AMC) was used to catalyze glycerol oxidation under base-free conditions at room temperature. To study the relationship between the carbon surface chemistry and the catalytic performance of the K-AMC-based Pt catalysts, different levels of surface oxygen functional groups (SOFGs) on the AMC supports were induced by thermal treatment at different temperatures under inert or H2 gas. A strong effect of the surface chemistry was observed on AMC-supported Pt catalysts for glycerol oxidation. The presence of carboxylic acid groups impedes the adsorption of glycerol, which leads to the reduction of catalytic activity, whereas the presence of high-desorption-temperature SOFGs, such as phenol, ether, and carbonyl/quinone groups, provide hydrophilicity to the carbon surface that improves the adsorption of glycerol molecules on Pt metal surface, which is beneficial for the catalytic activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    2014-01-01

    Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone) was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32) that contains granular activated carbon (GAC), and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending...

  2. Preparation of Co-Mo catalyst using activated carbon produced from egg shell and SiO2 as support – A hydrogenation study

    Adeniyi Sunday Ogunlaja

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of a series of cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo catalysts supported on SiO2 and carbonized egg shells were investigated using standard procedures; the catalysts were further calcined at the 500 oC temperature to generate the internally consistent set, and the metal atoms content were varied in a regular manner. The ratio 1:4 (Co2+: Mo6+ by weight was employed for the various catalysts prepared. The carbonized egg shells were divided into two parts: the first part was leached with HNO3, as the other one was not leached. Activity tests were run using these catalysts containing leached and unleached carbon for the hydrogenation of methyl orange; the changes in absorbance regarding the unhydrogenated methyl orange at a wavelength of 460 nm were respectively 0.07 and 0.067 when the catalyst containing the leached carbonized egg shell (catalyst A and the catalyst containing the unleached activated carbon (catalyst B were used for the hydrogenation reaction. This confirms that catalyst A is more efficient in hydrogenating methyl orange than catalyst B.

  3. Comparative study on the oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalytic activities of iron phthalocyanines supported on reduced graphene oxide, mesoporous carbon vesicle, and ordered mesoporous carbon

    Li, Mian; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Han, Ce; Guo, Liping

    2014-10-01

    Iron phthalocyanine (FePc) is combined with different carbon matrixes (reduced graphene oxide (RGO), mesoporous carbon vesicle (MCV), and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC)) through non-covalent π-π interaction. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms display that their specific surface areas obey an order of OMC > MCV > RGO. Raman spectroscopy reveals that OMC contains the most surface active sites. Meanwhile, SEM images show that the FePc monomers are more evenly dispersed on OMC than on MCV or RGO. Electrochemical measurements also display that oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is catalyzed more easily on the FePc/OMC than on the FePc, FePc/MCV, and FePc/RGO, undoubtedly testifying the importances of specific surface area and surface active sites of OMC matrix for uniformly dispersing FePc molecules and then improving the ORR performances. Particularly, experiment results reveal that the FePc/OMC catalyst displays an enhanced 4-electron pathway in ORR either in acid or in alkaline media. Meanwhile, the FePc/OMC also shows better durability and superior stability towards methanol crossover than the Pt/OMC catalyst in both acid and alkaline media, potentially making the FePc/OMC a non-precious metal catalyst for ORR in fuel cells.

  4. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  5. Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems

    Cooper, W; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Hanagaki, K; Johnson, M; Kuykendall, W; Lubatti, H; Matulik, M; Nomerotski, A; Quinn, B; Wang, J

    2005-01-01

    Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

  6. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  7. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively.

  8. XAFS study on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina: effect of complexing agent.

    Tsuji, K; Umeki, T; Yokoyama, Y; Kitada, T; Iwanami, Y; Nonaka, O; Shimada, H; Matsubayashi, N; Nishijima, A; Nomura, M

    2001-03-01

    The effect of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a complexing agent on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina was examined by the XAFS technique. The XAFS results revealed that NTA interacted with Co atoms and formed the Co-NTA interaction, while it showed almost no influence on the local structures around Mo atoms. The Co-NTA interaction suppressed the aggregation of cobalt atoms and the interaction between cobalt and alumina during sulfiding, and consequently promoted the formation of the Co-Mo-S phase.

  9. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using sewage sludge based activated carbon supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts.

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Sewage sludge of biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl₂ as activation agent, which supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts (including SBAC) to improve the performance of ozonation of real biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalysts significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal and the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. On the basis of positive effect of higher pH and significant inhibition of radical scavengers in catalytic ozonation, it was deduced that the enhancement of catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals and the possible reaction pathway was proposed. Moreover, the prepared catalysts showed superior stability and most of toxic and refractory compounds were eliminated at successive catalytic ozonation runs. Thus, the process with economical, efficient and sustainable advantages was beneficial to engineering application.

  10. 陶瓷-活性炭球为载体的CWAO催化剂%Ceramic-activated carbon sphere supported catalyst for catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO)

    刘卫民

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic-activated carbon sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) of resin effluent.The effects of the preparation conditions,such as ceramic-activated carbon sphere support,Ru loading,macro-pore diameter of ceramic sphere,etc.on the catalytic activity and stability were investigated.The results show that the catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120 Ru/KC-80 Ru/KC-60 KC-120 without catalysts.It is found that the 3% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displayed highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 120 min.Chemical oxygen demand(COD) and phenol removal were about 91% and 96%,respectively,at the reaction temperature of 200℃,oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa.%以陶瓷-活性炭球为载体制备载Ru催化剂,用于催化湿式氧化(CWAO)法处理酚醛树脂废水,考察了陶瓷-活性炭球载体、Ru负载量和陶瓷球宏孔孔径等对催化剂的催化活性和稳定性的影响。实验结果表明,催化剂催化活性的顺序为:Ru/KC-120〉Ru/KC-80〉Ru/KC-60〉KC-120〉无催化剂。在200℃,氧气分压为1.5 MPa等条件下,催化湿式氧化酚醛树脂废水,3%Ru/KC-120催化剂表现良好的催化活性与稳定性,在120 min内,COD和苯酚去除率分别达到91%和96%。

  11. Catalytic Sorption of (Chloro)Benzene and Napthalene in Aqueous Solutions by Granular Activated Carbon Supported Bimetallic Iron and Palladium Nanoparticles

    Adsorption of benzene, chlorobenzene, and naphthalene on commercially available granular activated carbon (GAC) and bimetallic nanoparticle (Fe/Pd) loaded GAC was investigated for the potential use in active capping of contaminated sediments. Freundlich and Langmuir linearizatio...

  12. Heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of acid red B over Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported on activated carbon fiber

    Lan, Huachun [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences,China (China); Wang, Aiming [Department of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University,China (China); Liu, Ruiping, E-mail: liuruiping@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences,China (China); Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences,China (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with small particle size was highly dispersed on activated carbon fiber. • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF exhibited higher photo-Fenton activity toward ARB degradation. • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF has an excellent long-term stability without obvious deactivation. - Abstract: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported on activated carbon fiber (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF) was prepared via an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and BET analysis. The results indicated that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with small particle size was highly dispersed on the surface of the ACF and the introduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} did not change the ACF pore structure. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF exhibited a higher Fenton efficiency for the degradation of acid red B (ARB), especially under simulated solar irradiation. Complete decoloration of the ARB solution and 43% removal of TOC could be achieved within 200 min under optimal conditions. It was verified that more ·OH radicals were generated in the photo-assisted Fenton process and involved as active species in ARB degradation. FTIR analysis indicated that the degradation of ARB was initiated through the cleavage of −N=N−, followed by hydroxylation and opening of phenyl rings to form aliphatic acids, and further oxidation of aliphatic acids would produce CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Moreover, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF maintained its activity after being reused 4 times and the release of iron from the catalyst was found to be insignificant during the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes, indicating that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ACF had good long-term stability.

  13. Application of an Activated Carbon-Based Support for Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Spectrophotometric Determination of Tartrazine in Commercial Beverages

    Rodríguez, José A.; Escamilla-Lara, Karen A.; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Miranda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for magnetic solid phase extraction of tartrazine from nonalcoholic beverages. The method involves the extraction and clean-up by activated carbon covered with magnetite dispersed in the sample, followed by the magnetic isolation and desorption of the analyte by basified methanol. The tartrazine eluted from the magnetic support was determined by spectrophotometry. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve ranges from 3 to 30 mg L−1, with a limit of detection of 1 mg L−1. The method was validated by comparing the results with those obtained by HPLC. A precision of <5.0% was obtained in all cases and no significant differences were observed (P < 0.05). PMID:25873965

  14. Application of an Activated Carbon-Based Support for Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Spectrophotometric Determination of Tartrazine in Commercial Beverages

    José A. Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented for magnetic solid phase extraction of tartrazine from nonalcoholic beverages. The method involves the extraction and clean-up by activated carbon covered with magnetite dispersed in the sample, followed by the magnetic isolation and desorption of the analyte by basified methanol. The tartrazine eluted from the magnetic support was determined by spectrophotometry. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve ranges from 3 to 30 mg L−1, with a limit of detection of 1 mg L−1. The method was validated by comparing the results with those obtained by HPLC. A precision of <5.0% was obtained in all cases and no significant differences were observed (P<0.05.

  15. Application of an activated carbon-based support for magnetic solid phase extraction followed by spectrophotometric determination of tartrazine in commercial beverages.

    Rodríguez, José A; Escamilla-Lara, Karen A; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Miranda, Jose M; Páez-Hernández, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for magnetic solid phase extraction of tartrazine from nonalcoholic beverages. The method involves the extraction and clean-up by activated carbon covered with magnetite dispersed in the sample, followed by the magnetic isolation and desorption of the analyte by basified methanol. The tartrazine eluted from the magnetic support was determined by spectrophotometry. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve ranges from 3 to 30 mg L(-1), with a limit of detection of 1 mg L(-1). The method was validated by comparing the results with those obtained by HPLC. A precision of <5.0% was obtained in all cases and no significant differences were observed (P < 0.05).

  16. Assessment of the ethanol oxidation activity and durability of Pt catalysts with or without a carbon support using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Saleh, Farhana S.; Easton, E. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We compared the stability and performance of 3 commercially available Johnson Matthey catalysts with various Pt loadings (20, 40 and 100%) using two different accelerated durability testing (ADT) protocols. The various Pt-loaded catalysts were tested by means of a series of intermittent life tests (1, 200, 400, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 cycles). The electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss of electrode was investigated by electrochemical technique (CV). The use of EIS as an accelerated-testing protocol distinctly elucidates the extent of degradation of Johnson Matthey catalysts with various Pt loading. Using EIS, it was possible to show that Pt-black catalyst layers suffer from increased electronic resistance over the course of ADT which is not observed when a corrosion stable carbon support is present. The effect of Pt loading was further elucidated by comparing the electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst layers towards ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The catalyst layer with the lowest Pt loading showed the enhanced EOR performance.

  17. Conceptual design and scaled experimental validation of an actively damped carbon tie rods support system for the stabilization of future particle collider superstructures.

    Collette, C; Tshilumba, D; Fueyo-Rosa, L; Romanescu, I

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a simple solution to increase the stability of the large superstructures supporting the final electromagnets of future linear particle collider. It consists of active carbon fiber tie rods, fixed at one end on the structure and at the other end to the detector through active tendons. In the first part of the paper, the solution has been tested on a finite element model of one half of the CLIC_ILD final focus structure. With a reasonable design, it is shown numerically that the compliance can be decreased by at least a factor 4, i.e., that the structure is 4 times more robust to technical noise at low frequency. Two additional features of the active rods are that they can also actively damp the structural resonances and realign the superstructures. The second part of the paper presents a successful experimental validation of the concept, applied to a scaled test bench, especially designed to contain the same modal characteristics as the full scale superstructure.

  18. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  19. Preparation, characterization and performance of a novel visible light responsive spherical activated carbon-supported and Er3+:YFeO3-doped TiO2 photocatalyst.

    Hou, Dianxun; Feng, Liang; Zhang, Jianbin; Dong, Shuangshi; Zhou, Dandan; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2012-01-15

    A novel spherical activated carbon (SAC) supported and Er(3+):YFeO(3)-doped TiO(2) visible-light responsive photocatalyst (Er(3+):YFeO(3)/TiO(2)-SAC) was synthesized by a modified sol-gel method with ultrasonic dispersion. It was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), powder X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer (DRS). The photocatalytic activity of Er(3+):YFeO(3)/TiO(2)-SAC was evaluated for degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. The effects of calcination temperature and irradiation time on its photocatalytic activity were examined. The experimental results indicated that Er(3+):YFeO(3) could function as an upconversion luminescence agent, enabling photocatalytic degradation of MO by TiO(2) under visible light. The Er(3+):YFeO(3)/TiO(2) calcinated at 700°C showed the highest photocatalytic capability compared to those calcinated at other temperatures. The photocatalytic degradation of MO followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. Although the photocatalyst showed a good physical stability and could tolerate a shear force up to 25 × 10(-3)N/g, its photocatalytic activity decreased over a four-cycle of reuse in concentrated MO solution, indicating that the decreased activity was ascribed to the fouling of catalyst surface by MO during the degradation process. However, the fouled Er(3+):YFeO(3)/TiO(2)-SAC could be regenerated through water rinsing-calcination or acid rinsing-calcination treatment.

  20. Understanding the Effects of Surface Chemistry and Microstructure on the Activity and Stability of Pt Electrocatalysts on Non-Carbon Supports

    Mustain, William [Univ. of Conneticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the effects of the chemical composition and microstructure of the electrocatalyst support on the activity, stability and utilization of supported Pt clusters.

  1. Adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol by mixed culture using activated carbon as a supporting medium-reactor performance and model verification

    Lin, Yen-Hui

    2016-12-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by attached and suspended biomass on activated carbon process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included 2-CP adsorption by activated carbon, 2-CP mass transport diffusion in biofilm, and biodegradation by attached and suspended biomass. Batch kinetic tests were performed to determine surface diffusivity of 2-CP, adsorption parameters for 2-CP, and biokinetic parameters of biomass. Experiments were conducted using a biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor system with high recycled rate to approximate a completely mixed flow reactor for model verification. Concentration profiles of 2-CP by model predictions indicated that biofilm bioregenerated the activated carbon by lowering the 2-CP concentration at the biofilm-activated carbon interface as the biofilm grew thicker. The removal efficiency of 2-CP by biomass was approximately 98.5% when 2-CP concentration in the influent was around 190.5 mg L-1 at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended biomass reached up to about 25.3 mg L-1 while the thickness of attached biomass was estimated to be 636 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model predictions.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the activity and stability of carbon supported PtMo alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Hassan, Ayaz; Carreras, Alejo; Trincavelli, Jorge; Ticianelli, Edson Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the activity, stability and CO tolerance of PtMo/C catalysts was studied, due to their applicability in the anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To this purpose, a carbon supported PtMo (60:40) alloy electrocatalyst was synthesized by the formic acid reduction method, and samples of this catalyst were heat-treated at various temperatures ranging between 400 and 700 °C. The samples were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS). Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the stability, and polarization curves were used to investigate the performance of all materials as CO tolerant anode on a PEM single cell text fixture. The catalyst treated at 600 °C, for which the average crystallite size was 16.7 nm, showed the highest hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO, giving an overpotential induced by CO contamination of 100 mV at 1 Acm-2. This catalyst also showed a better stability up to 5000 potential cycles of cyclic voltammetry, as compared to the untreated catalyst. CV, SEM and WDS results indicated that a partial dissolution of Mo and its migration/diffusion from the anode to the cathode occurs during the single cell cycling. Polarization results showed that the catalytic activity and the stability can be improved by a heat treatment, in spite of a growth of the catalyst particles.

  3. Nanoporous carbon supported metal particles: their synthesis and characterisation

    Yang Yunxia, E-mail: yunxia.yang@csiro.au; Tang Liangguang; Burke, Nick; Chiang, Ken [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    In the current work, a simplified hard templating approach is used to synthesise metal (Ag, Rh, Ir and Pt) containing structured carbon. The target metals are first introduced into the NaY zeolite template by wetness impregnation. The metals are carried in the super cages of the zeolite and subsequently embedded in the final structures after the steps of carbonisation and the template removal. Scanning electron microscopy images have confirmed that the carbon structures produced by this method retain the morphology of the original template. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of dispersed metal particles in all the carbon structures produced. The metal loadings in these templated structures can reach 35 wt% without significant losses of surface areas and pore volumes. Selected carbon supported metals are tested for their catalytic activity for the methanation of carbon monoxide. The finding suggested that this method is effective in preparing metal nanoparticles for use as catalysts.

  4. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide over carbon supported palladium catalyst

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Saxena, Amit [Centre for Fire Explosive and Environmental Safety, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Shah, Dilip; Mahato, T.H. [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Singh, Beer, E-mail: beerbs5@rediffmail.com [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Shrivastava, A.R.; Gutch, P.K. [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Shinde, C.P. [School of Studies in Chemistry, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic removal of CO over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Pd %, CO conc., humidity, GHSV and reaction environment were studied. - Abstract: Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared by impregnation of palladium chloride using incipient wetness technique, which was followed by liquid phase reduction with formaldehyde. Thereafter, Pd/C catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffractometery, scanning electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermo gravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and surface characterization techniques. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide (CO) over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Pd/C catalyst was found to be continuously converting CO to CO{sub 2} through the catalyzed reaction, i.e., CO + 1/2O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2}. Pd/C catalyst provided excellent protection against CO. Effects of palladium wt%, CO concentration, humidity, space velocity and reaction environment were also studied on the breakthrough behavior of CO.

  5. Oxygen reduction catalyzed by gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets

    Wang, Qiannan; Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Fucai; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Electrochemical studies showed that the composites demonstrated apparent ORR activity in alkaline media, and the sample with a 30% Au mass loading was identified as the best catalyst among the series, with a performance comparable to that of commercial Pt/C, but superior to those of Au102 nanoclusters and carbon nanosheets alone, within the context of onset potential, kinetic current density, and durability. The results suggest an effective approach to the preparation of high-performance ORR catalysts based on gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets.Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as

  6. Hydrogen isotherms in palladium loaded carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Martinez, M. T.; Anson, A.; Lafuente, E.; Urriolabeitia, E.; Navarro, R.; Benito, A. M.; Maser, W. K.

    2005-07-01

    Session 5a In order to increase the hydrogen sorption capacity of carbon materials, a sample of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the activated carbon MAXSORB have been loaded with palladium nanoparticles. While carbon materials adsorb hydrogen due to physical interactions, palladium can capture hydrogen into the bulk structure or chemically react to form hydrides. Experiental SWNTs have been synthesized in an electric arc reactor, using Ni and Y as catalysts in a 660 mbar He atmosphere. MAXSORB is a commercial activated carbon obtained from petroleum coke through a chemical treatment with KOH. Palladium has been deposited over the carbon support by means of a reflux method in a solution of an organometallic complex. Different samples have been prepared depending on the weight ratio (Carbon material / Pd) in the original reactants. The effectiveness of the deposition method has been examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), induction coupled plasma spectrometry (ICPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The volumetric system Autosorb-1 from Quantachrome Instruments has been used to obtain the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K for all the materials. The hydrogen isotherms at 77 K and room temperature and up to 800 torr have also been obtained in the Autosorb-1. The BET specific surface area and the micropore volume have been calculated from the nitrogen adsorption data. High pressure hydrogen isotherms up to 90 bar have been carried out at room temperature in a VTI system provided with a Rubotherm microbalance. (Author)

  7. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon.

  8. Controlled synthesis of ordered mesoporous TiO{sub 2}-supported on activated carbon and pore-pore synergistic photocatalytic performance

    Liu, Chen; Li, Youji, E-mail: bcclyj@163.com; Xu, Peng; Li, Ming; Zeng, Mengxiong

    2015-01-15

    Ordered mesoporous titania/activated carbon (OMTAC) were prepared by the template technique with the aid of an ultrasonic method. To explore the relationship between the structure and properties of OMTAC, the ultrasonic-sol-gel technique was applied to synthesize titania dioxide/activated carbon (USTAC). The obtained material structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption – desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV diffuse reflectance (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra. OMTAC photocatalytic performance was evaluated by means of acid red B (ARB) degradation. The pore-pore synergistic amplification mechanism of photocatalysis was proposed and the effects of catalytic conditions on synergistic amplification were explored. The results show that compared to OMT, OMTAC has a small particle size, low electron-hole recombination rate and high surface areas, due to the hindering effect of activated carbon on crystalline grain growth and an ordered mesoporous structure of titania. OMTAC has higher catalytic activity than USTAC, OMT and P25, due to pore-pore synergistic amplification effect of photocatalysis. The OMT content is strongly affected OMTAC photocatalytic activity, and OMTAC-3 (loading 3 times of OMT on AC) has the highest photocatalytic activity due to high hydroxyl concentration, surface area and low electron-hole recombination rate. When ARB is degraded by OMTAC-3, the optimum catalytic conditions are a catalyst concentration of 1 g/L, an ARB concentration of 15 mg/L and a pH of 5. - Graphical abstract: We investigate the influence of mesoporous titania content upon the photocatalytic performance of OMTAC in acid red B degradation. - Highlights: • OMTAC were fabricated by a template technique with the aid of an ultrasonic method. • OMTAC show high photoactivity for acid red B (ARB) degradation. • OMTAC also show pore-pore synergistic photocatalytic

  9. Carbon Aerogel-Supported Pt Catalysts for the Hydrogenolysis and Isomerization of n-Butane: Influence of the Carbonization Temperature of the Support and Pt Particle Size

    Marta B. Dawidziuk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels prepared at different carbonization temperatures and with varying mesopore volumes were used as supports for Pt catalysts to study the n-C4H10/H2 reaction. Mean Pt particle size depended on the mesopore volume of the support, showing a linear decrease when the mesopore volume increased. The turnover frequency (TOF for hydrogenolysis was much higher than for isomerization in catalysts supported on carbon aerogels obtained at 900–950 °C. However, both TOF values were similar in catalysts supported on the carbon aerogel obtained at 500 °C. TOF for hydrogenolysis and isomerization were related to the mean Pt particle size in catalysts supported on carbon aerogels obtained at 900–950 °C. In addition, both reactions showed a compensation effect between the activation energy and pre-exponential factor, indicating that they have the same intermediate, i.e., the chemisorbed dehydrogenated alkane.

  10. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  11. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  12. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon hollow fibers

    2009-01-01

    Carbon hollow fibers were prepared with regenerated cellulose or polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using sodium phosphate dibasic followed by the carbonization process. The activation process increases the adsorption properties of fibers which is more prominent for active carbone fibers obtained from the cellulose precursor. Chemical activation with sodium phosphate dibasic produces an active carbon material with both mesopores and micropores.

  13. NiCo2O4 spinel/ordered mesoporous carbons as noble-metal free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction and the influence of structure of catalyst support on the electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4

    Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Nsabimana, Anaclet; Guo, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Three ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) with different structures are used as catalyst supports for growth of NiCo2O4 spinel. The high surface area of OMCs provides more active sites to adsorb metal precursors. The porous structure confines the growth of NiCo2O4 and supplies more efficient transport passage for reactant molecules to access the active sites. Due to the structural characteristics of OMCs and catalytic properties of NiCo2O4, NiCo2O4/OMCs composites are highly active, cheap, and selective noble metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. The electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4 supported on three OMCs with different structures, surface areas, pore sizes, pore volumes, and defective sites is studied. NiCo2O4/OMCs composites may be further used as efficient and inexpensive noble metal-free ORR catalysts in alkaline solution.

  14. The Effect of Catalyst Support on the Decomposition of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon

    Sharif Hussein Sharif Zein Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of methane into carbon and hydrogen over Cu/Ni supported catalysts was investigated. The catalytic activities and the lifetimes of the catalysts were studied. Cu/Ni supported on TiO2 showed high activity and long lifetime for the reaction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the relationship between the catalyst activity and the formation of the filamentous carbon over the catalyst after methane decomposition. While different types of filamentous carbon formed on the various Cu/Ni supported catalysts, an attractive carbon nanotubes was observed in the Cu/Ni supported on TiO2. Key Words:  Methane decomposition, carbon nanotube, Cu/Ni supported catalysts.

  15. Novel Carbon Nanotubes-supported NiB Amorphors Alloy Catalyst for Benzene Hydrogenation

    Mei Hua YANG; Rong Bin ZHANG; Feng Yi LI

    2004-01-01

    The NiB amorphous alloy catalysts supported on CNTs and alumina were prepared by impregnation and chemical reduction. The gas-phase benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction to evaluate the catalytic activity. The result showed that the NiB amorphous alloy catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes exhibited higher activity than that supported on alumina.

  16. Catalytic Activity of Nanosized CuO-ZnO Supported on Titanium Chips in Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    Ahn, Ho-Geun; Lee, Hwan-Gyu; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kang, Byeong-Mo; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, titanium chips (TC) generated from industrial facilities was utilized as TiO2 support for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) over Cu-based catalysts. Nano-sized CuO and ZnO catalysts were deposited on TiO2 support using a co-precipitation (CP) method (CuO-ZnO/TiO2), where the thermal treatment of TC and the particle size of TiC2 are optimized on CO2 conversion under different reaction temperature and contact time. Direct hydrogenation of CO2 to CH3OH over CuO-ZnO/TiO2 catalysts was achieved and the maximum selectivity (22%) and yield (18.2%) of CH3OH were obtained in the range of reaction temperature 210-240 degrees C under the 30 bar. The selectivity was readily increased by increasing the flow rate, which does not affect much to the CO2 conversion and CH3OH yield.

  17. Carbon nanotube synthesis with different support materials and catalysts

    Gümüş, Fatih; Yuca, Neslihan; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Having remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of interest. Their mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical properties make CNTs suitable for several applications such as electronic devices, hydrogen storage, textile, drug delivery etc. CNTs have been synthesized by various methods, such as arc discharge, laser ablation and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). In comparison with the other techniques, CCVD is widely used as it offers a promising route for mass production. High capability of decomposing hydrocarbon formation is desired for the selected catalysts. Therefore, transition metals which are in the nanometer scale are the most effective catalysts. The common transition metals that are being used are Fe, Co, Ni and their binary alloys. The impregnation of the catalysts over the support material has a crucial importance for the CNT production. In this study, the influence of the support materials on the catalytic activity of metals was investigated. CNTs have been synthesized over alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2) and magnesium oxide (MgO) supported Fe, Co, Fe-Co catalysts. Catalyst - support material combinations have been investigated and optimum values for each were compared. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced at 800°C. The duration of synthesis was 30 minutes for all support materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  18. 不同方法制备碳载金催化剂对臭氧的催化分解%Catalytic Activity of Au Supported on Activated Carbon Catalyst Preparing with Different Methods for Ozone Decomposition

    张博; 徐九华; 李宏煦; 史蕊

    2011-01-01

    采用浸渍法和溶胶负载法制备以改性活性碳为载体以纳米金为活性组分的催化剂,通过BET,SEM和XPS表征制备方法对催化剂比表面积、孔隙结构、表面形貌及表面元素组成的影响,测试催化剂在室温下对低浓度臭氧的催化分解性能.结果显示,在室温,相对湿度为45±5%,空速为96000h(-1).臭氧初始浓度为50mg/m3,气体与催化剂的接触时间为0.04s的条件下,在1200min时采用浸渍法制备的催化剂对臭氧的分解率为85%,而溶胶负载法制备的催化剂此时对臭氧的分解效率仍在94%以上.采用溶胶负载法制备的催化剂纳米金颗粒粒径更小、更均匀,在催化剂表面的覆盖率更大是其催化活性更高的主要原因.%The catalysts of nano-particle Au supported by modified activated carbon are prepared with the methods of impregnation and sol-immobilized, and characterized by BET, SEM and XPS to consider the influence of preparation method to its specific surface area, pore structure, surface topography and composition.The catalytic activity for low-level ozone decomposition at ambient temperature of the catalysts is evaluated.The results show that under the condition of 50mg/m3 ozone in air, space velocity 96000 h-1, relative humidity 45 ±5% , contact time 0.04s and ambient temperature, the ozone removal ratio with the catalyst prepared by impregnation method is at 85% within 1200min, however, the ozone removal ratio with the catalyst by sol-immobilized method could be maintained above 94%.This is due to the reason that the supported gold nanoparticles in the catalyst prepared with sol-immobilized method are much smaller and more uniformly dispersed on the activated carbon, exhibit the higher fraction of coverage.

  19. ACTIVATED CARBON (CHARCOAL OBTAINING . APPLICATION

    Florin CIOFU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The activated carbon is a microporous sorbent with a very large adsorption area that can reach in some cases even 1500sqm / gram. Activated carbon is produced from any organic material with high carbon content: coal, wood, peat or moor coal, coconut shells. The granular activated charcoal is most commonly produced by grinding the raw material, adding a suitable binder to provide the desired hardness and shape. Enabling coal is a complete process through which the raw material is fully exposed to temperatures between 600-900 degrees C, in the absence of oxygen, usually in a domestic atmosphere as gases such as nitrogen or argon; as material that results from this process is exposed in an atmosphere of oxygen and steam at a temperature in the interval from 600 - 1200 degrees C.

  20. Graphitic mesoporous carbon based on aromatic polycondensation as catalyst support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Liu, Peng; Kong, Jiangrong; Liu, Yaru; Liu, Qicheng; Zhu, Hongze

    2015-03-01

    Mesoporous carbon is constructed by monolithic polyaromatic mesophase deriving from the hexane insoluble of coal-tar pitch. This carbon material exhibits spherical morphology and layered crystallite, and thereby can be graphitized at 900 °C without destroying the mesoporous structure. Electrochemical measurements indicate that graphitic mesoporous carbon (GMC) support not only improves the activity of Pt electrocatalyst to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), but also shows higher corrosion resistance than commercial XC-72 carbon black in the acid cathode environment.

  1. PROGRESS ON ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    2002-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber is one kind of important adsorption materials. These novel fibrousadsorbents have high specific surface areas or abundant functional groups, which make them havegreater adsorption/desorption rates and larger adsorption capacities than other adsorbents. They canbe prepared as bundle, paper, cloth and felt to meet various technical requirement. They also showreduction property. In this paper the latest progress on the studies of the preparation and adsorptionproperties of activated carbon fibers is reviewed. The application of these materials in drinking waterpurification, environmental control, resource recovery, chemical industry, and in medicine and healthcare is also presented.

  2. Study on Direct Synthesis of Diphenyl Carbonate with Heterogeneous Catalytic Reaction (Ⅵ) Effect of Sn Loading Method and Content on Activity of Sn-Pd Supported Catalyst

    张光旭; 吴元欣; 马沛生; 田崎峰; 吴广文; 李定或

    2004-01-01

    The compound metal oxide LaxPbyMnzO used as support was prepared by the sol-gel method, and the catalyst in which Pd was used as active component and Sn as co-active component for direct synthesis of diphenyl carbonate (DPC) with heterogeneous catalytic reaction was obtained by co-calcination and precipitation respectively.The catalyst was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM respectively. The specific surface area of catalysts was measured by ChemBET3000 instrument, and the activity of the catalysts was tested by the synthesis of DPC in a pressured reactor. The results showed that when the co-active component Sn was added by co-calcination method A, its loading content was equal to 14.43% and active component Pd was loaded by precipitation, the yield and selectivity of DPC could reach 26.78% and 99% respectively.

  3. Effect of Activated Carbon Doping on Structure and Property of Porous Alumina Support%活性炭掺杂对多孔氧化铝陶瓷支撑体结构及性能的影响

    董国祥; 漆虹; 徐南平

    2012-01-01

    Disk porous alumina supports were fabricated by dry-pressing method using u-Al2O3 powder (with average particle size of 4 μm) as raw materials, together with activated carbon as pore-forming agent. Effect of activated carbon doping on structures and proper- ties of porous alumina support was investigated. The oxidation reaction of activated carbon during high temperature sintering process could greatly increase the porosity and, hence, resulted in high permeability of porous alumina support. The porosity, average pore size, three point bending strength and pure water flux of the alumina support with 17% (mass fraction) activated carbon dopant sintered at 1450 ℃ were 45.8%, 2.1 μm, 44.6 MPa and 88 ma/(m^2·h·MPa), respectively. The three point bending strength of the support remained at 23.4 MPa even after immersed in 10% NaOH (80 ℃) for 20 d, indicating a comparatively good corrosion resistance to alkali solutions.%以平均粒径为4μm的a-Al2O3为起始原料、活性炭为成孔剂,通过干压成型法制备片状多孔Al2O3支撑体。研究了活性炭含量对多孔氧化铝支撑体结构和性能的影响。结果表明:活性炭在高温烧成过程中的氧化可显著提高支撑体的孔隙率,进而提高其渗透性能。当活性炭添加量为17%(质量分数)、烧成温度为1450℃时,支撑体的孔隙率、平均孔径、三点抗弯强度和纯水渗透通量分别达到45.8%,2.1μm,44.6MPa和88m3/(m^2·h·MPa)。经过80℃、10%NaOH溶液腐蚀20d后,支撑体的三点抗弯强度仍可以维持在23.4MPa,表明支撑体具有较好的耐碱腐蚀性能。

  4. ACTIVATION ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF DIBENZOFURAN ON ACTIVATED CARBONS

    LI Xiang; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; LUO Lingai

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of commercial activated carbons, such as Norit RB1, Monolith and Chemviron activated carbons, were used as adsorbents for adsorption of dibenzofuran. The average pore size and specific surface area of these activated carbons were measured. Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons, and then the activation energy for desorption of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons was estimated. The results showed that the Chemviron and the Norit RB1 activated carbon maintained higher specific surface area and larger micropore pore volume in comparison with the Monolith activated carbon, and the activation energy for the desorption of dibenzofuran on these two activated carbons was higher than that on the Monolith activated carbon. The smaller the pore of the activated carbon was, the higher the activated energy of dibenzofuran desorption was.

  5. A kinetic model for describing effect of the external surface concentration of TiO2 on the reactivity of egg-shell activated carbon supported TiO2 photocatalyst

    2007-01-01

    The porous support supported TiO2 is considered to be the promising photocatalyst due to the fact that it is easily recovered from water and has high capacity to mineralize pollutants. Obviously, the expected structure of this kind of photocatalyst is egg-shell, that is, TiO2 is mainly on the external surface of the porous support. The reactivity of the supported photocatalyst strongly depends on the concentration of TiO2 on the external surface of the porous support. In this study, a kinetic model was developed to describe the effect of the external surface concentration of TiO2 (CESC) on the reactivity of egg-shell activated carbon (AC) supported TiO2 photocatalysts. It was found that the obtained model precisely described the effect of CESC, on the reactivity of TiO2/AC photocatalysts. This study can be used to deeply understand the performance of TiO2/AC catalysts and to provide valuable information on designing efficient supported TiO2 photocatalysts.

  6. Pd and Pt-Ru anode electrocatalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their use in passive and active direct alcohol fuel cells with an anion-exchange membrane (alcohol = methanol, ethanol, glycerol)

    Bambagioni, Valentina; Bianchini, Claudio; Marchionni, Andrea; Filippi, Jonathan; Vizza, Francesco; Teddy, Jacques; Serp, Philippe; Zhiani, Mohammad

    Palladium and platinum-ruthenium nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are prepared by the impregnation-reduction procedure. The materials obtained, Pd/ MWCNT and Pt-Ru/ MWCNT, are characterized by TEM, ICP-AES and XRPD. Electrodes coated with Pd/ MWCNT are scrutinized for the oxidation of methanol, ethanol or glycerol in 2 M KOH solution in half cells. The catalyst is very active for the oxidation of all alcohols, with glycerol providing the best performance in terms of specific current density and ethanol showing the lowest onset potential. Membrane-electrode assemblies have been fabricated using Pd/ MWCNT anodes, commercial cathodes and anion-exchange membrane and evaluated in both single passive and active direct alcohol fuel cells fed with aqueous solutions of 10 wt.% methanol, 10 wt.% ethanol or 5 wt.% glycerol. Pd/ MWCNT exhibits unrivalled activity as anode electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation. The analysis of the anode exhausts shows that ethanol is selectively oxidized to acetic acid, detected as acetate ion in the alkaline media of the reaction, while methanol yields carbonate and formate. A much wider product distribution, including glycolate, glycerate, tartronate, oxalate, formate and carbonate, is obtained from the oxidation of glycerol. The results obtained with Pt-Ru/ MWCNT anodes in acid media are largely inferior to those provided by Pd/ MWCNT electrodes in alkaline media.

  7. Carbon paper supported Pt/Au catalysts prepared via Cu underpotential deposition-redox replacement and investigation of their electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    Khosravi, Mohsen; Amini, Mohammad K. [Chemistry Department, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81744-73441 (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Through a simple and rapid method, carbon papers (CPs) were coated with Au and the resulting Au/CP substrates were used for the preparation of Pt/Au/CP by Cu underpotential deposition (Cu UPD) and redox replacement technique. A series of Pt{sub n}/Au/CP catalysts (where n = number of UPD-redox replacement cycles) were synthesized and their electrochemical properties for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were investigated by electrochemical measurements. The Pt{sub n}/Au/CP electrodes show higher electrocatalytic activity and enhanced poison tolerance for the MOR as compared to a commercial Pt/C on CP (Pt/C/CP). The highest mass specific activity and Pt utilization efficiency for MOR was observed on Pt{sub 1}/Au/CP with a thickness close to a monatomic Pt layer. Chronoamperometric tests in methanol solution revealed that Pt{sub n}/Au/CPs have much higher CO tolerance compared to Pt/C/CP. Among the Pt{sub n}/Au/CPs, CO tolerance decreases with increasing the amount of deposited Pt, indicating that the exposed Au atoms in close proximity to Pt plays a positive role against CO poisoning. Compared with the Pt/C/CP, all the Pt{sub n}/Au/CP electrodes show more positive onset potentials and lower overpotentials for ORR. For instance, the onset potential of ORR is 150 mV more positive and the overpotential is {proportional_to}140 mV lower on Pt{sub 4}/Au/CP with respect to Pt/C/CP. (author)

  8. States of Carbon Nanotube Supported Mo-Based HDS Catalysts

    Hongyan Shang; Chenguang Liu; Yongqiang Xu; Jieshan Qiu; Fei Wei

    2006-01-01

    The dispersion of the active phase and loading capacity of the Mo species on carbon nanotube (CNT) was studied by the XRD technique. The reducibility properties of Co-Mo catalysts in the oxide state over CNTs were investigated by TPR, while the sulfided Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were characterized by means of the XRD and LRS techniques. The activity and selectivity with respect to the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) performances on carbon nanotube supported Co-Mo catalysts were evaluated. It was found that the main active molybdenum species in the oxide state MoO3/CNT catalysts were MoO2, but not MoO3, as generally expected. The maximum loading before the formation of the bulk phase was lower than 6% (percent by mass, based on MoO3). TPR studies revealed that the active species in the oxide state Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were reduced more easily at relatively lower temperatures in comparison to those of the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, indicating that the CNT support promoted or favored the reduction of the active species. The active species of a Co-Mo-0.7/CNT catalyst were more easily reduced than those of the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts with Co/Mo atomic ratios of 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5, respectively, suggesting that the Co/Mo atomic ratio has a great effect on the reducibility of the active species. It was found that the incorporation of cobalt improved the dispersion of the molybdenum species on the support, and a phenomenon of mobilization and re-dispersion had occurred during the sulfurization process, resulting in low valence state Mo3S4 and Co-MoS2.17 active phases. HDS measurements showed that the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more active than the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3 ones for the desulfurization of DBT, and the hydrogenolysis/hydrogenation selectivity of the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts was also much higher than those of the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3. The Co-Mo/CNT catalyst with a Co/Mo atomic ratio of 0.7 showed the highest activity, whereas the catalyst with a Co/Mo atomic ratio of 0.35 had the highest selectivity.

  9. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  10. Copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial for preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide

    高美怡; 江楠; 赵宇宏; 徐长进; 苏海全; 曾尚红

    2016-01-01

    The CuxO-CeO2/Fe@CNSs, CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Co and CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Ni catalysts were prepared by the im-pregnation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffrac-tion, H2-temperature programmed reduction and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. It was found that the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated into the multi-layered carbon nanospheres (CNSs). However, the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were generated on the Co/Al2O3 and Ni/Al2O3 precursor. The addition of carbon nanomaterial as supports could improve structural properties and low-temperature activity of the CuO-CeO2 catalyst, and save the used amount of metal catalysts in the temperature range with high selectivity for CO oxidation. The copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial had good resistence to H2O and CO2.

  11. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; Rooij, Marietta de; Gemert, Wim van

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room temperature. This provides the suitable technology to replace bulky and expensive cylindrical compressed natural gas tanks. Activated carbons with large surface area and high porosity are particularly suitabl...

  12. Allotropic Carbon Nanoforms as Advanced Metal-Free Catalysts or as Supports

    Hermenegildo Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective paper summarizes the use of three nanostructured carbon allotropes as metal-free catalysts (“carbocatalysts” or as supports of metal nanoparticles. After an introductory section commenting the interest of developing metal-free catalysts and main features of carbon nanoforms, the main body of this paper is focused on exemplifying the opportunities that carbon nanotubes, graphene, and diamond nanoparticles offer to develop advanced catalysts having active sites based on carbon in the absence of transition metals or as large area supports with special morphology and unique properties. The final section provides my personal view on future developments in this field.

  13. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  14. Minimizing activated carbons production cost

    Stavropoulos, G.G.; Zabaniotou, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Univ. P. O. Box 1520, 54006, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    A detailed economic evaluation of activated carbons production process from various raw materials is undertaken using the conventional economic indices (ROI, POT, and NPV). The fundamental factors that affect production cost were taken into account. It is concluded that for an attractive investment in activated carbons production one should select the raw material with the highest product yield, adopt a chemical activation production scheme and should base product price on product-surface area (or more generally on product adsorption capacity for the adsorbate in consideration). A raw material that well meets the above-mentioned criteria is petroleum coke but others are also promising (charcoals, and carbon black). Production cost then can be optimized by determining its minimum value of cost that results from the intercept between the curves of plant capacity and raw material cost - if any. Taking into account the complexity of such a techno-economic analysis, a useful suggestion could be to start the evaluations from a plant capacity corresponding to the break-even point, i. e. the capacity at which income equals production cost. (author)

  15. Fabrication of ordered uniform porous carbon networks and their application to a catalyst supporter.

    Yu, Jong-Sung; Kang, Soonki; Yoon, Suk Bon; Chai, Geunseok

    2002-08-14

    Ordered uniform porous carbon frameworks showing interesting morphology variations were synthesized against removable colloidal silica crystalline templates through simply altering acid catalyst sites for acid-catalyzed polymerization. These highly ordered uniform porous carbons as a catalyst supporter resulted in much improved catalytic activity for methanol oxidation in a fuel cell.

  16. INFORMATION SUPPORT OF ANTITERRORIST ACTIVITY

    Arthur Muradinovich Shamaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the possibilities and the problematic issues of the information support of anti-terrorist activities. Among the main measures are called: PRsupport of speeches by leaders and officials of the state executive authorities, prosecutors, law enforcement agencies in the media; countering terrorism and extremism in the information space; press conferences, round tables and conferences on anti-terrorist and antiextremist topics; utilization of social advertising; monitoring of Internet resources to the development of the social networks of anti-terrorist direction.Terrorism can not be regarded as a problem of a single country. International and domestic experience in combating these phenomena indicates failure only of force feedback, which at any stage of the problem only to show the ability of temporal localization of specific threats and prevent individual acts of terrorism without affecting the situation as a whole.Terrorist offenses, is widespread in modern society is a complex system of balances is included in the set of complementary processes. These processes are not only, as is commonly believed, criminal and economic background, although any even minor manifestations of a terrorist nature no doubt be regarded as an attack on the security of society and the state.

  17. Controllable-nitrogen doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes as novel carbon support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Kuo, P.L.; Hsu, C.H.; Wu, H.M.; Hsu, W.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Kuo, D. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Novel nitrogen-doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes composite (NC-CNT) (N/C ratio 3.3-14.3 wt.%) as catalyst support has been prepared using aniline as a dispersant to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and as a source for both carbon and nitrogen coated on the surface of the CNTs, where the amount of doped nitrogen is controllable. The NC-CNT so obtained were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 1.5-2.0 nm) was then anchored on the surface of NC-CNT by using aromatic amine as a stabilizer. For these Pt/NC-CNTs, cyclic voltammogram measurements show a high electrochemical activity surface area (up to 103.7 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commercial E-TEK catalyst (55.3 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). In single cell test, Pt/NC-CNT catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in mass activity compared with that of E-TEK. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. STUDIES ON THE PREPARATION OF ZINC-CONTAINING ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS AND THEIR ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY

    2002-01-01

    Several kinds of activated carbon fibers, using sisal fiber as precursors, were preparedwith steam activation or with ZnCl2 activation. Zinc or its compounds were dispersed in them. Theantibacterial activities of these activated carbon fibers were determined and compared. The researchresults showed that these sisal based activated carbon fibers supporting zinc have strongerantibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and S. aureus. The antibacterial activity is related tothe precursors, the pyrolysis temperature, and the zinc content. In addition, small quantity of silversupported on zinc-containing ACFs will greatly enhance the antibacterial activity of ACFs.

  19. Platinum supported catalysts for carbon monoxide preferential oxidation: Study of support influence

    Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the addition of different oxides to an alumina support, on surface acidity and platinum reducibility in platinum-based catalysts, as well as their effect on the activity and selectivity in CO preferential oxidation, in presence of hydrogen. A correlation between surface acidity and acid strength of surface sites and metal reducibility was obtained, being Pt-support interaction a function of the acid sites concentration under a particular temperature range. In platinum supported on alumina catalysts, CO oxidation follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, where O{sub 2} and CO compete in the adsorption on the same type of active sites. It is noteworthy that the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the reaction mechanism. In this case, CO is not only adsorbed on the Pt active sites but also on La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, forming bridge bonded carbonates which leads to high reactivity at low temperatures. An increase on temperature produces CO desorption from Pt surface sites and favours oxygen adsorption producing CO{sub 2}. CO oxidation with surface hydroxyl groups was activated producing simultaneously CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. (author)

  20. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  1. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth [Wheeling, WV; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw [Glen Dale, WV

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  2. Simulations of phenol adsorption on activated carbon and carbon black

    Prosenjak, Claudia; Valente Nabais, Joao; Laginhas, Carlos; Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    We use grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of phenol on carbon materials. Activated carbon is modelled by pore size distributions based on DFT methods; carbon black is represented by a single carbon slab with varying percentages of surface atoms removed. GCMC results for the adsorption from the corresponding gas phase gave reasonable agreement with experimental adsorption results. MD simulations, that studied the influence of the presence of ...

  3. The study on carbon nanotubes-supported Pt catalysts for PEMFC

    朱捷; 朱红; 康晓红; 葛奉娟; 杨玉国

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-supported-platinum (Pt/CNTs) and carbon-supported-platinum (Pt/C) catalysts were prepared by in situ chemical reduction method and analyzed by TEM and XRD. Then the experiments were carried out to test the performance of PEMFCs with the Pt electrodes. The results showed that in both catalyst, Pt was of small particle size (about 4 nm) and Pt/CNTs exhibited higher catalytic activity than Pt/C.

  4. Carbon monoxide tolerant platinum electrocatalysts on niobium doped titania and carbon nanotube composite supports

    Rigdon, William A.; Huang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    In the anode of electrochemical cells operating at low temperature, the hydrogen oxidation reaction is susceptible to poisoning from carbon monoxide (CO) which strongly adsorbs on platinum (Pt) catalysts and increases activation overpotential. Adsorbed CO is removed by oxidative processes such as electrochemical stripping, though cleaning can also cause corrosion. One approach to improve the tolerance of Pt is through alloying with less-noble metals, but the durability of alloyed electrocatalysts is a critical concern. Without sacrificing stability, tolerance can be improved by careful design of the support composition using metal oxides. The bifunctional mechanism is promoted at junctions of the catalyst and metal oxides used in the support. Stable metal oxides can also form strong interactions with catalysts, as is the case for platinum on titania (TiOx). In this study, niobium (Nb) serves as an electron donor dopant in titania. The transition metal oxides are joined to functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) supports in order to synthesize composite supports. Pt is then deposited to form electrocatalysts which are characterized before fabrication into anodes for tests as an electrochemical hydrogen pump. Comparisons are made between the control from Pt-CNT to Pt-TiOx-CNT and Pt-Ti0.9Nb0.1Ox-CNT in order to demonstrate advantages.

  5. Design of activated carbon/activated carbon asymmetric capacitors

    Isabel ePiñeiro-Prado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Supercapacitors are energy storage devices that offer a high power density and a low energy density in comparison with batteries. Their limited energy density can be overcome by using asymmetric configuration in mass electrodes, where each electrode works within their maximum available potential window, rendering the maximum voltage output of the system. Such asymmetric capacitors must be optimized through careful electrochemical characterization of the electrodes for accurate determination of the capacitance and the potential stability limits. The results of the characterization are then used for optimizing mass ratio of the electrodes from the balance of stored charge. The reliability of the design largely depends on the approach taken for the electrochemical characterization. Therefore, the performance could be lower than expected and even the system could break down, if a well thought out procedure is not followed.In this work, a procedure for the development of asymmetric supercapacitors based on activated carbons is detailed. Three activated carbon materials with different textural properties and surface chemistry have been systematically characterized in neutral aqueous electrolyte. The asymmetric configuration of the masses of both electrodes in the supercapacitor has allowed to cover a higher potential window, resulting in an increase of the energy density of the three devices studied when compared with the symmetric systems, and an improved cycle life.

  6. States of carbon nanotube supported Mo-based HDS catalysts

    Shang, Hongyan; Liu, Chenguang; Xu, Yongqiang [Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CNPC, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061 (China); Qiu, Jieshan [Carbon Research Laboratory, Center for Nano Materials and Science, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, P. O. Box 49, Dalian 116012 (China); Wei, Fei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Being, 100084 (China)

    2007-02-15

    As HDS catalysts, the supported catalysts including oxide state Mo, Co-Mo and sulfide state Mo on carbon nanotube (CNT) were prepared, while the corresponding supported catalysts on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared as comparison. Firstly, the dispersion of the active phase and loading capacity of Mo species on CNT was studied by XRD and the reducibility properties of Co-Mo catalysts in oxide state over CNTs were investigated by TPR while the sulfide Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were characterized by XRD and LRS techniques. Secondly, the activity and selectivity of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene with Co-Mo/CNT and Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied. It has been found that the main active molybdenum species in the oxide state MoO{sub 3}/CNT catalysts were MoO{sub 2}, rather than MoO{sub 3} as generally expected. The maximum loading before formation of the bulk phase was lower than 6%m (calculated in MoO{sub 3}). The TPR studies revealed that that active species in oxide state Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more easily reduced at relatively lower temperatures in comparison to those in Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, indicating that the CNT support promoted the reduction of active species. Among 0-1.0 Co/Mo atomic ratio on Co-Mo/CNT, 0.7 has the highest reducibility. It shows that the Co/Mo atomic ratio has a great effect on the reducibility of active species on CNT and their HDS activities and that the incorporation of cobalt improved the dispersion of molybdenum species on CNT and mobilization. It was also found that re-dispersion could occur during the sulfiding process, resulting in low valence state Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4} and Co-MoS{sub 2.17} active phases. The HDS of DBT showed that Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more active than Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the hydrogenolysis/hydrogenation selectivity of Co-Mo/CNT catalyst was also much higher than Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For the Co-Mo/CNT catalysis system, the catalyst with Co/Mo atomic

  7. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water.

  8. Functionalized Activated Carbon Derived from Biomass for Photocatalysis Applications Perspective

    Samira Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review highlighted the developments of safe, effective, economic, and environmental friendly catalytic technologies to transform lignocellulosic biomass into the activated carbon (AC. In the photocatalysis applications, this AC can further be used as a support material. The limits of AC productions raised by energy assumption and product selectivity have been uplifted to develop sustainable carbon of the synthesis process, where catalytic conversion is accounted. The catalytic treatment corresponding to mild condition provided a bulk, mesoporous, and nanostructure AC materials. These characteristics of AC materials are necessary for the low energy and efficient photocatalytic system. Due to the excellent oxidizing characteristics, cheapness, and long-term stability, semiconductor materials have been used immensely in photocatalytic reactors. However, in practical, such conductors lead to problems with the separation steps and loss of photocatalytic activity. Therefore, proper attention has been given to develop supported semiconductor catalysts and certain matrixes of carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes, carbon microspheres, carbon nanofibers, carbon black, and activated carbons have been recently considered and reported. AC has been reported as a potential support in photocatalytic systems because it improves the transfer rate of the interface charge and lowers the recombination rate of holes and electrons.

  9. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  10. Graphitised Carbon Nanofibres as Catalyst Support for PEMFC

    Yli-Rantala, E.; Pasanen, A.; Kauranen, P.;

    2011-01-01

    Graphitised carbon nanofibres (G-CNFs) show superior thermal stability and corrosion resistance in PEM fuel cell environment over traditional carbon black (CB) and carbon nanotube catalyst supports. However, G-CNFs have an inert surface with only very limited amount of surface defects...... catalyst and the effects of the different surface treatments were discussed. On the basis of these results, new membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were manufactured and tested also for carbon corrosion by in situ FTIR analysis of the cathode exhaust gases. It was observed that the G-CNFs showed 5?times...... lower carbon corrosion compared to CB based catalyst when potential reached 1.5?V versus RHE in simulated start/stop cycling....

  11. Evaluation of porous carbon and ceramic supports for hyperfiltration

    Cabellon, J.B.; Padia, A.K.; Whitesides, L.E. Jr.

    1971-03-24

    Porous carbon and ceramic tubes were evaluated as supports for dynamically formed zirconium (IV) hydrous oxide-polycarboxylic acid hyperfiltration membranes. The most promising membranes were formed on Union Carbide 6-C carbon tubes using a 150,000 molecular weight polyacrylic acid. Sodium chloride rejections as high as 97% were obtained at water fluxes of 80 gpd/ft{sup 2} compared with rejections of 90 to 95% and fluxes of 130 gpd/ft{sup 2} using the porous stainless steel-Acropor/Millipore supports. The effects of pressure, circulation velocity, and temperature on membrane flux and sodium chloride and Coalinga water rejections were studied. A small industrial module containing 6-C carbon supports with a 3.04 ft{sup 2} filtration surface gave a salt rejection of 86% and a product water flux of 60 gpd/ft{sup 2}.

  12. Studies of activated carbon and carbon black for supercapacitor applications

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Carbon Black and activated carbon materials providing high surface areas and a distinct pore distribution are prime materials for supercapacitor applications at frequencies < 0.5 Hz. A number of these materials were tested for their specific capacitance, surface and pore size distribution. High capacitance electrodes were manufactured on the laboratory scale with attention to ease of processability. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref.

  13. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming [School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-10-01

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles. (author)

  14. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles.

  15. Petrographic evaluation of xylite activated carbon

    Predeanu, G. [Metallurgical Research Institute, Department of Raw Materials, Mehadia St. 39, Sector 6, 060543 Bucharest (Romania); Panaitescu, C. [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Fuel Laboratory, Polizu St. 1, Sector 1, 011061, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-08-01

    Xylites are promising materials for activated carbon manufacturing due to their low rank, low inorganic content, and structural characteristics similar to the strong consistence of wood. These are similar to the classical adsorbents used for waste water purification, and available and profitable in the long term. This study has been undertaken to provide by means of petrographic data, new information on the porous structure development in chars during direct heating carbonization and physical activation. The xylite petrographic composition is very important, mainly due to the existence of structured wooden material - textinite with round and elongated cells - that influences the development of the structure and texture during carbonization and activation. The charcoal microstructure reveals some interesting aspects about the carbonization process with regard to evolution, efficiency and pore development. In the xylite activated carbon, the adsorption surface development by means of the highly porous system depends on the type of petrographical components, raw material grain size, and carbonization parameters. (author)

  16. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  17. Structure and properties of carbon nanofibers. application as electrocatalyst support

    S. del Rio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to gain an insight into the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanofibers and the relationship between those properties and the electrocatalytic behavior when used as catalyst support for their application in fuel cells.

  18. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles : Cellulose at work

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a

  19. The Analysis of Activated Carbon Regeneration Technologies

    姚芳

    2014-01-01

    A series of methods for activated carbon regeneration were briefly introduced.Such as thermal regeneration,chemical regeneration,biochemical regeneration,and newly supercritical fluid regeneration, electrochemical regeneration,light-catalyzed regeneration,and microwave radiation method,and the developing trend of activated carbon regeneration was predicted.

  20. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  1. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles: cellulose at work.

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J; Geus, John W; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a homogeneous impregnation of the aqueous base metal salt solutions, 2) it acts as an efficacious (carbonaceous) support material for the uniformly dispersed base metal salts, their oxides and the metal nanoparticles derived therefrom, and 3) it contributes as a reducing agent via carbothermal reduction for the conversion of the metal oxide nanoparticles into the metal nanoparticles. Finally, the base metal nanoparticles capable of forming metastable metal carbides catalytically convert the carbonaceous support into a mesoporous graphitic carbon material.

  2. Oxygen reduction in acid media: influence of the activity of CoNPc(1,2) bilayer deposits in relation to their attachment to the carbon black support and role of surface groups as a function of heat treatment

    Biloul, A.; Contamin, O.; Scarbeck, G.; Savy, M.; Palys, B.J.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.

    1994-01-01

    O2 reduction was investigated using rotating disk electrode and voltammetry techniques on NPcCo(1,2) impregnations deposited onto two kinds of carbon black support. They were selected on the basis of their similar pH and dibuthylphthalate (DBP) adsorption values. Samples were also characterized by I

  3. Structure and electrocatalytic performance of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles

    Esparbe, Isaac; Brillas, Enric; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere-Lluis [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The structure of Pt nanoparticles and the composition of the catalyst-Nafion films strongly determine the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effect of Nafion content in the catalyst ink, prepared with a commercially available carbon-supported Pt, in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), has been studied by the thin layer rotating disk electrode technique. The kinetic parameters have been related to the catalyst nanoparticles structure, characterized by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The size-shape analysis is consistent with the presence of 3D cubo-octahedral Pt nanoparticles with average size of 2.5 nm. The electrochemically active surface area, determined by CO stripping, appears to depend on the composition of the deposited Pt/C-Nafion film, with a maximum value of 73 m{sup 2} g{sub Pt}{sup -1} for 30 wt.% Nafion. The results of CO stripping indicate that the external Pt faces are mainly (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) terraces, thus confirming the cubo-octahedral structure of nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetry combined with the RDE technique has been applied to study the kinetic parameters of HOR besides the ionomer resistance effect on the anode kinetic current at different ionomer contents. The kinetic parameters show that H{sub 2} oxidation behaves reversibly with an estimated exchange current density of 0.27 mA cm{sup -2}. (author)

  4. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  5. FT-IR Study of Carbon Nanotube Supported Co-Mo Catalysts

    Hongyan Shang; Chenguang Liu1; Fei Wei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, adsorption properties of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on carbon nanotube, carbon nanotube supported oxide state and sulfide state CoMo catalysts are studied by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) technique and FT-IR spectroscopy. Activated carbon support, γ-Al2O3 support and supported CoMo catalysts are also subjected to studies for comparison. It was found that sulfide state CoMoS/MWCNT, CoMoS/AC and CoMoS/γ-Al2O3 catalysts adsorbed much more DBT molecules than their corresponding oxide state catalysts, as well as their corresponding supports. The chemically adsorbed DBT aromatic molecules did not undergo decomposition on the surface of supports, supported oxide state CoMo catalysts and sulfide state CoMo catalysts when out-gassing at 373 K. FT-IR results indicated that DBT molecules mainly stand upright on the active sites (acid sites and/or transition active phases) of CoMoS/MWCNT catalyst. However, DBT aromatic molecules mainly lie flat on MWCNT and CoMoO/MWCNT.

  6. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  7. Catalytic ozonation of metronidazole in presence of activated carbon supported metallic oxide catalyst%活性炭负载金属氧化物催化臭氧氧化甲硝唑

    杨文清; 李旭凯; 李来胜; 张秋云; 吕向红; 曾宝强

    2011-01-01

    采用浸渍法制备了Fe、Ni、Ag、Ce 4种金属氧化物负载活性炭(MeOx/AC)催化剂,并用于甲硝唑(MNZ)的催化臭氧氧化降解,以考察其催化活性.在20 mg/h的臭氧投加量下,催化剂的加入(0.5 g)对MNZ(C0=5 mg/L;pH=5.5)的氧化和矿化有明显改善,其中NiOX/AC催化剂表现出较好的催化活性,反应60 min后,MNZ和TOC的去除率分别达87%和30%,较AC催化臭氧氧化(80%和26%)及单独臭氧氧化(70%和10%)有所提高.叔丁醇或硝酸根的加入对MNZ的降解起抑制作用.%Activated carbon-supported(Fe, Ni, Ag, Ce) metallic oxide catalyst (MeOw/AC) was prepared by impregnation. The activity of four kinds of MeOx/AC in the catalytic ozonation of aqueous phase metronidazole (MNZ) was evaluated. In the 20 mg/h of ozone dosage, the oxidation and mineralization of MNZ (CO =5 rog/L; pH = 5.5) was significantly improved in presence of catalyst (0.5 g). NiOx/AC provides preferable catalytic activity. The oxidation of MNZ and its TOC removal rates were 87% and 30% at 60 rain, compared with AC catalytic ozonation (80% and 26% ) and ozonation alone (70% and 10% ). Addition of tea-butanol or nitrate showed inhibition on MNZ degradation.

  8. Carbon-Supported Silver Catalysts for CO Selective Oxidation in Excess Hydrogen

    Limin Chen; Ding Ma; Barbara Pietruszka; Xinhe Bao

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials were used as supports for Ag catalysts that are prepared using the conventional wet impregnation method, and their catalytic properties for CO selective oxidation in excess hydrogen at temperatures below 483 K were tested. A variety of techniques, e.g. N2 adsorption, XPS, TPD, UV-Vis DRS, TEM and SEM, were used to determine the influence of physical and chemical properties of the carbon on the properties of Ag catalyst. It was found that defects on the carbon surface served as nucleation sites for silver ions, while functional groups on carbon surface induced their reduction to the metallic form. The formation of silver particles on carbon was governed by homogeneous and/or heterogeneous nucleation during the impregnation and subsequent activation processes. The best catalytic performance was obtained with a Ag/carbon black catalyst with a uniform size distribution of silver nanoparticles (about 12 nm), moderate BET surface area (with a mesoporous structure), and a limited amount of carbon-oxygen groups. The research indicates that carbon materials are potentially good supports for silver catalysts for preferential oxidation of CO in excess hydrogen.

  9. Networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as superior catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    Huang, Meihua; Zhang, Jianshuo; Wu, Chuxin; Guan, Lunhui

    2017-02-01

    The high cost and short lifetime of the Pt-based anode catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) hamper the widespread commercialization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Therefore, improving the activity of Pt-based catalysts is necessary for their practical application. For the first time, we prepared networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with loading ratio as high as 91 wt% (Pt/MWCNTs). Thanks for the unique connected structure, the Pt mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs for methanol oxidation reaction is 4.4 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C (20 wt%). When carbon support is considered, the total mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs is 20 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C. The durability and anti-poisoning ability are also improved greatly.

  10. Supporting Active User Involvment in Prototyping

    Grønbæk, Kaj

    1990-01-01

    development of prototypes to early evaluation of prototypes in envisioned use situations. Having users involved in such activities creates new requirements for tool support. Tools that support direct manipulation of prototypes and simulation of behaviour have shown promise for cooperative prototyping...... activities. Examples of such tools are given and the ways that they support cooperative prototyping within various use domains are discussed.......The term prototyping has in recent years become a buzzword in both research and practice of system design due to a number of claimed advantages of prototyping techniques over traditional specification techniques. In particular it is often stated that prototyping facilitates the users' involvement...

  11. Novel catalytic applications of carbon nanofibers on sintered metal fibers filters as structured supports

    2009-01-01

    Supported metal catalysts are important from both an industrial and a scientific point of view. They are used, amongst others, in large-scale processes such as catalytic reforming, hydrotreating, polymerization reactions and hydrogenations. Often, these catalysts consist of nanosized metal particles deposited on a suitable support, which acts as an anchor for the active phase and, in several cases, contributes to improve the overall catalyst performances. The growth of carbon nanofibers on si...

  12. Novel catalytic applications of carbon nanofibers on sintered metal fibers filters as structured supports

    2008-01-01

    Supported metal catalysts are important from both an industrial and a scientific point of view. They are used, amongst others, in large-scale processes such as catalytic reforming, hydrotreating, polymerization reactions and hydrogenations. Often, these catalysts consist of nanosized metal particles deposited on a suitable support, which acts as an anchor for the active phase and, in several cases, contributes to improve the overall catalyst performances. The growth of carbon nanofibers on si...

  13. Study on hydrogen evolution performance of the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes

    YANG; Bin; LI; Yang; ZAN; Lin-han

    2005-01-01

    The carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes having Pt about 0.10 mg/cm2 or even less were prepared by ion beam sputtering method (IBSM). It was valued on the hydrogen analyse performance, the temperature influence factor and the stability by electroanalysis hydrogen analyse method. It was found that the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes had higher hydrogen evolution performance and stability, such as the hydrogen evolution exchange current density (j0) was increase as the temperature (T) rised, and it overrun 150 mA/cm2 as the trough voltage in about 0.68V, and it only had about 2.8% decline in 500 h electrolytic process. The results demonstrated that the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes kept highly catalytic activity and stability, and it were successfully used in pilot plant for producing H2 on electrolysis of H2S.

  14. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  15. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  16. Influence of the Synthesis Method for Pt Catalysts Supported on Highly Mesoporous Carbon Xerogel and Vulcan Carbon Black on the Electro-Oxidation of Methanol

    Cinthia Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum catalysts supported on carbon xerogel and carbon black (Vulcan were synthesized with the aim of investigating the influence of the characteristics of the support on the electrochemical performance of the catalysts. Three synthesis methods were compared: an impregnation method with two different reducing agents, sodium borohydride and formic acid, and a microemulsion method, in order to study the effect of the synthesis method on the physico-chemical properties of the catalysts. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used for studying carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation. Catalysts supported on carbon xerogel presented higher catalytic activities towards CO and CH3OH oxidation than catalysts supported on Vulcan. The higher mesoporosity of carbon xerogel was responsible for the favored diffusion of reagents towards catalytic centers.

  17. Activation of Carbon Dioxide and Synthesis of Propylene Carbonate

    2002-01-01

    Cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide to propylene carbonate catalyzed by tetra-tert-butyl metal phthalocyanine in the presence of tributylamine (TBA) shows higher yield than catalyzed by unsubstituted metal phthalocyanine. Comparing different catalysts of diverse metals, (t-Bu)4PcMg is more active than (t-Bu)4PcFe. But (t-Bu)4PcCo and (t-Bu)4PcNi only have low catalytic activities towards the reaction. Moreover, the yield will increase as the temperature increases.

  18. 活性炭负载型固体碱催化酯交换反应的研究%Study on Transesterification Catalyzed by Solid Base Supported on Activated Carbon

    刘贤响; 刘姣; 苏胜培; 尹笃林

    2013-01-01

    采用浸渍法制备了活性炭负载KOH固体碱催化剂,考察了它们在三醋酸甘油酯与甲醇酯交换反应中的催化性能,及时间、温度、催化剂用量、醇酯摩尔比等因素对酯交换反应的影响。结果表明,当醇酯比为9∶1,催化剂用量为0.3g(三醋酸甘油酯为0.02mol),KOH浸渍液浓度为20.0wt%,反应温度为65℃,反应1.0h,三醋酸甘油酯转化率可达到94.7%。该工艺操作简单,催化剂可以回收,过程无三废污染。%Transesteriifcation of glycerol triacetate and methanol catalyed by KOH supported on activated carbon was studied. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation and had a high catalysis activity. Effects of some factors on the transesteriifcation were inves-tigated systematically and reaction conditions were optimized. The optimized reaction conditions on the catalyst were:molar ratio of methanol to oil 9:1, the amount of catalyst 0.3g(the amount of glycerol triacetate 0.02mol), the consistency of KOH 20.0wt%, reac-tion temperature 65℃and reaction time 1.0h, under these conditions the conversion of biodiesel reached 94.7%. The new technology featured simplicity, reusable catalyst, zero pollution.

  19. Implementation of Business Game Activity Support System

    TANABU Motonari

    2004-01-01

    Business game can be used not only as an educational tool for the development of decision making ability, but also can be used for supporting the knowledge creation activity in organizations. In this paper, some conceptual considerations to meanings of the business game in the knowledge creation activity by using the knowledge creation theory and other related theories are given,and business game activity concept which refers to game play and development is proposed. Then focusing on the business game activity as an instantiation of the knowledge creation activity, and a Web based gaming activity support system based on the former system called YBG that enables us to play and develop many business games through the standard web browser is proposed. This system also provides us a lot of opportunities to play and develop the business games over business game communities.

  20. The catalytic dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane with activated carbon supported calcium chloride%活性炭负载CaCl2催化五氯乙烷脱HCl的研究

    王智春; 陈胜洲; 陈汉伦; 谢文健

    2012-01-01

    Supported catalyst calcium chloride/activated carbon(CaCl2/AC) was prepared and used in dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane to produce perchloroethylene.Influences of reaction temperature,space velocity and CaCl2 loading amount on catalytic activity of CaCl2/AC were investigated.Stability of catalytic activity of catalyst was also studied.Results of the experiment showed that the optimal conditions were reaction temperature 240℃,space velocity 3.4h-1,CaCl2 loading amount 0.3mmol/g.Under the optimal conditions,the conversion of pentachloroethane and the yield of perchloroethylene can reach more than 99% and 95%,respectively.And the repeatability of catalytic activity of catalyst was fine.The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption method.The results showed that the dispersion of CaCl2 on activated carbon surface was good.The BET surface area and pore volume of CaCl2/AC catalyst gradually decreased with the CaCl2 loading amount increased.%筛选出了催化性能较好的活性炭负载氯化钙(CaCl2/AC)催化剂用于五氯乙烷脱HCl制备四氯乙烯。考察了反应温度、空速、CaCl2负载量对CaCl2/AC催化剂催化性能的影响及催化剂的稳定性。实验结果表明最佳反应条件:反应温度为240℃,空速为3.4h-1,CaCl2负载量为0.3mmol/g,在此反应条件下五氯乙烷的转化率可达99%以上,四氯乙烯的收率达95%以上,催化剂催化性能重现性良好。采用X射线衍射(XRD)、氮气吸附-脱附对催化剂进行了表征。结果表明CaCl2在活性炭表面分散良好;随着CaCl2负载量的增加,CaCl2/AC催化剂的BET比表面及孔容逐渐减小。

  1. Preparation, characterization and performance of a novel visible light responsive spherical activated carbon-supported and Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    Hou, Dianxun [Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Feng, Liang [Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); College of Environmental Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Jianbin [Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Dong, Shuangshi, E-mail: dongshuangshi@gmail.com [Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Dandan [Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Lim, Teik-Thye [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3} could be as upconversion luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}-SAC possessed the photocatalytic capability under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic degradation followed the Langmiur-Hinshelwood kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalyst possessed good physical stability to sheer force at studied range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Washing-calcination and pickling-calcination treatments can regenerate. - Abstract: A novel spherical activated carbon (SAC) supported and Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}-doped TiO{sub 2} visible-light responsive photocatalyst (Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}-SAC) was synthesized by a modified sol-gel method with ultrasonic dispersion. It was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), powder X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer (DRS). The photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}-SAC was evaluated for degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. The effects of calcination temperature and irradiation time on its photocatalytic activity were examined. The experimental results indicated that Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3} could function as an upconversion luminescence agent, enabling photocatalytic degradation of MO by TiO{sub 2} under visible light. The Er{sup 3+}:YFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} calcinated at 700 Degree-Sign C showed the highest photocatalytic capability compared to those calcinated at other temperatures. The photocatalytic degradation of MO followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. Although the photocatalyst showed a good physical stability and could tolerate a shear force up to 25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} N/g, its photocatalytic activity decreased over a four-cycle of reuse in concentrated MO solution, indicating that the decreased activity was ascribed to the

  2. Granular Activated Carbon Performance Capability and Availability.

    1983-06-01

    Kinetics of Activated Carbon Adsorption Journal of Water Polution 47(4) Aoril 1975 Control Federation 4-t9 Wnitna) G Aoalied Polarography for...proposed models for kinetics of adsorption of pink water organics by activated carbon. Both models are basically similar in nature and propose that...include formulation of a complete model of the pink water system based upon existing data. This model would then serve to reduce the amount of

  3. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS CARBON BY CARBON DIOXIDE ACTIVATION WITH CATALYST

    W.Z.Shen; A.H.Lu; J.T.Zheng

    2002-01-01

    A mesoporous activated carbon (AC) can be successfully prepared by catalytic activa-tion with carbon dioxide. For iron oxide as catalyst, there were two regions of mesoporesize distribution, i.e. 2-5nm and 30-70nm. When copper oxide or magnesium oxidecoexisted with iron oxide as composite catalyst, the content of pores with sizes of 2-5nm was decreased, while the pores with 30 70nm were increased significantly. Forcomparison, AC reactivated by carbon dioxide directly was also investigated. It wasshown that the size of mesopores of the resulting AC concentrated in 2-5nm with lessvolume. The adsorption of Congo red was tested to evaluate the property of the result-ing AC. Furthermore, the factors affecting pore size distribution and the possibility ofmesopore formation were discussed.

  4. Carbon Management and Decision Support Systems for the CASA Ecosystem Model

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Fladeland, M.; Genovese, V.; Kramer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Ecosystem modeling and satellite remote sensing can link human activities such as land use change and forest management to the spatial distribution of carbon pools and fluxes at regional scales. The main objectives of this research and application are to: 1) evaluate major forest and agricultural sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the U. S. using NASA EOS satellite data and ecosystem modeling, 2) support the U. S. Government interagency program for registration of voluntary greenhouse gas emissions reductions under section 1605(b) of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, and 3) develop an internet-based decision support system (DSS) of carbon sequestration in U. S. ecosystems for users nationwide. We report on the first results of this DSS to assess the impacts of forest stand age on potential carbon sequestration, as predicted by the CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model. Estimates of carbon storage in woody plant pools are compared before and after adjustment for management of stand age based on U. S. Forest Service map products. These predictions of historical forest carbon storage are subsequently compared to the potential annual increment of ecosystem carbon gain or loss under conditions of future climate variation.

  5. ESTIMATION OF ACTIVATED ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF n—HEXANE ON ACTIVATED CARBONS BY PTD TECHNIQUE

    LIZhong; WANGHongjuan; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,six kinds of activated carbons such as Ag+-activated carbon,Cu2+activated carbon,Fe3+-activated carbon,activated carbon,Ba2+-activated carbon and Ca2+activated carbon were prepared.The model for estimating activated energy of desorption was established.Temperature-programmed desorption(TPD)experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of n-hexanol and then estimate the activation energy for desorption of n-hexanol on the activated carbons.Results showed that the activation energy for the desorption of n-hexanol on the Ag+-activated carbon,the Cu2+-activated carbon and the Fe3+-activated carbon were higher than those of n-hexanol on the activated carbon,the Ca2+-activated carbon and the Ba2+-activated carbon.

  6. ESTIMATION OF ACTIVATED ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF n-HEXANE ON ACTIVATED CARBONS BY TPD TECHNIQUE

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, six kinds of activated carbons such as Ag+-activated carbon, Cu2+-activated carbon, Fe3+- activated carbon, activated carbon, Ba2+- activated carbon and Ca2+-activated carbon were prepared. The model for estimating activated energy of desorption was established. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of n-hexanol and then estimate the activation energy for desorption of n-hexanol on the activated carbons. Results showed that the activation energy for the desorption of n-hexanol on the Ag+- activated carbon, the Cu2+- activated carbon and the Fe3+- activated carbon were higher than those of n-hexanol on the activated carbon, the Ca2+- activated carbon and the Ba2+- activated carbon.

  7. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  8. Nanospace engineering of KOH activated carbon.

    Romanos, J; Beckner, M; Rash, T; Firlej, L; Kuchta, B; Yu, P; Suppes, G; Wexler, C; Pfeifer, P

    2012-01-13

    This paper demonstrates that nanospace engineering of KOH activated carbon is possible by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. High specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nanometer (activation temperature. The process typically leads to a bimodal pore size distribution, with a large, approximately constant number of sub-nanometer pores and a variable number of supra-nanometer pores. We show how to control the number of supra-nanometer pores in a manner not achieved previously by chemical activation. The chemical mechanism underlying this control is studied by following the evolution of elemental composition, specific surface area, porosity, and pore size distribution during KOH activation and preceding H(3)PO(4) activation. The oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen contents decrease during successive activation steps, creating a nanoporous carbon network with a porosity and surface area controllable for various applications, including gas storage. The formation of tunable sub-nanometer and supra-nanometer pores is validated by sub-critical nitrogen adsorption. Surface functional groups of KOH activated carbon are studied by microscopic infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Research of special carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst for fuel cell through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from novel phthalocyanine

    GUO Yanchuan; YUE Jun; PAN Zhongxiao; XU Haitao; ZHANG Bing; HAN Fengmei; CHEN Lijuan; PENG Bixian; XIE Wenwei; QIAN Haisheng; YAN Tiantang

    2004-01-01

    The carbon nanobeads were prepared through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from phthaiocyanine. After surface's functionalization treatment of the carbon beads, the carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst was produced. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by SEM,TEM, Raman spectrum, EDS and XRD methods. Combining the carbonaceous paper spreaded up with the catalyst with Nafion membrane, we made MEA electrode. The discharge curves indicated that this carbon nanobeads supported Pt is a good fuel cell catalyst with excellent performance, high activity and sign of a long-time life.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  11. Catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde over activated carbon-supported platinum catalysts at room temperature%室温下活性炭载纳米铂催化剂对空气中甲醛的去除效果

    黄海保; 张路; 梁耀彰; 叶信国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore catalytic oxidation of gaseous formaldehyde over activated carbon- supported platinum catalysts (Pt/AC) at room temperature. Methods Pt/AC catalysts were prepared by liquid reduction method using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The effect of Pt loading (0.1% ,0.5% and 1% ) on formaldehyde removal was investigated. Results Reduced Pt nanoparticles of 18 ran diameter could be observed by transmission electron microscope. Formaldehyde removal efficiency was 98.2% in case of 0.5% Pt loading after reaction for 5 h. Conclusion The prepared Pt/AC catalysts in this study can be used for the efficient removal of formaldehyde in air.%目的 探讨活性炭载纳米铂催化剂对空气中甲醛的去除效果.方法 采用硼氢化钠液相还原法制备活性炭载纳米铂催化剂,观察不同载铂量(0.1%,0.5%和1%)对甲醛去除率的影响.结果 透射电镜观察显示,活性炭载铂为还原态纳米粒子(d≈18 nm),铂负载量为0.5%时,反应5h甲醛去除率为98.2%.结论 本研究制备的活性炭载纳米铂催化剂可有效去除空气中甲醛.

  12. 活性炭负载磷钨酸催化合成丙二酸二乙酯的研究%Synthesis of Diethyl Malonate over Phosphotungstic Acid Catalytst Supported on Activated Carbon

    樊亚娟

    2011-01-01

    文章以无水乙醇和丙二酸为原料,以活性炭负载磷钨酸催化剂在不同的条件下酯化合成丙二酸二乙酯。选用L9(33)正交表考察合成丙二酸二乙酯的最优化条件,数据表明醇酸比3.0∶1,活性炭负载磷钨酸0.75 g,反应时间为100 min,带水剂甲苯10 mL时酯化收率可达91.86%。同时研究了不同的反应时间、醇酸比和催化剂用量对酯化收率的影响,并考察了负载型磷钨酸催化剂的重复使用情况,效果较好。%In the paper,diethyl malonate was synthesized by ethanol and malonic acid as raw materials and phosphotungstic acid catalyst supported on activated carbon under different conditions.The table of L9(33) orthogonal was used to selected the optimum conditions.The result showed that when the condition was that the alkyd ratio was 3.0∶1,and the catalyst was 0.75 g,and the reaction time was 100 min,and aqueous toluene was 10 mL,the esterification rate reached to 91.86 %.It also studied the effection of different reaction time,alkyd ratio and the mass of catalyst on the esterification yield.In addition,it studied the reuse of this catalyst,and the data showed it worked well.

  13. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  14. Production and characterization of granular activated carbon from activated sludge

    Z. Al-Qodah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, activated sludge was used as a precursor to prepare activated carbon using sulfuric acid as a chemical activation agent. The effect of preparation conditions on the produced activated carbon characteristics as an adsorbent was investigated. The results indicate that the produced activated carbon has a highly porous structure and a specific surface area of 580 m²/g. The FT-IR analysis depicts the presence of a variety of functional groups which explain its improved adsorption behavior against pesticides. The XRD analysis reveals that the produced activated carbon has low content of inorganic constituents compared with the precursor. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to three adsorption isotherm models and found to closely fit the BET model with R² equal 0.948 at pH 3, indicating a multilayer of pesticide adsorption. The maximum loading capacity of the produced activated carbon was 110 mg pesticides/g adsorbent and was obtained at this pH value. This maximum loading was found experimentally to steeply decrease as the solution pH increases. The obtained results show that activated sludge is a promising low cost precursor for the production of activated carbon.

  15. Ferrous ion oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans immobilized on activated carbon

    ZHOU Ji-kui; QIN Wen-qing; NIU Yin-jian; LI Hua-xia

    2006-01-01

    The immobilization of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on the activated carbon particles as support matrix was investigated. Cycling batch operation results in the complete oxidation of ferrous iron in 8 d when the modified 9 K medium is set to flow through the mini-bioreactor at a rate of 0.104 L/h at 25 ℃. The oxidation rate of ferrous iron with immobilized T. ferrooxidans is 9.38 g/(L·h). The results show that the immobilization of T. ferrooxidans on activated carbon can improve the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron. The SEM images show that a build-up of cells of T. ferrooxidans and iron precipitates is formed on the surface of activated carbon particles.

  16. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  17. Designing Interactive Applications to Support Novel Activities

    Lee, H.; Mohamad Ali, N.; Hardman, L.

    2013-01-01

    R&D in media-related technologies including multimedia, information retrieval, computer vision, and the semantic web is experimenting on a variety of computational tools that, if sufficiently matured, could support many novel activities that are not practiced today. Interactive technology demonstrat

  18. Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity.

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a multi-year, worldwide, indefinite quantity contract by which the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Global Bureau Center for Human Capacity (G/HCD) can work to achieve four objectives: (1) improve the quality, efficiency, access, and equity of education, particularly basic…

  19. Study of the Electrocatalytic Activity of Cerium Oxide and Gold-Studded Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Sonogel-Carbon Material as Supporting Electrode: Electroanalytical Study in Apple Juice for Babies

    Abdelrahim, M. Yahia M.; Benjamin, Stephen R.; Cubillana-Aguilera, Laura Ma; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Ignacio; Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, Josè L.; Delgado, Juan Josè; Palacios-Santander, Josè Ma

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports a study of the electrocatalytic activity of CeO2 nanoparticles and gold sononanoparticles (AuSNPs)/CeO2 nanocomposite, deposited on the surface of a Sonogel-Carbon (SNGC) matrix used as supporting electrode and the application of the sensing devices built with them to the determination of ascorbic acid (AA) used as a benchmark analyte. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to investigate the electrocatalytic behavior of CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes, utilizing different concentrations of CeO2 nanoparticles and different AuSNPs:CeO2 w/w ratios. The best detection and quantification limits, obtained for CeO2 (10.0 mg·mL−1)- and AuSNPs/CeO2 (3.25% w/w)-modified SNGC electrodes, were 1.59 × 10−6 and 5.32 × 10−6 M, and 2.93 × 10−6 and 9.77 × 10−6 M, respectively, with reproducibility values of 5.78% and 6.24%, respectively, for a linear concentration range from 1.5 μM to 4.0 mM of AA. The electrochemical devices were tested for the determination of AA in commercial apple juice for babies. The results were compared with those obtained by applying high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a reference method. Recovery errors below 5% were obtained in most cases, with standard deviations lower than 3% for all the modified SNGC electrodes. Bare, CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). AuSNPs and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and information about their size distribution and shape was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM;. The advantages of employing CeO2 nanoparticles and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite in SNGC supporting material are also described. This research suggests that the modified electrode can be a very promising voltammetric sensor for the determination of

  20. Study of the electrocatalytic activity of cerium oxide and gold-studded cerium oxide nanoparticles using a Sonogel-Carbon material as supporting electrode: electroanalytical study in apple juice for babies.

    Abdelrahim, M Yahia M; Benjamin, Stephen R; Cubillana-Aguilera, Laura Ma; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Ignacio; de Cisneros, José L Hidalgo-Hidalgo; Delgado, Juan José; Palacios-Santander, José Ma

    2013-04-12

    The present work reports a study of the electrocatalytic activity of CeO2 nanoparticles and gold sononanoparticles (AuSNPs)/CeO2 nanocomposite, deposited on the surface of a Sonogel-Carbon (SNGC) matrix used as supporting electrode and the application of the sensing devices built with them to the determination of ascorbic acid (AA) used as a benchmark analyte. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to investigate the electrocatalytic behavior of CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes, utilizing different concentrations of CeO2 nanoparticles and different AuSNPs:CeO2 w/w ratios. The best detection and quantification limits, obtained for CeO2 (10.0 mg·mL(-1))- and AuSNPs/CeO2 (3.25% w/w)-modified SNGC electrodes, were 1.59 × 10(-6) and 5.32 × 10(-6) M, and 2.93 × 10(-6) and 9.77 × 10(-6) M, respectively, with reproducibility values of 5.78% and 6.24%, respectively, for a linear concentration range from 1.5 µM to 4.0 mM of AA. The electrochemical devices were tested for the determination of AA in commercial apple juice for babies. The results were compared with those obtained by applying high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a reference method. Recovery errors below 5% were obtained in most cases, with standard deviations lower than 3% for all the modified SNGC electrodes. Bare, CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). AuSNPs and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and information about their size distribution and shape was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The advantages of employing CeO2 nanoparticles and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite in SNGC supporting material are also described. This research suggests that the modified electrode can be a very promising voltammetric sensor for the determination of

  1. Study of the Electrocatalytic Activity of Cerium Oxide and Gold-Studded Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Sonogel-Carbon Material as Supporting Electrode: Electroanalytical Study in Apple Juice for Babies

    José Mª Palacios-Santander

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports a study of the electrocatalytic activity of CeO2 nanoparticles and gold sononanoparticles (AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite, deposited on the surface of a Sonogel-Carbon (SNGC matrix used as supporting electrode and the application of the sensing devices built with them to the determination of ascorbic acid (AA used as a benchmark analyte. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV were used to investigate the electrocatalytic behavior of CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes, utilizing different concentrations of CeO2 nanoparticles and different AuSNPs:CeO2 w/w ratios. The best detection and quantification limits, obtained for CeO2 (10.0 mg·mL−1- and AuSNPs/CeO2 (3.25% w/w-modified SNGC electrodes, were 1.59 × 10−6 and 5.32 × 10−6 M, and 2.93 × 10−6 and 9.77 × 10−6 M, respectively, with reproducibility values of 5.78% and 6.24%, respectively, for a linear concentration range from 1.5 µM to 4.0 mM of AA. The electrochemical devices were tested for the determination of AA in commercial apple juice for babies. The results were compared with those obtained by applying high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC as a reference method. Recovery errors below 5% were obtained in most cases, with standard deviations lower than 3% for all the modified SNGC electrodes. Bare, CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. AuSNPs and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD, and information about their size distribution and shape was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The advantages of employing CeO2 nanoparticles and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite in SNGC supporting material are also described. This research suggests that the modified electrode can be a very promising voltammetric sensor for the determination

  2. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  3. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  4. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  5. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  6. 超声波辅助活性炭负载杂多酸盐催化合成尼泊金丁酯%CATALYTIC SYNTHESIS OF BUTYL PARABEN WITH ACTIVATED CARBON SUPPORTED HETEMPOLY COMPOUND BY ULTRASONIC ASSISTED METHOD

    徐斌; 王雪源

    2012-01-01

    以对羟基苯甲酸和正丁醇为原料,活性炭负载Keggin型杂多酸盐[(CH2)5NH2]4SiM012O40为催化剂,在超声波辐射下合成尼泊金丁酯.考察了催化剂用量、原料配比、超声波辐射功率及辐射时间对尼泊金丁酯收率的影响.结果表明:超声波辐射下活性炭负载Keggin型杂多酸盐[(CH2)5NH2]4SiMo12O40具有良好的催化活性.较佳工艺条件为:对羟基苯甲酸4.14 g(0.03 mol),酸醇摩尔比1.0:2.0,环己烷40 mL,催化剂7g,450 W超声波辐射20 min.尼泊金丁酯收率达到97%以上.%The butyl paraben was synthesized with p-hydroxy benzoic acid and n-butanol by ultrasonic assisted method, with activated carbon supported keggin-structured hetempoly compound, [(CH2)5NH2]4SiMo12O40, as catalysts. Effects of catalyst dosage, molar ratios of the reactants, ultrasonic wave power and radiation time were investigated. The results showed that the catalytic activity is good under ultrasonic and the optimal conditions were determined as follows: p-hydroxy benzoic 4. 14 g (0. 03 mol), mole ratio of p-hydroxy benzoic acid to n-butanol 1.0 : 2. 0, cyclohexane 40 mL, catalyst 7 g as well as radiation time 20 min with the ultrasonic wave power of 450 W. Under these conditions, the yield of butyl paraben was up to 97%.

  7. Supported PtRu on mesoporous carbons for direct methanol fuel cells

    Arbizzani, Catia; Beninati, Sabina; Soavi, Francesca; Varzi, Alberto; Mastragostino, Marina [University of Bologna, Department of Metal Science, Electrochemistry and Chemical Techniques, via San Donato 15, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-12-01

    We prepared and characterized several cryogel mesoporous carbons of different pore size distribution and report the catalytic activity of PtRu supported on mesoporous carbons of pore size >15 nm in passive and in active direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). At room temperature (RT), the specific maximum power of the passive DMFCs with mesoporous carbon/PtRu systems as anode was in the range 3-5 W g{sup -1}. Passive DMFC assembly and RT tests limit the performance of the electrocatalytic systems and the anodes were thus tested in active DMFCs at 30, 60 and 80 C. Their responses were also compared to those of commercial Vulcan carbon/PtRu. At 80 C, the specific maximum power of the active DMFC with C656/PtRu was 37 W g{sup -1} and the required amount of Pt per kW estimated at 0.4 V cell voltage was 31 g kW{sup -1}, a value less than half that of Vulcan carbon/PtRu. (author)

  8. Intercalated carbon nanotubes as a template for the preparation of supported heteroatomic nanoparticles.

    Schouler, Marie-Claude; Chamssedine, Fadel; Claves, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Chemistry in confined conditions is explored at the level of the interlayer space of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Starting from preliminary intercalated tubes, a ligand exchange reaction has been successfully conducted within the former Van der Waals gap, resulting in a final dispersion of heteroatomic particles, around 2 nm large and nearly homogeneous in size, on the outer surface of the tubes. Intercalated tubular carbon architectures thus prove to be interesting templates for a bottom-up preparation of chemically complex supported nanoparticles, with potential activities for versatile applications.

  9. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    Shen, Haijie [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Liu, Enhui, E-mail: liuenhui99@sina.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  10. Effect of Carbon Supported Pt Catalysts on Selective Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde

    Qing Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde (CAL to cinnamyl alcohol (COL is of both fundamental and industrial interest. It is of great significance to evaluate the possible differences between different supports arising from metal dispersion and electronic effects, in terms of activity and selectivity. Herein, Pt catalysts on different carbon supports including carbon nanotubes (CNTs and reduced graphene oxides (RGO were developed by a simple wet impregnation method. The resultant catalysts were well characterized by XRD, Raman, N2 physisorption, TEM, and XPS analysis. Applied in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde, 3.5 wt% Pt/CNT shows much higher selectivity towards cinnamyl alcohol (62% than 3.5 wt% Pt/RGO@SiO2 (48%. The enhanced activity can be ascribed to the high graphitization degree of CNTs and high density of dispersed Pt electron cloud.

  11. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  12. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Lin J. Q.; Yang S. E.; Duan J. M.; Wu J.J.; Jin L. Y.; Lin J. M.; Deng Q. L.

    2016-01-01

    Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and ki...

  13. thesis of high-purity carbon nanotubes over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts

    Sanja Ratković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD of ethylene over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts based on Fe, Co and Ni. The catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method, calcined at 600 °C and in situ reduced in hydrogen flow at 700 °C. The CNTs growth was carried out by a flow the mixture of C2H4 and nitrogen over the catalyst powder in a horizontal oven. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized CNTs were characterized using SEM. The as-synthesized nanotubes were purified by acid and basic treatments in order to remove impurities such as amorphous carbon, graphite nanoparticles and metal catalysts. XRD and DTA/TG analyses showed that the amounts of by-products in the purified CNTs samples were reduced significantly. According to the observed results, ethylene is an active carbon source for growing high-density CNTs with high yield but more on alumina-supported catalysts than on their silica- supported counterparts. The last might be explained by SMSI formed in the case of alumina-supported catalysts, resulting in higher active phase dispersion.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of vanadium nanoparticles on activated carbon and their catalytic activity in thiophene hydrodesulphurization

    Pinto, Susana [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela); Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); D' Ornelas, Lindora [Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); Betancourt, Paulino [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela)], E-mail: pbetanco@strix.ciens.ucv.ve

    2008-06-30

    Vanadium nanoparticles ({approx}7 nm) stabilized on activated carbon were synthesized by the reduction of VCl{sub 3}.3THF with K[BEt{sub 3}H]. This material was characterized by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The catalytic performance of the carbon-supported vanadium was studied using thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) as model reaction at 300 deg. C and P = 1 atm. The catalytic activity of the vanadium carbide phase on the activated carbon carrier was more significant than that of the reference catalysts, alumina supported NiMoS. The method proposed for the synthesis of such a catalyst led to an excellent performance of the HDS process.

  15. Active Network Supports for Mobile IP

    LU Yueming; QIAN Depei; XU Bin; WANG Lei

    2001-01-01

    The basic mobile IP protocol is difficult to implement on the traditional IP network and not flexible and efficient under certain conditions. For example, firewalls or boundary routers may drop packets sent by mobile nodes for security reasons. Traditional networking devices such as routers cannot dynamically load and unload extended services to achieve different qualities of services. In this paper, a new scheme of using the active network to support the mobile IP is presented. The Softnet, a prototype of active networks based on mobile agents,is introduced. The active network is characterized by the programmability of its intermediatenodes and therefore presents dynamic and flexible behaviors. Special services can be dynamically deployed onto the active nodes in the Softnet. This property is definitely required in implementing the mobile IP protocols. The Softnet supports not only the basic mobile IP protocol but also other extended mobile IP protocols. Virtual networks for mobile IP services are dynamically formed by mobile agents in the Softnet to provide different qualities of services.

  16. Review of carbon dioxide research staffing and academic support

    Clark, S. B.; Howard, L.; Stevenson, W.; Trice, J.

    1985-04-01

    More than 60 percent of the staff on Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) projects were university affiliated, and over one third of project scientists and engineers also had university teaching responsibilities. Almost 20 percent of project staff were students. CO2 research is unlikely to affect the general labor market for scientists and engineers because it uses such a small portion of the total pool. On the other hand, anticipated tight labor markets in some disciplines important to CO2 research may make it advantageous for CDRD to expand its support of university faculty, students, and staff to ensure that competent, knowledgeable researchers and managers are available for eventual policy decisions on CO2 issues. Options for academic support that lend themselves readily to the diffuse nature of CO2 research, while providing flexibility in the identification and accomplishment of specific programmatic objectives, include modifying procurement procedures for research contracts to enhance academic involvement, sponsoring summer institutes tailored to specific participants and focused on issues of interest to CDRD, and supporting traveling lecture programs designed to bring information of concern to CDRD to technical and nontechnical audiences.

  17. Large Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibres on Sodium Chloride Support

    Ravindra Rajarao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Large scale synthesis of carbon nanofibres (CNFs on a sodium chloride support has been achieved. CNFs have been synthesized using metal oxalate (Ni, Co and Fe as catalyst precursors at 680 C by chemical vapour deposition method. Upon pyrolysis, this catalyst precursors yield catalyst nanoparticles directly. The sodium chloride was used as a catalyst support, it was chosen because of its non‐toxic and water soluble nature. Problems, such as the detrimental effect of CNFs, the detrimental effects on the environment and even cost, have been avoided by using a water soluble support. The structure of products was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The purity of the grown products and purified products were determined by the thermal analysis and X‐ray diffraction method. Here we report the 7600, 7000 and 6500 wt% yield of CNFs synthesized over nickel, cobalt and iron oxalate. The long, curved and worm shaped CNFs were obtained on Ni, Co and Fe catalysts respectively. The lengthy process of calcination and reduction for the preparation of catalysts is avoided in this method. This synthesis route is simple and economical, hence, it can be used for CNF synthesis in industries.

  18. Characteristics of Nonafluorobutyl Methyl Ether (NFE) Adsorption onto Activated Carbon Fibers and Different-Size-Activated Carbon Particles.

    Tanada; Kawasaki; Nakamura; Araki; Tachibana

    2000-08-15

    The characteristics of adsorption of 1,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4-nonafluorobutyl methyl ether (NFE), a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement, onto six different activated carbon; preparations (three activated carbon fibers and three different-sized activated carbon particles) were investigated to evaluate the interaction between activated carbon surfaces and NFE. The amount of NFE adsorbed onto the three activated carbon fibers increased with increasing specific surface area and pore volume. The amount of NFE adsorbed onto the three different-sized-activated carbon particles increased with an increase in the particle diameter of the granular activated carbon. The differential heat of the NFE adsorption onto three activated carbon fibers depended on the porosity structure of the activated carbon fibers. The adsorption rate of NFE was also investigated in order to evaluate the efficiency of NFE recovery by the activated carbon surface. The Sameshima equation was used to obtain the isotherms of NFE adsorption onto the activated carbon fibers and different-sized-activated carbon particles. The rate constant k for NFE adsorption onto activated carbon fibers was larger for increased specific surface area and pore volume. The rate of NFE adsorption on activated carbons of three different particle sizes decreased with increasing particle diameter at a low initial pressure. The adsorption isotherms of NFE for the six activated carbons conformed to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation; the constants BE(0) (the affinity between adsorbate and adsorbent) and W(0) (the adsorption capacity) were calculated. These results indicated that the interaction between the activated carbon and NFE was larger with the smaller specific surface area of the activated carbon fibers and with the smaller particle diameter of the different-sized-activated carbon particles. The degree of packing of NFE in the pores of the activated carbon fibers was greater than that in the pores of the granular activated

  19. High activity carbon sorbents for mercury capture

    George G. Stavropoulos; Irene S. Diamantopoulou; George E. Skodras; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory

    2006-07-01

    High efficiency activated carbons have been prepared for removing mercury from gas streams. Starting materials used were petroleum coke, lignite, charcoal and olive seed waste, and were chemically activated with KOH. Produced adsorbents were primarily characterized for their porosity by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77K. Their mercury retention capacity was characterized based on the breakthrough curves. Compared with typical commercial carbons, they have exhibited considerably enhanced mercury adsorption capacity. An attempt has been made to correlate mercury entrapment and pore structure. It has been shown that physical surface area is increased during activation in contrast to the mercury adsorption capacity that initially increases and tends to decrease at latter stages. Desorption of active sites may be responsible for this behavior. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Removal performance and mechanism of ibuprofen from water by catalytic ozonation using sludge-corncob activated carbon as catalyst.

    Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Liqiu; Qi, Fei; Wang, Xue; Li, Lu; Feng, Li

    2014-09-01

    To discover the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon in catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen, the performance of sludge-corncob activated carbon and three selected commercial activated carbons as catalysts in catalytic ozonation was investigated. The observation indicates the degradation rate of Ibuprofen increases significantly in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon and the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon is much higher than that of the other three commercial activated carbons. Ibuprofen's removal rate follows pseudo-first order kinetics model well. It is also found that the adsorption removal of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon is less than 30% after 40 min. And the removal efficiency of Ibuprofen in the hybrid ozone/sludge-corncob activated carbon system is higher than the sum of sludge-corncob activated carbon adsorption and ozonation alone, which is a supportive evidence for catalytic reaction. In addition, the results of radical scavenger experiments demonstrate that catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon follows a hydroxyl radical reaction pathway. During ozonation of Ibuprofen in the presence of activated carbon, ozone could be catalytically decomposed to form hydrogen peroxide, which can promote the formation of hydroxyl radical. The maximum amount of hydrogen peroxide occurs in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon, which can explain why sludge-corncob activated carbon has the best catalytic activity among four different activated carbons.

  1. Methane Adsorption Study Using Activated Carbon Fiber and Coal Based Activated Carbon

    Guo Deyong; Li Fei; Liu Wenge

    2013-01-01

    Inlfuence of ammonium salt treatment and alkali treatment of the coal based activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon ifber (ACF) adsorbents on methane adsorption capacity was studied via high-pressure adsorption experiment. Sur-face functional groups and pore structure of two types of adsorbents were characterized by the application of infrared ab-sorption spectroscopy (IR) and low temperature liquid nitrogen adsorption method. The results show that both ammonium salt treatment and alkali treatment have obvious effect on changing BET, pore volume as well as pore size distribution of adsorbents; and methane adsorption capacity of the activated carbon ifber is the maximum after the ammonium salt treatment.

  2. Catalytic activity of carbons for methane decomposition reaction

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Catalytic decomposition of methane is an environmentally attractive approach to CO{sub 2}-free production of hydrogen. The objective of this work is to evaluate catalytic activity of a wide range of carbon materials for methane decomposition reaction and determine major factors governing their activity. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of carbon materials for methane decomposition is mostly determined by their structural and surface properties. Kinetics of methane decomposition reaction over disordered (amorphous) carbons such as carbon black and activated carbon were determined. The mechanism of carbon-catalyzed methane decomposition reaction and the nature of active sites on the carbon surface are discussed in this paper.

  3. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  4. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported carbides catalysts for hydrous hydrazine decomposition

    Mnatsakanyan, Raman; Zhurnachyan, Alina R.; Matyshak, Valery A.; Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported Mo2C and WC nanomaterials was studied. Two different routes were utilized to prepare MoO3 (WO3) - C precursors that were then subjected to microwave irradiation in an inert atmosphere. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as irradiation time and gas environment, was investigated. The structure and formation mechanism of the carbide phases were explored. As-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited catalytic activity for hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) decomposition at 30-70 °C. It was shown that the catalyst activity significantly increases if microwave irradiation is applied during the decomposition process. Such conditions permit complete conversion of hydrazine to ammonia and nitrogen within minutes. This effect can be attributed to the unique nanostructure of the catalysts that includes microwave absorbing carbon and active carbide constituents.

  5. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    Din, Israf Ud, E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Naeem, A., E-mail: naeeem64@yahoo.com [National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  6. Synthesis and study of carbon microspheres for use as catalyst support for cobalt

    N.J. Coville

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of pure carbon spheres was achieved in the absence of a catalyst through the direct pyrolysis of two hydrocarbon sources, acetylene and ethylene. Systematic studies using acetylene as the feedstock indicated that the size distribution of the resulting carbon microspheres can be controlled by pyrolysis temperature, time and feedstock flow rate. The resulting spheres were fully characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis. The TEM examination showed that these spheres have a ball-like and chain-like morphology, and the balls have smooth surfaces with a variation in diameter size and distribution determined by the reaction conditions. Carbon microsphere-supported cobalt catalysts were synthesised and have shown good activity in the ethylene hydrogenation reaction.

  7. Potential of Ni supported on clinoptilolite catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Nimwattanakul, Weetima; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Jitkarnka, Sirirat [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2006-01-15

    Carbon dioxide reforming of methane to synthesis gas has been investigated with Ni-supported clinoptilolite catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by using the incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalytic activity of Ni supported on clinoptilolite with varying Ni loadings was determined and the results showed that at 700{sup o}C, 8wt% Ni/clinoptilolite gave the highest activity. It exhibited not only the highest activity and selectivity but also remarkable stability. Moreover, both the activity and stability of this catalyst were observed to vary with the Zr content, exhibiting a maximum at a composition of 2% Zr. The amount of carbonaceous deposits on the spent catalysts was further investigated by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) studies. (author)

  8. Carbon nitride supported copper nanoparticles: light-induced electronic effect of the support for triazole synthesis

    Nandi, Debkumar; Taher, Abu; Ul Islam, Rafique; Siwal, Samarjeet; Choudhary, Meenakshi; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-11-01

    The composite framework of graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) supported copper nanoparticle can act as a high-performance photoreactor for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives under light irradiation in the absence of alkaline condition. The photoactivity of gCN originates from an electron transition from the valence band to the conduction band, in the presence of photon energy, and the hot electron acts as a scavenger of the terminal proton of the alkyne molecule to facilitate the formation of copper acetanilide complex. In this study, we have performed the experiment under a different photonic environment, including dark condition, and in the presence and absence of base. A comparative study was also executed using Cu-TiO2 system, as a reference material, in the support of our proposed mechanism. The recycling performance and the photocorrosion effect of the catalyst have also been reported in this study.

  9. Nickel catalysts supported on MgO with different specific surface area for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Luming; Zhang; Lin; Li; Yuhua; Zhang; Yanxi; Zhao; Jinlin; Li

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, three kinds of MgO with different specific surface area were prepared, and their effects on the catalytic performance of nickel catalysts for the carbon dioxide reforming of methane were investigated. The results showed that MgO support with the higher specific surface area led to the higher dispersion of the active metal, which resulted in the higher initial activity. On the other hand, the specific surface area of MgO materials might not be the dominant factor for the basicity of support to chemisorb and activate CO2, which was another important factor for the performance of catalysts. Herein, Ni/MgO(CA) catalyst with proper specific surface area and strong ability to activate CO2exhibited stable catalytic property and the carbon species deposited on the Ni/MgO(CA) catalyst after 10 h of reaction at 650 ?C were mainly activated carbon species.

  10. Voltammetric Response of Epinephrine at Carbon Nanotube Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode and Activated Glassy Carbon Electrode

    WANG Juan; TANG Ping; ZHAO Fa-qiong; ZENG Bai-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of epinephrine at activated glassy carbon electrode and carbon nanotube-coated glassy carbon electrode was studied. Epinephrine could exhibit an anodic peak at about 0.2 V (vs. SCE) at bare glassy carbon electrode, but it was very small.However, when the electrode was activated at certain potential (i. e. 1.9V) or modified with carbon nanotube, the peak became more sensitive,resulting from the increase in electrode area in addition to the electrostatic attraction. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to epinephrine concentration in the range of 3.3 × 10-7-1.1 × 10-5mol/L at activated glassy carbon electrode and in the range of 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-5 mol/L at carbon nanotube-coated electrode. The correlation coefficients were 0. 998 and 0. 997, respectively. The determination limit was 1.0 × 10-7 mol/L. The two electrodes have been successfully applied for the determination of epinephrine in adrenaline hydrochloride injection with recovery of 95%-104%.

  11. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  12. Electrocatalytic Activity of Palladium Nanocatalysts Supported on Carbon Nanoparticles in Formic Acid Oxidation%碳纳米粒子支撑的钯纳米催化剂在甲酸氧化中的电催化活性

    黄洁; 周志有; 宋洋; 康雄武; 刘珂; 周万城; 陈少伟

    2012-01-01

    采用化学还原法制备了碳纳米粒子支撑的钯纳米结构(Pd-CNP).透射电镜表征显示在Pd-CNP纳米复合物中,金属Pd呈菜花状结构,粒径约20~30 nm.它们由许多更小的Pd纳米粒子(3~8 nm)组成.电化学研究表明,Pd-CNP的电化学活性面积比商业Pd黑低40%,可能原因是部分Pd表面被一层碳纳米粒子覆盖,但其对甲酸氧化却表现出更好的电催化活性,质量比活性和面积比活性都比Pd黑高几倍.催化活性增强的原因可能是碳纳米粒子支撑的Pd纳米结构具有特殊的层次化结构,可以形成更多的活性位,以及表面位更利于反应进行.%Palladium nanostructures were deposited onto carbon nanoparticle surface by a chemical reduction method. Transmission electron microscopic studies showed that whereas the resulting metal-carbon (Pd-CNP) nanocomposites exhibited a diameter of 20 to 30 nm, the metal components actually showed a cauliflower-like surface morphology that consisted of numerous smaller Pd nanoparticles (3 to 8 run). Electrochemical studies showed that the effective surface area of the Pd-CNP nanoparticles was about 40% less than that of Pd black, possibly because the Pd nanoparticles were coated with a layer of carbon nanoparticles; yet, the Pd-CNP nanocomposites exhibited marked enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity in formic acid oxidation, as compared to that of Pd black. In fact, the mass- and surface-specific activities of the former were about three times higher than those of the latter. This improvement was likely a result of the enhanced accessibility of the Pd catalyst surface and the formation of abundant active sites of Pd on the carbon nanoparticle surface due to the hierarchical structure of the metal nanocatalysts.

  13. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  14. High Performance Palladium Supported on Nanoporous Carbon under Anhydrous Condition

    Yang, Zehui; Ling, Ying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xu, Guodong

    2016-11-01

    Due to the high cost of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), replacing platinum (Pt) with some inexpensive metal was carried out. Here, we deposited palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on nanoporous carbon (NC) after wrapping by poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] (PyPBI) doped with phosphoric acid (PA) and the Pd-NPs size was successfully controlled by varying the weight ratio between Pd precursor and carbon support doped with PA. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated from the optimized electrocatalyst with 0.05 mgPd cm‑2 for both anode and cathode sides showed a power density of 76 mW cm‑2 under 120 °C without any humidification, which was comparable to the commercial CB/Pt, 89 mW cm‑2 with 0.45 mgPt cm‑2 loaded in both anode and cathode. Meanwhile, the power density of hybrid MEA with 0.45 mgPt cm‑2 in cathode and 0.05 mgPd cm‑2 in anode reached 188 mW cm‑2. The high performance of the Pt-free electrocatalyst was attributed to the porous structure enhancing the gas diffusion and the PyPBI-PA facilitating the proton conductivity in catalyst layer. Meanwhile, the durability of Pd electrocatalyst was enhanced by coating with acidic polymer. The newly fabricated Pt-free electrocatalyst is extremely promising for reducing the cost in the high-temperature PEFCs.

  15. CARBON NANOTUBES VIA METHANE DECOMPOSITION ON AN ALUMINA SUPPORTED COBALT AEROGEL CATALYST

    Lingyu Piao; Jiuling Chen; Yongdan Li

    2003-01-01

    An alumina-supported cobalt aerogel catalyst prepared from a sol-gel and a supercritical drying method was used in the catalytic decomposition of methane. The physical-chemical properties of the catalyst were characterized and its activity for methane decomposition was investigated. The effects of calcination and reaction temperatures on the activity of the catalyst and the morphology of the carbon nanotubes produced were discussed. A CoAl2O4 spinel structure formed in the calcined catalyst. The quantity of the nanotubes produced in the reaction increases with the amount of cobalt in the reduced catalyst. A higher reaction temperature leads to a higher reaction rate, though faster deactivation of the catalyst occurs with the change. The carbon nanotubes grown on the catalyst have smooth walls and uniform diameter distribution.

  16. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  17. Methanol Electro-Oxidation on Pt-Ru Alloy Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nanotubes

    Yangchuan Xing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been investigated in recent years as a catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Improved catalyst activities were observed and attributed to metal-support interactions. We report a study on the kinetics of methanol electro-oxidation on CNT supported Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles. Alloy catalysts with different compositions, Pt53Ru47/CNT, Pt69Ru31/CNT and Pt77Ru23/CNT, were prepared and investigated in detail. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures, electrode potentials, and methanol concentrations. It was found that the reaction order of methanol electro-oxidation on the PtRu/CNT catalysts was consistent with what has been reported for PtRu alloys with a value of 0.5 in methanol concentrations. However, the electro-oxidation reaction on the PtRu/CNT catalysts displayed much lower activation energies than that on the Pt-Ru alloy catalysts unsupported or supported on carbon black (PtRu/CB. This study provides an overall kinetic evaluation of the PtRu/CNT catalysts and further demonstrates the beneficial role of CNTs.

  18. Proximate analysis for determination of micropores in granulated activated carbon

    Berman, Ya. G.; Nikolaev, V.B.; Shepelev, A.N.

    1987-02-01

    A method is discussed for determining the specific micropore volume of granulated activated carbon used for water treatment in Soviet coking plants. Toluene molecules with a diameter of 0.67 nm are sorbed by activated carbon with micropore diameter ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Therefore, sorptive properties of activated carbon in relation to toluene supply information on micropore volume in carbon. A formula which describes this relation is derived. The method for determining micropore volume on the basis of toluene adsorption was tested using 8 types of activated carbon produced from coal and petroleum. Types of activated carbon characterized by the highest adsorption were selected. 1 ref.

  19. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  20. In vitro adsorption study of fluoxetine in activated carbons and activated carbon fibres

    Nabais, J.M. Valente; Mouquinho, A.; Galacho, C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Centro de Quimica de Evora e Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Evora, Rua Romao Ramalho no. 59, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)

    2008-05-15

    We study the in vitro adsorption of fluoxetine hydrochloride by different adsorbents in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, pH 1.2 and 7.5, respectively. The tested materials were two commercial activated carbons, carbomix and maxsorb MSC30, one activated carbon fibre produced in our laboratory and also three MCM-41 samples, also produced by us. Selected samples were modified by liquid phase oxidation and thermal treatment in order to change the surface chemistry without significant modifications to the porous characteristics. The fluoxetine adsorption follows the Langmuir model. The calculated Q{sub 0} values range from 54 to 1112 mg/g. A different adsorption mechanism was found for the adsorption of fluoxetine in activated carbon fibres and activated carbons. In the first case the most relevant factors are the molecular sieving effect and the dispersive interactions whereas in the activated carbons the mechanism seams to be based on the electrostatic interactions between the fluoxetine molecules and the charged carbon surface. Despite the different behaviours most of the materials tested have potential for treating potential fluoxetine intoxications. (author)

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from waste biomass.

    Tay, Turgay; Ucar, Suat; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-06-15

    Lignocellulosic materials are good and cheap precursors for the production of activated carbon. In this study, activated carbons were prepared from the pyrolysis of soybean oil cake at 600 and 800 degrees C by chemical activation with K(2)CO(3) and KOH. The influence of temperature and type of chemical reagents on the porosity development was investigated and discussed. K(2)CO(3) was found more effective than KOH as a chemical reagent under identical conditions in terms of both porosity development and yields of the activated carbons. The maximum surface area (1352.86 m(2)g(-1)) was obtained at 800 degrees C with K(2)CO(3) activation which lies in the range of commercial activated carbons. Elemental analyses of the activated carbons indicate insignificant sulphur content for all activated carbons. The ash and sulphur contents of the activated carbons obtained with chemical activation by K(2)CO(3) were lower than those by chemical activation with KOH.

  2. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies.

  3. Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    José L.G. Fierro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF, thermogravimetry (TGA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS, have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts.

  4. Designing Interactive Applications to Support Novel Activities

    Hyowon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available R&D in media-related technologies including multimedia, information retrieval, computer vision, and the semantic web is experimenting on a variety of computational tools that, if sufficiently matured, could support many novel activities that are not practiced today. Interactive technology demonstration systems produced typically at the end of their projects show great potential for taking advantage of technological possibilities. These demo systems or “demonstrators” are, even if crude or farfetched, a significant manifestation of the technologists’ visions in transforming emerging technologies into novel usage scenarios and applications. In this paper, we reflect on design processes and crucial design decisions made while designing some successful, web-based interactive demonstrators developed by the authors. We identify methodological issues in applying today’s requirement-driven usability engineering method to designing this type of novel applications and solicit a clearer distinction between designing mainstream applications and designing novel applications. More solution-oriented approaches leveraging design thinking are required, and more pragmatic evaluation criteria is needed that assess the role of the system in exploiting the technological possibilities to provoke further brainstorming and discussion. Such an approach will support a more efficient channelling of the technology-to-application transformation which are becoming increasingly crucial in today’s context of rich technological possibilities.

  5. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  6. Oxidation of Carbon Supports at Fuel Cell Cathodes: Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometric Study

    Li, Ming-fang; Tao, Qian; Liao, Ling-wen; Xu, Jie; Cai, Jun; Chen, Yan-xia

    2010-08-01

    The effects of O2 and the supported Pt nano-particles on the mechanisms and kinetics of the carbon support corrosion are investigated by monitoring the CO2 production using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry in a dual-thin layer flow cell. Carbon can be oxidized in different distinct potential regimes; O2 accelerates carbon oxidation, the rates of CO2 production from carbon oxidation in O2 saturated solution are two times of that in N2 saturated solution at the same potential; Pt can catalyze the carbon oxidation, with supported Pt nanoparticles, the overpotential for carbon oxidation is much smaller than that without loading in the carbon electrode. The mechanism for the enhanced carbon oxidation by Pt and O2 are discussed.

  7. Supporting Human Activities - Exploring Activity-Centered Computing

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bardram, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore an activity-centered computing paradigm that is aimed at supporting work processes that are radically different from the ones known from office work. Our main inspiration is healthcare work that is characterized by an extreme degree of mobility, many interruptions, ad...... objects. We also present an exploratory prototype design and first implementation and present some initial results from evaluations in a healthcare environment....

  8. Development of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    Yang, Wulin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication of activated carbon air cathodes for larger-scale microbial fuel cells requires a diffusion layer (DL) that is highly resistant to water leakage, oxygen permeable, and made using inexpensive materials. A hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane synthesized using a simple phase inversion process was examined as a low cost ($0.9/m(2)), carbon-free DL that prevented water leakage at high pressure heads compared to a polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon black DL ($11/m(2)). The power density produced with a PVDF (20%, w/v) DL membrane of 1400±7mW/m(2) was similar to that obtained using a wipe DL [cloth coated with poly(dimethylsiloxane)]. Water head tolerance reached 1.9m (∼19kPa) with no mesh supporter, and 2.1m (∼21kPa, maximum testing pressure) with a mesh supporter, compared to 0.2±0.05m for the wipe DL. The elimination of carbon black from the DL greatly simplified the fabrication procedure and further reduced overall cathode costs.

  9. Nanocrystalline MgO supported nickel-based bimetallic catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Meshkani, Fereshteh [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Rezaei, Mehran [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area and plate-like shape was employed as catalyst support for preparation of nickel-based bimetallic catalysts in methane reforming with carbon dioxide. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET), Temperature programmed oxidation and desorption (TPO-TPD), Thermal gravimetric and differential thermal gravimetric (TGA-DTG), H{sub 2} chemisorption and Transmission and electron microscopies (TEM and SEM) analyses. CO{sub 2}-TPD data showed the high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of catalysts which improves the resistance of catalysts against the carbon formation. The H{sub 2} chemisorption results also indicated that the addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved the nickel dispersion. The obtained results revealed that the prepared catalysts showed a high activity and stability during the reaction with a low amount of deposited carbon. Addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved both the activity and resistivity against carbon formation. (author)

  10. Cycloaddition Reaction of Carbon Dioxide to Epoxides Catalyzed by Polymer-Supported Quaternary Phosphonium Salts

    Yubing Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-supported quaternary phosphonium salt (PS-QPS was explored as effective catalyst for the coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides. The results indicated that cyclic carbonates with high yields (98.6% and excellent selectivity (100% could be prepared at the conditions of 5 MPa CO2, 150°C, and 6 h without the addition of organic solvents or cocatalysts. The effects of various reaction conditions on the catalytic performance were investigated in detail. The catalyst is applicable to a variety of epoxides, producing the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yields. Furthermore, the catalyst could be recovered easily and reused for five times without loss of catalytic activity obviously. A proposed mechanism for synthesis of cyclic carbonate in the presence of PS-QPS was discussed. The catalyst was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrum. It is believed that PS-QPS is of great potential for CO2 fixation applications due to its unusual advantages, such as easy preparation, high activity and selectivity, stability, low cost, and reusability.

  11. Metal oxide coating of carbon supports for supercapacitor applications.

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tribby, Louis, J (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lakeman, Charles D. E. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Han, Sang M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lambert, Timothy N.; Fleig, Patrick F. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-01

    The global market for wireless sensor networks in 2010 will be valued close to $10 B, or 200 M units. TPL, Inc. is a small Albuquerque based business that has positioned itself to be a leader in providing uninterruptible power supplies in this growing market with projected revenues expected to exceed $26 M in 5 years. This project focused on improving TPL, Inc.'s patent-pending EnerPak{trademark} device which converts small amounts of energy from the environment (e.g., vibrations, light or temperature differences) into electrical energy that can be used to charge small energy storage devices. A critical component of the EnerPak{trademark} is the supercapacitor that handles high power delivery for wireless communications; however, optimization and miniaturization of this critical component is required. This proposal aimed to produce prototype microsupercapacitors through the integration of novel materials and fabrication processes developed at New Mexico Technology Research Collaborative (NMTRC) member institutions. In particular, we focused on developing novel ruthenium oxide nanomaterials and placed them into carbon supports to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. These improvements were expected to reduce maintenance costs and expand the utility of the TPL, Inc.'s device, enabling New Mexico to become the leader in the growing global wireless power supply market. By dominating this niche, new customers were expected to be attracted to TPL, Inc. yielding new technical opportunities and increased job opportunities for New Mexico.

  12. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT

    T S Sonia; P A Mini; R Nandhini; Kalluri Sujith; Balakrishnan Avinash; S V Nair; K R V Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the high electrical storage capacity of composite electrodes made from nanoscale activated carbon combined with either poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) or PEDOT doped with multiple dopants such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The composites were fabricated by electropolymerization of the conducting polymers (PEDOT:PSS, doped PEDOT) onto the nanoscale activated carbon backbone, wherein the nanoscale activated carbon was produced by ball-milling followed by chemical and thermal treatments. Activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS yielded capacitance values of 640 F g-1 and 26mF cm-2, while activated carbon/doped PEDOT yielded capacitances of 1183 F g-1 and 42 mF cm-2 at 10 mV s-1. This is more than five times the storage capacity previously reported for activated carbon–PEDOT composites. Further, use of multiple dopants in PEDOT improved the storage performance of the composite electrode well over that of PEDOT:PSS. The composite electrodes were characterized for their electrochemical behaviour, structural and morphological details and electronic conductivity and showed promise as high-performance energy storage systems.

  13. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Li, Yunchao [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL; Grappe, Hippolyte A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  14. Influence of carbon nanofiber properties as electrocatalyst support on the electrochemical performance for PEM fuel cells

    Sebastian, D.; Suelves, I.; Moliner, R.; Lazaro, M.J. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Energy and Environment, C/Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Calderon, J.C.; Gonzalez-Exposito, J.A.; Pastor, E. [Universidad de La Laguna, Dpto de Quimica-Fisica, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Novel carbonaceous supports for electrocatalysts are being investigated to improve the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Within several supports, carbon nanofibers blend two properties that rarely coexist in a material: a high mesoporosity and a high electrical conductivity, due to their particular structure. Carbon nanofibers have been obtained by catalytic decomposition of methane, optimizing growth conditions to obtain carbon supports with different properties. Subsequently, the surface chemistry has been modified by an oxidation treatment, in order to create oxygen surface groups of different nature that have been observed to be necessary to obtain a higher performance of the electrocatalyst. Platinum has then been supported on the as-prepared carbon nanofibers by different deposition methods and the obtained catalysts have been studied by different electrochemical techniques. The influence of carbon nanofibers properties and functionalization on the electrochemical behavior of the electrocatalysts has been studied and discussed, obtaining higher performances than commercial electrocatalysts with the highest electrical conductive carbon nanofibers as support. (author)

  15. 78 FR 13894 - Certain Activated Carbon From China

    2013-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Activated Carbon From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4381 (February 2013), entitled Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation...

  16. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported Pt-W electrocatalysts

    Meza, D.; Morales, U.; Salgado, L. [Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Distrito Federal (Mexico); Roquero, P. [Unidad de Investigacion en Catalisis, Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    The catalytic activity of Pt-W electrocatalysts towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied. Pt-W/C materials were prepared by thermolysis of tungsten and platinum carbonyl complexes in 1-2 dichloro-benzene during 48 h. The precursors were mixed to obtain relations of Pt:W: 50:50 and 80:20%w, respectively. The Pt carbonyl complex was previously synthesized by bubbling CO in a chloroplatinic acid solution. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The results show that both materials (Pt{sub 50}W{sub 50}/C and Pt{sub 80}W{sub 20}/C) have a crystalline phase associated with metallic platinum and an amorphous phase related with tungsten and carbon. The particle size of the electrocatalysts depends on the relationship between platinum and tungsten. Finally, both materials exhibit catalytic activity for oxygen reduction. (author)

  17. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium.

  18. Study on Direct Synthesis of Diphenyl Carbonate with Heterogeneous Catalytic Reaction (VI) Effect of Sn Loading Method and Content on Activity of Sn-Pd Supported Catalyst%非均相催化一步合成碳酸二苯酯的研究(VI)Sn的添加方法及添加量对Pd-Sn催化性能的影响

    张光旭; 吴元欣; 马沛生; 田崎峰; 吴广文; 李定或

    2004-01-01

    The compound metal oxide LaxPbyMnzO used as support was prepared by the sol-gel method, and the catalyst in which Pd was used as active component and Sn as co-active component for direct synthesis of diphenyl carbonate (DPC) with heterogeneous catalytic reaction was obtained by co-calcination and precipitation respectively.The catalyst was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM respectively. The specific surface area of catalysts was measured by ChemBET3000 instrument, and the activity of the catalysts was tested by the synthesis of DPC in a pressured reactor. The results showed that when the co-active component Sn was added by co-calcination method A, its loading content was equal to 14.43% and active component Pd was loaded by precipitation, the yield and selectivity of DPC could reach 26.78% and 99% respectively.

  19. Carbon-Supported Fe Catalysts for CO2 Electroreduction to High-Added Value Products: A DEMS Study: Effect of the Functionalization of the Support

    S. Pérez-Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulcan XC-72R-supported Fe catalysts have been synthesised for the electroreduction of CO2 to high-added value products. Catalysts were obtained by the polyol method, using ethylene glycol as solvent and reducing agent. Prior to the metal deposition, Vulcan was subjected to different oxidation treatments in order to modify its surface chemistry and study its influence on the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the catalysts, as well as on the product distribution. The oxidation treatments of the supports modify their textural properties, but do not affect significantly the physicochemical properties of catalysts. However, DEMS studies showed that the carbon support degradation, the distribution of products, and the catalytic activity toward the CO2 electroreduction reaction depend significantly on the surface chemistry of the carbon support.

  20. Particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by Co catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes

    Ali Nakhaei Pour; Elham Hosaini; Mohammad Izadyar; Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Co particle size on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) activity of carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Co catalysts was investigated. Microemulsion (using water-to-surfactant molar ratios of 2 to12) and impregnation techniques were used to prepare catalysts with different Co particle sizes. Kinetic studies were performed to understand the effect of Co particle size on catalytic activity. Size-dependent kinetic parameters were developed using a thermodynamic method, to evaluate the structural sensitivity of the CNT-supported Co catalysts. The size-independent FTS reaction rate constant and size-independent adsorption parameter increased with increasing reac-tion temperature. The Polani parameter also depended on catalyst particle size, because of changes in the catalyst surface coverage.

  1. Enzyme-Mediated Hydrolysis of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Supported Carbonates

    K. Matsumoto; M. Shimojo; M. Nogawa; M. Okudomi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Enzymatic kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols or esters is known as a useful method for the preparation of optically active secondary alcohols. However, the work-up including the separation of the mixture of the remaining substrate and the resulting compound spend a lot of time and waste much amount of solvents. On the other hand, organic synthesis based on polymer supports has made rapid progress. Although the methodology is potentially useful for the easy separation of compounds obtained by the enzymatic reaction, there have been relatively few reports on enzymatic resolutions of using a polymer so far. We have noticed that using a watersoluble polymer could be suitable for enzymatic transformation. Here, we report the first example of an enzyme-mediated enantioselective hydrolysis of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-supported substrates with a carbonate moiety to afford optically active compounds, and the method enables us to achieve the easy separation of the products[1]. See Scheme 1.

  2. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water with carbon nanotube supported manganese oxides as catalyst

    Sui, Minghao, E-mail: suiminghao.sui@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Sichu; Sheng, Li; Huang, Shuhang; Guo, Hongguang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ciprofloxacin in water was degraded by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx were supported on MWCNTs to serve as catalyst for ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT exhibited highly catalytic activity on ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT resulted in effective antibacterial activity inhibition on ciprofloxacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-supported manganese oxides (MnOx/MWCNT) were used as catalysts to assist ozone in degrading ciprofloxacin in water. Manganese oxides were successfully loaded on multi-walled carbon nanotube surfaces by simply impregnating the carbon nanotube with permanganate solution. The catalytic activities of MnOx/MWCNT in ciprofloxacin ozonation, including degradation, mineralization effectiveness, and antibacterial activity change, were investigated. The presence of MnOx/MWCNT significantly elevated the degradation and mineralization efficiency of ozone on ciprofloxacin. The microbiological assay with a reference Escherichia coli strain indicated that ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT results in more effective antibacterial activity inhibition of ciprofloxacin than that in ozonation alone. The effects of catalyst dose, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, and initial pH conditions on ciprofloxacin ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT were surveyed. Electron spin resonance trapping was applied to assess the role of MnOx/MWCNT in generating hydroxyl radicals (HO{center_dot}) during ozonation. Stronger 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide-OH signals were observed in the ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT compared with those in ozonation alone, indicating that MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The degradation of ciprofloxacin was studied in drinking water and wastewater process samples to gauge the potential effects of water background matrix on

  3. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......, the ionomer may have an adsorption preference to the platinum nano particle rather than to the overall catalyst. This was verified by a close examination on the decomposition temperature of the carbon support and the ionomer. The electrochemical stability of the catalyst ionomer composite electrode suggests...

  4. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    Qingfeng, Li; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Bjerrum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    improve the oxygen reduction kinetics due to increased oxygen solubility and suppressed adsorption of phosphoric acid anions. Further enhancement of the catalytic activity can be obtained by operating the polymer electrolytes at higher temperatures. Efforts have been made to develop a polymer electrolyte......Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer electrolytes in a temperature range up to 190 degrees C. Compared with pure H3PO4, the combination of H3PO4 and polymer electrolytes can significantly...

  5. Highly Porous Carbon Derived from MOF-5 as a Support of ORR Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells.

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-13

    The development of highly competent electrocatalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathodes of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is extremely important for their long-term operation and wide applications. Herein, we present highly efficient ORR electrocatalysts based on Pt/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles dispersed on highly porous carbon obtained via pyrolysis of a metal-organic framework MOF-5. In comparison to the commercial Pt/C (20%), the electrocatalyst Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) in this study exhibits a pronounced positive shift of 90 mV in Eonset. In addition, it also demonstrates excellent long-term stability and durability during the 500-cycle continue-oxygen-supply (COS) accelerating durability tests (ADTs). The significantly improved activity and stability of Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) can be attributed to the Pt electron interaction with Ni and carbon support as has been proved in X-ray and microscopic analysis.

  6. Polyaniline-functionalized carbon nanotube supported platinum catalysts.

    He, Daping; Zeng, Chao; Xu, Cheng; Cheng, Niancai; Li, Huaiguang; Mu, Shichun; Pan, Mu

    2011-05-03

    Electrocatalytically active platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on a carbon nanotube (CNT) with enhanced nucleation and stability have been demonstrated through introduction of electron-conducting polyaniline (PANI) to bridge the Pt nanoparticles and CNT walls with the presence of platinum-nitride (Pt-N) bonding and π-π bonding. The Pt colloids were prepared through ethanol reduction under the protection of aniline, the CNT was dispersed well with the existence of aniline in the solution, and aniline was polymerized in the presence of a protonic acid (HCl) and an oxidant (NH(4)S(2)O(8)). The synthesized PANI is found to wrap around the CNT as a result of π-π bonding, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles are loaded onto the CNT with narrowly distributed particle sizes ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 nm due to the polymer stabilization and existence of Pt-N bonding. The Pt-PANI/CNT catalysts are electroactive and exhibit excellent electrochemical stability and therefore promise potential applications in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  7. Computational Chemistry Approach to Interpret the Crystal Violet Adsorption on Golbasi Lignite Activated Carbon

    Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Prisbrey, Keith A.; Yucel, Aysegul

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, adsorption mechanism of Crystal Violet (CV) dye from the aqueous solution on the activated carbon prepared from Golbasi lignite was explained and interpreted by a computational chemistry approach and experimental studies. Molecular dynamic simulations and Ab initio frontier orbital analysis indicated relatively high energy and electron transfer processes during adsorption, and molecular dynamics simulations showed CV dye molecules moving around on the activated carbon surface after adsorption, facilitating penetration into cracks and pores. The experimental results supported to molecular dynamic simulation and showed that the monolayer coverage occurred on the activated carbon surface and each CV dye ion had equal sorption activation energy.

  8. Hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate as a new recyclable solid base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation in water

    Monika Gupta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Knoevenagel condensation between aromatic aldehydes and malononitrile, ethyl cyanoacetate or malonic acid with hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate in water is described. HAP–Cs2CO3 was found to be a highly active, stable and recyclable catalyst under the reaction conditions.

  9. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...

  10. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  11. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  12. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  13. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times.

  14. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  15. Pt supported on carbon nanofibers as electrocatalyst for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Alcaide, Francisco; Alvarez, Garbine; Miguel, Oscar [Dpto. de Energia, CIDETEC, Paseo Miramon, 196, 20009 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Lazaro, Maria Jesus; Moliner, Rafael [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez-Cudero, Ana; Solla-Gullon, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Carbon nanofibers synthesized via the thermo catalytic decomposition of methane were investigated for the first time as an electrocatalyst support in PEMFC cathodes. Their textural and physical properties make them a highly efficient catalyst support for cathodic oxygen reduction in low temperature PEMFC. Tests performed in MEAs showed that Pt supported on carbon nanofibers exhibited an enhancement of ca. 94% in power density at 0.600 V, in comparison with a commercial catalyst supported on conventional carbon black, Pt/Vulcan XC-72R. (author)

  16. Preparation of palladium loaded carbon nanotubes and activated carbons for hydrogen sorption

    Anson, A. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: aanson@ualberta.ca; Lafuente, E. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Urriolabeitia, E. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Navarro, R. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Benito, A.M. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Maser, W.K. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Martinez, M.T. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-06-14

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and MAXSORB activated carbon have been used as the support of palladium nanoparticles. The preparation of the palladium loaded carbon materials has been done by direct reaction between the support and a Pd (0) compound, either Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3} or Pd(PPh{sub 3}){sub 4}. The efficiency of the loading reaction has been much better when Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3} has been chosen as the Pd source, reaching high palladium loadings (up to ca. 45 wt.%) with relatively small particle size (5-10 nm for SWNTs and 30-40 nm for MAXSORB). The hydrogen isotherms of the palladium loaded materials present a steep increase at very low pressures. The H/Pd atomic ratio of the samples has been found to be dependent on the Pd precursor, being higher in the case of Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3}. Several samples have achieved H/Pd ratios higher than the value for bulk Pd (H/Pd {approx} 0.6-0.7). Maximum hydrogen sorption at room temperature in the palladium loaded samples has been found to be of 0.5 wt.% at atmospheric pressure. Oxidative treatments on the substrate before the palladium loading have diminished the efficiency of the loading reaction, the hydrogen adsorption, and the H/Pd atomic ratio.

  17. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  18. Carbon-supported ionic liquids as innovative adsorbents for CO₂ separation from synthetic flue-gas.

    Erto, Alessandro; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Balsamo, Marco; Lancia, Amedeo; Montagnaro, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Fixed-bed thermodynamic CO2 adsorption tests were performed in model flue-gas onto Filtrasorb 400 and Nuchar RGC30 activated carbons (AC) functionalized with [Hmim][BF4] and [Emim][Gly] ionic liquids (IL). A comparative analysis of the CO2 capture results and N2 porosity characterization data evidenced that the use of [Hmim][BF4], a physical solvent for carbon dioxide, ended up into a worsening of the parent AC capture performance, due to a dominating pore blocking effect at all the operating temperatures. Conversely, the less sterically-hindered and amino acid-based [Emim][Gly] IL was effective in increasing the AC capture capacity at 353 K under milder impregnation conditions, the beneficial effect being attributed to both its chemical affinity towards CO2 and low pore volume reduction. The findings derived in this work outline interesting perspectives for the application of amino acid-based IL supported onto activated carbons for CO2 separation under post-combustion conditions, and future research efforts should be focused on the search for AC characterized by optimal pore size distribution and surface properties for IL functionalization.

  19. Tungsten carbide modified high surface area carbon as fuel cell catalyst support

    Shao, Minhua; Merzougui, Belabbes; Shoemaker, Krista; Stolar, Laura; Protsailo, Lesia; Mellinger, Zachary J.; Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m 2 g -1) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  20. Carbon Supported Ag Nanoparticles as High Performance Cathode Catalyst for Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Le eXin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-precious metal catalyst - carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C. XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm and narrow size distribution (2-9 nm are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80 oC.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  2. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated; Caracterizacion volumetrica y superficial de carbon activado

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  3. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  4. Superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges for separation and absorption.

    Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Liang, Weidong; Zhao, Xinhong; La, Peiqing; Deng, Weiqiao

    2013-06-01

    Highly porous activated carbon with a large surface area and pore volume was synthesized by KOH activation using commercially available activated carbon as a precursor. By modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), highly porous activated carbon showed superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 163.6°. The changes in wettability of PDMS- treated highly porous activated carbon were attributed to the deposition of a low-surface-energy silicon coating onto activated carbon (confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), which had microporous characteristics (confirmed by XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses). Using an easy dip-coating method, superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges were also fabricated; those exhibited excellent absorption selectivity for the removal of a wide range of organics and oils from water, and also recyclability, thus showing great potential as efficient absorbents for the large-scale removal of organic contaminants or oil spills from water.

  5. Thermal analysis of activated carbons modified with silver metavanadate

    Goscianska, Joanna; Nowicki, Piotr; Nowak, Izabela [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Pietrzak, Robert, E-mail: pietrob@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of the activated carbons from waste materials as new supports for AgVO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of AgVO{sub 3} to V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ag{sup 0} for the samples 1 and 3 wt.% Ag-V is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples containing 5 wt.% Ag-V decompose to vanadyl species as intermediate compounds. - Abstract: The effect of silver metavanadate doping on physicochemical properties and thermal behaviour of the activated carbons obtained from waste materials was investigated. The carbonaceous supports were subjected to carbonisation at 400 or 600 Degree-Sign C. The samples carbonised at 600 Degree-Sign C have much more developed surface area and porous structure than the analogous samples obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C. Impregnation of activated carbons with silver metavanadate leads to a decrease in their surface area and pore volume. According to thermal analysis (TG, DTG) in the samples containing 1 and 3 wt.% of silver metavanadate, AgVO{sub 3} is fully decomposed to do vanadium oxide and Ag, with no intermediate products, while in the samples containing 5 wt.% AgVO{sub 3}, this salt is decomposed to vanadyl species as intermediate compounds at 350 Degree-Sign C before the formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at 500 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, in all samples impregnated with silver metavanadate the nanoparticles of silver undergo crystallisation leading to reduction of Ag{sup +} ions from the vanadium salt to Ag{sup 0}.

  6. Kinetics of carbon monoxide oxidation over modified supported CuO catalysts

    Loc, Luu Cam; Tri, Nguyen; Cuong, Hoang Tien; Thoang, Ho Si [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    The following supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: 10(wt.)%CuO (CuAl), 10%CuO+10%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CuCrAl) and 10%CuO+20%CeO{sub 2} (CuCeAl) were under the investigation. Physico-chemical characteristics of the catalysts were determined by the methods of BET, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR). A strong interaction of copper with support in CuAl resulted in the formation of low active copper aluminates. The bi-oxide CuCrAl was more active than CuAl owing to the formation of high catalytically active spinel CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The fact of very high activity of the sample CuCeAl can be explained by the presence of the catalytically active form of CuO-CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The kinetics of CO total oxidation was studied in a gradientless flow-circulating system at the temperature range between 200 C and 270 C. The values of initial partial pressures of carbon monoxide (P{sup o}{sub CO}), oxygen (P{sup o}{sub O2}), and specially added carbon dioxide (P{sup o}{sub CO{sub 2}}) were varied in ranges (hPa): 10 / 45; 33 / 100, and 0 / 30, respectively. (orig.)

  7. UV /VIS Photocatalytic Degradation of Formaldehyde by Bamboo Activated Carbon Supported Catalyst (Abstract)%竹活性炭负载催化剂UV/VIS光降解甲醛的研究(摘要)

    崔丹丹

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of bamboo activated carbon (BAC) and the photoeatalysis of titanium dioxide ( TiO2 ) act synergistically in the treatment of formaldehyde aqueous solution. On the basis of review of domestic and international research, composites of TiO2 and BAC (TiO2/BAC) were developed through sol-gel method. Meanwhile, elements of Pt and N were doped in the composite to produce Pt/N/TiO2/BAC. The photocatalysis under UV/Vis light was investigated. Main contents and results are summarized as follows :%利用竹活性炭(BAC)的强吸附性和二氧化钛(TiO2)的光催化氧化性二者的协同作用,对水溶液中的甲醛进行处理。在综述国内外研究的基础上,采用溶胶-凝胶法制备TiO2溶胶,采用浸渍法将TiO2负载于竹活性炭的表面,研制了一种以竹活性炭为基质负载TiO2的复合紫外光催化剂(TiO2/BAC),同时制备了铂、氮共掺杂的可见光响应型催化剂(Pt/N/TiO2/BAC),并考察二者对水溶液中甲醛的光催化处理效果。1)BAC以及TiO2/BAC的制备以竹子为原料,通过磷酸活化法制备不同孔径和比表面积的系列BAC作为载体。

  8. Supporting localized activities in ubiquitous computing environments

    Pinto, Helder

    2004-01-01

    The design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems must be centered on users' activity in order to bring computing systems closer to people. Adopting an activity-centered approach to the design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems leads us to seek to understand: a) how humans naturally accomplish an activity; and b) how computing artifacts from both the environmental and personal domains may contribute to the accomplishment of an activity. This work particularly focuses o...

  9. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  10. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  11. Ozonation of benzothiazole saturated-activated carbons: Influence of carbon chemical surface properties

    Valdes, H. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Caupolican 491, Concepcion (Chile)]. E-mail: hvaldes@ucsc.cl; Zaror, C.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica (F. Ingenieria), Universidad de Concepcion, Correo 3, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2006-09-21

    The combined or sequential use of ozone and activated carbon to treat toxic effluents has increased in recent years. However, little is known about the influence of carbon surface active sites on ozonation of organic adsorbed pollutants. This paper presents experimental results on the effect of metal oxides and oxygenated surface groups on gaseous ozonation of spent activated carbons. Benzothiazole (BT) was selected as a target organic compound in this study due to its environmental concern. Activated carbons with different chemical surface composition were prepared from a Filtrasorb-400 activated carbon. Pre-treatment included: ozonation, demineralisation, and deoxygenation of activated carbon. Ozonation experiments of BT saturated-activated carbons were conducted in a fixed bed reactor loaded with 2 g of carbon samples. The reactor was fed with an O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} gas mixture (2 dm{sup 3}/min, 5 g O{sub 3}/h), for a given exposure time, in the range 10-120 min, at 298 K and 1 atm. Results show that extended gaseous ozonation of activated carbon saturated with BT led to the effective destruction of the adsorbate by oxidation reactions. Oxidation of BT adsorbed on activated carbon seemed to occur via both direct reaction with ozone molecules, and by oxygen radical species generated by catalytic ozone decomposition on metallic surface sites.

  12. Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review

    W.D.P Rengga

    2012-11-01

    supports renewable energy. Keywords: adsorption; bamboo; formaldehyde; modified activated carbon; nano size particles

  13. Supported mesoporous carbon ultrafiltration membrane and process for making the same

    Strano, Michael; Foley, Henry C.; Agarwal, Hans

    2004-04-13

    A novel supported mesoporous carbon ultrafiltration membrane and process for producing the same. The membranes comprise a mesoporous carbon layer that exists both within and external to the porous support. A liquid polymer precursor composition comprising both carbonizing and noncarbonizing templating polymers is deposited on the porous metal support. The coated support is then heated in an inert-gas atmosphere to pyrolyze the polymeric precursor and form a mesoporous carbon layer on and within the support. The pore-size of the membranes is dependent on the molecular weight of the noncarbonizing templating polymer precursor. The mesoporous carbon layer is stable and can withstand high temperatures and exposure to organic chemicals. Additionally, the porous metal support provides excellent strength properties. The composite structure of the membrane provides novel structural properties and allows for increased operating pressures allowing for greater membrane flow rates. The invention also relates to the use of the novel ultrafiltration membrane to separate macromolecules from solution. An example is shown separating bovine serum albumin from water. The membrane functions by separating and by selective adsorption. Because of the membrane's porous metal support, it is well suited to industrial applications. The unique properties of the supported mesoporous carbon membrane also allow the membrane to be used in transient pressure or temperature swing separations processes. Such processes were not previously possible with existing mesoporous membranes. The present invention, however, possesses the requisite physical properties to perform such novel ultrafiltration processes.

  14. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  15. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  16. The Effectiveness of Staff Support: Evaluating Active Support Training Using a Conditional Probability Approach.

    Felce, David; Bowley, Clare; Baxter, Helen; Jones, Edwin; Lowe, Kathy; Emerson, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Active Support, a package of procedures which includes activity planning, support planning, and training on providing effective assistance, was evaluated in five community residences serving 19 adults with severe mental retardation. Findings indicated that the likelihood of a resident engaging in activity significantly increased following staff…

  17. Enhanced adsorption of humic acids on ordered mesoporous carbon compared with microporous activated carbon.

    Liu, Fengling; Xu, Zhaoyi; Wan, Haiqin; Wan, Yuqiu; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-04-01

    Humic acids are ubiquitous in surface and underground waters and may pose potential risk to human health when present in drinking water sources. In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon was synthesized by means of a hard template method and further characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transition electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate adsorption of two humic acids from coal and soil, respectively, on the synthesized carbon. For comparison, a commercial microporous activated carbon and nonporous graphite were included as additional adsorbents; moreover, phenol was adopted as a small probe adsorbate. Pore size distribution characterization showed that the synthesized carbon had ordered mesoporous structure, whereas the activated carbon was composed mainly of micropores with a much broader pore size distribution. Accordingly, adsorption of the two humic acids was substantially lower on the activated carbon than on the synthesized carbon, because of the size-exclusion effect. In contrast, the synthesized carbon and activated carbon showed comparable adsorption for phenol when the size-exclusion effect was not in operation. Additionally, we verified by size-exclusion chromatography studies that the synthesized carbon exhibited greater adsorption for the large humic acid fraction than the activated carbon. The pH dependence of adsorption on the three carbonaceous adsorbents was also compared between the two test humic acids. The findings highlight the potential of using ordered mesoporous carbon as a superior adsorbent for the removal of humic acids.

  18. Synthesis of Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon supports with enhanced hydrogen sorption kinetics

    Au, Y.S.; Ponthieu, M.; van Zwienen, M.; Zlotea, C.; Cuevas, F.; de Jong, K.P.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics and reversibility for hydrogen sorption were investigated for supported Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon. A new preparation method is proposed to synthesize the supported alloy nanoparticles. The motivation of using a support is to separate the nanoparticles to prevent sintering a

  19. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    S. G. Herawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced.

  20. THE ROLE OF ACTIVATED CARBON IN SOLVING ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    V. M. Mukhin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a brief analysis of the current global situation concerning the utilization of activated carbon in various fields. The article presents data concerning the synthesis and adsorption and structure properties of new activated carbons, used for solving ecological problems. The authors investigated the newly obtained activated carbons in comparison with several AC marks known in the world. It has been shown that currently synthesized AC are competitive with foreign marks.

  1. Preparation of a MFI zeolite coating on activated carbon

    Vaart, van der R.; Bosch, H.; Keizer, K.; Reith, T.

    1997-01-01

    A new and simple method for the preparation of MFI zeolite coated activated carbon is presented. Suitable nucleation sites for the growth of zeolites were introduced to the carbon by adding hydrophilic montmorillonite clay to the carbon substrate. A gas tight MFI zeolite coating was obtained on this

  2. Methane carbon supports aquatic food webs to the fish level.

    Angela M Sanseverino

    Full Text Available Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4 are produced by anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in lakes. In spite of extensive freshwater CH(4 emissions, most of the CH(4 is typically oxidized by methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB before it can reach the lake surface and be emitted to the atmosphere. In turn, it has been shown that the CH(4-derived biomass of MOB can provide the energy and carbon for zooplankton and macroinvertebrates. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of specific fatty acids synthesized by MOB in fish tissues having low carbon stable isotope ratios. Fish species, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates and the water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes were collected from a shallow lake in Brazil and analyzed for fatty acids (FA and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ(13C. The fatty acids 16:1ω8c, 16:1ω8t, 16:1ω6c, 16:1ω5t, 18:1ω8c and 18:1ω8t were used as signature for MOB. The δ(13C ratios varied from -27.7‰ to -42.0‰ and the contribution of MOB FA ranged from 0.05% to 0.84% of total FA. Organisms with higher total content of MOB FAs presented lower δ(13C values (i.e. they were more depleted in (13C, while organisms with lower content of MOB signature FAs showed higher δ(13C values. An UPGMA cluster analysis was carried out to distinguish grouping of organisms in relation to their MOB FA contents. This combination of stable isotope and fatty acid tracers provides new evidence that assimilation of methane-derived carbon can be an important carbon source for the whole aquatic food web, up to the fish level.

  3. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    Socaci, C; Pogacean, F; Biris, A R; Coros, M; Rosu, M C; Magerusan, L; Katona, G; Pruneanu, S

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of supramolecular assemblies of tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and its metallic complexes with graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO). The two carbon supports are introducing different characteristics in the absorption spectra of the investigated nanocomposites. Raman spectroscopy shows that the absorption of iron-tetrapyridylporphyrin is more efficient on GO than TRGO, suggesting that oxygen functionalities are involved in the non-covalent interaction between the iron-porphyrin and graphene. The biomimetic peroxidase activity is investigated and the two iron-containing composites exhibit a better catalytic activity than each component of the assembly, and their cobalt and manganese homologues, respectively. The main advantages of this work include the demonstration of graphene oxide as a very good support for graphene-based nanomaterials with peroxidase-like activity (K(M)=0.292 mM), the catalytic activity being observed even with very small amounts of porphyrins (the TPyP:graphene ratio=1:50). Its potential application in the detection of lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E can be measured in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range) is also shown.

  4. PROPERTIES AND SYNTHESIS OF NEW SUPPORTS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ENZYMES BY COPOLYMERIZATION OF VINYLENE CARBONATE AND METHACRYLIC ACID

    Lun-han Ding; Yue Li; Yan Jiang; Zhe Cao; Jia-xian Huang

    2000-01-01

    Methacrylic acid first was neutralized with an aqueous solution of NaOH to pH = 6.0~7.0, vinylene carbonate (VCA) was added to the solution, then monomers were copolymerized in paraffin oil by means of reverse-phase suspension polymerization and hydrophilic copolymeric supports were prepared. The properties of the supports were determined using trypsin and results show that the amount of enzymes coupled to the supports and the specific activity of immobilized trypsin are related to the content of VCA structure units, reaction time and concentration of enzyme solution, etc.

  5. Carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures as support material for nanoparticulate noble-metal catalysts in fuel cells

    Veltzé, Sune; Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Elina, Yli-Rantala

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1–5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...... for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties...

  6. Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Veltzé, Sune; Skou, Eivind Morten

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...... for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties...

  7. Biomass derived graphene-like activated and non-activated porous carbon for advanced supercapacitors

    KASINATH OJHA; BHARAT KUMAR; ASHOK K GANGULI

    2017-03-01

    Graphene-like activated and non-activated carbon nanostructures were synthesized from various natural sources like sugar, rice husk and jute. These carbon nanostructures were characterized using SEM, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, surface area and thermogravimetric analysis. The electrochemical studies of these carbon materials confirm their promising characteristics for supercapacitor applications. Activated carbon nanostructures exhibit higher specific capacitance compared to that of non-activated carbons (non-Ac sugar).The activated carbon (Ac-jute) exhibits maximum specific capacitance of 476 F/g at an applied current density of 0.2 A/g which is much higher than that of graphene oxide (GO).

  8. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor: Molasses

    Legrouri, K.; Ezzine, M.; Ichcho, S.; Hannache, H.; Denoyel, R.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulfuric acid, followed by carbonization. The adsorption capacity, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined. The micropore volume was assessed by Dubinin- Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and show the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activation in steam yielded a carbon that contains both micropores and supermicropores. Analysis of the nitrogen isotherm by BET and DR methods established that most of obtained carbons are highly microporous, with high surface areas (≥ 1200 m2/g) and very low mesoporosity.

  9. Copper on activated carbon for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Nora Dolores Martínez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is an important source of water contamination. Some of the organic contaminants cannot be eliminated by nature in a reasonable period. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation is one of the most effective methods to purify wastewater with organic contaminants. In this work, catalysts based on copper supported on activated carbon were synthesized. The activated carbons were obtained from industrial wastes (apricot core and grape stalk of San Juan, Argentina. These were impregnated with a copper salt and thermically treated in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of specific surface, pore volume, p zc, acidity, basicity and XRD patterns were made in order to characterize the catalysts. The catalytic activity was tested in the oxidation of methylene blue (MB and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in aqueous phase with pure oxygen. Reaction tests were carried out in a Parr batch reactor at different temperatures, with a 0.2 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. The amount of unconverted organics was measured by spectrophotometry. Higher temperatures were necessary for the degradation of PVA compared to those for methylene blue.

  10. Bio-Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Removal for Air Revitalization in Exploration Life Support Systems Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important aspect of the ISS air revitalization system for life support is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air and retrieves oxygen from CO2. The current...

  11. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  12. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  13. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  14. Efficient L-lactic acid fermentation by the mold Rhizopus oryzae using activated carbon

    Koide, M.; Hirata, M.; Gaw, M.; Takanashi, H.; Hano, T. [Oita Univ, Oita (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2004-11-01

    Batch fermentations of Rhizopus oryzae AHU 6537 in medium containing granular activated carbon from coal, powder activated carbon from coal or granular activated carbon from coconut were carried out in an airlift bioreactor. As a result, fermentation broths were decolorized by activated carbon, and clearer fermentation broths were obtained than in fermentation without activated carbon. With activated carbon from coal, the cells formed smaller pellets than in fermentation without activated carbon, and fermentation performance was improved. Productivity was further improved by increasing the amount of activated carbon from coal. Therefore, the productivity of lactic acid fermentation could be improved by selecting a suitable activated carbon and by controlling the amount of activated carbon.

  15. Application of Black Pearl carbon-supported WO 3 nanostructures as hybrid carriers for electrocatalytic RuSe x nanoparticles

    Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Fiechter, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    RuSe x electrocatalytic nanoparticles were deposited onto hybrid carriers composed of Black Pearl carbon-supported tungsten oxide; and the resulting system's electrochemical activity was investigated during oxygen reduction reaction. The tungsten oxide-utilizing and RuSe x nanoparticle-containing materials were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical diagnostic techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk voltammetry. Application of Black Pearl carbon carriers modified with ultra-thin films of WO 3 as matrices (supports) for RuSe x catalytic centers results during electroreduction of oxygen in 0.5 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4 (under rotating disk voltammetric conditions) in the potential shift of ca. 70 mV towards more positive values relative to the behavior of the analogous WO 3-free system. Also the percent formation (at ring in the rotating ring-disk voltammetry) of the undesirable hydrogen peroxide has been decreased approximately twice by utilizing WO 3-modified carbon carriers. The results are consistent with the bifunctional mechanism in which oxygen reduction is initiated at RuSe x centers and the hydrogen peroxide intermediate is reductively decomposed at reactive WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports. The electrocatalytic activity of the system utilizing WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports has been basically unchanged upon addition of acetic acid, formic acid or methyl formate to the sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte.

  16. The Infinite Possible Growth Ambients that Support Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Forest Growth

    Kimura, Hiroe; Goto, Jundai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We report the virtually infinite possible carbon feedstocks which support the highly efficient growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Our results demonstrate that diverse varieties of carbon feedstocks, in the form of hydrocarbons, spanning saturated rings (e.g. trans-deca-hydronaphthalene), saturated chains (e.g. propane), unsaturated rings (e.g. dicyclopentadiene), and unsaturated chains (e.g. ethylene) could be used as a carbon feedstocks with SWCNT forests with heights exceeding 100 ums. Further, we found that all the resultant SWCNTs possessed similar average diameter indicating that the diameter was mainly determined by the catalyst rather than the carbon feedstock within this synthetic system. A demonstration of the generality was the synthesis of a carbon nanotube forest from a highly unorthodox combination of gases where trans-decahydronaphthalene acted as the carbon feedstock and benzaldehyde acted as the growth enhancer.

  17. Biomedical Support of U.S. Extravehicular Activity

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Dervay, J. P.; Gillis, D.; McMann, H. J.; Thomas, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    The world's first extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed by A. A. Leonov on March 18, 1965 during the Russian Voskhod-2 mission. The first US EVA was executed by Gemini IV astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965, with an umbilical tether that included communications and an oxygen supply. A hand-held maneuvering unit (HHMU) also was used to test maneuverability during the brief EVA; however the somewhat stiff umbilical limited controlled movement. That constraint, plus difficulty returning through the vehicle hatch, highlighted the need for increased thermal control and improved EVA ergonomics. Clearly, requirements for a useful EVA were interrelated with the vehicle design. The early Gemini EVAs generated requirements for suits providing micro-meteor protection, adequate visual field and eye protection from solar visual and infrared radiation, gloves optimized for dexterity while pressurized, and thermal systems capable of protecting the astronaut while rejecting metabolic heat during high workloads. Subsequent Gemini EVAs built upon this early experience and included development of a portable environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and an astronaut maneuvering unit. The ECLSS provided a pressure vessel and controller with functional control over suit pressure, oxygen flow, carbon dioxide removal, humidity, and temperature control. Gemini EVA experience also identified the usefulness of underwater neutral buoyancy and altitude chamber task training, and the importance of developing reliable task timelines. Improved thermal management and carbon dioxide control also were required for high workload tasks. With the Apollo project, EVA activity was primarily on the lunar surface; and suit durability, integrated liquid cooling garments, and low suit operating pressures (3.75 pounds per square inch absolute [psia] or 25.8 kilopascal [kPa],) were required to facilitate longer EVAs with ambulation and significant physical workloads with average metabolic

  18. Modeling of Membrane-Electrode-Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells - Local H2 Starvation and Start-Stop Induced Carbon-Support Corrosion

    Gu, Wenbin; Yu, Paul T.; Carter, Robert N.; Makharia, Rohit; Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Carbon-support corrosion causes electrode structure damage and thus electrode degradation. This chapter discusses fundamental models developed to predict cathode carbon-support corrosion induced by local H2 starvation and start-stop in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Kinetic models based on the balance of current among the various electrode reactions are illustrative, yielding much insight on the origin of carbon corrosion and its implications for future materials developments. They are particularly useful in assessing carbon corrosion rates at a quasi-steady-state when an H2-rich region serves as a power source that drives an H2-free region as a load. Coupled kinetic and transport models are essential in predicting when local H2 starvation occurs and how it affects the carbon corrosion rate. They are specifically needed to estimate length scales at which H2 will be depleted and time scales that are valuable for developing mitigation strategies. To predict carbon-support loss distributions over an entire active area, incorporating the electrode pseudo-capacitance appears necessary for situations with shorter residence times such as start-stop events. As carbon-support corrosion is observed under normal transient operations, further model improvement shall be focused on finding the carbon corrosion kinetics associated with voltage cycling and incorporating mechanisms that can quantify voltage decay with carbon-support loss.

  19. ADSORPTION OF DYES ON ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    ChenShuixia; WuChangqing; 等

    1998-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of dyes on a variety of sisal based activated carbon fibers (SACF) has been studied in this paper. The results show that this kind of ACF has excellent adsorption capacities for some organic (dye) molecules.SACF can remove nearly all methylene blue,crystal violet,bromophenol blue and Eriochrome blue black R from water after static adsorption for 24h. at 30℃. The adsorption amounts can reach more than 400mg/g when adding 50 mg SACF into 50 ml dye solution.Under the same conditions,the adsorption amounts of xylenol orange fluorescein and Eriochrome black T wree lower.On the other hand,the adsorption amounts change along with the characteristics of adsorbents.The SACFs activated above 840℃,which have higher specific surface areas and wider pore radii,have higher adsorption amounts for the dyes.The researching results also show that the adsorption rates of dyes onto SACFs decrease by the order of methylene blue,Eriochrome blue black R and crystal violet.

  20. High-performance hydrogen production and oxidation electrodes with hydrogenase supported on metallic single-wall carbon nanotube networks.

    Svedružić, Draženka; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Tenent, Robert C; Rocha, John-David R; Vinzant, Todd B; Heben, Michael J; King, Paul W

    2011-03-30

    We studied the electrocatalytic activity of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaH2ase) immobilized on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. SWNT networks were prepared on carbon cloth by ultrasonic spraying of suspensions with predetermined ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Current densities for both proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation electrocatalytic activities were at least 1 order of magnitude higher when hydrogenase was immobilized onto SWNT networks with high metallic tube (m-SWNT) content in comparison to hydrogenase supported on networks with low metallic tube content or when SWNTs were absent. We conclude that the increase in electrocatalytic activities in the presence of SWNTs was mainly due to the m-SWNT fraction and can be attributed to (i) substantial increases in the active electrode surface area, and (ii) improved electronic coupling between CaH2ase redox-active sites and the electrode surface.

  1. Adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: a comparative study on granular activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-08-15

    Adsorption of three aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) by four types of carbonaceous adsorbents [a granular activated carbon (HD4000), an activated carbon fiber (ACF10), two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT, SWNT-HT), and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)] with different structural characteristics but similar surface polarities was examined in aqueous solutions. Isotherm results demonstrated the importance of molecular sieving and micropore effects in the adsorption of AOCs by carbonaceous porous adsorbents. In the absence of the molecular sieving effect, a linear relationship was found between the adsorption capacities of AOCs and the surface areas of adsorbents, independent of the type of adsorbent. On the other hand, the pore volume occupancies of the adsorbents followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT, indicating that the availability of adsorption site was related to the pore size distributions of the adsorbents. ACF10 and HD4000 with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption affinities to low molecular weight AOCs than SWNT and MWNT with higher mesopore and macropore volumes. Due to their larger pore sizes, SWNTs and MWNTs are expected to be more efficient in adsorption of large size molecules. Removal of surface oxygen-containing functional groups from the SWNT enhanced adsorption of AOCs.

  2. Transition metal-modified polyoxometalates supported on carbon as catalyst in 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole sulfoxidation

    Romina A Frenzel; Gustavo P Romanelli; Mirta N Blanco; Luis R Piz

    2015-01-01

    Polyoxometalates with lacunary Keggin structure modified with transition metal ions [PW11O39M(H2O)]5−, where M = Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+ or Zn2+, were synthesized and supported on activated carbon to obtain the PW11MC catalysts. Using FT-IR and DTA-TGA it was concluded that the [PW11O39M(H2O)]5− species are interacting with the functional groups of the support, and that thermal treatment leads to the loss of the coordinatively bonded water molecules without any noticeable anion degradation. The activity and selectivity of the catalysts in the sulfoxidation reaction of 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole, an emerging environmental pollutant, were evaluated. The reaction was carried out in acetonitrile as solvent using H2O2 35% p/v as a clean oxidant. The conversion values decreased in the following order: PW11NiC > PW11CuC > PW11CoC > PW11ZnC, with selectivity to sulfoxide higher than 69%. The catalyst could be reused without appreciable loss of the catalytic activity at least three times. The materials were found to be efficient and recyclable catalysts for 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole sulfoxidation in order to obtain a more biodegradable product than the corresponding substrate.

  3. Nano-Scale Au Supported on Carbon Materials for the Low Temperature Water Gas Shift (WGS Reaction

    Paula Sánchez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Au-based catalysts supported on carbon materials with different structures such as graphite (G and fishbone type carbon nanofibers (CNF-F were prepared using two different methods (impregnation and gold-sol to be tested in the water gas shift (WGS reaction. Atomic absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses (CNH, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and temperature-programmed decomposition were employed to characterize both the supports and catalysts. Both the crystalline nature of the carbon supports and the method of gold incorporation had a strong influence on the way in which Au particles were deposited on the carbon surface. The higher crystallinity and the smaller and well dispersed Au particle size were, the higher activity of the catalysts in the WGS reaction was noted. Finally, catalytic activity showed an important dependence on the reaction temperature and steam-to-CO molar ratio.

  4. Polystyrene-supported Phenol/DMAP: an Efficient Binary Catalyst System for CO2 Fixation to Give Cyclic Carbonates

    QI, Chao-Rong; JIANG, Huan-Feng; WANG, Zhao-Yang; ZOU, Bo

    2007-01-01

    Polystyrene-supported phenol (PS-PhOH) was successfully synthesized by alkylation reaction of phenol with 2% DVB cross-linked chloromethylated polystyrene and characterized by IR spectra and elemental analysis. In conjunction with an organic base such as DMAP, DBU, triethylamine (Et3N), diethylamine (Et2NH) or pyridine, the PS-PhOH could effectively catalyze the coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides to give cyclic carbonates in high yield and selectivity under mild conditions. The binary catalyst system of the PS-PhOH/DMAP was found to be the most active. The influence of reaction temperature, carbon dioxide pressure and reaction time on the yield of product was carefully investigated. The PS-PhOH could be recycled by simple filtration for at least up to ten times without loss of catalytic activity.

  5. Reactivity of a Carbon-Supported Single-Site Molybdenum Dioxo Catalyst for Biodiesel Synthesis

    Mouat, Aidan R.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Wegener, Evan C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delferro, Massimiliano; Stair, Peter C.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2016-08-23

    A single-site molybdenum dioxo catalyst, (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C, was prepared via direct grafting of MoO2Cl2(dme) (dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) on high-surface- area activated carbon. The physicochemical and chemical properties of this catalyst were fully characterized by N2 physisorption, ICP-AES/OES, PXRD, STEM, XPS, XAS, temperature-programmed reduction with H2 (TPR-H2), and temperature-programmed NH3 desorption (TPD-NH3). The single-site nature of the Mo species is corroborated by XPS and TPR-H2 data, and it exhibits the lowest reported MoOx Tmax of reduction reported to date, suggesting a highly reactive MoVI center. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C catalyzes the transesterification of a variety of esters and triglycerides with ethanol, exhibiting high activity at moderate temperatures (60-90 °C) and with negligible deactivation. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C is resistant to water and can be recycled at least three times with no loss of activity. The transesterification reaction is determined experimentally to be first order in [ethanol] and first order in [Mo] with ΔH = 10.5(8) kcal mol-1 and ΔS = -32(2) eu. The low energy of activation is consistent with the moderate conditions needed to achieve rapid turnover. This highly active carbon-supported single-site molybdenum dioxo species is thus an efficient, robust, and lowcost catalyst with significant potential for transesterification processes.

  6. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles.

  7. Preparation and application of active gangue's carbon black

    ZHANG Xiang-lin; ZHANG Yi-dong

    2007-01-01

    After three-stage pulverization, dry-distillated activation and coupling agent surface modification, the kaolinite-typed gangue of Sichuan Hongni Coal Mine(SHCM) can be manufactured into activated gangue's carbon black. Its surface area is >25 m2/g, and possesses carbon black's carbon framework and structure. It can be used as strengthening agent of high polymer material such as rubber.

  8. 活性碳纤维负载TiO2去除低浓度甲醛气体的实验研究%Study on the Degradation of Low Concentration Formaldehyde Gas by TiO2 Supported on Activated Carbon Fiber

    胡军; 陈建华; 贾铭椿

    2011-01-01

    A photocatalytic gas reactor system was manufactured to model the special airtight environment, and in this system TiO2 supported on activated carbon fiber was tested to wipe off the gas of formaldehyde. TiO2 nano-material was prepared by sol-gel method. Different proportion of mater to compose TiO2 which effected the degradation rate of formaldehyde and the reaction kinetics of TiO2 supported on activated carbon fiber as a whole were discussed. The results showed that: the proportion of acetic acid , ethanol and water effected the degradation rate mutually as well as the temperature, the formaldehyde gas could reach a degradation rate of 78. 89% in 120 minutes. The reaction kinetics model of C=mo + (C0- mo)exp(- Kt) fits the removing of the formaldehyde gas by TiO2 supported on activated carbon fiber as a whole. The removal amount of the material was 4357. 78mg/(hX m2) ,and the performance stability of the material was 78. 3%.%利用自制的光催化气体反应系统,模拟有限密闭空间特殊环境,以甲醛气体为代表,用溶胶凝胶法制得不同配比的TiO2并负载在活性碳纤维上,将其放人马弗炉中在不同温度下煅烧,最后测试其对甲醛的去除效率,且研究了活性炭纤维负载TiO2作为整体材料对甲醛的去除动力学方程.结果表明,冰醋酸、无水乙醇、去离子水和煅烧温度对去除效果的影响是交互的,理想配比下两小时去除率可达78.89%;活性炭纤维负载TiO2作为整体材料对低浓度甲醛的去除满足动力学方程ρA =m0 +(ρ0A-m0)exp(-Kt);自制材料对甲醛的去除量为4 357.78 mg/(h×m2),稳定性为78.3%.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Investigations of Pt Electrocatalyst Supported on Carbon Prepared through Plasma Pyrolysis of Natural Gas

    Tereza Cristina Santos Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical and electrochemical characterisations of Pt-based electrocatalysts supported on carbon (Vulcan carbon, C1, and carbon produced by plasma pyrolysis of natural gas, C2 toward ethanol electrooxidation were investigated. The Pt20/C180 and Pt20/C280 electrocatalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors at 350°C. The electrochemical and physicochemical characterisations of the electrocatalysts were performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, Raman scattering, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry tests. The XRD results show that the Pt-based electrocatalysts present platinum metallic which is face-centered cubic structure. The results indicate that the Pt20/C180 electrocatalyst has a smaller particle size (10.1–6.9 nm compared with the Pt20/C280 electrocatalyst; however, the Pt20/C280 particle sizes are similar (12.8–10.4 nm and almost independent of the reflection planes, which suggests that the Pt crystallites grow with a radial shape. Raman results reveal that both Vulcan carbon and plasma carbon are graphite-like materials consisting mostly of sp2 carbon. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry data obtained in this study indicate that the deposition of Pt on plasma carbon increases its electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation reaction.

  10. [Flue gas desulfurization by a novel biomass activated carbon].

    Liu, Jie-Ling; Tang, Zheng-Guang; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Wen-Ju; Jiang, Xia

    2013-04-01

    A novel biomass columnar activated carbon was prepared from walnut shell and pyrolusite was added as a catalyst. The activated carbon prepared was used for flue gas desulphurization in a fixed-bed reactor with 16 g of activated carbon. The impact of operating parameters such as SO2 inlet concentration, space velocity, bed temperature, moisture content and O2 concentration on the desulfurization efficiency of activated carbon was investigated. The results showed that both the breakthrough sulfur capacity and breakthrough time of activated carbon decreased with the increase of SO2 inlet concentration within the range of 0.1% -0.3%. The breakthrough sulfur capacity deceased with the increase of space velocity, with optimal space velocity of 600 h(-1). The optimal bed temperature was 80 degrees C, and the desulfurization efficiency can be reduced if the temperature continue to increase. The presence of moisture and oxygen greatly promoted the adsorption of SO2 onto the activated carbon. The best moisture content was 10%. When the oxygen concentrations were between 10% and 13%, the desulfurization performance of activated carbon was the highest. Under the optimal operating conditions, the sulfur capacity of activated carbon was 252 mg x g(-1), and the breakthrough time was up to 26 h when the SO2 inlet concentration was 0.2%.

  11. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  12. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  13. Continuous preparation of carbon-nanotube-supported platinum catalysts in a flow reactor directly heated by electric current

    Alicja Schlange

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present for the first time a continuous process for the production of highly active Pt catalysts supported by carbon nanotubes by use of an electrically heated tubular reactor. The synthesized catalysts show a high degree of dispersion and narrow distributions of cluster sizes. In comparison to catalysts synthesized by the conventional oil-bath method a significantly higher electrocatalytic activity was reached, which can be attributed to the higher metal loading and smaller and more uniformly distributed Pt particles on the carbon support. Our approach introduces a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for fuel cell catalyst preparation in a flow reactor which could be used at a large scale.

  14. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  15. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  16. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol over Carbon-Supported AuPd Catalysts

    Ketchie,W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-supported AuPd bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated as catalysts in the aqueous-phase selective oxidation of glycerol. The bimetallic catalysts were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involved the deposition of Au onto the surface of 3-nm supported Pd particles by catalytic reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution by H{sub 2}. The second method used the formation of a AuPd sol that was subsequently deposited onto a carbon support. Characterization of the catalysts using analytical transmission electron microscopy, H{sub 2} titration, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L{sub III} and Pd K-edges confirmed that the first synthesis method successfully deposited Au onto the Pd particles. Results from the AuPd sol catalyst also revealed that Au was preferentially located on the surface. Measurement of glycerol oxidation rates (0.3 M glycerol, 0.6 M NaOH, 10 atm O{sub 2}, 333 K) in a semibatch reactor gave a turnover frequency (TOF) of 17 s{sup -1} for monometallic Au and 1 s{sup -1} for monometallic Pd, with Pd exhibiting a higher selectivity to glyceric acid. Although the activity of the bimetallic AuPd catalysts depended on the amount of Au present, none of them had a TOF greater than that of the monometallic Au catalyst. However, the AuPd catalysts had higher selectivity to glyceric acid compared with the monometallic Au. Because a physical mixture of monometallic Au and Pd catalysts also gave higher selectivity to glyceric acid, the Pd is proposed to catalyze the decomposition of the side product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} that is also formed over the Au but is detrimental to the selectivity toward glyceric acid.

  17. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  18. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on adsorptive desulfurization by activated carbon

    Rakesh Kumar, D.; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India)

    2012-05-15

    Sulfur removal using adsorption requires a proper process parametric study to determine its optimal performance characteristics. In this study, response surface methodology was employed for sulfur removal from model oil (dibenzothiophene; DBT dissolved in iso-octane) using commercial activated carbon (CAC) as an adsorbent. Experiments were carried out as per central composite design with four input parameters such as initial concentration (C{sub 0}: 100-900 mg/L), adsorbent dosage (m: 2-22 g/L), time of adsorption (t: 15-735 min), and temperature (T: 10-50 C). Regression analysis showed good fit of the experimental data to the second-order polynomial model with coefficient of determination R{sup 2}-value of 0.9390 and Fisher F-value of 16.5. The highest removal of sulfur by CAC was obtained with m = 20 g/L, t = 6 h, and T = 30 C. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    gravimetric analysis (TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization curve and impedance spectroscopy were applied on the samples under accelerated stress conditions. The carbon nano-materials demonstrated better stability as support for nano-sized platinum catalyst under PEMFC related operating conditions. Due...

  1. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  2. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  3. [Study on adsorption properties of organic vapor on activated carbons].

    Cai, Dao-Fei; Huang, Wei-Qiu; Wang, Dan-Li; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Guang

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption technology is widely used in oil vapor recovery, and adsorbents have decisive effect on separation. Three kinds of activated carbon (AC) were chosen to study their adsorption properties and adsorption energy, where n-hexane and n-heptane acted as adsorbate and adsorption experiments were conducted at 293.15 K. At the same time, regression formula of Logistic model was used to fit the throughout curves of active carbons. The results showed that: surface area and pore volume of activated carbon were the main factors affecting its adsorption properties; the adsorption behavior of n-hexane and n-heptane were corresponding to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model; adsorption energy of these three kinds of activated carbon became greater with increasing specific surface area. Fitting curve of Logistic model had high similarity with the experimental results, which could be used in the prediction of breakthrough curves of activated carbons.

  4. Tailoring Synthesis Conditions of Carbon Xerogels towards Their Utilization as Pt-Catalyst Supports for Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon xerogels characterized by different textural, structural and chemical properties were synthesized and used as supports for Pt catalysts for the application in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Synthesis conditions were varied in order to synthesize carbon xerogels following the sol-gel method. These included the reactants ratio (precursor/formaldehyde, the catalyst concentration (precursor/catalyst ratio and type (basic and acid, the precursor type (resorcinol and pyrogallol and the solvent (aqueous or acetone based. Stoichiometric mixtures of resorcinol and formaldehyde yielded well polymerized gels and highly developed structures. Slow gelation, favored by the presence of acetone as solvent in the sol and low catalyst concentration, resulted in higher polymerization extent with a highly mesoporous or even macroporous texture and more ordered structure, as evidenced by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. Small Pt particles of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained by using carbon xerogels characterized by an ordered surface structure. The specific activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction, i.e., the limiting catalytic process in low temperature fuel cells, is significantly favored by highly ordered carbon xerogels due to a metal-support enhanced interaction. Nevertheless, surface defects favor the distribution of the metallic particles on the surface of carbon, which in the end influences the effectiveness of the catalyst. Accelerated degradation tests were conducted to evaluate catalyst stability under potential cycling conditions. The observed decay of performance was considerably lower for the catalysts based on ordered carbon xerogels stabilizing Pt particles in a higher extent than the other xerogels and the commercial carbon black support.

  5. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  6. Fractal analysis of granular activated carbons using isotherm data

    Khalili, N.R.; Pan, M. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Sandi, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Utilization of adsorption on solid surfaces was exercised for the first time in 1785. Practical application of unactivated carbon filters, and powdered carbon were first demonstrated in the American water treatment plant, and a municipal treatment plant in New Jersey, in 1883 and 1930, respectively. The use of activated carbon became widespread in the next few decades. At present, adsorption on carbons has a wide spread application in water treatment and removal of taste, odor, removal of synthetic organic chemicals, color-forming organics, and desinfection by-products and their naturally occurring precursors. This paper presents an analysis of the surface fractal dimension and adsorption capacity of a group of carbons.

  7. Clusters - Tourism Activity Increase Competitiveness Support

    Carmen IORDACHE

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tourism represents one of those areas with the greatest potential of global expansion. Tourism development strategy in terms of maximizing its positive effects on regional economic increase and implicitly on the national one starts from the premise that in global economy value is created in regions which are defined as particular geographical entities, separated by geographical reasons and not as political-administrative structures, and economic increase is centrally cumulated and valued according to the economic policy and the national legal system.Regional economic system approach based on “cluster” concept is explained by the fact that the regional activities portfolio is based on an inter and intra-industry networking grouped by cluster, in which is created the value that increases as the activity results are leading to the final consumers.This type of communication aims to highlight the tourism role as a factor in regional development, the clustering process significance in obtaining some competitiveness advantages, clusters development in tourism beginnings, and also the identification methodology used to select one touristic area to create the cluster.

  8. Porous carbon nitride nanosheets for enhanced photocatalytic activities

    Hong, Jindui; Yin, Shengming; Pan, Yunxiang; Han, Jianyu; Zhou, Tianhua; Xu, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Porous carbon nitride nanosheets (PCNs) have been prepared for the first time by a simple liquid exfoliation method via probe sonication. These mesoporous nanosheets of around 5 nm in thickness combine several advantages including high surface area, enhanced light absorption and excellent water dispersity. It can be used as a versatile support for co-catalyst loading for photocatalytic dye degradation and water reduction. With 3.8 wt% Co3O4 loaded, PCNs can achieve more efficient photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B, compared with non-porous C3N4 nanosheets (CNs), bulk porous C3N4 (PCN) and bulk nonporous C3N4 (CN). With 1.0 wt% Pt loaded, CNs and PCN exhibit 7-8 times enhancement in H2 evolution than CN. Remarkably, PCNs with both porous and nanosheet-like features achieve 26 times higher activity in H2 evolution than CN. These significant improvements in photocatalytic activities can be attributed to the high surface area as well as better electron mobility of the two-dimensional nanostructure.Porous carbon nitride nanosheets (PCNs) have been prepared for the first time by a simple liquid exfoliation method via probe sonication. These mesoporous nanosheets of around 5 nm in thickness combine several advantages including high surface area, enhanced light absorption and excellent water dispersity. It can be used as a versatile support for co-catalyst loading for photocatalytic dye degradation and water reduction. With 3.8 wt% Co3O4 loaded, PCNs can achieve more efficient photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B, compared with non-porous C3N4 nanosheets (CNs), bulk porous C3N4 (PCN) and bulk nonporous C3N4 (CN). With 1.0 wt% Pt loaded, CNs and PCN exhibit 7-8 times enhancement in H2 evolution than CN. Remarkably, PCNs with both porous and nanosheet-like features achieve 26 times higher activity in H2 evolution than CN. These significant improvements in photocatalytic activities can be attributed to the high surface area as well as better electron mobility of

  9. Enhanced Fuel Cell Catalyst Durability with Nitrogen Modified Carbon Supports

    2013-02-12

    1000 mg of commercially available carbon powder (Cabot Vulcan XCR72R) was placed into the barrel and the chamber was evacuated to approximately 1 × 10−6...unmodified and N-modified Vulcan were obtained on a Philips CM200 TEM. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the synthesized catalysts was done...durability cycles Pt-Ru/ Vulcan 73 3.3 × 10−5 24 51 10 Pt-Ru/N- Vulcan 55 2.9 × 10−5 17 60 40 Pt-Ru/C JM 5000 69 3.0 × 10−5 20 48 17 tials higher than 0.7 V

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  11. Enhanced Capacitive Characteristics of Activated Carbon by Secondary Activation

    YANG Hui; LU Tian-hong; Yoshio Masaki

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the improvement of commercial activated carbon(AC) on its specific capacitance and high rate capability of double layer(dl) charging/discharging process has been studied. The improvement of AC was carried out via a secondary activation under steam in the presence of catalyst NiCl2, and the suitable condition was found to be a heat treatment at about 875 ℃ for 1 h. Under those conditions, the discharge specific capacitance of the improved AC increases up to 53.67 F/g, showing an increase of about 25% as compared with that of as-received AC. The good rectangular-shaped voltammograms and A.C. impedance spectra prove that the high rate capability of the capacitor made of the improved AC is enhanced significantly. The capacitance resistance(RC) time constant of the capacitor containing the improved AC is 1.74 s, which is much lower than that of the one containing as-received AC(an RC value of 4. 73 s). It is noted that both kinds of AC samples show a similar specific surface area and pore size distribution, but some changes have taken place in the carbon surface groups, especially a decrease in the concentration of surface carbonyl groups after the improvement, which have been verified by means of X-photoelectron spectroscopy. Accordingly, it is suggested that the decrease in the concentration of surface carbonyl groups for the improved AC is beneficial to the organic electrolyte ion penetrating into the pores, thus leading to the increase in both the specific capacitance and high rate capability of the supercapacitor.

  12. Ammonia synthesis with barium-promoted iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    Iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon were investigated as ammonia synthesis catalysts. Barium was found to have a promoting effect for Fe with an optimum atomic ratio Ba/Fe of 0.35. At this Ba loading, a local maximum for the NH3 synthesis activity was found at 4 wt% Co by varying the Fe/Co ratio...... it was not as effective for Fe. Power-law kinetic investigation revealed that, compared to the commercial Fe-based NH3 catalyst, the Ba–Co/C samples showed a lower inhibition by NH3 and were more active under ordinary ammonia synthesis conditions........ Samples containing only Co and no Fe, however, yielded by far the most active catalysts (7.0 μmol (NH3) g−1 s−1, 673 K, 10 bar). Barium was a very efficient promoter for Co, increasing the NH3 synthesis activity by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the unpromoted Co samples, while...

  13. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  14. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  15. Relationship model and supporting activities of JIT, TQM and TPM

    Nuttapon SaeTong; Ketlada Kitiwanwong; Jirarat Teeravaraprug

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a relationship model and supporting activities of Just-in-time (JIT), Total Quality Management (TQM),and Total Productive Maintenance (TPM). By reviewing the concepts, 5S, Kaizen, preventive maintenance, Kanban, visualcontrol, Poka-Yoke, and Quality Control tools are the main supporting activities. Based on the analysis, 5S, preventive maintenance,and Kaizen are the foundation of the three concepts. QC tools are required activities for implementing TQM, whereasPoka-Yoke and v...

  16. Impact of sulfur oxides on mercury capture by activated carbon.

    Presto, Albert A; Granite, Evan J

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACl, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  17. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction.

  18. PENGARUH ACTIVITY SUPPORT TERHADAP KAWASAN PECINAN SEMARANG DI MALAM HARI

    Stella Prita Anugeraheni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Koridor Gang Warung merupakan koridor yang berada di kawasan perdagangan dan jasa ini terletak di kawasan pecinan yang merupakan kawasan bersejarah yang juga dikenal dengan sebutan “seribu kelenteng”. Keadaan lingkungan ini memiliki perbedaan pada saat malam hari. Keberadaan activity support pada malam hari berupa Waroeng Semawis merupakan salah satu kegiatan pendukung yang memiliki tujuan yakni mengembalikan fungsi kawasan pada malam hari yang mempengaruhi pada karakter visual yang muncul dari bangunan sekitarnya. Penelitian ini memiliki tujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh activity support berupa bazaar malam terhadap karakter visual kawasan pecinan. Metode yang digunakan adalah metode kuantitatif rasionalistik dengan menggunakan analisa deskriptif dan pengujian regresi karena tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menggali informasi mengenai pengaruh kegiatan activity support. Metode ini digunakan karena adanya perbedaan penilaian dan persepsi individu terhadap karakter visual yang disebabkan oleh activiy support pada malam hari. Adanya activity support berupa Waroeng Semawis dapat memberikan kontribusi dalam pengenalan karakter pecinan di koridor gang warung ini dengan keramaian dan beberapa kegiatan di dalamnya, yang tentunya diperkuat dengan adanya pencahayaan yang berasal dari kios, sehingga memunculkan kegiatan yang memberi kesan penciptaan karakter visual kawasan.[Influence of Activity Support Towards Visual Characteristic of Chinatown at Night] Gang Warung corridor is a corridor in the area of trade and services, that located in the Chinatown area which is a historical district which is also known as the "thousand temples". It has a different environmental conditions during the night. The existence of support activity at night in the form of Waroeng Semawis is one of the supporting activities that have the purpose of restoring the function of the area at night which affect the visual character of the surrounding buildings appear. This study

  19. CCN activation of pure and coated carbon black particles.

    Dusek, U; Reischl, G P; Hitzenberger, R

    2006-02-15

    The CCN (cloud condensation nucleus) activation of pure and coated carbon black particles was investigated using the University of Vienna cloud condensation nuclei counter (Giebl, H.; Berner, A.; Reischl, G.; Puxbaum, H.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Hitzenberger, R. J. Aerosol Sci. 2002, 33, 1623-1634). The particles were produced by nebulizing an aqueous suspension of carbon black in a Collison atomizer. The activation of pure carbon black particles was found to require higher supersaturations than predicted by calculations representing the particles as insoluble, wettable spheres with mobility equivalent diameter. To test whether this effect is an artifact due to heating of the light-absorbing carbon black particles in the laser beam, experiments at different laser powers were conducted. No systematic dependence of the activation of pure carbon black particles on laser power was observed. The observations could be modeled using spherical particles and an effective contact angle of 4-6 degrees of water at their surface. The addition of a small amount of NaCl to the carbon black particles (by adding 5% by mass NaCl to the carbon black suspension) greatly enhanced their CCN efficiency. The measured CCN efficiencies were consistent with Kohler theory for particles consisting of insoluble and hygroscopic material. However, coating the carbon black particles with hexadecanol (a typical film-forming compound with one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic end) efficiently suppressed the CCN activation of the carbon black particles.

  20. Gas Phase Conversion of Carbon Tetrachloride to Alkyl Chlorides Catalyzed by Supported Ionic Liquids

    SUN Aijun; ZHANG Jinlong; LI Chunxi; MENG Hong

    2009-01-01

    An efficient way of converting carbon tetrachloride(CTC)to alkyl chlorides is reported,which uses the catalysts of ionic liquids supported on granular active carbon.The catalytic performance was evaluated in a temperature range of 120-200℃ and atmospheric pressure for different ionic liquids,namely 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,hydrochloric salts of N-methylimidazole(MIm),pyridine and triethylamine,as well as bisulfate and dihydric phosphate of N-methylimidazole.On this basis,the reaction mechanism was proposed,and the influences of the reaction temperature and the attributes of ionic liquids were discussed.The overall reaction was assumed to be comprised of two steps,the hydrolysis of CTC and reaction of HCI with alcohols under acidic catalyst.The results indicate that the conversion of CTC increased monotonically with temperature and even approached 100% at 200 ℃,while the maximum selectivity to alkyl chlorides was obtained around 160 ℃.This reaction might be potentially applicable to the resource utilization of superfluous byproduct of CTC in the chloromethane industry.

  1. Preparation of activated carbons from Chinese coal and hydrolysis lignin

    Zou, Y.; Han, B.X. [Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL (USA). School of Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Activated carbons from Chinese coal and Chinese hydrolysis lignin have been prepared by chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. The following aspects of these activated materials have been analyzed: raw material; pre-treatment of raw material; activation agent, activation temperature and time, acid the activation agent/raw material ratio. Activated carbons with BET specific surface areas of the order of 2400-2600 m{sup 2}/g which exhibited substantial microporosity, a total pore volume of over 1.30 cm{sup 3}/g and a Methylene Blue adsorption capacity of over 440 mg/g were obtained.

  2. Carbon dioxide emission prediction using support vector machine

    Saleh, Chairul; Rachman Dzakiyullah, Nur; Bayu Nugroho, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the SVM model was proposed for predict expenditure of carbon (CO2) emission. The energy consumption such as electrical energy and burning coal is input variable that affect directly increasing of CO2 emissions were conducted to built the model. Our objective is to monitor the CO2 emission based on the electrical energy and burning coal used from the production process. The data electrical energy and burning coal used were obtained from Alcohol Industry in order to training and testing the models. It divided by cross-validation technique into 90% of training data and 10% of testing data. To find the optimal parameters of SVM model was used the trial and error approach on the experiment by adjusting C parameters and Epsilon. The result shows that the SVM model has an optimal parameter on C parameters 0.1 and 0 Epsilon. To measure the error of the model by using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) with error value as 0.004. The smallest error of the model represents more accurately prediction. As a practice, this paper was contributing for an executive manager in making the effective decision for the business operation were monitoring expenditure of CO2 emission.

  3. The electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes and carbon XC-72R and their application as Pt supports

    MAJA D. OBRADOVIĆ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic behavior of reduced nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide (NADH was studied at the surface of a rutin biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. According to the results, the rutin biosensor had a strongly electrocatalytic effect on the oxidation of NADH with the overpotential being decreased by about 450 mV as compared to the process at a bare glassy carbon electrode, GCE. The results of an investigation of two samples of commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a sample of carbon black, in the raw and activated state, were presented in the lecture. The activation of the carbon materials led to the formation of an abundance of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface, an increased electrochemically active surface area, an enhanced charge storage ability and a promotion of the electron-transfer kinetics. It was presented that the morphology of the carbon nanotubes is important for the electrochemical properties, because nanotubes with a higher proportion of edge and defect sites showed faster electron transfer and pseudocapacitive redox kinetics. Modification of oxidized nanotubes by ethylenediamine and wrapping by poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride led to a decrease in the electrochemically active surface area and to reduced electron-transfer kinetics. Pt nanoparticles prepared by the microwave-assisted polyol method were deposited at the investigated carbon materials. A much higher efficiency of Pt deposition was observed on the modified CNTs than on the activated CNTs. The activity of the synthesized catalyst toward electrochemical oxygen reduction was almost the same as the activity of the commercial Pt/XC-72 catalyst.

  4. IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research: Support of Ocean Carbon Research

    Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Gattuso, J.; Maddison, L.; Bakker, D. C.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research), co-sponsored by SCOR (Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research) and IGBP (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), coordinates research that focuses on understanding and predicting changes in oceanic food webs and biogeochemical cycles that arise from global change. An integral part of this overall goal is to understand the marine carbon cycle, with emphasis on changes that may occur as a result of a changing climate, increased atmospheric CO2 levels and/or reduced oceanic pH. To address these key ocean carbon issues, IMBER and SOLAS (Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study), formed the joint SOLAS-IMBER Carbon, or SIC Working Group. The SIC Working Group activities are organised into three sub-groups. Sub-group 1 (Surface Ocean Systems) focuses on synthesis, instrumentation and technology development, VOS (Voluntary Observing Ships) and mixed layer sampling strategies. The group contributed to the development of SOCAT (Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas, www.socat.info), a global compilation of underway surface water fCO2 (fugacity of CO2) data in common format. It includes 6.3 million measurements from 1767 cruises from 1968 and 2008 by more than 10 countries. SOCAT will be publically available and will serve a wide range of user communities. Its public release is planned for September 2011. SOCAT is strongly supported by IOCCP and CARBOOCEAN. Sub-group 2 (Interior Ocean Carbon Storage) covers inventory and observations, natural variability, transformation and interaction with modelling. It coordinated a review of vulnerabilities of the decadal variations of the interior ocean carbon and oxygen cycle. It has also developed a plan to add dissolved oxygen sensors to the ARGO float program in order to address the expected loss of oxygen as a result of ocean warming. The group also focuses on the global synthesis of ocean interior carbon observations to determine the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 since

  5. Preparation and catalytic properties of ZrO2-Al2O3 composite oxide supported nickel catalysts for methane reforming with carbon dioxide

    HAO Zheng-ping; HU Chun; JIANG Zheng; G. Q. LU

    2004-01-01

    ZrO2-Al2O3 composite oxides and supported Ni catalysts were prepared , and characterized by N2adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS ) techniques. Thecatalytic performance and carbon deposition was also investigated. This mesoporous composite oxide is shown to bea promising catalyst support. An increase in the catalytic activity and stability of methane and carbon dioxidereforming reaction was resulted from the zirconia addition, especially at 5wt% ZrO2 content. The Ni catalystsupported ZrO2-Al2O3 has a strong resistance to sintering and the carbon deposition in a relatively long-termreaction.

  6. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste

    Abdul Gani Haji

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties to decompose organic waste can be handled naturally by pyrolisis so it can  decomposes quickly that produces charcoal as the product. This study aims to investigate the characteristics of activated carbon from urban organic waste. Charcoal results of pyrolysis of organic waste activated with KOH 1.0 M at a temperature of 700 and 800oC for 60 to 120 minutes. Characteristics of activated carbon were identified by Furrier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. However, their quality is determined yield, moisture content, ash, fly substances, fixed carbon, and the power of adsorption of iodine and benzene. The identified functional groups on activated carbon, such as OH (3448,5-3436,9 cm-1, and C=O (1639,4 cm-1. In general, the degree and distance between the layers of active carbon crystallites produced activation in all treatments showed no significant difference. The pattern of activated carbon surface topography structure shows that the greater the pore formation in accordance with the temperature increase the more activation time needed. The yield of activated carbon obtained ranged from 72.04 to 82.75%. The results of characterization properties of activated carbon was obtained from 1.11 to 5.41% water, 13.68 to 17.27% substance fly, 20.36 to 26.59% ash, and 56.14 to 62.31% of fixed carbon . Absorption of activated carbon was good enough at 800oC and 120 minutes of activation time, that was equal to 409.52 mg/g of iodine and 14.03% of benzene. Activated carbon produced has less good quality, because only the water content and flying substances that meet the standards.Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94 [How to cite this article: Haji, A.G., Pari, G., Nazar, M., and Habibati.  (2013. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste . International Journal of Science and Engineering, 5(2,89-94. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94

  7. Correlation between catalytic activity of supported gold catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation and metal-oxygen binding energy of the support metal oxides%负载金催化剂上CO氧化反应活性与金属氧化物载体中金属-氧结合能之间的关系

    Takashi Fujita; Masanori Horikawa; Takashi Takei; Toru Murayama; Masatake Haruta

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a wide variety of metal oxide (MOx) supports has been discussed for CO oxidation on nanoparticulate gold catalysts. By using typical co‐precipitation and deposition–precipitation methods and under identical calcination conditions, supported gold catalysts were prepared on a wide variety of MOx supports, and the temperature for 50%conversion was measured to qualita‐tively evaluate the catalytic activities of these simple MOx and supported Au catalysts. Furthermore, the difference in these temperatures for the simple MOx compared to the supported Au catalysts is plotted against the metal–oxygen binding energies of the support MOx. A clear volcano‐like correla‐tion between the temperature difference and the metal–oxygen binding energies is observed. This correlation suggests that the use of MOx with appropriate metal–oxygen binding energies (300–500 kJ/atom O) greatly improves the catalytic activity of MOx by the deposition of Au NPs.%讨论了金属氧化物载体(MOx)对其负载纳米金催化剂(Au/MOx)上CO氧化反应的影响。采用典型的共沉淀法和沉积-沉淀法在完全相同的焙烧条件下制备了一系列MOx负载金催化剂,以CO氧化转化50%时的反应温度(T1/2)定量评价了MOx载体和Au/MOx催化剂的催化活性。进一步将MOx载体与相应Au/MOx催化剂的T1/2值之差对MOx载体的金属-氧结合能做曲线进行关联,发现二者呈明显的火山型关系。这一结果表明,采用具有适当金属-氧结合能(300–500 atom O)的MOx可大大提高沉积于其上的Au纳米颗粒的催化活性。

  8. System safety activities supporting an aero-space plane ground support technology

    Mattern, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the specific system safety activities required to support the ground support technology program associated with the design of an aerospace plane. Safe zones must be assessed to ensure that explosive safety requirements are attained to protect the vehicle, personnel, and support and operational facilities. Attention is given to the specific and unique design requirements connected with the utilization of cryogenic fuels as they apply to the design and development of an aerospace plane.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Supporting Sustainable Energy Systems

    Van der Zwaan, B. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    This insightful book explores the issue of sustainable development in its more operative and applied sense. Although a great deal of research has addressed potential interpretations and definitions of sustainable development, much of this work is too abstract to offer policy-makers and researchers the feasible and effective guidelines they require. This book redresses the balance. The authors highlight how various indicators and aggregate measures can be included in models that are used for decision-making support and sustainability assessment. They also demonstrate the importance of identifying practical means to assess whether policy proposals, specific decisions or targeted scenarios are sustainable. With discussions of basic concepts relevant to understanding applied sustainability analysis, such as definitions of costs and revenue recycling, this book provides policy-makers, researchers and graduate students with feasible and effective principles for measuring sustainable development.

  10. The preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on self-supported carbon foils

    Aaron, W. S.; Petek, M.; Zevenbergen, L. A.

    1987-06-01

    Another target preparative technique was recently added to the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory's (IRML) capabilities for custom target fabrication. In support of super-heavy-ion physics experiments, methods and equipment were developed for the preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on carbon foils. The starting material was obtained as either a chloride or nitrate solution, converted to the flouride, and evaporated on carbon foil substrates. Deposits ranging from 40 to 570 μg/cm 2 were prepared as a 12-mm-diam spot on 45- to 60-μg/cm 2 self-supported carbon foils. The deposits were then overcoated with approximately 10 μg/cm 2 of carbon to minimize contamination problems during target handling. The high cost of 248Cm ($100/μg) and its limited availability were the key constraints in the development of preparative technology beyond the inherent radioactivity of 248Cm.

  11. TiO2 Nanocatalysts Supported on a Hybrid Carbon-Covered Alumina Support: Comparison between Visible Light and UV Light Degradation of Rhodamine B

    Mphilisi M. Mahlambi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanoparticles were successfully supported on carbon-covered alumina (CCA supports via the impregnation method to form carbon-covered alumna titania (CCA/TiO2. The CCA supports were synthesised through an equilibrium adsorption of toluene 2,4-diisocyante where the N=C=O irreversibly adsorbs on the alumina and pyrolysis at 700°C affords CCA supports. These CCA/TiO2 nanocatalysts were tested for their photocatalytic activity both under UV and visible light using Rhodamine B as a model pollutant. The reaction rate constant of the CCA/TiO2 was found to be higher than that of unsupported titania and the reaction kinetics were found to follow an apparent first-order rate law. The CCA/TiO2 nanocatalysts had a much larger surface area than the unsupported titania and they exhibited overall higher photodegradation efficiency under both UV and visible light than unsupported TiO2.

  12. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  13. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest

  14. Carbon-supported bimetallic Pd–Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Hensley, Alyssa J.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

  15. ADSORPTION OF STRONTIUM IONS FROM WATER ON MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Mihai Ciobanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strontium ions from aqueous solutions on active carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been studied. It has been found that allure of the adsorption isotherms for both studied active carbons are practically identical. Studies have shown that the adsorption isotherms for strontium ions from aqueous solutions are well described by the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations, respectively. The surface heterogeneity of activated carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been assessed by using Freundlich equation.

  16. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  17. Adsorption of chromium ion (VI) by acid activated carbon

    A. A. Attia; Khedr,S. A.; Elkholy,S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The activated carbon produced from olive stones was chemically activated using sulfuric acid, (OS-S), and utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution in the concentration range 4-50 mg/L. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch process and various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial chromium ion concentration, carbon dosage, and pH on percentage removal have been studied. Adsorption results obtained for activated carbon (OS-S...

  18. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μm

  19. Preparation of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes-supported High Loading Platinum for Vehicular PEMFC Application

    Bing ZHANG; Li Juan CHEN; Kai Yong GE; Yan Chuan GUO; Bi Xian PENG

    2005-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube-supported Pt (Pt/MWNTs) catalysts with high dispersion and high loading of Pt were prepared by chemical reduction method and the loading of Pt got to 40wt%. The average diameter of Pt nanoparticles on MWNTs was about 3.5 nm. When the hydrogen and air were used as reactant gases for PEMFC, Pt/MWNTs catalysts showed significantly higher performance than the Pt/XC-72 (carbon black) catalysts.

  20. Study on the Reaction Mechanism for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over supported Nickel Catalyst

    Ling QIAN; Zi Feng YAN

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of methane and carbon dioxide for reforming on nickelcatalyst were extensively investigated by TPSR and TPD experiments. It showed that thedecomposition of methane results in the formation of at least three kinds of surface carbon specieson supported nickel catalyst, while CO2 adsorbed on the catalyst weakly and only existed in onekind of adsorption state. Then the mechanism of interaction between the species dissociatedfrom CH4 and CO2 during reforming was proposed.

  1. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    Nyunja, J; Ntiba, M; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isoto...

  2. Various conformations of carbon nanocoils prepared by supported Ni-Fe/molecular sieve catalyst.

    Yang, Shaoming; Chen, Xiuqin; Takeuchi, K; Motojima, Seiji

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanocoils with various kinds of conformations were prepared by the catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene using the Ni metal catalyst supported on molecular Sieves which was prepared using Fe-containing kaolin as the raw material. There are four kinds of carbon nanocoils conformations produced by this catalyst. The influences of reaction temperature and gas conditions on the conformations of the nanocoils were investigated and the reasons of forming nano-size coils were discussed by comparison with pure Ni metal catalyst.

  3. Characterization and evaluation of Pt-Ru catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by electrochemical impedance

    Ocampo, A.L.; Miranda-Hernandez, M.; Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, Temixco, 62580 Morelos (Mexico); Morgado, J.; Montoya, J.A. [IMP, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-10-06

    In this work the authors present the results of a systematic characterization and evaluation of the carbon nanotube supported Pt-Ru (Pt-Ru/CNT) for its use as methanol oxidation catalyst. Its activity was compared with that of Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts supported on Vulcan and synthesized from carbonyl precursors, and another commercial Pt-Ru catalyst. The cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and electrochemical impedance techniques were employed to determine the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts. The electrochemical studies were performed in 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing different concentrations of methanol (0.05-1M). The results showed a noticeable influence of the catalyst support (CNT) on the performance of the catalyst for CO oxidation. The electrochemical impedance studies allowed us to separate the different steps in the methanol oxidation reaction and to control these steps or reactions by varying the applied potential and the methanol concentration. At low methanol concentration and potentials the de-hydrogenation of methanol predominated. But, at high potential and methanol concentrations, the CO oxidation predominated. These results allowed us to clearly describe at what potential and concentration ranges the bi-functional effect of Ru becomes evident. Our results indicated that the CO oxidation occurs both on Pt and Ru. Compared to other catalysts, Pt-Ru supported on carbon nanotubes showed superior catalytic activity for CO and methanol oxidation. (author)

  4. Optimization of Synthesis Condition for Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Immobilization on Granular Activated Carbon

    Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Hwang, Yuhoon; Mines, Paul D.;

    2016-01-01

    economical loss, but also potential risk to human health and environment. Thus, the immobilization onto coarse or structured support is essential. In this study, two representative processes for nZVI immobilization on granular activated carbon (GAC) were evaluated, and optimized conditions for synthesizing...

  5. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  6. Surface sites on carbon-supported Ru, Co and Ni nanoparticles as determined by microcalorimetry of CO adsorption

    Cerro-Alarcon, M. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, C/Senda del Rey no 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Grupo de Diseno y Aplicacion de Catalizadores Heterogeneos, Unidad Asociada UNED-ICP(CSIC) (Spain); Maroto-Valiente, A. [Grupo de Diseno y Aplicacion de Catalizadores Heterogeneos, Unidad Asociada UNED-ICP(CSIC) (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie no 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Grupo de Diseno y Aplicacion de Catalizadores Heterogeneos, Unidad Asociada UNED-ICP(CSIC) (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie no 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, C/Senda del Rey no 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain) and Grupo de Diseno y Aplicacion de Catalizadores Heterogeneos, Unidad Asociada UNED-ICP (CSIC) (Spain)]. E-mail: aguerrero@ccia.uned.es

    2005-08-15

    The adsorption of CO on carbon-supported metal (Ru, Co and Ni) catalysts was studied by microcalorimetry. A correlation of the results thus obtained with those reported for monocrystals or with other studies available in the scientific literature for supported metal catalysts, including infrared spectroscopy data, enables the determination of the type of exposed crystalline planes and/or of the different types of CO adsorbed species. The results obtained suggest that the energetic distribution of the surface sites depends on the carbon support material and on the applied reduction treatment. In this way, the use of a high surface area graphite (clean of surface oxygen groups) leads to an electron density enrichment on the small metal particles (Ru) and, in general, to a higher heterogeneity of the active surface sites. The elimination of surface oxygen functional groups (with the reduction treatment at the higher temperature) of the carbon molecular sieve support leads to changes in the surface structure of the metal particles and, consequently, to higher CO adsorption heats, particularly for Ru and Co.

  7. Synthesis of carbon-supported PtRh random alloy nanoparticles using electron beam irradiation reduction method

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Seino, Satoshi; Okazaki, Tomohisa; Akita, Tomoki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2016-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts of PtRh supported on carbon were synthesized using an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The PtRh nanoparticle catalysts were composed of particles 2-3 nm in size, which were well dispersed on the surface of the carbon support nanoparticles. Analyses of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the PtRh nanoparticles have a randomly alloyed structure. The lattice constant of the PtRh nanoparticles showed good correlation with Vegard's law. These results are explained by the radiochemical formation process of the PtRh nanoparticles. Catalytic activities of PtRh/C nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation reaction were found to be higher than those obtained with Pt/C.

  8. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  9. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles

    Busscher, Henk J.; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Langworthy, Don E.; Collias, Dimitris I.; Bjorkquist, David W.; Mitchell, Michael D.; Van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and positiv

  10. Mechanism of phenol adsorption onto electro-activated carbon granules.

    Lounici, H; Aioueche, F; Belhocine, D; Drouiche, M; Pauss, A; Mameri, N

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to determine the mechanisms which govern the adsorption of the phenol onto electro-activated carbon granules. This new activation technique allowed an increase of the performance of the adsorbent. Two models were utilised to understand the improvement in the performance of electroactivated carbon granules. The first, a simple external resistance model based on film resistance, gave acceptable predictions, with an error of less than 15%, between the theoretical results and experimental data independent of the activation potential and phenol initial concentration. The second linear model, based on diffusion phenomena, was more representative in describing the experiment than the first model. It was observed that the electro-activation method did not change the mechanism which governs phenol adsorption onto granular carbon. Indeed, the same mathematical model based on diffusion phenomena made it possible to predict with a very low error (less than 5%) the experimental data obtained for the favourable activation potential, without activation potential and with an unfavourable activation potential. The electro-activation technique makes it possible to increase the number of active sites that improve the performance of the electro-activated granular carbon compared with conventional granular activated carbon.

  11. Preparation of mesoporous carbon from fructose using zinc-based activators

    Tutik Setianingsih

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous carbons were synthesized from fructose using activators of zinc silicate (ZS, zinc borate (ZB, and zinc borosilicate (ZBS. The synthesis involves 3 steps, including caramelization of sugar, carbonization of caramel, and washing of carbon to separate the activator from the carbon. The solid products were characterized by N2 gas adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectrophotometry, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The pore characterizations of the carbons indicate that in ZBS system, ZB may have the role as mesopore size controller, whereas silica component may improve porosity created by ZB without changing the size. This role of ZB may be connected to it’s performance as catalyst of caramelization and it’s crystalinity, as supported by measurement of caramel intermediete and characterization of the activators with X-ray diffraction. The infrared spectra confirms that the carbons’s surfaces have C=O, C-O, and O-H functional groups. The XRD patterns of the carbons show that all activators create the turbotratic carbons.

  12. Assessment of Carbon Tetrachloride Groundwater Transport in Support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Technology Demonstration Program

    Truex, Michael J.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cole, Charles R.; Cameron, Richard J.; Johnson, Michael D.; Skeen, Rodney S.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2001-07-13

    Groundwater modeling was performed in support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program. The ITRD program is facilitated by Sandia National Laboratory for the Department of Energy Office of Science and Technology. This report was prepared to document the results of the modeling effort and facilitate discussion of characterization and remediation options for the carbon tetrachloride plume among the ITRD participants. As a first step toward implementation of innovative technologies for remediation of the carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume underlying the 200-West Area, this modeling was performed to provide an indication of the potential impact of the CT source on the compliance boundary approximately 5000 m distant. The primary results of the modeling bracket the amount of CT source that will most likely result in compliance/non-compliance at the boundary and the relative influence of the various modeling parameters.

  13. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Cellulose to Gluconate on Carbon Aerogel Supported Gold Nanoparticles Anode in Alkaline Medium

    Hanshuang Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of high efficient and low energy consumption approaches for the transformation of cellulose is of high significance for a sustainable production of high value-added feedstocks. Herein, electrocatalytic oxidation technique was employed for the selective conversion of cellulose to gluconate in alkaline medium by using concentrated HNO3 pretreated carbon aerogel (CA supported Au nanoparticles as anode. Results show that a high gluconate yield of 67.8% and sum salts yield of 88.9% can be obtained after 18 h of electrolysis. The high conversion of cellulose and high selectivity to gluconate could be attributed to the good dissolution of cellulose in NaOH solution which promotes its hydrolysis, the surface oxidized CA support and Au nanoparticles catalyst which possesses high amount of active sites. Moreover, the bubbled air also plays important role in the enhancement of cellulose electrocatalytic conversion efficiency. Lastly, a probable mechanism for electrocatalytic oxidation of cellulose to gluconate in alkaline medium was also proposed.

  14. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-02-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  15. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Relationship model and supporting activities of JIT, TQM and TPM

    Nuttapon SaeTong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a relationship model and supporting activities of Just-in-time (JIT, Total Quality Management (TQM,and Total Productive Maintenance (TPM. By reviewing the concepts, 5S, Kaizen, preventive maintenance, Kanban, visualcontrol, Poka-Yoke, and Quality Control tools are the main supporting activities. Based on the analysis, 5S, preventive maintenance,and Kaizen are the foundation of the three concepts. QC tools are required activities for implementing TQM, whereasPoka-Yoke and visual control are necessary activities for implementing TPM. After successfully implementing TQM andTPM, Kanban is needed for JIT.

  17. Intact tropical forests, new evidence they uptake carbon actively

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available According to a paper recently published on Nature, tropical forests play as active carbon sink, absorbing 1.3·109 tons of carbon per year on a global scale. Functional interpretation is not clear yet, but a point is quite easy to realize: tropical forests accumulate and contain more carbon than any other vegetation cover and, if their disruption goes on at current rates, these ecosystems could revert to be a “carbon bomb”, releasing huge amount of CO2 to the atmosphere.

  18. Temperature dependence of the kinetics of oxygen reduction on carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles

    NEVENKA R. ELEZOVIC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR was studied on highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles supported on a carbon cryogel. The specific surface area of the support was 517 m2 g-1, the Pt particles diameter was about 2.7 nm and the loading of the catalyst was 20 wt. %. The kinetics of the ORR at the Pt/C electrode was examined in 0.50 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution in the temperature range from 274 to 318 K. At all temperatures, two distinct E–log j regions were observed; at low current densities with a slope of –2.3RT/F and at high current densities with a slope of –2.3´2RT/F. In order to confirm the mechanism of oxygen reduction previously suggested at a polycrystalline Pt and a Pt/Ebonex nanostructured electrode, the apparent enthalpies of activation at selected potentials vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode were calculated in both current density regions. Although ∆Ha,1≠ > ∆Ha,h≠, it was found that the enthalpies of activation at the zero Galvani potential difference were the same and hence it could be concluded that the rate-determining step of the ORR was the same in both current density regions. The synthesized Pt/C catalyst showed a small enhancement in the catalytic activity for ORR in comparison to the polycrystalline Pt, but no change in the mechanism of the reaction.

  19. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs

  20. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  1. Production of carbon nanofibers in high yields using a sodium chloride support.

    Geng, Junfeng; Kinloch, Ian A; Singh, Charanjeet; Golovko, Vladimir B; Johnson, Brian F G; Shaffer, Milo S P; Li, Yali; Windle, Alan H

    2005-09-08

    A new route for the highly convenient scalable production of carbon nanofibers on a sodium chloride support has been developed. Since the support is nontoxic and soluble in water, it can be easily removed without damage to the nanofibers and the environment. Nanofiber yields of up to 6500 wt % relative to the nickel catalyst have been achieved in a growth time of 15 min. Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the catalytically grown carbon had relatively little thermal over-growth and possessed either a herringbone or a semi-ordered nanostructure, depending on the growth conditions.

  2. A palladium-doped ceria@carbon core-sheath nanowire network: a promising catalyst support for alcohol electrooxidation reactions

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2015-08-01

    A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique interconnected one-dimensional core-sheath structure is revealed to facilitate immobilization of the metal catalysts, leading to the improved durability. This core-sheath nanowire network opens up a new strategy for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells.A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique

  3. Quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon.

    Qiu, Guannan; Guo, Mingxin

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a source material for generating activated carbon is a value-added and environmentally beneficial approach to recycling organic waste. In this study, the overall quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon was systematically evaluated based on its various physical and chemical properties. Granular activated carbon generated from pelletized poultry litter following a typical steam-activation procedure possessed numerous micropores in the matrix. The product exhibited a mean particle diameter of 2.59 mm, an apparent density of 0.45 g cm(-3), a ball-pan hardness of 91.0, an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1), and a BET surface area of 403 m(2) g(-1). It contained high ash, nitrogen, phosphorus contents and the trace elements Cu, Zn, and As. Most of the nutrients and toxic elements were solidified and solution-unextractable. In general, poultry litter-based activated carbon demonstrated overall quality comparable to that of low-grade commercial activated carbon derived from coconut shell and bituminous coal. It is promising to use poultry litter as a feedstock to manufacture activated carbon for wastewater treatment.

  4. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from castor de-oiled cake

    Viviana M. Ospina-Guarín

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass residues have been used to produce activated carbons. On this process, the activation method and the raw composition determine the properties as porosity and surface area of the charcoal. After the extraction of castor oil, there is a solid byproduct (cake of low added value, which was used in the production of activated carbon to add value to this waste. For this purpose two traditional methods were used, first, physical activation using as activating agents steam, CO2 and mixture of both, and additionally chemical activation using K2CO3 as the activating agent. Some activated carbons were characterized using N2 adsorption isotherms, BET surface areas varied between 255.98 (m2/g and 1218.43 (m2/g. By SEM and EDS analysis was possible to observe that materials obtained by the two types of activation are principally amorphous and morphological characteristics of the carbon obtained by physical activation are very different from those obtained by chemical activation. Finally, through impregnation of inorganic phases of Ni and Mo was revealed that the high dispersion characteristics, these carbonaceous materials will have potential to be used as catalyst support.

  5. OXIDATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE CARBON AG-5

    Tatiana Goreacioc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface chemistry of the commercial active carbon AG-5 has been modified by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid. The structural changes caused by oxidative treatment were estimated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms and thermal analysis. Boehm titration method and infrared spectral analysis have been used in order to evaluate surface chemistry characteristics of active carbon samples. After oxidation process the amount of total acidic groups on oxidized active carbon surface (AG-5ox increases by about 6 times in comparison with unmodified sample (AG-5. The concentration of the acidic groups on the oxidized active carbon surface (AG-5ox was in the following order: strong acidic >>> weak acidic > phenolic.

  6. Application of Activated Carbon Mixed Matrix Membrane for Oxygen Purification

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is performed primarily to investigate the effect of activated carbon on oxygen separation performance of polyethersulfone mixed matrix membrane. In this study, polyethersulfone (PES-activated carbon (AC mixed matrix membranes were fabricated using dry/wet technique. This study investigates the effect of polyethersulfone concentration and activated carbon loading on the performance of mixed matrix membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity of O2/N2 gas separation. The fabricated flat sheet mixed matrix membranes were characterized using permeation test, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. It was found that the activated carbon loading affected the gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane. PES- 1wt% AC membrane yielded 3.75 of O2/N2 selectivity, however 5 wt% of AC can produced 5 O2/N2 selectivity

  7. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  8. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  9. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches...

  10. Preparation of catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a novel spherical carbon support

    Eguchi, Mika; Okubo, Atsuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio [Department of Biomolecular Functional Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shun [Material and Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Kikuchi, Mayuko; Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Uno, Katsuhiro [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Ando, Toshihiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, the support Pt catalyst was supported by a novel spherical carbon using a convenient technique. Two different preparation methods utilizing a nanocolloidal solution method without heat treatment were developed (methods 1 and 2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations showed that the Pt nanoparticles (particle size) were supported, with higher dispersion being achieved with method 2 than method 1. The peak of the Pt metal was confirmed from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. Based on the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements, Pt loading was 19.5 wt.% in method 1 and approximately 50 wt.% in method 2. The Pt specific surface area of the Pt/novel spherical carbon catalyst calculated from the cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement result was larger than that of the commercially available Pt/Ketjen catalyst. These results indicated that the Pt nanoparticles were supported in high dispersion without heat treatment using novel spherical carbon as a carbon support. (author)

  11. Carbon supported Pt-Y electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Jeon, Min Ku; McGinn, Paul J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Carbon supported Pt{sub 3}Y (Pt{sub 3}Y/C) and PtY (PtY/C) were investigated as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. After synthesis via reduction by NaBH{sub 4}, the alloy catalysts exhibited 10-20% higher mass activity (mA mg{sub Pt}{sup -1}) than comparably synthesized Pt/C catalyst. The specific activity ({mu}A cm{sub Pt}{sup -2}) was 23 and 65% higher for the Pt{sub 3}Y/C and PtY/C catalysts, respectively, compared to Pt/C. After annealing at 900 C under a reducing atmosphere, Pt{sub 3}Y/C-900 and PtY/C-900 catalysts showed improved ORR activity; the Pt/C and Pt/C-900 (Pt/C catalyst annealed at 900 C) catalysts exhibited specific activities of 334 and 393 {mu}A cm{sub Pt}{sup -2}, respectively, while those of the Pt{sub 3}Y/C-900 and PtY/C-900 catalysts were 492 and 1050 {mu}A cm{sub Pt}{sup -2}, respectively. X-ray diffraction results revealed that both the Pt{sub 3}Y/C and PtY/C catalysts have a fcc Pt structure with slight Y doping. After annealing, XRD showed that more Y was incorporated into the Pt structure in the Pt{sub 3}Y/C-900 catalyst, while the PtY/C-900 catalyst remained unchanged. Although these results suggested that the high ORR activity of the PtY/C-900 catalyst did not originate from Pt-Y alloy formation, it is clear that the Pt-Y system is a promising ORR catalyst which merits further investigation. (author)

  12. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively.

  13. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced.

  14. Microwave absorbing properties of activated carbon fibre polymer composites

    Tianchun Zou; Naiqin Zhao; Chunsheng Shi; Jiajun Li

    2011-02-01

    Microwave absorption of composites containing activated carbon fibres (ACFs) was investigated. The results show that the absorptivity greatly depends on increasing ACF content in the absorbing layer, first increasing and then decreasing. When the content is 0.76 wt.%, the bandwidth below −10dB is 12.2 GHz. Comparing the absorption characteristics of the ACF composite with one containing unactivated fibres, it is found that carbon fibre activation increases the absorption of the composite.

  15. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  16. Ultrafine microporous and mesoporous activated carbon fibers from alkali lignin

    2013-01-01

    A facile and sustainable approach has been successfully devised to fabricate ultrafine (100-500 nm) highly porous activated carbon fibers (ACFs) by electrospinning of aqueous solutions of predominantly alkali lignin (low sulfonate content) followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation at 850 °C under N2. Incorporating a polyethylene oxide (PEO) carrier with only up to one ninth of lignin not only enabled efficient electrospinning into fibers but also retained fibrous structures during...

  17. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  18. Hydrogenation of Anthracene in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent Using Ni Supported on Hβ-Zeolite Catalyst

    Ashraf Aly Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of anthracene was studied over Ni supported on Hβ-zeolite catalyst under supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2 solvent. Hydrogenation of anthracene in sc-CO2 yielded 100% conversion at 100 °C, which is attributed to the reduced mass transfer limitations, and increased solubility of H2 and substrate in the reaction medium. The total pressure of 7 MPa was found to be optimum for high selectivity of octahydroanthracene (OHA. The conversion and selectivity for OHA increased with an increase in H2 partial pressure, which is attributed to higher concentration of hydrogen atoms at higher H2 pressures. The selectivity reduced the pressure below 7 MPa because of enhanced desorption of the tetrahydro-molecules and intermediates from Ni active sites, due to higher solubility of the surface species in sc-CO2. The selectivity of OHA increased with the increase in catalyst weight and reaction time. The rate of hydrogenation of anthracene was compared with that found for napthalene and phenanthrene. The use of acetonitrile as co-solvent or expanded liquid with CO2 decreased the catalytic activity.

  19. Oxygen reduction at platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon cryogel in alkaline solution

    N. R. ELEZOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution, on a porous coated electrode formed of Pt particles supported on carbon cryogel. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The results demonstrated a successful reduction of Pt to metallic form and homogenous Pt particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 2.7 nm. The ORR kinetics was investigated by linear sweep polarization at a rotating disc electrode. The results showed the existence of two E – log j regions, usually referred to polycrystalline Pt in acid and alkaline solution. At low current densities (lcd, the Tafel slope was found to be close to –2.3RT/F, while at high current densities (hcd it was found to be close to –2×2.3RT/F. It is proposed that the main path in the ORR mechanism on Pt particles was the direct four-electron process, with the transfer of the first electron as the rate determining step. If the activities are expressed through the specific current densities, a small enhancement of the catalytic activity for Pt/C was observed compared to that of polycrystalline Pt. The effect of the Pt particle size on the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction was ascribed to the predominant (111 facets of the platinum crystallites.

  20. Efficient Oxidative Removal of Organic Pollutants by Ordered Mesoporous Carbon-Supported Cobalt Phthalocyanine

    Yi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC materials have received attention for use as supports in highly efficient catalytic systems because of their excellent properties. We used epoxy compound 2,3-epoxypropyl trimethylammonium chloride (EPTAC to modify cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine (CoTAPc and obtained a novel catalyst (OMC-CoTAPc-EPTAC based on OMC-bonded CoTAPc-EPTAC that could oxidize Acid Red 1 (AR1 dyes by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 activation under neutral conditions. OMC enhanced the catalytic performance of OMC-CoTAPc-EPTAC, which resulted in the combined high catalytic activity and high stability. Because of its large surface area and tunable pore texture, OMC has high substrate accessibility, and the modification of the catalyst with EPTAC could promote adsorption of the target substrate into OMC, which achieved the aim of in situ catalytic oxidation with enrichment of the target substrate and improved the catalytic efficiency significantly. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trap experiments confirmed that the OMC-CoTAPc-EPTAC/H2O2 system had a nonradical catalytic mechanism, and the high-valent cobalt-oxo intermediates and generated holes were speculated to act as dominant oxidation species for the catalytic degradation of AR1. These results demonstrated a new strategy for the elimination of low-concentration organic pollutants.

  1. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  2. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  3. Calculation of Binary Adsorption Equilibria: Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Marcussen, Lis; Krøll, A.

    1999-01-01

    Binary adsorption equilibria are calculated by means of a mathematical model for multicomponent mixtures combined with the SPD (Spreading Pressure Dependent) model for calculation of activity coefficients in the adsorbed phase. The model has been applied successfully for the adsorption of binary ...... mixtures of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide on activated carbons. The model parameters have been determined, and the model has proven to be suited for prediction of adsorption equilibria in the investigated systems....

  4. Study on the Carbon-Methanation and Catalytic Activity of Ru/AC for Ammonia Synthesis

    祝一锋; 李小年; 季德春; 刘化章

    2004-01-01

    The effects of promoters K, Ba, Sm on the resistance to carbon-methanation and catalytic activity of ruthenium supported on active carbon (Ru/AC) for ammonia synthesis have been studied by means of TG-DTG (thermalgravity-differential thermalgravity), temperature-programmed desorption, and activity test. Promoters Ba,K, and Sm increased the activity of Ru/AC catalysts for ammonia synthesis significantly. Much higher activity can be reached for Ru/AC catalyst with bi- or tri-promoters. Indeed, the triply promoted catalyst showed the highest activity, coupled to a surprisingly high resistance to methanation. The ability of resistance of promoter to methanation of Ru/AC catalyst is dependent on the adsorption intensity of hydrogen. The strong adsorption of hydrogen would enhance methanation and impact the adsorption of nitrogen, which results in the decrease of catalytic activity.

  5. Co-Adsorption of Ammonia and Formaldehyde on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique S.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of a reversible carbon sorbent for trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is deemed non-regenerable, while the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. Data on concurrent sorption and desorption of ammonia and formaldehyde, which are major TCs of concern, are presented in this paper. A carbon sorbent was fabricated by dry impregnation of a reticulated carbon-foam support with polyvinylidene chloride, followed by carbonization and thermal oxidation in air. Sorbent performance was tested for ammonia and formaldehyde sorption and vacuum regeneration, with and without water present in the gas stream. It was found that humidity in the gas phase enhanced ammonia-sorption capacity by a factor larger than two. Co-adsorption of ammonia and formaldehyde in the presence of water resulted in strong formaldehyde sorption (to the point that it was difficult to saturate the sorbent on the time scales used in this study). In the absence of humidity, adsorption of formaldehyde on the carbon surface was found to impair ammonia sorption in subsequent runs; in the presence of water, however, both ammonia and formaldehyde could be efficiently removed from the gas phase by the sorbent. The efficiency of vacuum regeneration could be enhanced by gentle heating to temperatures below 60 deg.

  6. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area.

  7. Model study on the stability of carbon support materials under polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode operation conditions

    Colmenares, L.C.; Jusys, Z.; Behm, R.J. [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Wurth, A. [TS-IM-IM-CB Inorganic Materials, Evonik Degussa GmbH, D-50997 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-05-01

    The electrochemical oxidation and corrosion resistance of differently prepared and post-treated (graphitization, surface oxidation) carbon support materials, whose surface area and composition were characterized by adsorption measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, were investigated in model studies performed under fuel cell cathode relevant potential conditions. These included also the abnormal cathode potentials (up to 1.5 V{sub RHE}) occurring during start-up and shut-down procedures. Reversible surface oxidation, leading, e.g., to the formation of quinones/hydroquinones, and irreversible oxidation to CO{sub 2} were discriminated by combining electrochemical and on-line mass spectrometry measurements. Oxygenated surface carbon species were found to affect the surface area normalized electrooxidation activity much more than the surface area and porosity of the material, with graphitized carbon with low porosity and low oxygen surface content being most resistant towards reversible oxidation and towards irreversible oxidation at high potentials. Trapped CO{sub 2}, formed upon carbon oxidation at high potentials, is proposed to be at least partly responsible for CO{sub 2} release at low potentials, below the standard potential for electrochemical carbon oxidation. (author)

  8. Production of activated carbon from peanut hill using phosphoric acid and microwave activation

    Weerawat Clowutimon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimum conditions for preparing activated carbon from peanut hulls by phosphoric acid and microwave activation were studied. Factors investigated in this study were temperature of carbonization at 300, 350, 400 and 450๐ C, and time of carbonization at 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The optimum yield was observed that carbonization temperature of 400๐ C and time at 60 minutes, respectively. The yield of charcoal was 39% and the f ix carbon was 69%. Then the charcoal was activated by phosphoric acid and microwave irradiation, respectively. The effect of the weight per volume ratios of charcoal to activating acid (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1(W/V, microwave power at (activated 300, 500 and 700 watts, and activated time (30, 60 and 90 seconds were studied. The results showed that the optimum conditions for activating peanut charcoal were 1:2 (W/V charcoal per activating acid, microwave power 700 watts for 90 seconds. The results yielding maximum surface area by BET method was 303.1 m2 /g and pore volume was 0.140 cm3 /g. An efficiency of maximum iodine adsorption was 418 mg iodine/g activated carbon. Comparing the adsorption efficiency of non- irradiated and irradiated activated carbon, the efficiency of irradiated activated carbon improved up to 31%, due to its larger surface area and pore volume.

  9. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    Qingfeng, Li; Bergqvist, R. S.; Hjuler, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes in a temperature range from 80 to 190°C. Compared with pure H3PO4, using the H3PO4 doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes can significantly improve the oxygen...

  10. Carbon Nanofiber Supported Transition-Metal Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Jongerius, A.; Gosselink, R.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Bitter, J.H.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) studies over carbon nanofiber-supported (CNF) W2C and Mo2C catalysts were performed on guaiacol, a prototypical substrate to evaluate the potential of a catalyst for valorization of depolymerized lignin streams. Typical reactions were executed at 55 bar hydrogen pressure ove

  11. Carbon Supported Polyaniline as Anode Catalyst: Pathway to Platinum-Free Fuel Cells

    Zabrodskii, A G; Malyshkin, V G; Sapurina, I Y

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbon supported polyaniline as anode catalyst in a fuel cell (FC) with direct formic acid electrooxidation is experimentally demonstrated. A prototype FC with such a platinum-free composite anode exhibited a maximum room-temperature specific power of about 5 mW/cm2

  12. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove–seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two locat

  13. An infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper oxide

    Jong, K.P. de; Geus, John W.; Joziasse, J.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature (0.1–50 Torr) on silica-supported copper oxide was studied by infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation or impregnation. After calcination two types of adsorbed CO were identified showing absorption bands at 2136 ± 3

  14. Decision Support and Robust Estimation of Uncertainty in Carbon Stocks and Fluxes

    Hagen, S. C.; Braswell, B. H.; Saatchi, S. S.; Woodall, C. W.; Salas, W.; Ganguly, S.; Harris, N.

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of our project (NASA Carbon Monitoring System - Saatchi PI) is to create detailed maps of forest carbon stocks and stock changes across the US to assist with national GHG inventories and thereby support decisions associated with land management. A comprehensive and accurate assessment of uncertainty in the forest carbon stock and stock change products is critical for understanding the quantitative limits of the products and for ensuring their usefulness to the broader community. However, a rigorous estimate of uncertainty at the pixel level is challenging to produce for complex products generated from multiple sources of input data and models. Here, we put forth a roadmap for assessing uncertainty associated with the forest carbon products provided as part of this project, which are generated by combining several sources of measurements and models. We also present preliminary results.

  15. Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using a CVD Method with Lithium Fluoride as a Supported Cobalt Catalyst

    S. A. Manafi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs have been synthesized in high yield (>70% by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD on Co/LiF catalyst using acetylene as carbon source. A novel catalyst support (LiF is reported for the first time as an alternative for large-scale production of carbon nanofibers while purification process of nanofibers is easier. In our experiment, the sealed furnace was heated at 700∘C for 0.5 hour (the heating rate was 10∘C/min and then cooled to room temperature in the furnace naturally. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. The obtained sample was sequentially washed with ethanol, dilutes acid, and distilled water to remove residual impurities, amorphous carbon materials, and remaining of catalyst, and then dried at 110∘C for 24 hours. The combined physical characterization through several techniques, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, thermogarvimetric analysis (TGA, and zeta-sizer and Raman spectroscopy, allows determining the geometric characteristic and the microstructure of individual carbon nanofibers. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. As a matter of fact, the method of CCVD guarantees the production of CNFs for different applications.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Activated Carbon from Coconut Shell – Doped Tio2 in Water Solution

    Maulidiyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to prepare the activated carbon material doped TiO2-P25 (P25in order to determine the interaction occured in the water medium. The method was to prepare the activated carbon from coconut shell which had been cleaned, pyrolyzed, sievedthen followed by physical activation using a thermal process. Preparation of P25 was to form structures of anatase crystals in the furnace at temperature of 500°C for 3 hours. Both materials were mixed using distilled water until sol-gel was formed. Results of characterization using SEM showed that there is interaction between the activated carbon and P25inserted in the pores of the carbon, while SEM-EDX showed the composition of carbon, titanium and oxide are 46.9%; 27.5% and 25.6%, respectively. Data from XRD showed the formation of peaks from P25 anatase crystals and the carbon. It was supported by data of Flourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR which showed the bonds of –OH; C-H; C=C; COand the O-Ti-O.

  17. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  18. Rh nanoparticles supported on ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high-performance oxygen reduction reaction and catalytic hydrogenation.

    Lin, Chong; Wu, Guanghao; Li, Huiqin; Geng, Yanmin; Xie, Gang; Yang, Jianhui; Liu, Bin; Jin, Jian

    2017-02-02

    We reported a facile and scalable salt-templated approach to produce monodisperse Rh nanoparticles (NPs) on ultrathin carbon nanosheets with the assistance of calcination under inert gas. More importantly, in spite of the essentially poor ORR activity of Rh/C, the acquired Rh/C hybrid nanosheets display a comparable ORR activity to the optimal commercial Pt/C catalyst, which may be due to the extra-small size of Rh NPs and the 2D defect-rich amorphous carbon nanosheets that can facilitate the charge transfer and reactive surface exposure. Moreover, Rh/C nanosheets present the optimal current density and best durability with the minimum decline during the entire test, so that ∼93% activity after 20 000 s is achieved, indicating a good lifetime for ORR. In contrast, commercial Pt/C and commercial Rh/C exhibited worse durability, so that ∼74% and ∼85% activities after 20 000 s are maintained. What's more, in the model system of reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), the kinetic constant k for Rh/C nanosheets is 3.1 × 10(-3), which is 4.5 times than that of the commercial Rh/C catalyst, revealing that our Rh/C hybrid nanosheets can be potentially applied in industrial catalytic hydrogenation. This work opens a novel and facile way for the rest of the precious metal NPs to be supported on ultrathin carbon nanosheets for heterogeneous catalysis.

  19. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  20. Biopolymer protected silver nanoparticles on the support of carbon nanotube as interface for electrocatalytic applications

    Satyanarayana, M.; Kumar, V. Sunil; Gobi, K. Vengatajalabathy

    2016-04-01

    In this research, silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are prepared on the surface of carbon nanotubes via chitosan, a biopolymer linkage. Here chitosan act as stabilizing agent for nanoparticles and forms a network on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Synthesized silver nanoparticles-MWCNT hybrid composite is characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, XRD analysis, and FESEM with EDS to evaluate the structural and chemical properties of the nanocomposite. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated SNP-MWCNT hybrid modified glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance analysis. The silver nanoparticles are of size ˜35 nm and are well distributed on the surface of carbon nanotubes with chitosan linkage. The prepared nanocomposite shows efficient electrocatalytic properties with high active surface area and excellent electron transfer behaviour.

  1. Influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    Tejera, Noel A; Ortega, Eduardo; Rodés, Rosa; Lluch, Carmen

    2004-09-01

    The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were investigated. The amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid affected microbial growth and nitrogenase activity. Several enzymatic activities involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were affected by the carbon source used. In addition, glucose and gluconate significantly increased the oxygen consumption (respiration rate) of whole cells of G. diazotrophicus grown under aerobic conditions. Enzymes responsible for direct oxidation of glucose and gluconate were especially active in cells grown with sucrose and gluconate. The presence of amino acids in the apoplastic and symplastic sap of sugarcane stems suggests that these compounds might be of importance in the regulation of growth and nitrogenase activity during the symbiotic association. The information obtained from the plant-bacterium association together with the results of other biochemical studies could contribute to the development of biotechnological applications of G. diazotrophicus.

  2. Kinetics of naphthalene adsorption on an activated carbon: comparison between aqueous and organic media.

    Cabal, B; Ania, C O; Parra, J B; Pis, J J

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the kinetics of naphthalene adsorption on an activated carbon from aqueous and organic solutions. Kinetic curves were fitted to different theoretical models, and the results have been discussed in terms of the nature and properties of the solvents, the affinity of naphthalene to the solutions, and the accessibility to the porosity of the activated carbon. Data was fitted to the pseudo-second order kinetic model with good correlation coefficients for all the solution media. The faster adsorption rate was obtained for the most hydrophobic solvent (heptane). The overall adsorption rate of naphthalene seems to be controlled simultaneously by external (boundary layer) followed by intraparticle diffusion in the porosity of the activated carbon when water, ethanol and cyclohexane are used as solvents. In the case of heptane, only two stages were observed (pore diffusion and equilibrium) suggesting that the limiting stage is the intraparticle diffusion. The low value of the boundary thickness supports this observation.

  3. Characterization and adsorption behavior of a novel triolein-embedded activated carbon composite adsorbent

    RU Jia; LIU Huijuan; QU Jiuhui; WANG Aimin; DAI Ruihua

    2005-01-01

    A novel triolein-embedded activated carbon composite adsorbent was developed. Experiments were carried out in areas such as the preparation method, the characterization of physicochemical properties, and the adsorption behavior of the composite adsorbent in removing dieldrin from aqueous solution. Results suggested that the novel composite adsorbent was composed of the supporting activated carbon and the surrounding triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane. The adsorbent was stable in water, for no triolein leakage was detected after soaking the adsorbent for five weeks. The adsorbent had good adsorption capability to dieldrin, which was indicated by a residual dieldrin concentration of 0.204 μg·L-1. The removal efficiency of the composite adsorbent was higher than the traditional activated carbon adsorbent.

  4. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  5. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  6. Radical carbon-carbon bond formations enabled by visible light active photocatalysts.

    Wallentin, Carl-Johan; Nguyen, John D; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review highlights the Stephenson group's contribution to the field of photoredox catalysis with emphasis on carbon-carbon bond formation. The realization of photoredox mediated reductive dehalogenation initiated investigations toward both intra- and intermolecular coupling reactions. These reactions commenced via visible light-mediated reduction of activated halogens to give carbon-centered radicals that were subsequently involved in carbon-carbon bond forming transformations. The developed protocols using Ru and Ir based polypyridyl complexes as photoredox catalysts were further tuned to efficiently catalyze overall redox neutral atom transfer radical addition reactions. Most recently, a simplistic flow reactor technique has been utilized to affect a broad scope of photocatalytic transformations with significant enhancement in reaction efficiency.

  7. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  8. Low-temperature SCR of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} over carbon-ceramic supported catalysts

    Valdes-Solis, Teresa; Marban, Gregorio; Fuertes, Antonio B. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), c/Francisco Pintado Fe No. 26, 33011 Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-11-10

    A new method for preparing vanadium oxide supported on carbon-ceramic cellular monoliths is described. This includes a support oxidation step with HNO{sub 3}, followed by ionic exchange with a NaOH solution, equilibrium adsorption impregnation of VO{sup 2+} and thermal treatment. As a result an active catalyst for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction is obtained. The V-catalyst is more resistant to SO{sub 2} poisoning than the previously developed Mn-catalyst. Inhibition by water is reversible for both types of catalysts. Testing of the vanadium catalyst after subjecting it to the outlet gas stream of a power plant shows fast deactivation until constant residual activity is reached. Deactivation seems to be caused by arsenic poisoning and the formation of superficial sulphates.

  9. Proton catalysis with active carbons and partially pyrolyzed carbonaceous materials

    V. V. Strelko; S. S. Stavitskaya; Yu. I. Gorlov

    2014-01-01

    The development of environmentally friendly solid acid catalysts is a priority task. Highly oxidized activated carbon and their ion-substituted (saline) forms are effective proton transfer catalysts in esterification, hydrolysis, and dehydration, and thus are promising candidates as solid acid cata-lysts. Computations by the ab initio method indicated the cause for the enchanced acidity of the carboxylic groups attached to the surface of highly oxidized carbon. The synthesis of phosphorilated carbon was considered, and the proton transfer reactions catalyzed by them in recent studies were analyzed. The development of an amorphous carbon acid catalyst comprising polycyclic carbonaceous (graphene) sheets with-SO3H,-COOH and phenolic type OH-groups was carried out. These new catalysts were synthesized by partial pyrolysis and subsequent sulfonation of carbohydrates, polymers, and other organic compounds. Their high catalytic activities in proton transfere reactions including the processing of bio-based raw materials was demonsrated.

  10. Effect of Sn on methane decomposition over Fe supported catalysts to produce carbon

    Oliveira, Patricia F.; Ribeiro, Leandro P.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G. [ICEx. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada (Brazil); Dias, Anderson [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Lago, Rochel M., E-mail: rochel@qui.ufmg.br [ICEx. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    In this work, alumina-supported Sn containing Fe catalysts were investigated in CVD reactions (Chemical Vapor Deposition) using methane for carbon production. The catalysts were prepared with 10 wt.% of Fe (as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and 3, 6 and 12 wt.% of Sn (as SnO{sub 2}) supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} named hereon Fe10Sn3A, Fe5Sn6A and Fe10Sn12A, respectively. These catalysts were characterized by SEM, TPCVD, TPR, TG, Raman, XRD and {sup 57}Fe and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. Methane reacts with Fe10A catalyst (without Sn) in the temperature range 680-900 Degree-Sign C to produce mainly Fe{sup 0}, Fe{sub 3}C and 20 wt.% of carbon deposition. TPR and TPCVD clearly showed that Sn strongly hinders the CH{sub 4} reaction over Fe catalyst. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer suggested that in the presence of Sn the reduction of Fe{sup + 3} by methane becomes very difficult. {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer showed Sn{sup + 4} species strongly interact with metallic iron after CVD, producing iron-tin phases such as Fe{sub 3}SnC and FeSn{sub 2}. This interaction Sn-Fe increases the CVD temperatures and decreases the carbon yield leading to the production of more organized forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphite.

  11. Effect of Sn on methane decomposition over Fe supported catalysts to produce carbon

    Oliveira, Patrícia F.; Ribeiro, Leandro P.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Ardisson, José D.; Dias, Anderson; Lago, Rochel M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, alumina-supported Sn containing Fe catalysts were investigated in CVD reactions (Chemical Vapor Deposition) using methane for carbon production. The catalysts were prepared with 10 wt.% of Fe (as Fe2O3) and 3, 6 and 12 wt.% of Sn (as SnO2) supported on Al2O3 named hereon Fe10Sn3A, Fe5Sn6A and Fe10Sn12A, respectively. These catalysts were characterized by SEM, TPCVD, TPR, TG, Raman, XRD and 57Fe and 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. Methane reacts with Fe10A catalyst (without Sn) in the temperature range 680-900°C to produce mainly Fe0, Fe3C and 20 wt.% of carbon deposition. TPR and TPCVD clearly showed that Sn strongly hinders the CH4 reaction over Fe catalyst. 57Fe Mössbauer suggested that in the presence of Sn the reduction of Fe + 3 by methane becomes very difficult. 119Sn Mössbauer showed Sn + 4 species strongly interact with metallic iron after CVD, producing iron-tin phases such as Fe3SnC and FeSn2. This interaction Sn-Fe increases the CVD temperatures and decreases the carbon yield leading to the production of more organized forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphite.

  12. Dimethyl carbonate synthesis via transesterification of propylene carbonate with methanol by ceria-zinc catalysts: Role of catalyst support and reaction parameters

    Kumar, Praveen; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra; Mishra, Indra Mani [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2015-09-15

    Ceria and zinc oxide catalyst were impregnated onto various oxide supports, namely Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, individually by deposition-coprecipitation method. The synthesized catalysts (CZA, CZS and CZT having supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), NH{sub 3}- and CO{sub 2}-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and N2 adsorption. These catalysts were used for synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from methanol and propylene carbonate in a batch reactor. CZS was found to have larger average grain size as compared to CZA and CZT. Composite oxides (catalysts) were found to contain individual phases of ZnO, CeO{sub 2} and some spinel forms of Zn, Ce along with their supports. CZS having highest basicity and surface area showed better catalytic activity as compared to CZA and CZT. Effect of reaction temperature and methanol/PC molar ratio on DMC yield was studied and a reaction mechanism has been discussed. Maximum DMC yield of 77% was observed with CZS catalyst at 170 .deg. C with methanol/PC molar ratio of 10.

  13. TiN@nitrogen-doped carbon supported Pt nanoparticles as high-performance anode catalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Fu, Shenna; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, TiN@nitrogen-doped carbons (NDC) composed of a core-shell structure are successfully prepared through self-assembly and pyrolysis treatment using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as coupling agent, polyaniline as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Subsequently, TiN@NDC supporting Pt nanoparticles (Pt/TiN@NDC) are obtained by a microwave-assisted polyol process. The nitrogen-containing functional groups and TiN nanoparticles play a critical role in decreasing the average particle size of Pt and improving the electrocatalytic activity of Pt/TiN@NDC. Transmission electron microscope results reveal that Pt nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the TiN@NDC surface with a narrow particle size ranging from 1 to 3 nm in diameter. Moreover, the Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst shows significantly improved catalytic activity and high durability for methanol electrooxidation in comparison with Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, revealed by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Strikingly, this novel Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst reveals a better CO tolerance related to Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, which due to the bifunctional mechanism and strong metal-support interaction between Pt and TiN@NDC. In addition, the probable reaction steps for the electrooxidation of CO adspecies on Pt NPs on the basis of the bifunctional mechanism are also proposed. These results indicate that the TiN@NDC is a promising catalyst support for methanol electrooxidation.

  14. Pesticide Removal by Combined Ozonation and Granular Activated Carbon Filtration

    Orlandini, E.

    1999-01-01

    This research aimed to idendfy and understand mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effect of ozonation on removal of pesdcides and other micropoUutants by Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtradon. This allows optimization of the combination of these two processes, termed Biological Activated Car

  15. Composite TiO2-Carbon nano films with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Chakarov, Dinko; Sellappan, Raja

    2011-03-01

    Composite TiO2-carbon thin films prepared by physical vapor deposition techniques on fused silica substrates show enhanced photocatalytic activity, as compared to pure TiO2 films of similar thickness, towards decomposition of methanol to CO2 and water. Raman and XRD measurements confirm that annealed TiO2 films exhibit anatase structure while the carbon layer becomes graphitic. Characteristic for the composite films is an enhanced optical absorption in the visible range. The presence of the carbon film causes a shift of the TiO2 absorption edge and modifies its grain size to be smaller. The observed enhancement is attributed to synergy effects at the carbon-TiO2 interface, resulting in smaller crystallite size and anisotropic charge carrier transport, which in turn reduces their recombination probability. Supported by N-INNER through the Solar Hydrogen project (P30938-1 Solväte).

  16. Adsorption of chromium ion (VI by acid activated carbon

    A. A. Attia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The activated carbon produced from olive stones was chemically activated using sulfuric acid, (OS-S, and utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution in the concentration range 4-50 mg/L. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch process and various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial chromium ion concentration, carbon dosage, and pH on percentage removal have been studied. Adsorption results obtained for activated carbon (OS-S were compared with the acid-treated commercial activated carbon (CAC-S. The optimum efficiency shows that the Cr(VI uptake being attained at pH 1.5. The equilibrium adsorption data was better fitted to the Langmuir adsorption model. The results of kinetic models showed that the pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. It was concluded that activated carbon produced from olive stones (OS-S has an efficient adsorption capacity compared to (CAC-S sample.

  17. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey.

  18. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF L-HISTIDINE ON ACTIVE CARBON

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption properties of L-histidine on active carbon were studied in the paper, which are affected by the main parameters, such as the quantity percent of active carbon, pH value of the solution, the time of adsorption equilibrium and adsorption temperature. The results indicate that adsorption equilibrium time of L-his on active carbon is about 80 minutes. With the increasing of the quantity percent of active carbon, the adsorbance of L-his decreases sharply, and increases lighter after that. When the quantity percent of active carbon is 10%, the adsorbance reaches the minimum.pH value of solution and extraction temperature have great affection on the adsorption. When the pH value is higher or lower than the pI of L-his, the adsorbance is small, even zero. It is proven that the experimental equilibrium data which are obtained under the conditions of 80 ℃and pH=1.0, are fitted with the Freundlich equation: q=2.5914c0.8097. The results can provide certain references in L-his adsorption process of industrial operation.

  19. Adsorption and destruction of PCDD/Fs using surface-functionalized activated carbons.

    Atkinson, J D; Hung, P C; Zhang, Z; Chang, M B; Yan, Z; Rood, M J

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbon adsorbs polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) from gas streams but can simultaneously generate PCDD/Fs via de novo synthesis, increasing an already serious disposal problem for the spent sorbent. To increase activated carbon's PCDD/F sorption capacity and lifetime while reducing the impact of hazardous waste, it is beneficial to develop carbon-based sorbents that simultaneously destroy PCDD/Fs while adsorbing the toxic chemicals from gas streams. In this work, hydrogen-treated and surface-functionalized (i.e., oxygen, bromine, nitrogen, and sulfur) activated carbons are tested in a bench-scale reactor as adsorbents for PCDD/Fs. All tested carbons adsorb PCDD/F efficiently, with international toxic equivalent removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and mass removal efficiencies exceeding 98% for all but one tested material. Hydrogen-treated materials caused negligible destruction and possible generation of PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 100% and 107%. All tested surface-functionalized carbons, regardless of functionality, destroyed PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 73% and 96%. Free radicals on the carbon surface provided by different functional groups may contribute to PCDD/F destruction, as has been hypothesized in the literature. Surface-functionalized materials preferentially destroyed higher-order (more chlorine) congeners, supporting a dechlorination mechanism as opposed to oxidation. Carbons impregnated with sulfur are particularly effective at destroying PCDD/Fs, with destruction efficiency improving with increasing sulfur content to as high as 27%. This is relevant because sulfur-treated carbons are used for mercury adsorption, increasing the possibility of multi-pollutant control.

  20. Preparation of ZIF-8 membranes supported on macroporous carbon tubes via a dipcoating-rubbing method

    Kong, Lingyin; Zhang, Xiongfu; Liu, Haiou; Wang, Tonghua; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, a new dipcoating-rubbing method (DCRM) was developed to seed the surface of a macroporous carbon tube with a mixture of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles. A continuous and low-defect ZIF-8 membrane was well formed on the seeded carbon tube by solvothermal growth. The DCRM involved a two-step process including first dipcoating a thin layer of the composite of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles on the carbon surface and then rubbing the layer to form a stable seed layer. The graphite in the composite acting as binding agent could have two functions: (1) anchoring the ZIF-8 seeds onto the carbon surface; (2) smoothing the coarse surface of the macroporous carbon tube, thus forming a high quality ZIF-8 membrane. The as-prepared membrane was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and single gas permeation and was proved to be continuous and low-defect. The ideal selectivity of H2/CH4 is 7.9 with a H2 permeance of 7.15×10-8 mol Pa-1 s-1 m-2, which is higher than its corresponding Knudsen diffusion value. We could therefore expect the ZIF-8 membrane supported on macroporous tubular carbon to achieve a high selectivity of H2 over CH4 through a molecular sieving effect.

  1. A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-23

    A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

  2. Treatment of oil–water emulsions by adsorption onto activated carbon, bentonite and deposited carbon

    Khaled Okiel; Mona El-Sayed; Mohamed Y. El-Kady

    2011-01-01

    Emulsified oil in waste water constitutes is a severe problem in the different treatment stages before disposed off in a manner that does not violate environmental criteria. One commonly used technique for remediation of petroleum contaminated water is adsorption. The main objective of this study is to examine the removal of oil from oil–water emulsions by adsorption on bentonite, powdered activated carbon (PAC) and deposited carbon (DC). The results gave evidence of the ability of the adsorb...

  3. Trivalent chromium removal from wastewater using low cost activated carbon derived from agricultural waste material and activated carbon fabric cloth

    Mohan, Dinesh [Environmental Chemistry Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)]. E-mail: dm_1967@hotmail.com; Singh, Kunwar P. [Environmental Chemistry Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Singh, Vinod K. [Environmental Chemistry Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2006-07-31

    An efficient adsorption process is developed for the decontamination of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A low cost activated carbon (ATFAC) was prepared from coconut shell fibers (an agricultural waste), characterized and utilized for Cr(III) removal from water/wastewater. A commercially available activated carbon fabric cloth (ACF) was also studied for comparative evaluation. All the equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted at different temperatures, particle size, pHs, and adsorbent doses in batch mode. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied. The Langmuir model best fit the equilibrium isotherm data. The maximum adsorption capacities of ATFAC and ACF at 25 deg. C are 12.2 and 39.56 mg/g, respectively. Cr(III) adsorption increased with an increase in temperature (10 deg. C: ATFAC-10.97 mg/g, ACF-36.05 mg/g; 40 deg. C: ATFAC-16.10 mg/g, ACF-40.29 mg/g). The kinetic studies were conducted to delineate the effect of temperature, initial adsorbate concentration, particle size of the adsorbent, and solid to liquid ratio. The adsorption of Cr(III) follows the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics. From kinetic studies various rate and thermodynamic parameters such as effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy and entropy of activation were evaluated. The sorption capacity of activated carbon (ATFAC) and activated carbon fabric cloth is comparable to many other adsorbents/carbons/biosorbents utilized for the removal of trivalent chromium from water/wastewater.

  4. A Polyphenylene Support for Pd Catalysts with Exceptional Catalytic Activity

    Wang, Feng; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Richter, Felix Herrmann

    2014-01-01

    We describe a solid polyphenylene support that serves as an excellent platform for metal-catalyzed reactions that are normally carried out under homogeneous conditions. The catalyst is synthesized by palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling which directly results in formation of palladium nanoparticles...... confined to a porous polyphenylene network. The composite solid is in turn highly active for further Suzuki coupling reactions, including non-activated substrates that are challenging even for molecular catalysts....

  5. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration.

  6. Adsorption of aromatic organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets: comparison with carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Apul, Onur Guven; Wang, Qiliang; Zhou, Yang; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-15

    Adsorption of two synthetic organic compounds (SOCs; phenanthrene and biphenyl) by two pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and one graphene oxide (GO) was examined and compared with those of a coal base activated carbon (HD4000), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), and a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in distilled and deionized water and in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphenes exhibited comparable or better adsorption capacities than carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and granular activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of NOM. The presence of NOM reduced the SOC uptake of all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the SOC adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs and activated carbons. Furthermore, the SOC with its flexible molecular structure was less impacted from NOM preloading than the SOC with planar and rigid molecular structure. The results indicated that graphenes can serve as alternative adsorbents for removing SOCs from water. However, they will also, if released to environment, adsorb organic contaminants influencing their fate and impact in the environment.

  7. Removal of CO from CO-contaminated hydrogen gas by carbon-supported rhodium porphyrins using water-soluble electron acceptors

    Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Siroma, Zyun; Asahi, Masafumi; Ioroi, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    Carbon-supported Rh porphyrins catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide by water-soluble electron acceptors. The rate of this reaction is plotted as a function of the redox potential of the electron acceptor. The rate increases with an increase in the redox potential until it reaches a plateau. This profile can be explained in terms of the electrocatalytic CO oxidation activity of the Rh porphyrin. The removal of CO from CO(2%)/H2 by a solution containing a carbon-supported Rh porphyrin and an electron acceptor is examined. The complete conversion of CO to CO2 is achieved with only a slight amount of Rh porphyrins. Rh porphyrin on carbon black gives higher conversion than that dissolved in solution. This reaction can be used not only to remove CO in anode gas of stationary polymer electrolyte fuel cells but also to regenerate a reductant in indirect CO fuel cell systems.

  8. High surface area activated carbon prepared from cassava peel by chemical activation.

    Sudaryanto, Y; Hartono, S B; Irawaty, W; Hindarso, H; Ismadji, S

    2006-03-01

    Cassava is one of the most important commodities in Indonesia, an agricultural country. Cassava is one of the primary foods in our country and usually used for traditional food, cake, etc. Cassava peel is an agricultural waste from the food and starch processing industries. In this study, this solid waste was used as the precursor for activated carbon preparation. The preparation process consisted of potassium hydroxide impregnation at different impregnation ratio followed by carbonization at 450-750 degrees C for 1-3 h. The results revealed that activation time gives no significant effect on the pore structure of activated carbon produced, however, the pore characteristic of carbon changes significantly with impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature. The maximum surface area and pore volume were obtained at impregnation ratio 5:2 and carbonization temperature 750 degrees C.

  9. Systematic variation of the sodium/sulfur promoter content on carbon-supported iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch to olefins reaction

    Oschatz, M.; Krans, N.A.; Xie, J.; de Jong, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch to olefins (FTO) process is a method for the direct conversion of synthesis gas to lower C2–C4 olefins. Carbon-supported iron carbide nanoparticles are attractive catalysts for this reaction. The catalytic activity can be improved and undesired formation of alkanes can be suppres

  10. Synthesis of Sorbitolum ethoxylates oleate with active carbon supported p-toluene sulphonic acid as catalyst%活性炭负载对甲苯磺酸催化合成山梨醇聚氧乙烯醚油酸酯

    刘志湘; 钱建芳; 王月芬; 谢专

    2013-01-01

    以活性炭负载对甲苯磺酸作催化剂,山梨醇聚氧乙烯醚和油酸为原料,合成山梨醇聚氧乙烯醚油酸酯.考察了催化剂用量、反应温度、反应时间等条件对反应的影响.较优的合成条件为:真空脱水,催化剂用量为总物质量的0.25%,反应温度为130 ~135℃,反应时间为3.0h,满足指标要求.%Using p-toluensulphonic acid supported by activated carbon as catalyst, Sorbitolum ethoxylates oleate was synthesized from Sorbitolum ethoxylates and oleic acid. The effect of reaction conditions inclu-ding catalyst amount, reaction temperature, reaction time on esterification were investigated. The optimum synthesis conditions were as follows: vacuum dehydration, the amount of catalyst 0.25% base on the total mass of reactants, the reaction temperature 130~135℃, the reaction time 3.0 h, to meet the target re-quirements.

  11. Electroreduction of oxygen on Vulcan carbon supported Pd nanoparticles and Pd-M nanoalloys in acid and alkaline solutions

    Alexeyeva, N. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Sarapuu, A., E-mail: ave.sarapuu@ut.ee [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Tammeveski, K. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Vidal-Iglesias, F.J.; Solla-Gullon, J.; Feliu, J.M. [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-07-30

    Highlights: > Electroreduction of O{sub 2} on carbon-supported Pd, PdCo and PdFe nanoparticles is studied. > Pd-based catalysts were prepared by reduction in the presence of citrate and in microemulsion. > Four-electron reduction of O{sub 2} proceeds in both acid and alkaline media. > Specific activity of PdCo and PdFe nanocatalysts was similar to that of Pd nanoparticles. - Abstract: The kinetics of O{sub 2} reduction on novel electrocatalyst materials deposited on carbon substrates were studied using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique. Palladium nanoparticles and Pd-M (PdCo and PdFe) nanoalloys supported on Vulcan XC-72R were prepared using two different synthetic routes. The catalyst samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the average size of metal nanoparticles was determined. Electrochemical measurements were performed in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and in 0.1 M NaOH solutions. The influence of different synthetic conditions on the values of specific activity and other kinetic parameters was investigated. These parameters were determined from the Tafel plots taking into account the real electroactive area for each electrode. Pd nanoparticles and Pd-M nanoalloys exhibit significantly high electrocatalytic activity for the four-electron reduction of oxygen to water.

  12. Physical activity support community togetheractive - architecture, implementation and evaluation

    Elloumi, Lamia; Beijnum, van Bert-Jan; Hermens, Hermie

    2015-01-01

    Reducing sedentary lifestyle and physical inactivity is getting an increased attention of researchers and health organizations due to its significant benefits on health. In the same direction we are proposing a virtual community system, TogetherActive, which supports people in their daily physical a

  13. Physical Activity and Social Support in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Mélo, Edilânea Nunes; de Farias, José Cazuza, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically synthesize the results of original studies on the association between physical activity and social support in adolescents, published until April 2011. Searches were carried out in Adolec, ERIC, Lilacs, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, SportsDiscus and Web of Science electronic databases and the reference…

  14. Ubiquitous Support for Midwives to Leverage Daily Activities

    Al Mahmud, A.; Keyson, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present preliminary outcomes concerning the design of a support system for midwives in the Netherlands to carry out daily activities. The purpose of our design is to make the workflow of midwives more efficient. Our user studies confirm that the current workflows of midwives to supp

  15. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity: Tools and Publications.

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-sponsored, multi-year initiative designed to further improve the quality of, effectiveness of, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. This catalog is one element of the BEPS information dissemination process. The…

  16. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt-1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt-1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support.

  17. Ni-SiO₂ catalysts for the carbon dioxide reforming of methane: varying support properties by flame spray pyrolysis.

    Lovell, Emma C; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Silica particles were prepared by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) as a support for nickel catalysts. The impact of precursor feed rate (3, 5 and 7 mL/min) during FSP on the silica characteristics and the ensuing effect on catalytic performance for the carbon dioxide, or dry, reforming of methane (DRM) was probed. Increasing the precursor feed rate: (i) progressively lowered the silica surface area from ≈340 m2/g to ≈240 m2/g; (ii) altered the silanol groups on the silica surface; and (iii) introduced residual carbon-based surface species to the sample at the highest feed rate. The variations in silica properties altered the (5 wt %) nickel deposit characteristics which in turn impacted on the DRM reaction. As the silica surface area increased, the nickel dispersion increased which improved catalyst performance. The residual carbon-based species also appeared to improve nickel dispersion, and in turn catalyst activity, although not to the same extent as the change in silica surface area. The findings illustrate both the importance of silica support characteristics on the catalytic performance of nickel for the DRM reaction and the capacity for using FSP to control these characteristics.

  18. Ni-SiO2 Catalysts for the Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane: Varying Support Properties by Flame Spray Pyrolysis

    Emma C. Lovell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica particles were prepared by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP as a support for nickel catalysts. The impact of precursor feed rate (3, 5 and 7 mL/min during FSP on the silica characteristics and the ensuing effect on catalytic performance for the carbon dioxide, or dry, reforming of methane (DRM was probed. Increasing the precursor feed rate: (i progressively lowered the silica surface area from ≈340 m2/g to ≈240 m2/g; (ii altered the silanol groups on the silica surface; and (iii introduced residual carbon-based surface species to the sample at the highest feed rate. The variations in silica properties altered the (5 wt % nickel deposit characteristics which in turn impacted on the DRM reaction. As the silica surface area increased, the nickel dispersion increased which improved catalyst performance. The residual carbon-based species also appeared to improve nickel dispersion, and in turn catalyst activity, although not to the same extent as the change in silica surface area. The findings illustrate both the importance of silica support characteristics on the catalytic performance of nickel for the DRM reaction and the capacity for using FSP to control these characteristics.

  19. Carbon covered alumina prepared by the pyrolysis of sucrose: A promising support material for the supported Pt-Sn-bimetallic dehydrogenation catalysis

    Luo, S.; He, S.; Li, X.R.; Seshan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose was pyrolyzed on gamma alumina surface to prepare carbon covered alumina (CCA) material. Alumina and CCA supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by the complex impregnation method under vacuum. Dehydrogenation of n-octadecane was performed to study the effect of carbon addition, Pt loading a

  20. Synthesis of mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres as highly efficient Pd electrocatalyst support for ethanol oxidation

    Yan, Zaoxue; Meng, Hui; Li, Zihui; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Shi, Lei [Changling Catalyst Division, Sinopec Group, Yueyang 414012 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The synthesis procedure of the highly mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres (HCHs) using glucose as carbon source and solid core mesoporous shell silica (SCMSS) as template and the formation mechanism of the HCHs have been presented. The HCHs show an ultrahigh surface area of 1095.59 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and an average mesopore size of 9.38 nm. The hemispherical structure with large mesopores also results in the improvement in the mass transfer and therefore more concentrated ethanol solution can be used to increase the energy density. The additional advantage of the HCHs compared to the hollow carbon spheres is that they can provide the similar surface area at reduced volume. The current densities of ethanol oxidation on Pd nanoparticles supported on HCH (Pd/HCH) electrocatalyst are three times as many as on Pd/C at the same Pd loadings. (author)

  1. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  2. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  3. Influence of Synthesis pH on Textural Properties of Carbon Xerogels as Supports for Pt/CXs Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    C. Alegre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon xerogels (CXs have been prepared by polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde. Two synthesis pHs were studied in order to evaluate its influence on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt catalysts supported on previous carbon xerogels, synthesized by conventional impregnation method. Catalysts were also synthesized over a commercial carbon black (Vulcan-XC-72R for comparison purposes. Characterization techniques included nitrogen physisorption, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Catalysts electrochemical activity towards the oxidation of carbon monoxide and methanol was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry to establish the effect of the carbon support on the catalysts performance. Commercial Pt/C catalyst (E-TEK was analyzed for comparison purposes. It was observed that the more developed and mesopore-enriched porous structure of the carbon xerogel synthesized at a higher initial pH resulted in an optimal utilization of the active phase and in an enhanced and promising catalytic activity in the electrooxidation of methanol, in comparison with commercial catalysts.

  4. ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM VEGETAL RAW MATERIALS TO SOLVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    Viktor Mukhin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for active carbons obtaining from vegetable byproducts such as straw, nut shells, fruit stones, sawdust, hydrolysis products of corn cobs and sunflower husks have been developed. The physico-chemical characteristics, structural parameters and sorption characteristics of obtained active carbons were determined. The ability of carbonaceous adsorbents for detoxification of soil against pesticides, purification of surface waters and for removal of organic pollutants from wastewaters has been evaluated. The obtained results reveal the effectiveness of their use in a number of environmental technologies.

  5. Adsorption of Remazol Black B dye on Activated Carbon Felt

    Donnaperna Lucio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Remazol Black B (anionic dye on a microporous activated carbon felt is investigated from its aqueous solution. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using X-ray microanalysis, "Boehm" titrations and pH of PZC measurements which indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic in nature. The kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption is observed to be pH dependent and governed by the diffusion of the dye molecules. The experimental data can be explained by "intra-particle diffusion model". For Remazol Black B, the Khan model is best suited to simulate the adsorption isotherms.

  6. Activated carbon use in treating diesel engine exhausts

    Nelson, S.G.; Babyak, R.A. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Several active carbon materials were observed to be particularly effective in processes for the removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases. This paper describes the application of active carbon materials to two diesel engine exhaust gases at McClellan AFB in California. More specifically, one application involved a large diesel engine that supplies emergency power at the Base, and the second involved a mobile diesel-fueled generator that provides auxiliary power to aircraft. The designs of systems to control emissions for each application are discussed, and the results of tests on laboratory-scale, pilot-scale, and full-scale systems are presented.

  7. Investigation of altenative carbon materials for fuel-cell catalyst support

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    In order to ensure high utilization of the catalyst material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) it is usually fixed in the form of nanoparticles on a supporting material. The catalyst is platinum or a platinum alloy, and the commonly used support is carbon black (CB). Although...... the large surface area and good anchoring properties make it a suited material for this purpose, it is prone to degradation in the fuel-cell environment. Thus alternative materials with higher durability than CB, but with similar (or better) capability of dispersion, are desired. Among them are highly...... of non- or low-temperature-treated CBs were dominated by defects, and the FWCNTs contained both elements. By XPS it was possible to determine the concentration of oxygen in the carbons, but an exact deconvolution of the XPS peaks was not possible due to the very low oxygen contents, the lack of parameter...

  8. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  9. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  10. Structure, functions, and activities of a research support informatics section.

    Murray, Michael D; Smith, Faye E; Fox, Joanne; Teal, Evgenia Y; Kesterson, Joseph G; Stiffler, Troy A; Ambuehl, Roberta J; Wang, Jane; Dibble, Maria; Benge, Dennis O; Betley, Leonard J; Tierney, William M; McDonald, Clement J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe a research group that supports the needs of investigators seeking data from an electronic medical record system. Since its creation in 1972, the Regenstrief Medical Records System has captured and stored more than 350 million discrete coded observations on two million patients. This repository has become a central data source for prospective and retrospective research. It is accessed by six data analysts--working closely with the institutional review board--who provide investigators with timely and accurate data while protecting patient and provider privacy and confidentiality. From January 1, 1999, to July 31, 2002, data analysts tracked their activities involving 47,559 hours of work predominantly for physicians (54%). While data retrieval (36%) and analysis (25%) were primary activities, data analysts also actively collaborated with researchers. Primary objectives of data provided to investigators were to address disease-specific (35.4%) and drug-related (12.2%) questions, support guideline implementation (13.1%), and probe various aspects of clinical epidemiology (5.7%). Outcomes of these endeavors included 117 grants (including 300,000 US dollars per year salary support for data analysts) and 139 papers in peer-reviewed journals by investigators who rated the support provided by data analysts as extremely valuable.

  11. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    Stolarz, Anna; Maier-Komor, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 μg/cm 2, coated with approximately 4 μg/cm 2 MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm 2. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  12. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Cellulose to Gluconate on Carbon Aerogel Supported Gold Nanoparticles Anode in Alkaline Medium

    Hanshuang Xiao; Meifen Wu; Guohua Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The development of high efficient and low energy consumption approaches for the transformation of cellulose is of high significance for a sustainable production of high value-added feedstocks. Herein, electrocatalytic oxidation technique was employed for the selective conversion of cellulose to gluconate in alkaline medium by using concentrated HNO3 pretreated carbon aerogel (CA) supported Au nanoparticles as anode. Results show that a high gluconate yield of 67.8% and sum salts yield of 88.9...

  13. Efficiency of bimetallic PtPd on polydopamine modified on various carbon supports for alcohol oxidations

    Pinithchaisakula, A.; Ounnunkad, K.; Themsirimongkon, S.; Promsawan, N.; Waenkaew, P.; Saipanya, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the preparation, characterization, and electrocatalytic analysis of the catalysts on various carbon substrates for direct alcohol fuel cells were studied. Selected carbons were modified with/without polydopamine (labelled as PDA-C and C) and further metal electrodeposited incorporated onto the glassy carbon (labelled as 5Pt1Pd/PDA-C and 5Pt1Pd/C). Four various carbon materials were used e.g. graphite (G), carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene (GP) and graphene oxide (GO) and the carbons were modified with PDA denoted as PDA-G, PDA-CNT, PDA-GP and PDA-GO, respectively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) experimental observation showed narrow size distribution of metal anchored on the PDA-C and C materials. Chemical compositions and oxidation states of the catalysts were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The catalytic performances for small organic electro-oxidation (e.g. methanol and ethanol) were measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Among different PDA-C and C catalysts, monometallic Pt showed less activity than the bimetallic catalysts. Among catalysts with PDA, the 5Pt1Pd/PDA-GO catalyst facilitated methanol and ethanol oxidations with high oxidation currents and If/Ib value and stability with low potentials while among catalysts without PDA, the 5Pt1Pd/CNT provides highest activity and stability. It was found that the catalysts with PDA provided high activity and stability than the catalysts without PDA. The improved catalytic performance of the prepared catalysts could be related to the higher active surface area from polymer modification and bimetallic catalyst system in the catalyst composites.

  14. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  15. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  16. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  17. Preparation of Paper Containing Activated Carbon.

    1984-06-01

    development of charcoal paper. RESUME On a obtenu du papier contenant du charbon actif en dispersant du charbon r~duit en poudre et en versant des agents de...sa capaciti d’adsorption et de ritention du charbon . Ce papier pourrait servir d𔄀crans dans une salle de contr~le de contamination pour le balayage...contenant du charbon . "l-ii:: . ---:.-o * *** * *. .. t C Cd. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 S 2 INTRODUCTION . Activated

  18. Metal-Support Interactions of Platinum Nanoparticles Decorated N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Melke, Julia; Peter, Benedikt; Habereder, Anja; Ziegler, Juergen; Fasel, Claudia; Nefedov, Alexei; Sezen, Hikmet; Wöll, Christof; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Roth, Christina

    2016-01-13

    N-doped carbon materials are discussed as catalyst supports for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. This work deals with the preparation of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) supported on N-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNF) from a polyaniline nanofiber (PANI NF) precursor, and investigates the ORR activity of the produced materials. Initially, Pt NPs are deposited on PANI NFs. The PANI NF precursors are characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. It is shown, that in the PANI NF precursor materials electrons from the Pt are being transferred toward the π-conjugated systems of the aromatic ring. This strong interaction of Pt atoms with PANI explains the high dispersion of Pt NPs on the PANI NF. Subsequently, the PANI NF precursors are carbonized at different heat-treatment conditions resulting in structurally different N-CNFs which are characterized by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) ,and TEM measurements. It is shown that an interaction between N-groups and Pt NPs exists in all investigated N-CNFs. However, the N-CNFs differ in the composition of the N-species and the dispersion of the Pt NPs. A small mean Pt NP size with a narrow size distribution is attributed to the presence of pyrdinic N-groups in the N-CNFs, whereas, for the N-CNFs with mainly graphitic and pyrrolic N-groups, an increase in the average Pt NP size with a broad size distribution is found. The ORR activity in alkaline media investigated by Koutecky-Levich analysis of rotating disk electrode measurements showed a largely enhanced ORR activity in comparison to a conventional Pt/C catalyst.

  19. Zirconia supported catalysts for bioethanol steam reforming: Effect of active phase and zirconia structure

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Sanz, J.L.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/ Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-10

    Three new catalysts have been prepared in order to study the active phase influence in ethanol steam reforming reaction. Nickel, cobalt and copper were the active phases selected and were supported on zirconia with monoclinic and tetragonal structure, respectively. To characterize the behaviour of the catalysts in reaction conditions a study of catalytic activity with temperature was performed. The highest activity values were obtained at 973 K where nickel and cobalt based catalysts achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. Nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia exhibited the highest hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H{sub 2}/mol EtOH fed. The influence of steam/carbon (S/C) ratio on product distribution was another parameter studied between the range 3.2-6.5. Nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia at S/C = 3.2 operated at 973 K without by-product production such as ethylene or acetaldehyde. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term reaction experiment was performed at 973 K, S/C = 3.2 and atmospheric pressure. After 60 h, nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia exhibited high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. (author)

  20. Carbon-carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone.

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-02-05

    The activation of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C-C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C-C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C-C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C-C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C-C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process.