WorldWideScience

Sample records for activated athermal martensite

  1. Comments on the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry results for thermoelastic martensitic transformations: Athermal versus thermally activated kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.; Lipe, T.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous article Van Humbeeck and Planes have made a number of criticisms of the authors' recent paper concerning the interpretation of the results obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) from the Martensitic Transformation of Cu-Al-Ni-Mn-B alloys. Although the martensitic transformation of these shape memory alloys is generally classified as athermal, it has been confirmed that the capacity of the alloys to undergo a more complete thermoelastic transformation (i.e. better reversibility of the transformation) increased with the Mn content. This behavior has been explained by interpreting the DSC results obtained during thermal cycling in terms of a thermally activated mechanism controlling the direct and reverse transformations. When the heating rate increases during the reverse transformation the DSC curves shift towards higher temperatures while they shift towards the lower temperatures when the cooling rate was increased during the direct transformation. Since the starting transformation temperatures (As, Ms) do not shift, Van Humbeeck and Planes state that there is no real peak shift and assume that the DCS experiments were carried out without taking into account the thermal lag effect between sample and cell. On the following line they deduce a time constant, τ, of 60 seconds because the peak maximum shifts. In fact the assumption made by Van Humbeeck and Planes is false

  2. Thermally activated growth of lath martensite in Fe–Cr–Ni–Al stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The austenite to martensite transformation in a semi-austenitic stainless steel containing 17 wt-%Cr, 7 wt-%Ni and 1 wt-%Al was investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Magnetometry demonstrated that, within experimental accuracy, martensite formation...... can be suppressed on fast cooling to 77 K as well as on subsequent fast heating to 373 K. Surprisingly, martensite formation was observed during moderate heating from 77 K, instead. Electron backscatter diffraction demonstrated that the morphology of martensite is lath type. The kinetics...... of the transformation is interpreted in terms of athermal nucleation of lath martensite followed by thermally activated growth. It is anticipated that substantial autocatalytic martensite formation occurs during thermally activated growth. The observation of a retardation of the transformation followed by a new...

  3. Thermally activated martensite formation in ferrous alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetometry was applied to investigate the formation of α/α´martensite in 13ferrous alloys during immersion in boiling nitrogen and during re-heating to room temperature at controlled heating rates in the range 0.0083-0.83 K s-1. Data showsthat in 3 of the alloys, those that form {5 5 7}γ...... martensite, no martensite developsduring cooling. For all investigated alloys, irrespective of the type of martensiteforming, thermally activated martensite develops during heating. The activationenergy for thermally activated martensite formation is in the range 8‒27 kJ mol-1and increases with the fraction...... of interstitial solutes in the alloy...

  4. Effect of Prior Athermal Martensite on the Isothermal Transformation Kinetics Below M s in a Low-C High-Si Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Lopez, A.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermomechanical processing of Advanced Multiphase High Strength Steels often includes isothermal treatments around the martensite start temperature (M s). It has been reported that the presence of martensite formed prior to these isothermal treatments accelerates the kinetics of the subsequent

  5. Modelling of phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, J.-C.; Gavard, L.; Boussidan, C.; Lepoittevin, C.; Servant, C.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to summarize modelling of on-heating and on-cooling phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic (LAM) steels. Calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium phase fractions and kinetic aspects of phase transformations have been performed by using different approaches from experimental data (CCT and TTT diagrams obtained by dilatometry). All the calculated data have been compared to an important and systematic set of experimental data obtained on different LAM steels of the 7.5-11% CrWVT a type. (orig.)

  6. Modelling of phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, J.-C.; Gavard, L.; Boussidan, C.; Lepoittevin, C.; Denis, S.; Servant, C.

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this paper is to summarize modelling of on-heating and on-cooling phase transformations occurring in Low Activation Martensitic (LAM) steels. Calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium phase fractions and kinetic aspects of phase transformations have been performed by using different approaches from experimental data (CCT and TTT diagrams obtained by dilatometry). All the calculated data have been compared to an important and systematic set of experimental data obtained on different LAM steels of the 7.5-11% CrWVT a type.

  7. Recent progress in research on China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels (RAFMs) are considered as the primary candidate structural material for DEMO and the first fusion plant. China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel, one version of RAFMs, is being developed in ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) under wide collaboration with many institutes and universities. According to the past results, CLAM has good properties, such as tensile and impact properties before irradiation. Recently, the R and D activities are mainly covering the aspects such as impurities content control of smelting, optimization of main compositions (e.g. Ta), fatigue and creep properties of CLAM, bonding techniques of CLAM/CLAM, coating techniques of Al 2 O 3 on CLAM, corrosion behaviour in flowing LiPb, irradiation behaviour by high energy electrons, H/He beam and by neutrons from fission reactors etc.. This paper summarized the recent progress on CLAM. The further research and development, and the prospects on its application were also stated. (authors)

  8. CETA, a step towards a low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderko, K.; Ehrlich, K.; Schaefer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1993-06-01

    The conventional martensitic 9-12% CrMoV Nb steel, type MANET/W.nr. 1.4914, an European reference, shows promising properties for an application as ''First Wall'' - and as structural material for fusion devices. One of few drawbacks is the high neutron-induced, longterm activation through elements like Mo, Ni and Nb. The substitution of these important alloying elements by W and Ta leads to a new group of 8-10% Cr W V Ta alloys, to which the steel CETA belongs. Activation calculations indicate that a reduction of longterm activation can be achieved through this compositional change. Investigations of CETA revealed that this new steel is fully martensitic without any δ-ferrite formation, and grain-refinement can fully be achieved by Ta alloying. The alloy exhibits good hardenability and tempering behaviour. The transformation behaviour is very similar to that of the CrMoVNb steels. The tensile-, creep- and creep rupture-properties satisfy the requirements, the impact properties correspond to the values measured for the MANET material. Further improvement of all properties seems to be possible through optimization of the chemical composition of this new steel. (orig.) [de

  9. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ping [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  10. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  11. Advanced Athermal Telescopes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed innovative athermal telescope design uses advanced lightweight and high-stiffness material of Beryllium-Aluminum (Be-38Al). Peregrine's expertise with...

  12. Athermal kinetics in low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Jorge A Vega; Valencia Morales, Eduardo; Villar Cociña, Ernesto; Hernández Ruiz, Jesús; Donis, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Athermic analyses for the kinetic study of the reactions in the solid state are preferred because they consume much less experimental work time than the isothermal tests, and lead to more accurate calculations of the energies of activation of reactions that have occurred. In the present work are required conditions where you can apply the equation of speed of an athermal reaction in a low alloy in solid steel. From records of steel (AISI 1050) dilatometric triples were calculated kinetics (E, Ko, n) that characterize the reactions that occurred during the tempering of samples using different methods of iso conversion, one of which is a new modification of the method of Friedman. Also, has shown that during the formation of carbide Epsilon in the first stage of the tempering has occurred a saturation of sites, which validates the use of some methods. Finally, the orders of the reactions occurred during tempering of steel studied treatment are calculated.

  13. Athermal photofluidization of glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G. J.; Maclennan, J. E.; Yi, Y.; Glaser, M. A.; Farrow, M.; Korblova, E.; Walba, D. M.; Furtak, T. E.; Clark, N. A.

    2013-02-01

    Azobenzene and its derivatives are among the most important organic photonic materials, with their photo-induced trans-cis isomerization leading to applications ranging from holographic data storage and photoalignment to photoactuation and nanorobotics. A key element and enduring mystery in the photophysics of azobenzenes, central to all such applications, is athermal photofluidization: illumination that produces only a sub-Kelvin increase in average temperature can reduce, by many orders of magnitude, the viscosity of an organic glassy host at temperatures more than 100 K below its thermal glass transition. Here we analyse the relaxation dynamics of a dense monolayer glass of azobenzene-based molecules to obtain a measurement of the transient local effective temperature at which a photo-isomerizing molecule attacks its orientationally confining barriers. This high temperature (Tloc~800 K) leads directly to photofluidization, as each absorbed photon generates an event in which a local glass transition temperature is exceeded, enabling collective confining barriers to be attacked with near 100% quantum efficiency.

  14. Grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-Ni invar alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, Yoshikazu [Metal Powder Manufacturing and Sales Division, Sanyo Special Steel Co., Ltd, 3007 Nakashima, Shikama-ku, Himeji 672-8677 (Japan); Terai, Tomoyuki; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-30at.%Ni powder and ribbon specimens. The powder specimen with a particle size of 5 um does not show an athermal martensitic transformation but does show an isothermal martensitic transformation after an incubation time of about 10{sup 4} s at 205 K. On the other hand, the powder specimen with a particle size of 20 um shows an athermal martensitic transformation at 150 K. The value of M{sub s} is much lower than that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. However, the M{sub s} temperature of a ribbon specimen with an average grain size of 15 um is found to be almost identical to that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. Considering these results, the athermal martensitic transformation is suppressed by the decrease in particle size if grains do not have grain boundaries.

  15. Grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-Ni invar alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yoshikazu; Terai, Tomoyuki; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-30at.%Ni powder and ribbon specimens. The powder specimen with a particle size of 5 um does not show an athermal martensitic transformation but does show an isothermal martensitic transformation after an incubation time of about 104 s at 205 K. On the other hand, the powder specimen with a particle size of 20 um shows an athermal martensitic transformation at 150 K. The value of Ms is much lower than that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. However, the Ms temperature of a ribbon specimen with an average grain size of 15 um is found to be almost identical to that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. Considering these results, the athermal martensitic transformation is suppressed by the decrease in particle size if grains do not have grain boundaries.

  16. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  17. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  18. Strain-rate behavior in tension of the tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Spaetig, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The tensile properties of the high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on cylindrical specimens. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electro-mechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a JRC-split Hopkinson tensile bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. This tempered martensitic stainless steel showed significant strain-rate sensitivity. The constitutive behavior was investigated within a framework of dislocations dynamics model using Kock's approach. The parameters of the model were determined and then used to predict the deformation range of the tensile deformation stability. A very good agreement between the experimental results and predictions of the model was found.

  19. Complexion-mediated martensitic phase transformation in Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Tasan, C. C.; Lai, M. J.; Dippel, A.-C.; Raabe, D.

    2017-02-01

    The most efficient way to tune microstructures and mechanical properties of metallic alloys lies in designing and using athermal phase transformations. Examples are shape memory alloys and high strength steels, which together stand for 1,500 million tons annual production. In these materials, martensite formation and mechanical twinning are tuned via composition adjustment for realizing complex microstructures and beneficial mechanical properties. Here we report a new phase transformation that has the potential to widen the application window of Ti alloys, the most important structural material in aerospace design, by nanostructuring them via complexion-mediated transformation. This is a reversible martensitic transformation mechanism that leads to a final nanolaminate structure of α'' (orthorhombic) martensite bounded with planar complexions of athermal ω (a-ω, hexagonal). Both phases are crystallographically related to the parent β (BCC) matrix. As expected from a planar complexion, the a-ω is stable only at the hetero-interface.

  20. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  1. Athermal alterations in the structure in the canalicular membrane and ATPase activity induced by thermal levels of microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, A.M.; Neubauer, C.F.; Timm, R.; Neirenberg, J.; Lange, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were exposed 30 min/day for 4 days to thermogenic levels (rectal temperature increase of 2.2 degrees C) of microwave radiation [2.45 GHz, 80 mW/cm 2 , continuous-wave mode (CW)] or to a radiant heat source resulting in an equivalent increase in body temperature of 2.2 degrees C. On the fifth day the animals were sacrificed and their livers removed. The canalicular membranes were isolated and evaluated for adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity, total fatty acid composition and membrane fluidity characteristics. Mg ++ -ATPase activity (V max ) decreased by 48.5% in the group exposed to microwave radiation, with no significant change in the group exposed to radiant heat. The decrease in Mg ++ -ATPase was partially compensated by a concomitant increase in Na + /K + -ATPase activity (170% increase in V max over control) in animals exposed to microwave radiation, while no change occurred in the group exposed to radiant heat. This alteration in ATPase activity in the group exposed to microwave radiation is associated with a large decrease in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. Conversely, the group exposed to radiant heat had an increase in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. The most dramatic changes were found in the levels of arachidonic acid. Finally, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label technique used to measure the fluidity of the canalicular membranes of the animals in the three groups (sham, microwave radiation and radiant heat) indicated that the results were different in the three groups, reflecting the changes found in their fatty acid composition. The physiological response to open-quotes equivalentclose quotes thermal loads in rats is expressed differently for different types of energy sources. Possible mechanisms producing these divergent thermogenic responses are discussed. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Microstructural evolution of reduced-activation martensitic steel under single and sequential ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Fengfeng; Guo, Liping; Jin, Shuoxue; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Yang, Feng; Xiong, Xuesong; Suo, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of super-clean reduced-activation martensitic steels irradiated with single-beam (Fe + ) and sequential-beam (Fe + plus He + ) at 350 °C and 550 °C was studied. Sequential-beam irradiation induced smaller size and larger number density of precipitates compared to single-beam irradiation at 350 °C. The largest size of cavities was observed after sequential-beam irradiation at 550 °C. The segregation of Cr and W and depletion of Fe in carbides were observed, and the maximum depletion of Fe and enrichment of Cr occurred under irradiation at 350 °C

  3. Report of IEA workshop on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    IEA Workshop on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels under implementing agreement for program of research and development on fusion materials was held at Tokyo Yayoi Kaikan and JAERI headquarter on November 2-3, 2000. The objective of this workshop was a review of the fusion material development programs, the progress of the collaboration and the irradiation effects studies on RAF/M steels in the collaborating parties (Europe, Russia the United States, and Japan). Moreover, the development of plans for future collaboration was discussed. The present report contains viewgraphs presented at the workshop. (author)

  4. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hirose, T.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  5. High Temperature Elastic Properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) Steel Using Impulse Excitation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Raju, Subramanian; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja

    2018-03-01

    The polycrystalline elastic constants of an indigenous variant of 9Cr-1W-based reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel have been determined as a function of temperature from 298 K to 1323 K (25 °C to 1000 °C), using impulse excitation technique (IET). The three elastic constants namely, Young's modulus E, shear modulus G, and bulk modulus B, exhibited significant softening with increasing temperature, in a pronounced non-linear fashion. In addition, clearly marked discontinuities in their temperature variations are noticed in the region, where ferrite + carbides → austenite phase transformation occurred upon heating. Further, the incidence of austenite → martensite transformation upon cooling has also been marked by a step-like jump in both elastic E and shear moduli G. The martensite start M s and M f finish temperatures estimated from this study are, M s = 652 K (379 °C) and M f =580 K (307 °C). Similarly, the measured ferrite + carbide → austenite transformation onset ( Ac 1) and completion ( Ac 3) temperatures are found to be 1126 K and 1143 K (853 °C and 870 °C), respectively. The Poisson ratio μ exhibited distinct discontinuities at phase transformation temperatures; but however, is found to vary in the range 0.27 to 0.29. The room temperature estimates of E, G, and μ for normalized and tempered microstructure are found to be 219 GPa, 86.65 GPa, and 0.27, respectively. For the metastable austenite phase, the corresponding values are: 197 GPa, 76.5 GPa, and 0.29, respectively. The measured elastic properties as well as their temperature dependencies are found to be in good accord with reported estimates for other 9Cr-based ferritic-martensitic steel grades. Estimates of θ D el , the elastic Debye temperature and γ G, the thermal Grüneisen parameter obtained from measured bulk elastic properties are found to be θ D el = 465 K (192 °C) and γ G = 1.57.

  6. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contentsof tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys. After double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12degree centigree Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact tougness behavior. Both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strenght values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact tougness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron

  7. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys, after double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12%Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior, both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (Author) 21 refs

  8. OPTIFER, a further step in development of low activation martensitic steels. Results of characterization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirra, M.; Ehrlich, K.; Heger, S.; Hernandez, M.T.; Lapena, J.

    1995-11-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe 9.5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb, and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys. After double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between requests in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behaviour during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12% Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior. Both an upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 C. With an only moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge(Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (orig.) [de

  9. Compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels with liquid breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T.; Kondo, M.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.

    2008-10-01

    The compatibility of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (RAFM) with liquid Li and molten-salt Flibe have been characterized and accessed. Static compatibility tests were carried out in which the specimens were immersed into liquid Li or Flibe in isothermal autoclaves. Also carried out were compatibility tests in flowing liquid Li by thermal convection loops. In the case of liquid Li, the corrosion rate increased with temperature significantly. The corrosion was almost one order larger for the loop tests than for the static tests. Chemical analysis showed that the corrosion was enhanced when the level of N in Li is increased. Transformation from martensitic to ferritic phase and the resulting softening were observed in near-surface area of Li-exposed specimens, which were shown to be induced by decarburization. In the case of Flibe, the corrosion loss was much larger in a Ni crucible than in a RAFM crucible. Both fluorides and oxides were observed on the surfaces. Thus, the key corrosion process of Flibe is the competing process of fluoridation and oxidation. Possible mechanism of the enhanced corrosion in Ni crucible is electrochemical circuit effect. It was suggested that the corrosion loss rate of RAFM by liquid Li and Flibe can be reduced by reducing the level of impurity N in Li and avoiding the use of dissimilar materials in Flibe, respectively. (author)

  10. Effect of Microstructures and Tempering Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of 9Cr-2W Reduced-Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Kang, Nam Hyun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of microstructures (martensite, ferrite, or mixed ferrite and martensite) on the mechanical properties. Of particular interest was the Charpy impact results for 9Cr-2W reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels. Under normalized conditions, steel with martensitic microstructure showed superior tensile strength and Charpy impact results. This may result from auto-tempering during the transformation of martensite. On the other hand, both ferrite, and ferrite mixed with martensite, showed unusually poor Charpy impact results. This is because the ferrite phases, and coarse M 2 3C 6 carbides at the ferrite-grain boundaries acted as cleavage crack propagation paths, and as preferential initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. After the tempering heat treatment, although tensile strength decreased, the energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test drastically increased for martensite, and ferrite mixed with martensite. This was due to the tempered martensite. On the other hand, there were no distinctive differences in tensile and Charpy impact properties of steel with ferrite microstructure, when comparing normalized and tempered conditions.

  11. Effect of Microstructures and Tempering Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of 9Cr-2W Reduced-Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min-Gu; Kang, Nam Hyun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of microstructures (martensite, ferrite, or mixed ferrite and martensite) on the mechanical properties. Of particular interest was the Charpy impact results for 9Cr-2W reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels. Under normalized conditions, steel with martensitic microstructure showed superior tensile strength and Charpy impact results. This may result from auto-tempering during the transformation of martensite. On the other hand, both ferrite, and ferrite mixed with martensite, showed unusually poor Charpy impact results. This is because the ferrite phases, and coarse M{sub 2}3C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite-grain boundaries acted as cleavage crack propagation paths, and as preferential initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. After the tempering heat treatment, although tensile strength decreased, the energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test drastically increased for martensite, and ferrite mixed with martensite. This was due to the tempered martensite. On the other hand, there were no distinctive differences in tensile and Charpy impact properties of steel with ferrite microstructure, when comparing normalized and tempered conditions.

  12. Thermally activated formation of martensite in Fe-C alloys and Fe-17%Cr-C stainless steels during heating from boiling nitrogen temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The thermally activated austenite-to-martensite transformation was investigated by magnetometry in three Fe-C alloys and in two 17%Cr stainless steels. After quenching to room temperature, samples were immersed in boiling nitrogen and martensite formation was followed during subsequent (re)heating...... to room temperature. Different tests were performed applying heating rates from 0.5 K/min to 10 K/min. An additional test consisted in fast (re)heating the samples by immersion in water. Thermally activated martensite formation was demonstrated for all investigated materials by a heating rate......-dependent transformation curve. Moreover, magnetometry showed that the heating rate had an influence on the fraction of martensite formed during sub-zero Celsius treatment. The activation energy for thermally activated martensite formation was quantified in the range 11‒21 kJ/mol by a Kissinger-like method....

  13. Low-temperature mechanical and magnetic properties of the reduced activation martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui-Li; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Rui; Wang, Xian-Ping; Fang, Qian-Feng; Liu, Chang-Song; Suo, Jin-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical and magnetic properties as well as their relationship in the reduced activation martensitic (RAM) steel were investigated in the temperature range from -90°C to 20°C. Charpy impact tests show that the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the RAM steel is about -60°C. Low-temperature tensile tests show that the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and total elongation values increase as temperature decreases, indicating that the strength and plasticity below the DBTT are higher than those above the DBTT. The coercive field ( H C) in the scale of logarithm decreases linearly with the increasing temperature and the absolute value of the slope of ln H C versus temperature above the DBTT is obviously larger than that below the DBTT, also confirmed in the T91 steel. The results indicate that the non-destructive magnetic measurement is a promising candidate method for the DBTT detection of ferromagnetic steels.

  14. Damage behavior in helium-irradiated reduced-activation martensitic steels at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6, ON (Canada); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation at elevated temperatures in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Steels were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa between 300 K and 723 K. At irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} ⩽ 573 K, small defects with both Burger vectors b = 1/2〈1 1 1〉 and b = 〈1 0 0〉 were observed, while at T{sub irr} ⩾ 623 K, the microstructure was dominated by large convoluted interstitial dislocation loops with b = 〈1 0 0〉. Only small cavities were found in the steels irradiated at 723 K.

  15. Microstructural evolution of reduced-activation martensitic steel under single and sequential ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jin, Shuoxue; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, Feng; Xiong, Xuesong; Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Microstructural evolution of super-clean reduced-activation martensitic steels irradiated with single-beam (Fe{sup +}) and sequential-beam (Fe{sup +} plus He{sup +}) at 350 °C and 550 °C was studied. Sequential-beam irradiation induced smaller size and larger number density of precipitates compared to single-beam irradiation at 350 °C. The largest size of cavities was observed after sequential-beam irradiation at 550 °C. The segregation of Cr and W and depletion of Fe in carbides were observed, and the maximum depletion of Fe and enrichment of Cr occurred under irradiation at 350 °C.

  16. Effect of thermal aging on microstructure and mechanical properties of China low-activation martensitic steel at 550 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Shao Jun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Baoren; Huang, Qun Ying [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2016-04-15

    The thermal aging effects on mechanical properties and microstructures in China low-activation martensitic steel have been tested by aging at 550 degrees C for 2,000 hours, 4,000 hours, and 10,000 hours. The microstructure was analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the grain size and martensitic lath increased by about 4 μm and 0.3 μm, respectively, after thermal exposure at 550 degrees C for 10,000 hours. MX type particles such as TaC precipitated on the matrix and Laves-phase was found on the martensitic lath boundary and grain boundary on aged specimens. The mechanical properties were investigated with tensile and Charpy impact tests. Tensile properties were not seriously affected by aging. Neither yield strength nor ultimate tensile strength changed significantly. However, the ductile-brittle transition temperature of China low-activation martensitic steel increased by 46 degrees C after aging for 10,000 hours due to precipitation and grain coarsening.

  17. The microstructural stability and mechanical properties of two low activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Marmy, P.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J.; Briguet, C.; Rezai-Aria, F.; Gavillet, D.

    1996-01-01

    A desirable feature of future magnetically confined fusion reactors is the prospect of producing low level radioactive waste. In order to minimize the volume of radioactive material, in particular from the first wall and blanket structures, reduced long term activation alloys are being developed. Here, a low activation composition of a martensitic 9% Cr steel has been studied, based on the DIN (Deutsches Inst. fuer Normung) 1.4914 composition (MANET) but replacing Ni, Mo and Nb by the low activation elements W, V and Ta. Two casts were produced from high purity components, in which the effects of controlled additions of Mn (0.58 and 0.055 wt. %) and N (7 and 290 wt. ppm) were studied, so that the final compositions resulted in one cast with high Mn and low N (steel A) and the other with the opposite conditions (steel B). The two steels were evaluated in terms of structural stability and mechanical properties under tensile, fatigue and fracture toughness tests. It has been found that both alloys have a DBTT below room temperature, which in the case of the steel A is 70 K below that of MANET. Although the tensile strength is somewhat below that of the parent steel, both steels have longer fatigue life

  18. Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Tamura, M.; van der Schaaf, B.; Klueh, R. L.; Alamo, A.; Petersen, C.; Schirra, M.; Spaetig, P.; Odette, G. R.; Tavassoli, A. A.; Shiba, K.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A.

    2002-12-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies of the reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) before and after irradiation are reported. The design concept used for the development of this alloy is also introduced. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of using reduced-activation martensitic steels for fusion reactor structural materials, with F82H as one of the reference alloys. All the specimens used in these tests were prepared from plates obtained from 5-ton heats of F82H supplied to all participating laboratories by JAERI. Many of the results have been entered into relational databases with emphasis on traceability of records on how the specimens were prepared from plates and ingots.

  19. Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Tamura, M.; Schaaf, B. van der; Klueh, R.L.; Alamo, A.; Petersen, C.; Schirra, M.; Spaetig, P.; Odette, G.R.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Shiba, K.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies of the reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) before and after irradiation are reported. The design concept used for the development of this alloy is also introduced. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of using reduced-activation martensitic steels for fusion reactor structural materials, with F82H as one of the reference alloys. All the specimens used in these tests were prepared from plates obtained from 5-ton heats of F82H supplied to all participating laboratories by JAERI. Many of the results have been entered into relational databases with emphasis on traceability of records on how the specimens were prepared from plates and ingots

  20. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E.; Perujo, A.; Benamati, G.

    1997-06-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined.

  1. Fatigue life assessment based on crack growth behavior in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Shuhei; Sato, Yuki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Crack growth behavior under low cycle fatigue in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H IEA-heat (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), was investigated to improve the fatigue life assessment method of fusion reactor structural material. Low cycle fatigue test was carried out at room temperature in air at a total strain range of 0.4-1.5% using an hourglass-type miniature fatigue specimen. The relationship between the surface crack length and life fraction was described using one equation independent of the total strain range. Therefore, the fatigue life and residual life could be estimated using the surface crack length. Moreover, the microcrack initiation life could be estimated using the total strain range if there was a one-to-one correspondence between the total strain range and number of cycles to failure. The crack growth rate could be estimated using the total strain range and surface crack length by introducing the concept of the normalized crack growth rate. (author)

  2. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  3. Physical metallurgy and mechanical behaviour of FeCrWTaV low activation martensitic steels: Effects of chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, A.; Brachet, J. C.; Castaing, A.; Lepoittevin, C.; Barcelo, F.

    1998-10-01

    This paper essentially deals with chemical composition effects on metallurgical and mechanical behaviour of Fe-7.5/11CrWVTa low activation martensitic steels. Materials investigated are experimental alloys as well as large-scale heats having different contents of Cr (7.5-11%), Ta (0-0.1%), W (0.8-3%) and interstitial elements, like carbon (0.09-0.17%) and nitrogen (0.004-0.045%). For this purpose, phase transformation during heating and cooling have been investigated in anisothermal and isothermal conditions to establish the corresponding Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) and Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) diagrams. Austenitisation (normalisation) and tempering treatments were performed in a wide range of temperatures. Tensile and impact properties as a function of composition and metallurgical conditions have been determined and compared to 9Cr-1Mo conventional martensitic steels.

  4. Stress induced martensite transformation in Co–28Cr–6Mo alloy during room temperature deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S., E-mail: song_cai@fwmetals.com [Fort Wayne Metals Research Products Corporation, 9609 Ardmore Avenue, Fort Wayne, IN 46809 (United States); Daymond, M.R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Nicol Hall, 60 Union Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Ren, Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, 433/D008, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The phase transformation and texture change of two Co–28Cr–6Mo alloys during room temperature deformation were studied by using the in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. It is found that a slight difference in chemical compositions can significantly change the phase constitutions and the mechanical properties. For the material with less Ni, C and N (lower α-phase stability), increasing the grain size promotes the athermal martensite transformation during cooling. The kinetics of the Stress Induced Martensite (SIM) phase transformation may be more affected by the athermal martensite instead of the grain size of the α-phase. After deformation, similar textures are produced in samples regardless the differences in the initial structures such as the phase constitution and the grain size; while a relatively strong {111} texture and a weak {100} texture are produced in the α-phase, a {101"¯1} fiber texture is gradually developed in the ε-phase during uniaxial tension.

  5. Martensite Embryology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Andrew C. E.; Olson, Gregory B.

    2000-03-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of martensite is modeled by examining the strain field of a dislocation array in a nonlinear, nonlocal continuum elastic matrix. The dislocations are modeled by including effects from atomic length scales, which control the dislocation Burger's vector, into a mesoscopic continuum model. The dislocation array models the heterogeneous nucleation source of the Olson/Cohen defect dissociation model, and depending on the potency can give rise to embryos of different character. High potency dislocations give rise to fully developed, classical pre-existing embryos, whereas low-potency dislocations result in the formation of highly nonclassical strain embryos. Heterogeneous nucleation theory is related to nucleation kinetics through the critical driving force for nucleation at a defect of a given potency. Recent stereological and calorimetric kinetic studies in thermoelastic TiNi alloys confirm that these materials exhibit the same form of defect potency distribution and resulting sample-size dependent Martensite start temperature, M_s, as nonthermoelastic FeNi systems. These results together point towards a broad theory of heterogeneous nucleation for both thermoelastic and nonthermoelastic martensites.

  6. Design of a compact athermalized infrared seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing-jia; Wang, Jian; Sun, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    In order to meet the application requirement of a certain long wavelength infrared (LWIR) seeker, a small volume, light weight and passively athermalized infrared (IR) objective is designed in this paper. The two-lens telephoto structure is adopted by merely using aluminum alloy as the housing material. By balancing the thermo-optical coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of materials, an athermalized IR seeker with effective focal length of 90 mm and F number of 1.2 is achieved. The whole optical length is 75 mm, and the weight is only 234 g. The objective can remain fine imaging quality under temperature range from -40 °C to 60 °C, which is beneficial to the lightweight design of IR seekers.

  7. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Min-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min-Gu [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  8. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Gu; Han, Heung Nam

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  9. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  10. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wen, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique.

  11. Mechanical properties and fracture features of low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 at subzero temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Kravchenko, D. A.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    The short-term strength and plastic properties of ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181, as well as the features of its plastic deformation and fracture in the temperature range from 20 to -196°C are investigated by an active tensile deformation method. A significant increase in the temperature dependence of the steel yield strength in the interval of the ductile-to-brittle transition is observed. No qualitative changes in the fracture pattern of the samples are revealed in the region of this interval. The fractograms taken after deformation at several temperatures differ only in the relative fractions of the ductile and brittle components.

  12. Metallurgical Characterization of Reduced Activation Martensitic Steel F-82H Modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A.M.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Schirra, M.

    1999-12-01

    During 1995-1998 within of research and development programs on reduced ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion, metallurgical characterization of 8Cr-2WVTa steel, denominated F-28H modified, have been carried out. The work has focused on studying the microstructural and mechanical (tensile, creep, low cycle fatigue and charpy) characteristics of as-received state and aged material in the temperature range 300 degree centigrade to 600 degree centigrade for periods up to 5000 h. (Author) 45 refs

  13. Effects of irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.W.; Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Kohyama, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In materials life decision for a commercial blanket, thermal fatigue property of materials is a particularly important. The loading of structural materials in fusion reactor is, besides the plasma surface interactions, a combined effect of high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation. Depending on the pulse lengths, the operating conditions, and the thermal conductivity, these oscillating temperature gradients will cause elastic and elastic-plastic cyclic deformation giving rise to (creep-) fatigue in structural first wall and blanket components. Especially, investigation of the fatigue property in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) steel and establishment of the evaluation technology are demanded in particular immediately for design/manufacturing of ITER-TBM. And also, fatigue testing after irradiation will be carried out in hot cells with remote control system. Considering limited ability of specimen manipulation in the cells, the specimen and the test method need to be simple for operation. The existing data bases of RAF/M steel provide baseline data set including post-irradiation fatigue data. However, to perform the accurate fatigue lifetime assessment for ITER-TBM and beyond utilizing the existing data base, the mechanical understanding of fatigue fracture is mandatory. It has been previously reported by co-authors that dislocation cell structure was developed on low cycle fatigued RAF/M steel, and led the fatigue crack to develop along prior austenitic grain boundary. In this work, the effects of nuclear irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for RAF/M steels and its fracture mechanisms were examined based on the flow stress analysis and detailed microstructure analysis. Fracture surfaces and crack initiation site were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to clarify the microstructural features of fatigue behavior. It is also important to

  14. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  15. Microstructure anisotropy and its effect on mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel fabricated by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhai, Yutao; Liu, Shaojun; Mao, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a promising way for the fabrication of complex reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel components. The microstructure of the SLM built China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel plates was observed and analyzed. The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile testing of the specimens in different orientations were performed at room temperature. The results showed that the difference in the mechanical properties was related to the anisotropy in microstructure. The planer unmelted porosity in the interface of the adjacent layers induced opening/tensile mode when the tensile samples parallel to the build direction were tested whereas the samples vertical to the build direction fractured in the shear mode with the grains being sheared in a slant angle. Moreover, the impact absorbed energy (IAE) of all impact specimens was significantly lower than that of the wrought CLAM steel, and the IAE of the samples vertical to the build direction was higher than that of the samples parallel to the build direction. The impact fracture surfaces revealed that the load parallel to the build layers caused laminated tearing among the layers, and the load vertical to the layers induced intergranular fracture across the layers.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  17. Effect of W and N on mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic EUROFER-based steel grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puype, A.; Malerba, L.; De Wispelaere, N.; Petrov, R.; Sietsma, J.

    2018-04-01

    The C, N, and W content in EUROFER97, a 9CrWVTa reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, was varied to obtain an experimental assessment of the main effects of the compositional variation on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of six different experimental grades. Light optical microscopy (LOM) and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed in almost all cases a fine tempered lath martensite structure. Analyses of transmission electron micrographs, together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data, shows the precipitation state and spatial distribution of MxCy (M = Cr, W and Fe) and MX (M = V and/or Ta, X = C or N) carbonitrides within the matrix. The mechanical characterization of the six different steel grades was carried out by means of A50 tensile testing and Charpy tests on standard specimens (55 × 10 × 10 mm3). Lowering the carbon content and keeping the nitrogen content higher than 0.02 wt%, leads to a reduction of the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature (DBTT) in comparison with EUROFER97-2. The addition of tungsten further reduces the DBTT to - 94 °C, while maintaining good tensile strength and elongation.

  18. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  19. High heat loading properties of vacuum plasma spray tungsten coatings on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, K.; Hotta, T.; Araki, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Ezato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.; Nagasaka, T.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.

    2013-07-01

    High density W coatings on reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (RAF/M) have been produced by Vacuum Plasma Spraying technique (VPS) and heat flux experiments on them have been carried out to evaluate their possibility as a plasma-facing armor in a fusion device. In addition, quantitative analyses of temperature profile and thermal stress have been carried out using the finite element analysis (FEA) to evaluate its thermal properties. No cracks or exfoliation has been formed by steady state and cyclic heat loading experiments under heat loading at 700 °C of surface temperature. In addition, stress distribution and maximum stress between interface of VPS-W and RAF/M have been obtained by FEA. On the other hand, exfoliation has occurred at interlayer of VPS-W coatings near the interface between VPS-W and RAF/M at 1300 °C of surface temperature by cyclic heat loading.

  20. Echoes of the Glass Transition in Athermal Soft Spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Peter K; Corwin, Eric I

    2017-09-15

    Recent theoretical advances have led to the creation of a unified phase diagram for the thermal glass and athermal jamming transitions. This diagram makes clear that, while related, the mode-coupling-or dynamic-glass transition is distinct from the jamming transition, occurring at a finite temperature and significantly lower density than the jamming transition. Nonetheless, we demonstrate a prejamming transition in athermal frictionless spheres which occurs at the same density as the mode-coupling transition and is marked by percolating clusters of locally rigid particles. At this density in both the thermal and athermal systems, individual motions of an extensive number of particles become constrained, such that only collective motion is possible. This transition, which is well below jamming, exactly matches the definition of collective behavior at the dynamical transition of glasses. Thus, we reveal that the genesis of rigidity in both thermal and athermal systems is governed by the same underlying topological transition in their shared configuration space.

  1. Athermal operation of multi-section slotted tunable lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M J; O'Reilly Meehan, R; Enright, R; Bello, F; McCloskey, D; Barabadi, B; Wang, E N; Donegan, J F

    2017-06-26

    Two distinct athermal bias current procedures based on thermal tuning are demonstrated for a low-cost, monotlithic, three section slotted single mode laser, achieving mode-hop free wavelength stability of ± 0.04 nm / 5 GHz over a temperature range of 8-47 °C. This is the first time that athermal performance has been demonstrated for a three-section slotted laser with simple fabrication, and is well within the 50 GHz grid spacing specified for DWDM systems. This performance is similar to experiments on more complex DS-DBR lasers, indicating that strong athermal performance can be achieved using our lower-cost three section devices. An analytical model and thermoreflectance measurements provide further insight into the operation of multi-section lasers and lay the foundation for an accurate predictive tool for optimising such devices for athermal operation.

  2. Passive athermalization of doublets in 8-13 micron waveband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    Passive athermalization of lenses has become a key-technology for automotive and other outdoor applications using modern uncooled 25, 17 and 12 micron pixel pitch bolometer arrays. Typical pixel counts for thermal imaging are 384x288 (qVGA), 640x480 (VGA), and 1024x768 (XGA). Two lens arrangements (called Doublets) represent a cost effective way to satisfy resolution requirements of these detectors with F-numbers 1.4 or faster. Thermal drift of index of refraction and the geometrical changes (in lenses and housing) versus temperature defocus the initial image plane from the detector plane. The passive athermalization restricts this drop of spatial resolution in a wide temperature range (typically -40°C…+80°C) to an acceptable value without any additional external refocus. In particular, lenses with long focal lengths and high apertures claim athermalization. A careful choice of lens and housing materials and a sophistical dimensioning lead to three different principles of passivation: The Passive Mechanical Athermalization (PMA) shifts the complete lens cell, the Passive Optical and Mechanical Athermalization (POMA) shifts only one lens inside the housing, the Passive Optical Athermalization (POA) works without any mechanism. All three principles will be demonstrated for a typical narrow-field lens (HFOV about 12°) with high aperture (aperture based F-number 1.3) for the actual uncooled reference detector (17micron VGA). Six design examples using different combinations of lens materials show the impact on spatial lens resolution, on overall length, and on weight. First order relations are discussed. They give some hints for optimization solutions. Pros and cons of different passive athermalization principles are evaluated in regards of housing design, availability of materials and costing. Examples with a convergent GASIR®1-lens in front distinguish by best resolution, short overall length, and lowest weight.

  3. Elastic regimes of subisostatic athermal fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licup, A. J.; Sharma, A.; MacKintosh, F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Athermal models of disordered fibrous networks are highly useful for studying the mechanics of elastic networks composed of stiff biopolymers. The underlying network architecture is a key aspect that can affect the elastic properties of these systems, which include rich linear and nonlinear elasticity. Existing computational approaches have focused on both lattice-based and off-lattice networks obtained from the random placement of rods. It is not obvious, a priori, whether the two architectures have fundamentally similar or different mechanics. If they are different, it is not clear which of these represents a better model for biological networks. Here, we show that both approaches are essentially equivalent for the same network connectivity, provided the networks are subisostatic with respect to central force interactions. Moreover, for a given subisostatic connectivity, we even find that lattice-based networks in both two and three dimensions exhibit nearly identical nonlinear elastic response. We provide a description of the linear mechanics for both architectures in terms of a scaling function. We also show that the nonlinear regime is dominated by fiber bending and that stiffening originates from the stabilization of subisostatic networks by stress. We propose a generalized relation for this regime in terms of the self-generated normal stresses that develop under deformation. Different network architectures have different susceptibilities to the normal stress but essentially exhibit the same nonlinear mechanics. Such a stiffening mechanism has been shown to successfully capture the nonlinear mechanics of collagen networks.

  4. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel for Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel were explored. The samples for HAZs were prepared using a Gleeble simulator at different heat inputs. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and carbides through quenching and tempering treatment, whereas the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite, and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size, lath width of martensite, and δ-ferrite fraction in the HAZs increased with increase in the heat input. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and Charpy V-notch impact test. The Vickers hardness in the HAZs was higher than that in the base steel but did not change noticeably with increase in the heat input. The HAZs showed poor impact property due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared to the base steel. In addition, the impact property of the HAZs deteriorated more with the increase in the heat input. Post weld heat treatment contributed to improve the impact property of the HAZs through the formation of tempered martensite, but the impact property of the HAZs remained lower than that of base steel.

  5. Effect of processing on microstructural features and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic EUROFER steel grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puype, A.; Malerba, L.; De Wispelaere, N.; Petrov, R.; Sietsma, J.

    2017-10-01

    The microstructure of a 9Cr-1W-0.22V-0.09Ta-0.11C reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated after thermo-mechanical rolling with subsequent annealing for 30 min at temperatures of 880 °C, 920 °C, 980 °C and 1050 °C, followed by water quenching. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed to determine the microstructural features after the different thermal treatments. Additionally, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the materials were studied after tempering at 750 °C for 2 h. This study aims to understand microstructural processes that occur in the material during thermo-mechanical treatment and to assess the effect of the microstructure on its strength and toughness, with a view on improving its mechanical performance. Microstructural analysis together with the data from mechanical tests identified the beneficial effect of grain refinement obtained with adequate processing on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and on the delay of strength degradation at elevated temperatures.

  6. Mössbauer studies on athermal martensite formation in an Fe–Ni ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Thin foils of Fe–30% Ni–0⋅2% Mn alloy specimens were prepared by mechanical and chemical thinning proce- dures and used in Mössbauer spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic experiments. Foil samples for. Mössbauer spectroscopy and SEM were thinned by using double-jet polishing technique with a ...

  7. Effects of Ti element on the microstructural stability of 9Cr–WVTiN reduced activation martensitic steel under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jin, Shuoxue; Li, Tiecheng; Chen, Jihong [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6, ON (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Microstructure of 9Cr–WVTiN reduced-activation martensitic steels with two different Ti concentrations irradiated with Fe{sup +}, He{sup +} and H{sup +} at 300 °C was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Small dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated steels. The mean size and number density of dislocation loops decreased with the increase of Ti concentration. The segregation of Cr and Fe in carbides was observed in both irradiated steels, and the enrichment of Cr and depletion of Fe were more severe in the low Ti-concentration 9Cr–WVTiN steel.

  8. On the Prediction of α-Martensite Temperatures in Medium Manganese Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Baker, Daniel S.; Van Aken, David C.

    2017-05-01

    A new composition-based method for calculating the α-martensite start temperature in medium manganese steel is presented and uses a regular solution model to accurately calculate the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation, Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } . In addition, a compositional relationship for the strain energy contribution during martensitic transformation was developed using measured Young's moduli ( E) reported in literature and measured values for steels produced during this investigation. An empirical relationship was developed to calculate Young's modulus using alloy composition and was used where dilatometry literature did not report Young's moduli. A comparison of the Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } normalized by dividing by the product of Young's modulus, unconstrained lattice misfit squared ( δ 2), and molar volume ( Ω) with respect to the measured α-martensite start temperatures, M_{{S}}^{α } , produced a single linear relationship for 42 alloys exhibiting either lath or plate martensite. A temperature-dependent strain energy term was then formulated as Δ G_{{str}}^{γ \\to α } ( {{{J}}/{{mol}}} ) = EΩ δ2 (14.8 - 0.013T) , which opposed the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation. M_{{S}}^{α } was determined at a temperature where Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } + Δ G_{{str}}^{γ \\to α } = 0 . The proposed M_{{S}}^{α } model shows an extended temperature range of prediction from 170 K to 820 K (-103 °C to 547 °C). The model is then shown to corroborate alloy chemistries that exhibit two-stage athermal martensitic transformations and two-stage TRIP behavior in three previously reported medium manganese steels. In addition, the model can be used to predict the retained γ-austenite in twelve alloys, containing ɛ-martensite, using the difference between the calculated M_{{S}}^{ɛ} and M_{{S}}^{α }.

  9. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  10. Athermal design and analysis of glass-plastic hybrid lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Cen, Zhaofeng; Li, Xiaotong

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid development of security market, the glass-plastic hybrid lens has gradually become a choice for the special requirements like high imaging quality in a wide temperature range and low cost. The reduction of spherical aberration is achieved by using aspherical surface instead of increasing the number of lenses. Obviously, plastic aspherical lens plays a great role in the cost reduction. However, the hybrid lens has a priority issue, which is the large thermal coefficient of expansion of plastic, causing focus shift and seriously affecting the imaging quality, so the hybrid lens is highly sensitive to the change of temperature. To ensure the system operates normally in a wide temperature range, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of temperature on the hybrid lens system. A practical design method named the Athermal Material Map is summarized and verified by an athermal design example according to the design index. It includes the distribution of optical power and selection of glass or plastic. The design result shows that the optical system has excellent imaging quality at a wide temperature range from -20 ° to 70 °. The method of athermal design in this paper has generality which could apply to optical system with plastic aspherical surface.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junyu; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h.

  12. Characterization of martensitic transformations using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a highly sensitive technique which can reveal changes in materials not detectable by other means. The goal of this project was to obtain basic information on the AE response to martensitic transformation in steel. This information will enable the use of AE for improved quality assurance testing of rough-cut component blanks and semifinished parts. The AE response was measured as a function of temperature in four steels undergoing martensitic transformation, and the AE response was compared with martensitic start temperature M/sub s/ and finish temperature M/sub f/ obtained by other methods. As measured by AE activity, M/sub s/ occurred as much as 26 0 C higher than previously reported using less sensitive measurement techniques. It was also found that 10 to 30% of an alloy of Fe-0.2% C-27% Ni transformed to martensite during one AE burst. These results show that AE can be used to study transformations both inside and outside the classical M/sub s/-M/sub f/ ranges. The findings will help to achieve the goal of using AE for quality assurance testing, and will add to the knowledge of the basic materials science of martensitic transformations

  13. Production and qualification for fusion applications, a steel of low activity ferritic-martensitic ASTURFER; Produccion y cualificacion, para aplicaciones de fusion, de un acero de baja actividad ferritico-martensitico, ASTURFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Belzunce, J.; Artimez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    This article details the work carried out in the design and development pilot plant scale of a steel ferritic-martensitic of reduced activity, Asturfer, with a chemical composition and metallurgical properties similar to steel Eurofer. We describe the different stages of steel production and the results of the characterizations made in the context of an extensive test program.

  14. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase steels, with different martensite morphology, produced during TLP bonding of a low C-Mn steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Abolfazl; Ekrami, Aliakbar; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2016-09-01

    In this research, production of ferrite - martensite dual phase Steels with different martensite morphology was considered during transient liquid phase bonding of a low carbon steel. The steel was bonded using an iron base interlayer with melting point of 1443 K and 40 μm thickness. Bonding process carried out at 1473 K, under pressure of 0.5 MPa, at different holding time of 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. Microstructural studies of joint region showed that isothermal solidification completed at the bonding time of 40 minutes. Microstructure of joints made at the bonding time of 10, 20, and 30 minutes consists of two distinct region, athermal and isothermal solidified zones. Microstructure of these zones was studied and chemical composition of these zones was determined by EDS. Joints made with bonding time of 40 minutes were homogenized at 1008 K and then cooled into cold water to produce dual phase ferrite and martensite microstructure with different martensite morphology. According to shear test results, it was found that the shear strength of ferrite - fibrous martensite microstructure is greater than those with ferrite - continuous martensite and ferrite - blocky martensite microstructure.

  16. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    are chosen to investigate time dependent martensite formation. Among them, a Fe-11wt%Ni-0.6wt%C model alloy and Fe-1.6wt%Cr-1wt%C (AISI 52100), Fe-17wt%Cr-7wt%Ni (AISI 631) and Fe-16wt%Cr-5wt%Ni (AISI 630) commercial steels. The investigation was performed with in situ magnetometry, dilatometry, synchrotron...

  17. 110 °C range athermalization of wavefront coding infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Shi, Zelin; Chang, Zheng; Liu, Haizheng; Zhao, Yaohong

    2017-09-01

    110 °C range athermalization is significant but difficult for designing infrared imaging systems. Our wavefront coding athermalized infrared imaging system adopts an optical phase mask with less manufacturing errors and a decoding method based on shrinkage function. The qualitative experiments prove that our wavefront coding athermalized infrared imaging system has three prominent merits: (1) working well over a temperature range of 110 °C; (2) extending the focal depth up to 15.2 times; (3) achieving a decoded image being approximate to its corresponding in-focus infrared image, with a mean structural similarity index (MSSIM) value greater than 0.85.

  18. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  19. Martensitic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, W.; Neuhaus, J. [Techn. Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E13, Munich (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs.

  20. Athermalization of resonant optical devices via thermo-mechanical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakich, Peter; Nielson, Gregory N.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2016-01-19

    A passively athermal photonic system including a photonic circuit having a substrate and an optical cavity defined on the substrate, and passive temperature-responsive provisions for inducing strain in the optical cavity of the photonic circuit to compensate for a thermo-optic effect resulting from a temperature change in the optical cavity of the photonic circuit. Also disclosed is a method of passively compensating for a temperature dependent thermo-optic effect resulting on an optical cavity of a photonic circuit including the step of passively inducing strain in the optical cavity as a function of a temperature change of the optical cavity thereby producing an elasto-optic effect in the optical cavity to compensate for the thermo-optic effect resulting on an optical cavity due to the temperature change.

  1. Effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Kyu; Lee, Ji Won; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang Hoon; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2018-03-01

    The effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been investigated. Ti addition of 0.06 wt% to conventional RAFM reference base steel (Fe-9.3Cr-0.93W-0.22V-0.094Ta-0.1C) was intended to promote the precipitation of nano-sized (Ti,W) carbides with a high resistance to coarsening. In addition, the Ti addition was substituted for 0.094 wt% Ta. The Ti-added RAFM steel (Ti-RAFM) exhibited a higher yield strength (ΔYS = 32 MPa) at 600 °C than the reference base steel due to additional precipitation hardening by (Ti,W)-rich MX with an average size of 6.1 nm and the area fraction of 2.39%. However, after thermal exposure at 600 °C for 1000 h, this Ti-RAFM was more susceptible to degradation than the reference base steel; the block width increased by 77.6% in Ti-RAFM after thermal exposure while the reference base steel showed only 9.1% increase. In order to suppress diffusion rate during thermal exposure, the large-sized Ta element with low activation was added to Ti-RAFM. The Ta-added Ti-RAFM steel exhibited good properties with outstanding microstructure stability. Quantitative comparison in microstructures was discussed with a consideration of Ti and Ta addition.

  2. Martensitic transformation in zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Sylvain; Guenin, Gerard; Chevalier, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    We investigate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the surface relief resulting from martensitic tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation induced by low temperature autoclave aging in ceria-stabilized zirconia. AFM appears as a very powerful tool to investigate martensite relief quantitatively and with a great precision. The crystallographic phenomenological theory is used to predict the expected relief induced by the transformation, for the particular case of lattice correspondence ABC1, where tetragonal c axis becomes the monoclinic c axis. A model for variants spatial arrangement for this lattice correspondence is proposed and validated by the experimental observations. An excellent agreement is found between the quantitative calculations outputs and the experimental measurements at nanometer scale yielded by AFM. All the observed features are explained fully quantitatively by the calculations, with discrepancies between calculations and quantitative experimental measurements within the measurements and calculations precision range. In particular, the crystallographic orientation of the transformed grains is determined from the local characteristics of transformation induced relief. It is finally demonstrated that the strain energy is the controlling factor of the surface transformation induced by low temperature autoclave treatments in this material

  3. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiping [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Luo, Fengfeng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H{sup +}, 18 keV He{sup +} and 160 keV Ar{sup +}, alone and in combination at 723 K. He{sup +} single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H{sup +} and Ar{sup +} single-beam irradiation. H{sup +} post-irradiation after He{sup +} irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He{sup +} post-irradiation or Ar{sup +} post-irradiation following H{sup +} irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H{sup +} can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H{sup +} can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He{sup +} irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  4. Martensitic phase transformation in shape-memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Isothermal studies are described of the shape-recovery phenomenon, stress-strain behavior, electrical resistivity and thermo-electric power associated with the martensite-parent phase reaction in the Ni-Ti shape-memory alloys. The energy-balance equation that links the reaction kinetics with the strain energy change during the cooling-deforming and heating cycle is analyzed. The strain range in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation satisfactorily describes this reaction is determined. A large change in the Young's modulus of the specimen is found to be associated with the M → P reaction. A hysteresis loop in the resistivity-temperature plot is found and related to the anomaly in the athermal resistivity changes during cyclic M → P → M transformation. An explanation for the resistivity anomaly is offered. The M structure is found to be electrically negative relative to the P structure. A thermal emf of greater than or equal to 0.12 mV is found at the M-P interface

  5. Martensitic phase transformation in shape-memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golestaneh, A A

    1979-01-01

    Isothermal studies are described of the shape-recovery phenomenon, stress-strain behavior, electrical resistivity and thermo-electric power associated with the martensite-parent phase reaction in the Ni-Ti shape-memory alloys. The energy-balance equation that links the reaction kinetics with the strain energy change during the cooling-deforming and heating cycle is analyzed. The strain range in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation satisfactorily describes this reaction is determined. A large change in the Young's modulus of the specimen is found to be associated with the M ..-->.. P reaction. A hysteresis loop in the resistivity-temperature plot is found and related to the anomaly in the athermal resistivity changes during cyclic M ..-->.. P ..-->.. M transformation. An explanation for the resistivity anomaly is offered. The M structure is found to be electrically negative relative to the P structure. A thermal emf of greater than or equal to 0.12 mV is found at the M-P interface.

  6. Grafted polymer chains suppress nanoparticle diffusion in athermal polymer melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Chun; Griffin, Philip J.; Chao, Huikuan; Hore, Michael J. A.; Ohno, Kohji; Clarke, Nigel; Riggleman, Robert A.; Winey, Karen I.; Composto, Russell J.

    2017-05-01

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) in unentangled to slightly entangled PMMA melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. These grafted NPs diffuse ˜100 times slower than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation assuming a viscosity equal to bulk PMMA and a hydrodynamic NP size equal to the NP core diameter, 2Rcore = 4.3 nm. This slow NP diffusion is consistent with an increased effective NP size, 2Reff ≈ 20 nm, nominally independent of the range of grafting density and matrix molecular weights explored in this study. Comparing these experimental results to a modified Daoud-Cotton scaling estimate for the brush thickness as well as dynamic mean field simulations of polymer-grafted NPs in athermal polymer melts, we find that 2Reff is in quantitative agreement with the size of the NP core plus the extended grafted chains. Our results suggest that grafted polymer chains of moderate molecular weight and grafting density may alter the NP diffusion mechanism in polymer melts, primarily by increasing the NP effective size.

  7. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  8. Reorientation in combined stress induced martensite?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittner, P.; Tokuda, M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermoelastic martensitic transformation induced by independent external forces has been investigated in combined tension-torsion experiments with Cu-Al-Zn-Mn SMA hollow bar polycrystals. When the nonproportional change of the applied stress (reloading) occurs at low volume fraction of stress induced martensite phase, the shape of the experimental transformation path suggests, that the forward or reverse stress induced martensitic transformations take place, depending whether the mechanical energy is being supplied or released. At higher volume fraction of martensite, the deformation behavior upon reloading becomes more complex, suggesting a possible role of martensite to martensite transformations or reorientation processes. (orig.)

  9. Study on the properties of infrared wavefront coding athermal system under several typical temperature gradient distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huai-yu; Dong, Xiao-tong; Zhu, Meng; Huang, Zhan-hua

    2018-01-01

    Wavefront coding for athermal technique can effectively ensure the stability of the optical system imaging in large temperature range, as well as the advantages of compact structure and low cost. Using simulation method to analyze the properties such as PSF and MTF of wavefront coding athermal system under several typical temperature gradient distributions has directive function to characterize the working state of non-ideal temperature environment, and can effectively realize the system design indicators as well. In this paper, we utilize the interoperability of data between Solidworks and ZEMAX to simplify the traditional process of structure/thermal/optical integrated analysis. Besides, we design and build the optical model and corresponding mechanical model of the infrared imaging wavefront coding athermal system. The axial and radial temperature gradients of different degrees are applied to the whole system by using SolidWorks software, thus the changes of curvature, refractive index and the distance between the lenses are obtained. Then, we import the deformation model to ZEMAX for ray tracing, and obtain the changes of PSF and MTF in optical system. Finally, we discuss and evaluate the consistency of the PSF (MTF) of the wavefront coding athermal system and the image restorability, which provides the basis and reference for the optimal design of the wavefront coding athermal system. The results show that the adaptability of single material infrared wavefront coding athermal system to axial temperature gradient can reach the upper limit of temperature fluctuation of 60°C, which is much higher than that of radial temperature gradient.

  10. Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Maria Andrade dos, E-mail: camilaandr@gmail.com [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Adorno, Antonio Tallarico [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Galdino da Silva, Ricardo Alexandre [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, UNIFESP, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Thaisa Mary [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys is mainly influenced by Mn. • Interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs increases activation energy. • Cu diffusion is disturbed by the interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs. - Abstract: The influence of Mn and Ag additions on the isothermal kinetics of martensite decomposition in the Cu–9wt.%Al alloy was studied using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXS) and microhardness changes measurements with temperature and time. The results indicated that the reaction is disturbed by the increase of Mn, an effect associated with the increase in the Al–Mn and Cu–Mn atomic pairs, which disturbs Cu diffusion and increases the activation energy for the martensite decomposition reaction.

  11. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments; OPTIFER, un paso mas hacia el desarrollo de un acero martensitico de baja activacion. Resultados de los ensayos de caracterizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-07-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys, after double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12%Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior, both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (Author) 21 refs.

  12. Golf-course and funnel energy landscapes: Protein folding concepts in martensites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaraiah, N

    2017-06-01

    We use protein folding energy landscape concepts such as golf course and funnel to study re-equilibration in athermal martensites under systematic temperature quench Monte Carlo simulations. On quenching below a transition temperature, the seeded high-symmetry parent-phase austenite that converts to the low-symmetry product-phase martensite, through autocatalytic twinning or elastic photocopying, has both rapid conversions and incubation delays in the temperature-time-transformation phase diagram. We find the rapid (incubation delays) conversions at low (high) temperatures arises from the presence of large (small) size of golf-course edge that has the funnel inside for negative energy states. In the incubating state, the strain structure factor enters into the Brillouin-zone golf course through searches for finite transitional pathways which close off at the transition temperature with Vogel-Fulcher divergences that are insensitive to Hamiltonian energy scales and log-normal distributions, as signatures of dominant entropy barriers. The crossing of the entropy barrier is identified through energy occupancy distributions, Monte Carlo acceptance fractions, heat emission, and internal work.

  13. Characterization of 3R martensite in a Ni-40Al-15Pt bulk alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Marie, E-mail: marie.clancy@monash.edu [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Limerick, Castletroy (Ireland); Pomeroy, Michael J. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Limerick, Castletroy (Ireland); Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Castletroy (Ireland); Dickinson, Calum [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Castletroy (Ireland)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three alloys of same composition but different thermal histories are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inform the scientific community about martensite crystallography (3R) in NiAlPt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show how different the martensite composition is to adjacent untransformed {beta}-NiAl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show that cyclic and/or isothermal oxidation offer chemically different martensite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt needs high temperatures in excess of 900 {sup o}C for its thermal activation. - Abstract: As Pt promotes the reversible martensite transformation, the aim of this study was to assess the influence of Pt on the crystallography of ({beta} Prime ) martensite, in terms of ordering adapted, twinning and stacking faults. The focused ion beam (FIB) milling process was used to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of the NiAlPt bulk alloys, whereby 3R, L1{sub 0} ordering of the martensite was confirmed. The addition of Pt, coupled with high temperature oxidation resulted in more stacking faults, due to greater Pt diffusion and subsequent enrichment in martensite. For Pt diffusion the temperature must be in excess of 900 Degree-Sign C, both for isothermal and cyclic oxidation. When the favorable temperature environment is achieved Pt can diffuse preferentially allowing for promotion of the transformation to martensite.

  14. Characterization of 3R martensite in a Ni–40Al–15Pt bulk alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clancy, Marie; Pomeroy, Michael J.; Dickinson, Calum

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three alloys of same composition but different thermal histories are investigated. ► Inform the scientific community about martensite crystallography (3R) in NiAlPt. ► Show how different the martensite composition is to adjacent untransformed β-NiAl. ► Show that cyclic and/or isothermal oxidation offer chemically different martensite. ► Pt needs high temperatures in excess of 900 o C for its thermal activation. - Abstract: As Pt promotes the reversible martensite transformation, the aim of this study was to assess the influence of Pt on the crystallography of (β′) martensite, in terms of ordering adapted, twinning and stacking faults. The focused ion beam (FIB) milling process was used to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of the NiAlPt bulk alloys, whereby 3R, L1 0 ordering of the martensite was confirmed. The addition of Pt, coupled with high temperature oxidation resulted in more stacking faults, due to greater Pt diffusion and subsequent enrichment in martensite. For Pt diffusion the temperature must be in excess of 900 °C, both for isothermal and cyclic oxidation. When the favorable temperature environment is achieved Pt can diffuse preferentially allowing for promotion of the transformation to martensite.

  15. Diffusive Phenomena and the Austenite/Martensite Relative Stability in Cu-Based Shape-Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrina, J. L.; Yawny, A.; Sade, M.

    2018-02-01

    The main characteristic of martensitic phase transitions is the coordinate movement of the atoms which takes place athermally, without the contribution of diffusion during its occurrence. However, the impacts of diffusive phenomena on the relative stability between the phases involved and, consequently, on the associated transformation temperatures and functional properties can be significant. This is particularly evident in the case of Cu-based shape-memory alloys where atomic diffusion in both austenite and martensite metastable phases might occur even at room-temperature levels, giving rise to a variety of intensively studied phenomena. In the present study, the progresses made in the understanding of three selected diffusion-related effects of importance in Cu-Zn-Al and Cu-Al-Be alloys are reviewed. They are the after-quench retained disorder in the austenitic structure and its subsequent reordering, the stabilization of the martensite, and the effect of applied stress on the austenitic order. It is shown how the experimental results obtained from tests performed on single crystal material can be rationalized under the shed of a model developed to evaluate the variation of the relative stability between the phases in terms of atom pairs interchanges.

  16. Density scaling and quasiuniversality of flow-event statistics for athermal plastic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, E.; Bailey, N.P.; Dyre, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Athermal steady-state plastic flows were simulated for the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones system and its repulsive version in which the sign of the attractive terms is changed to a plus. Properties evaluated include the distributions of energy drops, stress drops, and strain intervals between the

  17. Investigation of Martensite Formation in Fe Based Alloys During Heating From Boiling Nitrogen Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-01-01

    heating was convincingly demonstrated for all investigated materials by showing heating rate dependent transformation kinetics. Moreover, magnetometry showed that the heating rate influences the fraction of martensite formed during the thermal treatment. The activation energy for thermally activated...

  18. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Early studies on the formation of martensite in different ferrous alloys revealed that the formation mecha- nism and substructure of martensite are considerably altered by ... This thermal stimulation caused martensite plates formation in figure 1(b). Martensite start temperatures (Ms) of martensite transfor- mation (γ → α ) was ...

  19. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production; Caracterizacion mecanica de un acero ferritico/martenitico de activacion reducida de produccion espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  20. A wide-FoV athermalized infrared imaging system with a two-element lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Shi, Zelin; Zhao, Yaohong; Liu, Haizheng; Liu, Li

    2017-12-01

    For infrared imaging systems to achieve wide field of view (FoV), wide operating temperature and low weight, this work designs a wide-FoV athermalized infrared imaging system (AIIS) with a two-element lens. Its principle, design, manufacture, measurement and performance validation are successively discussed. The two-element lens contains four surfaces, where three aspheric surfaces are introduced to reduce optical off-axis aberrations and a cubic surface is introduced to achieve athermalization. The key coding mask containing an aspheric surface and a cubic surface is manufactured by nano-metric machining of ion implanted material (NiIM). Experimental results validate that our wide-FoV wavefront coding AIIS has a full FoV of 26.10° and an operating temperature over -20 °C to +70 °C.

  1. Martensite formation by relaxation of hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortner, B.; Kuehlein, W.; Stuewe, H.P.; Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Leoben

    1992-01-01

    According to thermodynamics it should be possible to produce martensite by austenitizing a steel under high hydrostatic pressure and then releasing the pressure at a suitable temperature. Such martensite was produced experimentally as could be demonstrated by observing the resulting heat of reaction. (orig.) [de

  2. The basic elementary particles as martensitic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguinaco-Bravo, V. J.; Onoro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The martensitic transformation is a diffusional structural change that produces an important modification of the microstructure and properties of materials. In this paper we propose how the martensitic phase is nucleated from a basic elementary particle (bep). The bep is formed in several stages. Vacancies, divacancies, etc. are formed at high temperature, which collapse into prismatic dislocation loops during the cooling process. We define a bep as a dislocation loop reaching a critical radius and fulfilling certain elastic energy conditions. A martensitic nucleus is a bep that coincides crystallographically with the habit plane of the matrix. (Author) 16 refs

  3. Theory of nonlinear, distortive phenomena in solids: Martensitic, crack, and multiscale structures-phenomenology and physics. Progress summary, 1991--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethna, J.P.; Krumhansl, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    We have identified tweed precursors to martensitic phase transformations as a spin glass phase due to composition variations, and used simulations and exact replica theory predictions to predict diffraction peaks and model phase diagrams, and provide real space data for comparison to transmission electron micrograph images. We have used symmetry principles to derive the crack growth laws for mixed-mode brittle fracture, explaining the results for two-dimensional fracture and deriving the growth laws in three dimensions. We have used recent advances in dynamical critical phenomena to study hysteresis in disordered systems, explaining the return-point-memory effect, predicting distributions for Barkhausen noise, and elucidating the transition from athermal to burst behavior in martensites. From a nonlinear lattice-dynamical model of a first-order transition using simulations, finite-size scaling, and transfer matrix methods, it is shown that heterophase transformation precursors cannot occur in a pure homogeneous system, thus emphasizing the role of disorder in real materials. Full integration of nonlinear Landau-Ginzburg continuum theory with experimental neutron-scattering data and first-principles calculations has been carried out to compute semi-quantitative values of the energy and thickness of twin boundaries in InTl and FePd martensites

  4. Theory of nonlinear, distortive phenomena in solids: Martensitic, crack, and multiscale structures-phenomenology and physics. Progress summary, 1991--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethna, J.P.; Krumhansl, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified tweed precursors to martensitic phase transformations as a spin glass phase due to composition variations, and used simulations and exact replica theory predictions to predict diffraction peaks and model phase diagrams, and provide real space data for comparison to transmission electron micrograph images. We have used symmetry principles to derive the crack growth laws for mixed-mode brittle fracture, explaining the results for two-dimensional fracture and deriving the growth laws in three dimensions. We have used recent advances in dynamical critical phenomena to study hysteresis in disordered systems, explaining the return-point-memory effect, predicting distributions for Barkhausen noise, and elucidating the transition from athermal to burst behavior in martensites. From a nonlinear lattice-dynamical model of a first-order transition using simulations, finite-size scaling, and transfer matrix methods, it is shown that heterophase transformation precursors cannot occur in a pure homogeneous system, thus emphasizing the role of disorder in real materials. Full integration of nonlinear Landau-Ginzburg continuum theory with experimental neutron-scattering data and first-principles calculations has been carried out to compute semi-quantitative values of the energy and thickness of twin boundaries in InTl and FePd martensites.

  5. Theory and Model for Martensitic Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1986-01-01

    Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry is constr...... is constructed and analyzed by computer simulation and by a theory which accounts for correlation effects. Dramatic precursor effects at the first-order transition are demonstrated. The model is also of relevance for surface reconstruction transitions.......Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry...

  6. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  7. About the determination of the thermal and athermal stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruml, Tomáš; Coddet, O.; Martin, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2008), s. 333-340 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Internal stresses * Compression test * Thermally activated processes * Plastic deformation * Stress-relaxation experiments Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2008

  8. Development of highly compact and low power consumption athermal military laser designators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijan, A.

    2012-10-01

    The utility of military lasers, particularly in the area of laser designation for laser-guided weapons, is well understood. Laser systems based on Nd:YAG have been fielded since the 1980's and over the last three decades have introduced incremental technology steps to improve performance and weight. The most recent technology step has been the introduction of athermal lasers based on laser-diode pumping of Nd:YAG and products are now emerging for use on the battlefield. The technical performance, efficiency, size, weight and power for these lasers, has been key to driving the new production designs. In this paper, we review the development of the laser designs and their introduction since the advent of laser designation. In particular, we compare the relative performance and characteristics over the evolution of fielded laser designators. Moreover, we will review the key building blocks for the design of athermal lasers and describe some critical design issues for engineering and productionisation of a military laser system, including removal of thermal lensing, novel diode-pumping schemes and robustness over the environment. These will be exemplified using results from the development of the SELEX Galileo Type 163 Laser Target Designators. These will cover not only technical performance, power and efficiency, but also thermal management, mass, volume, cost and overall complexity for manufacture.

  9. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  10. Demonstration of Compact and Low-Loss Athermal Arrayed-Waveguide Grating Module Based on 2.5%-Δ Silica-Based Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Koichi; Abe, Yukio; Uetsuka, Hisato

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrated a compact and low-loss athermal arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) module utilizing silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. Spot-size converters based on a vertical ridge-waveguide taper were integrated with a 2.5%-Δ athermal AWG to reduce the loss at chip-to-fiber interface. Spot-size converters based on a segmented core were formed around resin-filled trenches for athermalization formed in the slab to reduce the diffraction loss at the trenches. A 16-channel athermal AWG module with 100-GHz channel spacing was fabricated. The use of a 2.5%-Δ athermal chip with a single-side fiber array enabled a compact package of the size of 41.6×16.6×4.5 mm3. Athermal characteristics and a small insertion loss of 3.5-3.8 dB were obtained by virtue of low fiber-to-chip coupling loss and athermalization with low excess loss.

  11. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  12. General Aspects about the Martensitic Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With the time, the number of studies associated to the martensitic transformation has been expanded; therefore, understand as this mechanism operates and as it confers different characteristics to diverse materials where it occurs, many studies has been conducted in different areas carrying out to discoveries at microstructural, kinetic and crystallographic level. This paper presents an overview of the martensitic transformation, beginning with a historical development, through a review on their morphology and kinetically characteristics, in addition to an analysis of the prospects of the studies carried out in the area, with a special interest in the phenomena of thermo-elasticity and shape memory.

  13. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs

  14. Athermal mechanisms of size-dependent crystal flow gleaned from three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.I.; Dimiduk, D.M.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Uchic, M.D.; Tang, M.; Woodward, C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have revealed that micrometer-scale face-centered cubic (fcc) crystals show strong strengthening effects, even at high initial dislocation densities. We use large-scale three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations (DDS) to explicitly model the deformation behavior of fcc Ni microcrystals in the size range of 0.5-20 μm. This study shows that two size-sensitive athermal hardening processes, beyond forest hardening, are sufficient to develop the dimensional scaling of the flow stress, stochastic stress variation, flow intermittency and high initial strain-hardening rates, similar to experimental observations for various materials. One mechanism, source-truncation hardening, is especially potent in micrometer-scale volumes. A second mechanism, termed exhaustion hardening, results from a breakdown of the mean-field conditions for forest hardening in small volumes, thus biasing the statistics of ordinary dislocation processes

  15. Polymer chain dynamics and glass transition in athermal polymer/nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunjoon; Green, Peter F.

    2009-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), prepared by incorporating nanoparticles within a polymer host, generally exhibit properties that differ significantly from those of the host, even with small amounts of nanoparticles. A significant challenge is how to tailor the properties of these materials for applications (structural and biomedical to optoelectronic), because PNCs derive their properties from a collective and complex range of entropic and enthalpic interactions. Here, we show that PNCs, prepared from athermal mixtures of polymer-chain-grafted gold nanoparticles and unentangled polymer chains, may exhibit increases or decreases in their relaxation dynamics, and viscosity, by over an order of magnitude through control of nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, grafting density and grafting chain degree of polymerization. In addition, we show how the glass transition may also be tailored by up to 10∘ with the addition of less than 1.0 wt% nanoparticles to the polymer host.

  16. Athermal Wavelength Characteristics of Si Slot Ring Resonator Embedded with Benzocyclobutene for Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki Atsumi,; Keita Inoue,; Nobuhiko Nishiyama,; Shigehisa Arai,

    2010-05-01

    An athermal Si-slot-waveguide ring resonator embedded with benzocyclobutene (BCB), a low-k material used in electronics, was proposed. By controlling the width of the BCB-filled gap to 90 nm, the temperature coefficient of equivalent index of a Si slot waveguide could be reduced to 3.70× 10-6, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of a conventional Si waveguide. The dependences of peak wavelength shift on temperature in the fabricated devices of a conventional Si wire waveguide with SiO2 cladding, Si wire waveguide with BCB cladding, and Si slot waveguide with BCB cladding were 26, 17, and -0.6 pm/K, respectively.

  17. Athermalization and achromatization of visible/SWIR optics using instantaneous Abbe number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    With the move to more and more lightweight and cost-effective design, a move to multiband or multi-spectral optics is required. These systems are becoming more prevalent in the market as new detector technologies have been developed. However, the lens designs are only starting to be considered with the addition of new materials in the MWIR and the LWIR. For the VIS/SWIR region the designs have been possible, but a lack of detector technology has resulted in few designs being considered for actual manufacturing. These designs are also difficult due to changes in the Abbe number in the different wavebands. Where the glass map is robust in the visible region, there exists a lack of crown glasses in the SWIR, and one is left with mostly flint glasses. This proves challenging from a chromatic perspective. The challenge becomes even more difficult if one wants to incorporate athermalization.

  18. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature (≤380 degrees C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300 degrees C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300 degrees C to 500 degrees C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180 degrees C to 330 degrees C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited

  19. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites. [Proper and improper ferroelastic martensites; In-Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1992-09-30

    Theoretical studies were pursued with supporting experimental investigations (In-Tl) on the statics, dynamics, and statistical mechanics of twin boundaries, twin bands, and pretransformation structural modulations in proper and improper ferroelastic martensites.

  20. Comparison of residual stress in martensitic alloys by nondestructive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Suresh, S.B.; Wells, D.

    2006-01-01

    Three martensitic materials, namely Alloys EP-823, HT-9 and 422 were subjected to tensile loading at ambient temperature. The cylindrical specimens tested at different levels of tensile loading were analyzed for characterization of residual stress resulting from plastic deformation corresponding to the applied loads between the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength. The extent of residual stress developed at these applied stresses was analyzed by nondestructive positron annihilation spectroscopy, activation, and neutron diffraction techniques. The results indicate that the residual stresses characterized by all three techniques exhibited a consistent pattern showing a gradual enhancement in residual stress with increasing applied load

  1. Japanese great pioneer and leader, Zenji Nishiyama, on studies of martensitic transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.

    2003-10-01

    Professor Zenji Nishiyama passed away on March 12, 1991, at the age of 89. He was born on October 14, 1901, and so the last year was the centennial birthday anniversary. In such a occasion, his personality and academic achievements will be introduced, because he had been one of great leaders of the world-wide martensite community for a long time, as is well known. The introduction consists of his personal history and academic activities and achievements on martensitic transformations. In addition, some hidden stories will be introduced as to publication of the well-known Nishiyama's orientation relationship and of the crystal structure of a Cu-Al alloy martensite, and as to several works which were carried out during the 2nd world-war and so not published in English.

  2. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  3. Characterization and assessment of ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Harries, D.R.; Moeslang, A.

    1997-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for a DEMO fusion reactor and are investigated intensively within the frame of the European Long Term Fusion Technology Programme. This report summarizes general features of ferritic/martensitic steels and gives a broad overview on the available data of the 9-12% CrMoVNb steels MANET I and II. The data include informations on the physical metallurgy, the transformation and hardening/tempering behaviour as well as results on tensile, creep, creep-rupture, isothermal and thermal fatigue, charpy impact and fracture toughness properties. Other topics are corrosion tests of helium or high pressure water coolants, compatibility with breeding and neutron multiplier materials, advanced welding techniques, and a short review on fabrication and technology of these steels. In the relevant temperature region from ambient temperatures to 450 C a widespread field of results on pre-, postirradiation and in-situ mechanical properties is available up to a few dpa and up to 500 appm helium. Special emphasis has been put on the recent world-wide optimization of these steels. New 7-10% CrWVTa steels have been developed with significantly improved impact and fracture toughness properties. Initial results from unirradiated and neutron irradiated charpy specimens from various heats are favourable and showed a general improvement of the fracture toughness properties. These ferritic/martensitic steels also satisfy the criteria of reduced long-term activation. The potential for fusion applications is discussed together with some guidelines for required R and D. (orig.)

  4. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Filho, I.R. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil); Sandim, M.J.R., E-mail: msandim@demar.eel.usp.br [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil); Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L.C.C.M. [Instituto de Física, University of Sao Paulo, 05314-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hoffmann, J. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, D-72061 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bolmaro, R.E. [Instituto de Física Rosario, CONICET-UNR, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Sandim, H.R.Z. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil)

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides T{sub c}, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanent magnetization (M{sub R}), and coercive field (H{sub c}). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600–700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism. - Highlights: • H{sub c} and M{sub R}/M{sub S} ratio give information about distribution of strain-induced martensite. • According to Thermo-calc©, the BCC phase in AISI 201 steel is stable until 600 °C. • Thermo-calc predictions agrees with magnetic properties of AISI 201 steel. • Possible magnetic anisotropy induced by rolling in AISI 201 steel is investigated.

  5. Examining of athermal effects in microwave-induced glucose/glycine reaction and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Liu, Shulan; Qin, Xiaopei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Owusu, John

    2013-08-14

    Many reports claim the existence of athermal effects in microwave-induced reactions, and this challenge the assumption that the thermal effect (heating) is the sole factor in microwave heating. Therefore, microwave-induced Maillard reaction of d-glucose/glycine and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis (PSPY) were investigated. Browning reactions were monitored by measuring heating rate, UV-absorbance and brown color, UV-vis and synchronous fluorescence spectra, GC/MS analysis and intrinsic viscosity of degradation. Heating of d-glucose/glycine solution produced brown compounds which were detected at A420, and the intermediate products, 2-acetylfuran and 5-methylfurfural, whose fluorescence intensity evidenced their formation. Maximum emission of synchronous fluorescence spectra of samples were at 430-440 nm and 370-390 nm. Both microwave and water bath heating did not cause any compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. All data failed to show any significant athermal effects of compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. It can be inferred that some of the reports suggesting the existence of athermal effects, which could ascribe to the different set-up obtained in not well temperature controlled microwave heating systems. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  7. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available of austenitic solidification. Table 4 - Chemical composition of the laser cladded martensitic stainless steel in the dendritic and interdendritic areas Material Area C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Dendritic 0.3 12.8 0.15 0.7 0.65 0.02 Fe211-1 (420) Off... alloy steels and are shown in Table 4. Ms (ºC) = 550 – 350C – 40Mn - 20Cr – 10Mo – 17Ni – 8W – 35V – 10Cu + 15Co + 30Al (Eq 3) Table 5 - Ms temperatures of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel Material Ms Dendritic area (ºC) Ms...

  8. Boundary-induced segregation in nanoscale thin films of athermal polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chih-Yu; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-05-18

    The surface segregation of binary athermal polymer blends confined in a nanoscale thin film was investigated by dissipative particle dynamics. The polymer blend included linear/linear, star/linear, bottlebrush/linear, and rod-like/linear polymer systems. The segregation was driven by purely entropic effects and two different mechanisms were found. For the linear/linear and star/linear polymer blends, the smaller sized polymers were preferentially segregated to the boundary because their excluded volumes were smaller than those of the matrix polymers. For the bottlebrush/linear and rod-like/linear polymer blends, the polymers with a larger persistent length were preferentially segregated to the boundary because they favored staying in the depletion zone by alignment with the wall. Our simulation outcome was consistent with experimental results and also agreed with theoretical predictions - that is, a surface excess dictated by the chain ends for the branch/linear system. These consequences are of great importance in controlling the homogeneity and surface properties of polymer blend thin films.

  9. Study of an athermal quasi static plastic deformation in a 2D granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    In crystalline materials, the plasticity has been well understood in terms of dynamics of dislocation, i.e. flow defects in the crystals where the flow defects can be directly visualized under a microscope. In a contrast, the plasticity in amorphous materials, i.e. glass, is still poorly understood due to the disordered nature of the materials. In this talk, I will discuss the recent results we have obtained in our ongoing research of the plasticity of a 2D glass in the athermal quasi static limit where the 2D glass is made of bi-disperse granular disks with very low friction. Starting from a densely packed homogeneous and isotropic initial state, we apply pure shear deformation to the system. For a sufficiently small strain, the response of the system is linear and elastic like; when the strain is large enough, the plasticity of the system gradually develops and eventually the shear bands are fully developed. In this study, we are particularly interested in how to relate the local plastic deformation to the macroscopic response of the system and also in the development of the shear bands.

  10. MARTENSITIC CREEP RESISTANT STEEL STRENGTHENED BY Z-PHASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to steel alloys having a martensitic or martensitic- ferritic structure and comprising Z-phase (CrXN) particles, where X is one or more of the elements V, Nb, Ta, and where the Z-phase particles have an average size of less than 400 nm. The alloy comprises by wt...

  11. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  12. Martensitic textures: Multiscale consequences of elastic compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, S.R.; Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    2001-03-01

    We show that a free energy entirely in the order-parameter strain variable(s), rather than the displacement field, provides a unified understanding of martensitic textures. We use compatibility equations, linking the strain tensor components in the bulk and at interfaces, that induce anisotropic order-parameter strain interactions. These two long-range bulk/interface potentials, together with local compositional fluctuations, drive the formation of global elastic textures. Relaxational simulations show the spontaneous formation (and evolution under stress/temperature quenches) of equal width parallel twins, branched twins, and tweed, including characteristic scaling of twin width with twin length. (author)

  13. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  14. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Sub-zero treatment of steels with an Mf below zero degrees Celsius relies (partly) on a continuation of the martensite formation. The present work reports on the observation of isothermal martensite formation in the sub-zero temperature regime for two steels: AISI 1070 and AISI 52100. Samples were...... austenitized and quenched in oil and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample agnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the subzero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. A mechanism is proposed that explains the occurrence of isothermal martensite formation....

  15. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  16. Twin bands in martensites: Statics and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horovitz, B. (Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva, 84105, Israel (IL)); Barsch, G.R. (Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania (USA)); Krumhansl, J.A. (Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The theory of forming a coherent twin band and its relation to the parent-product interface in a martensitic transition is studied. We find that the twin band is stabilized by a long-range elastic interaction between the twin boundaries, which is mediated via the parent phase. The mean distance {ital l} between twin boundaries is then {ital l}{similar to} {radical}{ital L}{sub 2} , with {ital L}{sub 2} the size of a twin boundary, i.e., the product grain'' size. The collective twin-boundary oscillations ( dyadons'') have unusually low frequencies and a limiting dispersion of frequency, which goes as the square root of the wave vector. Explicit results are given for a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic transition. We also show that dyadons cause the specific heat to change from a {ital T}{sup 3} temperature dependence to {ital T}{sup 2} at lower temperatures and to allow for a linear temperature dependence of the resistivity to extend to low temperatures. We compare our results with data on conventional martensites and on the more recent ceramic superconductors.

  17. Athermal silicon optical add-drop multiplexers based on thermo-optic coefficient tuning of sol-gel material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namnabat, Soha; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Jones, Adam; Himmelhuber, Roland; DeRose, Christopher T; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L; Pomerene, Andrew; Lentine, Anthony L; Norwood, Robert A

    2017-09-04

    Silicon photonics has gained interest for its potential to provide higher efficiency, bandwidth and reduced power consumption compared to electrical interconnects in datacenters and high performance computing environments. However, it is well known that silicon photonic devices suffer from temperature fluctuations due to silicon's high thermo-optic coefficient and therefore, temperature control in many applications is required. Here we present an athermal optical add-drop multiplexer fabricated from ring resonators. We used a sol-gel inorganic-organic hybrid material as an alternative to previously used materials such as polymers and titanium dioxide. In this work we studied the thermal curing parameters of the sol-gel and their effect on thermal wavelength shift of the rings. With this method, we were able to demonstrate a thermal shift down to -6.8 pm/°C for transverse electric (TE) polarization in ring resonators with waveguide widths of 325 nm when the sol-gel was cured at 130°C for 10.5 hours. We also achieved thermal shifts below 1 pm/°C for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization in the C band under different curing conditions. Curing time compared to curing temperature shows to be the most important factor to control sol-gel's thermo-optic value in order to obtain an athermal device in a wide temperature range.

  18. Finite element modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    The present report studies the brittle fracture in high-chromium reduced activation tempered martensitic steels foreseen as structural materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Developing the adequate materials that can withstand the severe irradiation conditions of the burning plasma in a fusion reactor is one of the major challenges to be solved in order to make profit from the great advantages of thermonuclear fusion as an energy source. High-chromium tempered martensitic steels such as F82H and the most advanced version Eurofer97 are among the main candidate materials for structural applications in future fusion power plants due to low irradiation-induced swelling, good mechanical and thermal properties, and reasonably fast radioactive decay. Drawback of this kind of steels is irradiation embrittlement, which is manifested by a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift to higher temperatures after irradiation. The laboratory specimen fracture data has to be transferred to real components in order to assess the performance of these steels in the different operating and transient conditions they could find during the operation life of a fusion reactor. The specimen geometry effects and specimen size effects on measured fracture toughness need to be properly understood, taken into account and predicted with an appropriate model. The microstructure of Eurofer97 and F82H has been characterized and compared by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in order to identify microstructural features that could play a role in the measured fracture toughness. Both steels have similar but slightly different chemical composition and final heat treatments but the prior austenitic grain size measured in F82H is approximately 8 times larger than in Eurofer97. The alloying element tantalum is added to stabilize the austenite grain size. In Eurofer97 it forms carbides of an

  19. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  20. A Study of nuclear of interest martensitic steels and FeCr ODS alloys using small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, Marie-Helene; De Carlan, Yann; Zhong, Shengyi; Klosek, Vincent; Ji, Vincent; Henry, Jean; Olier, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique allows to characterize at a nano-scale the microstructure of the ferritic martensitic steels and ODS FeCr alloys which are candidates for the internal structures of future nuclear reactors. Firstly, the microstructure evolution induced by neutron irradiation at high dose in conventional and Reduced Activation Fe9%Cr martensitic steels is presented. Then, a SANS study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys is also presented. The main objective is to control the nano-size oxide particles at the various stages of the fabrication process. (authors)

  1. Strain Induced Martensitic Transformation in Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. H.; Saal, P.; Gan, W. M.; Landesberger, M.; Hoelzel, M.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-09-01

    The strain induced martensitic transformation in austempered ductile iron (ADI) has been investigated using high resolution neutron diffraction on samples compressed ex-situ to different plastic strains. In addition bulk texture measurements using neutron diffraction have been performed to calculate the orientation distribution of ferrite and austenite phases for different strain levels. Combing the detailed texture information with neutron diffraction pattern proved to be essential for quantitative phase analysis and extraction of martensite phase fractions. The martensite content induced by strain in ADI depends on austempering temperature and degree of deformation.

  2. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  3. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  4. Structure analysis of NiAl martensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Shapiro, S.M.; Shirane, G.; Yamada, Y.; Fuchizaki, K.; Tanner, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron elastic scattering experiments were performed in order to investigate the structure of the low temperature martensitic phase of Ni/sub 62.5/Al/sub 37.5/ alloy. The average structure analyzed from the integrated intensity was approximately described by the (5,/minus/2) structure proposed by Martynov et al. Small deviation from the exact (5,/minus/2) model in the positional parameters and the anomalously large Debye-Waller factor were obtained. The observed satellite profiles show asymmetrical broadening, and the peak positions shift from the regular reciprocal lattice points. These anomalous features of scattering profiles were tentatively interpreted by introducing spatial modulation of the strain and order parameters. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Structure analysis of NiAl martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Y.; Shapiro, S.M.; Shirane, G.; Yamada, Y.; Fuchizaki, K.; Tanner, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron elastic scattering experiments were performed in order to investigate the structure of the low temperature martensitic phase of Ni 62.5 Al 37.5 alloy. The average structure analyzed from the integrated intensity was approximately described by the (5,-2) structure proposed by Martynov et al. Small deviation from the exact (5,-2) model in the positional parameters and the anomalously large Debye-Waller factor were obtained. The observed satellite profiles show asymmetrical broadening, and the peak positions shift from the regular reciprocal lattice points. These anomalous features of scattering profiles were tentatively interpreted by introducing spatial modulation of the strain and order parameters. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. In-situ investigation of martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature was investigated with Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. The investigation reports the stabilization of retained austenite in quenched samples during storage at room temperature and reveals the thermally activated nature...

  7. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Sub-zero treatment of steels with an Mf below 0°C relies (partly) on a continuation of the martensite formation. The present work reports on the observation of isothermal martensite formation in the sub-zero temperature regime for two steels: AISI 1070 and AISI 52100. Samples were austenitized......, quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K....../min) at temperatures in the range of 80-233 K. The kinetics of isothermal martensite formation depends strongly on the temperature and can be described by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetics. Isothermal experiments with dilatometry indicated the occurrence of a volume increase on isothermal holding, consistent...

  8. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Sub-zero treatment of steels with an M1 below 0°C relies (partly) on a continuation of the martensite formation. The present work reports on the observation of isothermal martensite formation in the sub-zero temperature regime for two steels: AISI 1070 and AISI 52100. Samples were austenitized......, quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K....../min) at temperatures in the range of 80-233 K. The kinetics of isothermal martensite formation depends strongly on the temperature and can be described by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetics. Isothermal experiments with dilatometry indicated the occurrence of a volume increase on isothermal holding, consistent...

  9. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  10. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1992-09-30

    Theoretical studies were pursued with supporting experimental investigations (In-Tl) on the statics, dynamics, and statistical mechanics of twin boundaries, twin bands, and pretransformation structural modulations in proper and improper ferroelastic martensites.

  11. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  12. Cu precipitation kinetics during martensite tempering in a medium C steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Jung, Minsu; Lee, Sang-Min [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eunjoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Han-Chul [Products Solution Research Group, POSCO Technical Laboratory, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Kook, E-mail: yklee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► The cementite precipitation was finished prior to Cu precipitation during heating. ► Cu precipitation kinetics was accelerated with increasing temperature up to 600 °C. ► Nano-sized bcc Cu-rich particles greatly strengthened the tempered medium C steel. ► Cementite precipitation lowered the activation energy for Cu precipitation. -- Abstract: The Cu precipitation kinetics during martensite tempering of an Fe–0.44C–0.60Mn–0.21Si–0.11Cr–1.53Cu (wt.%) steel was quantitatively investigated by separating the Cu precipitation from the cementite precipitation through electrical resistivity, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), dilatometry, and thermodynamic calculations. The cementite precipitation was already finished during continuous heating to 450 °C, and then Cu precipitation occurred above 450 °C. The Cu precipitation kinetics was accelerated with increasing tempering temperature. The fcc ε-Cu particles were precipitated mainly at cementite interfaces, while bcc Cu-rich particles were formed in the tempered martensite matrix, and transformed to 9R, 3R, and fcc ε-Cu during further tempering, resulting in higher hardness of a medium C steel. The activation energy for isothermal Cu precipitation (64.9 ± 13.3 kJ/mol) during martensite tempering of the present medium C steel was even lower than that of a low C steel due to the greater cementite fraction.

  13. Martensite transformations influence in austenite stainless steel fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, H.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1976-07-01

    The influence of martensitic transformation on the fracture of tensile specimens of type AISI 310, and type 302, stainless steels was studied in the temperature interval from 25 0 C to -196 0 C. The influence of the metastability through the amount and rate of martensite transformation leading to high stresses and work hardening, apparently explains the brittle characteristics observed in the fracture of type 302 alloy as well as its ductile nature at -196 0 C [pt

  14. Magnetic domains in martensite of Ni-Mg-Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorin, V.V.; Babij, O.M.; Dubinko, S.V.; Prokopov, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structural changes attendant on intermartensitic transformation in a Ni-Mg-Ga shape memory alloy are considered using magneto-optical visualization with the help of ferrite-garnet monocrystalline films. It is established that on the intermartensitic transformation the complete reorganization of martensite macrostructure fails. Martensite crystals resulted from the basic transformation change somewhat their sizes on intermartensitic transition. The existence of large-scale labyrinth magnetic domain structure is revealed [ru

  15. Effect of microstructural evolution on high-temperature strength of 9Cr–3W–3Co martensitic heat resistant steel under different aging conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Peng; Liu, Zhengdong; Bao, Hansheng; Weng, Yuqing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of microstructures and high-temperature strength at 650 °C of 9Cr–3W–3Co martensitic heat resistant steel after aging at 650 °C and 700 °C for different time durations have been experimentally investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) and post-aged tensile tests. The results show that after aging at 650 °C, the high-temperature strength and the microstructures of 9Cr–3W–3Co steel keep almost stable with increasing aging time from 300 h to 3000 h. In comparison, after aging at 700 °C, there are obvious changes in the high-temperature strength and the microstructures. The strengthening mechanisms of the 9Cr–3W–3Co steel were also discussed and the athermal yield stresses were calculated. The change of the high-temperature strength is mainly affected by the evolution of dislocations and laths. The precipitates mainly act as obstacles against motion of dislocations and lath boundaries

  16. Atomic force microscopy study of stacking modes of martensitic transformation in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.Z.; Kikuchi, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Shinya, N.

    2000-01-01

    Stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensitic transformation in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr shape memory alloys have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been found that thermally induced martensite plates appear with the self-accommodated stacking form, in which all the three possible variants with different left angle 112 right angle shear directions in a {111} plane are activated and formed in parallel but at separate places; i.e. each plate corresponds to one variant. In addition, a plastic deformation band is always induced in austenite between two different variants. On the other hand, stress-induced martensite plates appear with the mono-partial stacking form, i.e. only single variant is activated in a {111} plane in a grain. The difference between stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensites makes them play a different role in contributing to shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys. (orig.)

  17. Martensitic transformation induced by quenching or by plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Henry, I.; Dagbert, C.; Hyspecka, L.; Galland, J.

    2003-10-01

    Nowadays the possibility to use the TRIP effect (Transformation Induced Plasticity) is stated not only for the high alloy steels but also for the low alloy steels. This effect is connected with the martensitic transformation, but not necessarily the strain induced martensitic transformation induced by deformation provokes the TRIP effect: decisive factors are the chemical composition, the stability of the austenite, its grain size, the particles geometry and their distribution, and also the temperature, amplitude and rate of deformation during the mechanical loading. The change of energy is compared between the creation of the quench and strain induced martensite with and without the TRIP effect. The molar enthalpy released during the creation of quench induced martensite in the continually cooled austenite of the alloy Fe-23.87wt %Ni-0.39wt %C, was calculated from DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) measurements. For this same material, the consumed work during tensile tests was determined at different temperatures. The temperatures interval was between Ms and Md. At each température, a volume traction of strain induced martensite was created and thé TRIP effect could occur, that is both extraordinary great elongation at high ultimate tensile strength and nearly no local deformation (no creation of a neck). This paper conclues with a discussion on the preferences and lacks in the use of TRIP effect in low alloy steels.

  18. Influence of microscopic strain heterogeneity on the formability of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettanini, Alvise Miotti; Delannay, Laurent; Jacques, Pascal J.; Pardoen, Thomas; Badinier, Guillaume; Mithieux, Jean-Denis

    2017-10-01

    Both finite element modeling and mean field (Mori-Tanaka) modeling are used to predict the strain partitioning in the martensite-ferrite microstructure of an AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel. Numerical predictions reproduce experimental trends according to which macroscopic strength is increased when the dissolution of carbides leads to carbon enrichment of martensite. However, the increased strength contrast of ferrite and martensite favours strain localization and high stress triaxiality in ferrite, which in turn promotes ductile damage development.

  19. Microstructure and martensitic transformation of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chunwang [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Shanghai Maritime University, College of Arts and Sciences, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Shilei; Jin, Yongjun; Hou, Qingyu [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Guo, Shaoqiang [Beihang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement, Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The effect of Pr addition on the microstructure and martensitic transformation behavior of Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50-x}Pr{sub x} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9) alloys were investigated experimentally. Results show that the microstructures of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys consist of the NiTi matrix and the NiPr precipitate with the Ti solute. The martensitic transformation start temperature decreases gradually with the increase in Pr fraction. The stress around NiPr precipitates is responsible for the decrease in martensitic transformation temperature with the increase in Pr fraction in Ni-Ti-Pr alloys. (orig.)

  20. A study on fatigue crack growth in dual phase martensitic steel in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dual phase (DP) steel was intercritically annealed at different temperatures from fully martensitic state to achieve martensite plus ferrite, microstructures with martensite contents in the range of 32 to 76%. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) and fracture toughness tests were carried out as per ASTM standards E 647 and E 399, ...

  1. Magnetic anisotropy of nonmodulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Novák, Václav; Fähler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 9 (2010), 09A914/1-09A914/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy of non-modulated martensite * temperature dependence of anisotropy * Ni-Mn-Ga * adaptive martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.064, year: 2010 http://jap.aip.org/resource/1/japiau/v107/i9/p09A914_s1

  2. A Dislocation-Based Theory for the Deformation Hardening Behavior of DP Steels: Impact of Martensite Content and Ferrite Grain Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Bergström

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A dislocation model, accurately describing the uniaxial plastic stress-strain behavior of dual phase (DP steels, is proposed and the impact of martensite content and ferrite grain size in four commercially produced DP steels is analyzed. It is assumed that the plastic deformation process is localized to the ferrite. This is taken into account by introducing a nonhomogeneity parameter, f(ε, that specifies the volume fraction of ferrite taking active part in the plastic deformation process. It is found that the larger the martensite content the smaller the initial volume fraction of active ferrite which yields a higher initial deformation hardening rate. This explains the high energy absorbing capacity of DP steels with high volume fractions of martensite. Further, the effect of ferrite grain size strengthening in DP steels is important. The flow stress grain size sensitivity for DP steels is observed to be 7 times larger than that for single phase ferrite.

  3. Shape effects on time-scale divergence at athermal jamming transition of frictionless non-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Jin, Weiwei; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2017-10-01

    The critical behaviors of a granular system at the jamming transition have been extensively studied from both mechanical and thermodynamic perspectives. In this work, we numerically investigate the jamming behaviors of a variety of frictionless non-spherical particles, including spherocylinder, ellipsoid, spherotetrahedron and spherocube. In particular, for a given particle shape, a series of random configurations at different fixed densities are generated and relaxed to minimize interparticle overlaps using the relaxation algorithm. We find that as the jamming point (i.e., point J) is approached, the number of iteration steps (defined as the "time-scale" for our systems) required to completely relax the interparticle overlaps exhibits a clear power-law divergence. The dependence of the detailed mathematical form of the power-law divergence on particle shapes is systematically investigated and elucidated, which suggests that the shape effects can be generally categorized as elongation and roundness. Importantly, we show the jamming transition density can be accurately determined from the analysis of time-scale divergence for different non-spherical shapes, and the obtained values agree very well with corresponding ones reported in literature. Moreover, we study the plastic behaviors of over-jammed packings of different particles under a compression-expansion procedure and find that the jamming of ellipsoid is much more robust than other non-spherical particles. This work offers an alternative approximate procedure besides conventional packing algorithms for studying athermal jamming transition in granular system of frictionless non-spherical particles.

  4. Martensitic nature of δ → γ allotropic transformation in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, P.C.; Cost, J.R.; Axler, K.M.

    1996-09-01

    Isothermal and isoplethal studies using differential scanning calorimetry have been conducted to characterize the allotropic transformations of plutonium. The δ-γ transformation (upon cooling) was observed to have a classic martensitic nature. The work described herein is the first quantitative study of this phenomena in plutonium

  5. DSC study of martensite transformation in TiPt alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available with TiPt phase after SPS and HP shows incomplete homogenisation, the volume fraction of TiPt phase formed by various solid-state diffusion methods ranges from 40-55%. DSC shows two-stage B2-B19 martensite transformation, an intermediate phase of unknown...

  6. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetical, morphological, crystallographical and thermal characteristics of thermally induced martensite in an Fe–30%Ni–1%Pd alloy has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction method. Kinetics of ...

  7. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...

  8. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1990-01-15

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations is being carried out on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for a new theoretical basis for investigating the martensite nucleation mechanism and for establishing the conditions for nonclassical nucleation. Soliton-like solutions of a dynamic Ginzburg-Landau continuum theory for ferroelastic martensites are being studied in order to determine the strain distribution, strain energy and dynamical behavior for various geometric configurations as a function of the material parameters, temperature and boundary conditions. Model parameters of the theory consist of the second and higher order elastic constants and the harmonic strain gradient coefficients in the parent phase. X-ray measurements of the transformation strain versus temperature, and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements on biaxially stressed crystals in In{sub 1{minus}x}Tl{sub x} alloys for determining the second and higher order elastic constants in the single domain tetragonal state and for studying the morphology and the dynamic behavior of the martensite interfaces and transformation precursors are in progress.

  9. EBSD characterization of deformed lath martensite in if steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.A.; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2017-01-01

    Rolling deformation results in the transformation of a lath martensite structure to a lamellar structure characteristic to that of IF steel cold-rolled to medium and high strains. The structural transition takes place from low to medium strain, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows ...

  10. Modulated martensite: why it forms and why it deforms easily

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaufmann, S.; Niemann, R.; Thersleff, T.; Roßler, U.K.; Heczko, Oleg; Buschbeck, J.; Holzapfel, B.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2011), 053029/1-053029/24 ISSN 1367-2630 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : modulated martensite * adaptive phase * Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2011

  11. Obtaining Martensitic Structures during Thixoforming of Hypoeutectic Gray Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Bertolino Ragazzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of parameters such as liquid fraction, holding time, and cooling rate during thixoforming can help control the final microstructure of the thixoformed part, thus improving its mechanical properties. This study intended to investigate conditions required to obtain martensite in hypoeutectic gray cast iron at 3.1% CE (carbon equivalent deformed in the semisolid state. Samples heated up to 1130, 1135, and 1145°C (liquid fractions of 10, 30, and 45% were compressed into platens without any holding time (0 s. If a sample presented a martensitic structure for 0 s holding time, new samples were retested at the same temperature for 30, 60, and 90 s holding times. The die casting process was simulated by allowing the platens to become locked after hot compression. Samples that cooled in the locked platens were submitted to higher cooling rates than samples that cooled with the platens open and presented martensite instead of the conventional ferrite and pearlite. Thus, the factor that had the greatest influence on the formation of martensite was the cooling rate rather than stress. The thixoforming process presented good morphological stability, which is highly desirable for industrial applications.

  12. Fractographic correlations with mechanical properties in ferritic martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan; Chakravartty, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-12-01

    The ultimate continuum of a material is nothing but the process called fracture. Fracture surface retains the imprint of the entire deformation history undergone in a material. Hence, it is possible to derive the approximate deformation and fracture properties of a material from a systematic fracture feature analysis. There has been large volume of literature available in the open domain correlating different mechanical and fracture responses of reduced activation ferritic martensitic grade steels under various testing conditions/circumstances with corresponding microstructural interpretation. There has been no such literature available to establish the relationship between the two-dimensional fracture geometry/topography with its corresponding deformation and mechanical properties of the material as a function of testing temperature, which has been the primary aim in the current investigation. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried out to realize this fact. In order to establish the above hypothesis, many tensile experiments were carried out at constant strain rate by systematic variation of the test temperature. The initial void volume fraction or the inclusion content of material was kept unaltered and the test temperature has been varied orderly on different multiple specimens to vary the deformation-induced nucleation sites of micro voids (i.e. different carbides, phase interfaces, dislocation pile up etc), which results in a change of fracture topography under uniaxial tensile deformation. A conventional metallographic technique followed by optical microscopy has been employed to understand the basic morphologies and characteristics of the alloy exposed at different temperatures. Fractographic investigation of the broken tensile specimens at various temperatures is carried out to measure the fracture features by using quantitative fractography on representative scanning electron fractographs through image processing.

  13. Magnetic interactions in martensitic Ni-Mn based Heusler systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Seda

    2010-04-22

    In this work, magnetic, magnetocaloric and structural properties are investigated in Ni-Mn-based martensitic Heusler alloys with the aim to tailor these properties as well as to understand in detail the magnetic interactions in the various crystallographic states of these alloys. We choose Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} as a prototype which undergoes a martensitic transformation and exhibits field-induced strain and the inverse magnetocaloric effect. Using the structural phase diagram of martensitic Ni-Mn-based Heusler alloys, we substitute gallium and tin for indium to carry these effects systematically closer to room temperature by shifting the martensitic transformation. A magneto-calorimeter is designed and built to measure adiabatically the magnetocaloric effect in these alloys. The temperature dependence of strain under an external magnetic field is studied in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 50-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga, Sn, In and Sb) and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga and Sn). An argument based on the effect of the applied magnetic field on martensite nucleation is adopted to extract information on the direction of the magnetization easy axis in the martensitic unit cell in Heusler alloys. Parallel to these studies, the structure in the presence of an external field is also studied by powder neutron diffraction. It is demonstrated that martensite nucleation is influenced by cooling the sample under a magnetic field such that the austenite phase is arrested within the martensitic state. The magnetic interactions in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 40}Sb{sub 10} are characterized by using neutron polarization analysis. Below the martensitic transformation temperature, M{sub s}, an antiferromagnetically correlated state is found. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments are carried out on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} to gain more detailed information on the nature of the magnetic interactions. The experimental

  14. Pearlitic and martensitic transformations under tensile stress in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeby-Gautier, Elisabeth

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the study of stress interactions on phase transformations: many studies showed that alloy transformation kinetics is affected (accelerated or slowed down) by a stress or a strain, and that the material displays a much higher plasticity during phase transformation under mechanical loading (the so-called transformation plasticity). Based on a bibliographical study, the author first reports the effect of plastic strains and stresses on the three types of phase transformation met in steels: ferritic or pearlitic, bainitic, and martensitic. She reports the study of kinetic parameters of transformation and transformation plasticity by either obtaining these parameters directly, or by means of directly proportional measurement which is not influenced by the applied stress or strain. The pearlitic transformation is more particularly studied on eutectoid steel. The martensitic transformation is studied on two synthetic Fe-Ni-C alloys, and on 60 NCD steel [fr

  15. Mobility of domain walls in proper ferroelastic martensites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Materials Research Lab.]|[Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-01

    Based on the Landau-Ginzberg free energy functional for an O{sub h}-D{sub 4h} proper ferroelastic martensitic transformation the mobility of a (110) twin boundary in a large bicrystal has been calculated by including dissipation in the approximation of the phonon viscosity model and by solving the inverse boundary value problem for the limiting case of strong shear modulus softening. Application to actual materials requires determination of the phonon viscosity tensor from experimental ultrasonic attenuation or low frequency internal friction data after subtraction of ``extrinsic`` losses, especially those from pretransformation structural strain modulations (``tweed``) and dislocations. Numerical application to V{sub 3}Si, the only proper ferroelastic martensite for which such experimental data pertaining to the soft [110]/[1 anti 10] shear mode are available, is discussed. (orig.).

  16. Ultrafine Structure and High Strength in Cold-Rolled Martensite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Morito, S.; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    with a coarse grain size (120 mu m) has also included based on a previous study. Deformation microstructures and structural parameters have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, and mechanical properties have been characterized by hardness and tensile testing....... At low to medium strains, lath martensite transforms into a cell block structure composed of cell block boundaries and cell boundaries with only a negligible change in strength. At medium to large strains, cell block structures in all samples refine with increasing strain and the hardening rate...... is constant (stage IV). A strong effect of the initial structure is observed on both the structural refinement and the strength increase. This effect is largest in lath martensite and smallest in unalloyed ferrite. No saturation in structural refinement and strength is observed. The discussion covers...

  17. Dislocation Characteristics in Lath Martensitic Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjo, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Gong, W.; Aizawa, K.

    2016-09-01

    In situ neutron diffraction during tensile deformation of an as-quenched lath martensitic 22SiMn2TiB steel, was performed using a high resolution and high intensity time- of-flight neutron diffractometer. The characterizations of dislocations were analyzed using the classical Williamson-Hall (cWH) and modified Williamson-Hall (mWH) plots on the breadth method, and the convolutional multiple whole profile (CMWP) fitting method. As results, the dislocation density as high as 1015 m-2 in the as-quenched martensitic steel was determined. The dislocation density was found to decrease qualitatively with plastic deformation by the cWH and mWH plots, but hardly to change by the CMWP method. The scanning transmission electron microscopy observation supported the results of the latter method. In the CMWP method, the parameter M that represents the arrangement of dislocations was found to decrease rapidly where a very high work hardening was observed.

  18. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  19. An enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Jung Ju [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju-Won [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae Hyuk [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We propose an enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation. Two additional material constants are considered to follow the stress-temperature diagram above austenite start temperature (As) along with treatment to keep the continuity of the martensite volume fraction and the path dependency of the phase transformation. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed model, we implement this algorithm into ABAQUS user subroutine, then conduct several numerical simulations and compare their results with SMA wire experiments as well as those of three-dimensional SMA constitutive models. From the results, it turns out that the proposed model is as accurate as the three-dimensional models and shows better accuracy over original Brinson model in terms of recovery stress.

  20. Hot deformation behaviour and fracture of 10CrMoWNb ferritic–martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churyumov, A.Yu.; Khomutov, M.G.; Solonin, A.N.; Pozdniakov, A.V.; Churyumova, T.A.; Minyaylo, B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The optimal temperature range for hot deformation of 10CrMoWNb steel was established. • A constitutive Arrhenius-type model of 10CrMoWNb steel was obtained. • The Nb 7 B 4 C 4 phase was identified as a reason of the hot fracture of the steel. - Abstract: High-Cr ferritic–martensitic steels are important materials for use in nuclear reactors. This study describes a development activity for this category of steels involving the investigation of the hot deformation behaviour and microstructure evolution during hot deformation of 10CrMoWNb steel. Hot compression and tension tests were performed in the temperature range of 900–1350 °C by using a Gleeble 3800 thermomechanical simulator. The results indicate that the flow stress and ultimate tensile strength increase with a decrease of the deformation temperature and an increase of the strain rate. Based on the experimental true strain-true stress data, the modified Arrhenius-type constitutive model was established for a form of 10CrMoWNb ferritic–martensitic steel. The hot plasticity properties of the 10CrMoWNb steel increase with temperature up to 1275 °C due to dynamic recrystallisation processes in the austenite phase. The reduction of area decreases when the temperature is higher than 1300 °C and is zero at 1350 °C for all strain rates because of the liquid phase appearance in the structure of the steel

  1. Magnetic nondestructive technology for detection of tempered martensite embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefi, Mehrdad; Rafsanjani, Ali; Kahrobaee, Saeed; Alaee, Moeen

    2012-11-01

    A nondestructive eddy current technique is used to evaluate tempered martensite embrittlement in 4340 AISI steels after quench and tempering in the range 240-550 °C. A relation between the responses of the magnetic induction (normalized impedance of the coil) and destructive Charpy impact test results has been established. The study shows that the eddy current method could be used to separate brittle parts due to the microstructure changes.

  2. The role of adaptive martensite in magnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Rößler, U.K.; Gruner, M.E.; Heczko, Oleg; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2012), s. 562-581 ISSN 1438-1656 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory alloy * ferromagnetic martensite * modulated structure * adaptive phase * mobility of twin boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2012

  3. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  4. Elucidation of mechanism wear carbon steel with structure of martensite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is an estimation of degree of metal hardness change for the railway wheel with martensite structure during rolling. Methodology. As strength characteristic the Rockwell hardness is used. Wear tests were conducted in the conditions of normal loading with (10% and without sliding on the test equipment SMTs-2. Parameters of the fine crystalline structure (tetragonality degree of the crystalline grid, dislocation density, scale of coherent scattering regions, and disturbance value of the crystalline grid of second kind are determined by the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Findings. During operation of the railway wheels with different strength level, origin of defects on the wheel thread is caused by simultaneous action of both the friction forces and the cyclically changing loadings. Considering that formation of damage centers is largely determined by the state of metal volumes near the wheel thread, one should expect the differences in friction processes development at high contact stress for the wheels with different strength level and structural state. Originality. During the wear tests softening effect of carbon steel with martensite quenching structure is obtained. Softening effect equaled 3.5–7% from the level of quenched metal hardness. The softening effect is accompanied by the reduction of tetragonality degree of the crystalline structure of martensite, reduction of coherent scattering regions, dislocation density increase and crystalline grid disturbance of the second kind. Practical value. The results point out the necessity for further studies to clarify the resulted softening effect mechanism.

  5. Investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenite using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.-H.; Oh, C.-S.; Kim, D.H.; Oh, K.H.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Han, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  6. Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Metastable Austenite using Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.-H. [Seoul National University; Oh, C.-S. [Korean Institute of Materials Science; Kim, D. H. [Seoul National University; Oh, K. H. [Seoul National University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Han, H. N. [Seoul National University

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  7. Orientation relationship between austenite and non-modulated martensite in Ni–Mn–Ga single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulist, R.; Faryna, M.; Szczerba, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In-situ electron back scatter diffraction experiments were used to accurately determine the orientation relationships between austenite and martensite in non-modulated Ni–Mn–Ga single crystals. Using a heating stage device direct orientation measurements of austenite and martensite in single-, two- and self-accommodated state were performed. The initial single crystals show a typical self-accommodated microstructure composed of a mixture of variants allowing the distribution of martensitic variants with minimal macroscopic shear. The martensitic variants are observed on different length scales: starting from a few nanometers up to a few micrometers. The corresponding experimental pole figures reveal a strongly asymmetric distribution of martensitic variants with respect to the parent cubic orientation. Combining the microstructural and crystallographic orientation information it is obvious that a hierarchy in twin formation exists. At first the main martensitic variants arise by Bain strain and rigid body rotation. Subsequently, the remaining variants follow a specific crystallographic orientation relationship. Using training procedure a single- or two-variant state in martensite can be obtained. In-situ heating experiments reveal that such configurations show a different orientation relationship between the martensitic variants and austenite compared to that in a self-accommodated state. It strongly suggests that the orientation relationship between these two phases is not strictly fixed, as given by the main models describing this relation, but also depends on the number and width of martensitic variants. The results are discussed with respect to lattice parameters, number of variants and existing models in the literature.

  8. Electron irradiation-induced nanocrystallization of amorphous Fe85B15 alloy: Evidence for athermal nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, W.; Nagase, T.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystallization of amorphous alloys induced by electronic energy deposition has been frequently reported in recent years. In this paper, the crystallization of amorphous Fe 85 B 15 alloy was performed by electron irradiation with 2 MeV electrons up to a flux of 4.0 x 10 24 m -2 s -1 . It was found that at 298 K, nanocrystalline Fe-B intermetallic phases formed prior to α-Fe phase, while at 463 K, only the α-Fe phase was observed. This phenomenon cannot be interpreted in terms of the electron-beam heating, but may be attributed to the irradiation-induced increases in the short-range order and atomic diffusivity. Theoretical analysis also showed that the maximum-temperature rise driven by beam heating is much lower than that required for thermal crystallization. Our work offers strong evidence that the irradiation-induced crystallization in amorphous alloys is not a thermal activation process

  9. Use prospect of the of athermic technologies of metal softening for rolling stock elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Grischenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is the possibility estimation of аthermic technologies use of cold-deformed metal softening for elements of railway car body and wheel. Methodology. The material for research is the carbon steel of the wheel rim fragment containing 0.55%С, 0.74%Mn, 0.33%Si, and the steel 20. The wheel steel is studied after heat strengthening and cold work after operation. Steel 20 is studied after plastic cold work by rolling. Electric pulse treatment (ET is carried out on the special equipment. As the property of metal strength the Vickers hardness number is used. The microstructure research is carried out using the light and electronic microscope. Findings. During operation of the rolling stock elements with different strength level origin of damages on metallic surfaces is caused by a simultaneous load action. Taking into account that forming of breakdown sites is largely determined by the state of metal volumes nearby the places of maximal active voltages, the technology development of defect accumulation slowdown or the level of active voltages development allow one to prolong the operating term of rolling stock elements. After electric pulse treatment of the wheel rim fragment the regular changes of metal internal structure corresponded to the hardness changes. The hardness of low carbon steel increases proportional to the increase of the level of cold work by rolling. Alternating bending of the cold-deformed flat is accompanied by strength decrease, which is caused by the metal substructure changes. Originality. The softening process of the cold-worked steel is accompanied by substructure changes, which to a greater extent correspond to the hardening development from the plastic cold-work: dispersion of the dislocation cellular structure, formation of the new sub boundaries and displacement of the formed sub boundaries. Practical value. Introduction of electric pulse treatment in the conditions of railway depots repair base

  10. Effect of hardness of martensite and ferrite on void formation in dual phase steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, M.; Goutianos, Stergios; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the hardness of martensite and ferrite phases in dual phase steel on void formation has been investigated by in situ tensile loading in a scanning electron microscope. Microstructural observations have shown that most voids form in martensite by evolving four steps: plastic...

  11. Relationship between austenite stability and martensite formation in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Baoqun; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at investigating the relationship between austenite stability and martensite formation in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, the fully austenitized steel was cooled to a temperature above or below the start temperature of martensite transformation (M s o , 406 C), which occurs upon continuous cooling from the austenitizing temperature to room temperature, and held for different times (10 min, 25 min, and 45 min) followed by cooling to room temperature. The concept of primary and secondary martensite is introduced to indicate that two different, sequential, martensites formed in this processing. When cooled to 650 C or 450 C for different times, the austenite stability decreased with prolonged holding time, and during the subsequent cooling the primary martensite start temperature (M s ) was raised to a value higher than M s o . In contrast, M s was reduced to a level lower than M s o when cooled to 420 C or 410 C for 45 min. On the other hand, as the steel was isothermally quenched at temperatures below M s o , during the subsequent cooling a secondary martensite reaction could be observed, and the secondary martensite start temperature (M s ') decreased with holding time. Retained austenite in the form of thin films along martensite lath boundaries was obtained when cooled to 380 C or below for different times. (orig.)

  12. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  13. On the Nature of Internal Interfaces in Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dronhofer, A.; Pešička, J.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2003), s. 511-520 ISSN 0044-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/1172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Tempered martensite ferritic steels * martensite variants * orientation imaging Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.637, year: 2003

  14. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  15. On the multiplication of dislocations during martensitic transformations in NiTi shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simon, T.; Kröger, A.; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2010), s. 1850-1860 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : NiTi * Martensitic transformations * Dislocation multiplication mechanism * Martensite variants * Dislocations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2010

  16. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; Santis, G. de; Filacchioni, G. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Carosi, A.; Amato, S. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali, Rome (Italy)

    1998-10-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties. (orig.) 14 refs.

  17. The morphology of lath martensite: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumatos Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical framework is proposed to predict the features of the (5 5 7 lath transformation in low-carbon steels based on energy minimisation. This theory generates a one-parameter family of possible habit plane normals and a selection mechanism then identifies the (5 5 7 normals as those arising from a deformation with small atomic movement and maximal compatibility. While the calculations bear some resemblance to those of double shear theories, the assumptions and conclusions are different. Interestingly, the predicted microstructure morphology resembles that of plate martensite, in the sense that a type of twinning mechanism is involved.

  18. Martensite and bainite in steels: transformation mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Many essential properties of iron alloys depend on what actually happens when one allotropic form gives way to another, i.e. on the mechanism of phase change. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the atomic mechanism by which bainite and martensite grow is the focus of this paper. The discussion is illustrated in the context of some common engineering design parameters, and with a brief example of the inverse problem in which the mechanism may be a function of the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear, distortive phenomena in solids: Martensitic, crack, and multiscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J.A.; Sethna, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This ongoing program, from the beginning of the first three year grant 1988--1991 and now in the first year of the second phase 1991--1994, has been directed at developing both an understanding of the physics underlying structural transformations in real (alloy) materials as well as new theoretical methods which adequately describe the large (nonlinear) distortions which characterize such processes. We have had a particular interest in martensitic systems, first (1988--1991) in the equilibrium limits, and now (below) in phenomena associated with the transformation process.

  20. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; De Santis, G.; Filacchioni, G.; Carosi, A.; Amato, S.

    1998-10-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties.

  1. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...... stable. Increase in strain, plastic strainand strain hardening lead to strengthening of austenite....

  2. Gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Yun, Hyeonsang; Kim, Dongcheol; Kang, Munjin; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-01-01

    The gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic (MART) steel was evaluated using both inverter direct current (DC) and DC pulse power type welders, under conditions of different welding currents, welding speeds, and shielding gasses. By investigating the bead appearance, tensile strength, and arc stability, it was determined that DC pulse power is better than inverter DC power for arc welding of 1.3 mm thick 1.5 GPa grade MART steel. Further, from the results of the weldability for various shielding gases, it was determined that mixed shielding gas is more effective for welding 1.5 GPa grade MART steel than is pure inert gas (Ar) or active (CO2) gas. In the case of pure shielding gas, no sound bead was formed under any conditions. However, when the mixed shielding gas was used, sound and fine beads were obtained.

  3. Elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels for application to future nuclear reators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, Woo Seog; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-12-15

    The future nuclear systems such as nuclear hydrogen production reactors and fusion reactor require low activation and radiation embrittlement resistance in addition to excellent high temperature properties because their operating temperature are even higher than those of the light water reactors. The R and D of ferritic-martensitic steels in nuclear leading centuries like USA, Japan and EU has been continued for decades of years nuclear and they commercialized several steels. Korea consider modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate materials for reactor pressure vessel of very high temperature reactor. This state-of-the art report aimed to provide informations about the applicabilities of high Cr steels and low Cr steels through the analyses of their microstructures, mechanical properties and radiation characteristics. The metallurgical understanding of background of alloy evolutions might be helpful for the establishment of research orientation.

  4. Athermal laser launch telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphues, F.G.; Henselmans, R.; Rijnveld, N.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Doelman, N.J.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    ESO has developed a concept for a compact laser guide star unit for use in future Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. A small powerful laser is combined with a telescope that launches the beam, creating a single modular unit that can be mounted directly on a large telescope. This approach solves several

  5. Influence of Martensite Volume Fraction on Impact Properties of Triple Phase (TP) Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Ahmad; Ekrami, A.

    2013-03-01

    Ferrite-bainite-martensite triple phase (TP) microstructures with different volume fractions of martensite were obtained by changing heat treatment time during austempering at 300 °C. Room temperature impact properties of TP steels with different martensite volume fractions ( V M) were determined by means of Charpy impact testing. The effects of test temperature on impact properties were also investigated for two selected microstructures containing 0 (the DP steel) and 8.5 vol.% martensite. Test results showed reduction in toughness with increasing V M in TP steels. Fracture toughness values for the DP and TP steels with 8.5 vol.% martensite were obtained from correlation between fracture toughness and the Charpy impact energy. Fractography of Charpy specimens confirmed decrease in TP steels' toughness with increasing V M by considering and comparing radial marks and crack initiation regions at the fracture surfaces of the studied steels.

  6. Isomagnetic martensitic transformation in Ni sub 2 MnGa alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Glavatska, N I

    2000-01-01

    An effect of the magnetic field on the martensitic transformation and the change in the martensitic variants of the alloy Ni sub 2 MnGa containing (at%) 49.6 Ni, 28.4 Mn and 22.0 Ga was studied using X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the applied magnetic field induces martensitic transformation and initiates the development of a preferential martensitic variant. These processes are extended in time, which resembles the isothermal martensitic transformation observed in iron-based alloys. The kinetics of transformation under magnetic field and the after-effect when the field is taken out are studied. The kinetics is shown to depend on the orientation of the applied field in relation to the direction of easy magnetization 1 0 0. The strain induced by the magnetic field is measured and the time dependence of the strain is found in consistence with the results of X-ray diffraction study.

  7. In Situ Study of Phase Transformations during Non-Isothermal Tempering of Bainitic and Martensitic Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hesamodin Talebi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase transformations during non-isothermal tempering of bainitic or martensitic microstructures obtained after quenching of a medium-carbon low-alloy steel was studied. The microstructures correspond to different locations of an as-quenched large-sized forged ingot used as a die material in the automotive industry. High-resolution dilatometry experiments were conducted to simulate the heat treatment process, as well as to investigate different phenomena occurring during non-isothermal tempering. The microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dilatometry analyses demonstrated that tempering behavior varied significantly from bainitic to martensitic microstructures. Retained austenite, which exists between bainitic ferrite sheaves, decomposes to lower bainite causing a remarkable volume increase. It was found that this decomposition finishes below 386 °C. By contrast, martensite tempering was accompanied with a volume decrease due to the decomposition of medium-carbon martensite to low carbon martensite and carbides.

  8. Relationship between thermomechanical treatment, microstructure and α' martensite in stainless Fe-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otubo, J.; Mei, P.R.; Shinohara, A.H.; Suzuki, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents some preliminary results relating training treatment, training temperature and the formation of α' martensite to the shape recovery effect of stainless shape memory alloys. For the composition tested, the sample shows some mechanical memory (constant tensile stress at 4% strain and constant yield stress throughout the training cycles) with a very good shape recovery (95% after 4% tensile strain) at a training temperature of 873 K. Its residual strain is related to the generation of perfect dislocations only. For the sample trained at 723 K, the residual strain could be attributed to incomplete reversion of stress-induced ε martensite, in part due to the blocking effect of α' martensite and also to the generation of perfect dislocations. The influence of α' martensite on shape recovery is relative and is dependent on training temperature, and the preferential growth of α' martensite is shown to occur for large grain size. (orig.)

  9. Dislocation Characteristics in Lath Martensitic Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harjo, S; Kawasaki, T; Gong, W; Aizawa, K

    2016-01-01

    In situ neutron diffraction during tensile deformation of an as-quenched lath martensitic 22SiMn2TiB steel, was performed using a high resolution and high intensity time- of-flight neutron diffractometer. The characterizations of dislocations were analyzed using the classical Williamson-Hall (cWH) and modified Williamson-Hall (mWH) plots on the breadth method, and the convolutional multiple whole profile (CMWP) fitting method. As results, the dislocation density as high as 10 15 m -2 in the as-quenched martensitic steel was determined. The dislocation density was found to decrease qualitatively with plastic deformation by the cWH and mWH plots, but hardly to change by the CMWP method. The scanning transmission electron microscopy observation supported the results of the latter method. In the CMWP method, the parameter M that represents the arrangement of dislocations was found to decrease rapidly where a very high work hardening was observed. (paper)

  10. Mesoscale martensitic transformation in single crystals of topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Zhou, Ye; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-09-05

    Liquid crystal blue phases (BPs) are highly ordered at two levels. Molecules exhibit orientational order at nanometer length scales, while chirality leads to ordered arrays of doubletwisted cylinders over micrometer scales. Past studies of polycrystalline BPs were challenged by grain boundaries between randomly oriented crystalline nanodomains. Here, the nucleation of BPs is controlled with considerable precision by relying on chemically nano-patterned surfaces, leading to macroscopic single-crystal BP specimens where the dynamics of meso-crystal formation can be directly observed. Theory and experiments show that transitions between two BPs having a different network structure proceed through local re-organization of the crystalline array, without diffusion of the double twisted cylinders. In solid crystals, martensitic transformations between crystal structures involve the concerted motion of a few atoms, without diffusion. The transformation between BPs, where crystal features arise in the sub-micron regime, is found to be martensitic in nature, with the diffusion-less feature associated to the collective behavior of the double twist cylinders. Single-crystal BPs are shown to offer fertile grounds for the study of directed crystal-nucleation and the controlled growth of soft matter.

  11. Surface martensitization of Carbon steel using Arc Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Haris; Dimyati, Arbi; Sebayang, Darwin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new technology of surface structure modification of steel by short plasma exposure in Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) device is presented. APS is an apparatus working based on plasma generated by DC pulsed current originally used for synthesizing materials via sintering and melting. Plasma exposure in APS was applied into the specimens for 1 and 3 seconds which generate temperature approximately about 1300-1500°C. The SUP9, pearlitic carbon steel samples were used. The hardness, hardening depth and microstructure of the specimens have been investigated by Vickers micro hardness test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) supported by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results have showed that the mechanical property was significantly improved due to the formation of single martensitic structures as identified by SEM. The hardness of treated surface evaluated by Vickers hardness test showed significant improvement nearly three time from 190 VHN before to 524 VHN after treatment. Furthermore, EDX confirmed that the formation of martensite layer occurred without altering its composition. The APS also produced uniform hardened layer up to 250 μm. The experiment has demonstrated that arc plasma process was successfully improved the mechanical properties of steel in relatively very short time.

  12. Significance of rate of work hardening in tempered martensite embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietikainen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main explanations for tempered martensite embrittlement are based on the effects of impurities and cementite precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries. There are some studies where the rate of work hardening is proposed as a potential reason for the brittleness. One steel was studied by means of a specially developed precision torsional testing device. The test steel had a high Si and Ni content so ε carbide and Fe 3 C appear in quite different tempering temperature ranges. The M S temperature is low enough so that self tempering does not occur. With the testing device it was possible to obtain the true stress - true strain curves to very high deformations. The minimum toughness was always associated with the minimum of rate of work hardening. The change of deformed steel volume before the loss of mechanical stability is proposed as at least one reason for tempered martensite embrittlement. The reasons for the minimum of the rate of work hardening are considered. (orig.)

  13. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are being less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort. (author)

  14. Deformation twinning in irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2018-04-01

    Two different ferritic/martensitic steels were tensile tested to gain insight into the mechanisms of embrittlement induced by the combined effects of displacement damage and helium after proton/neutron irradiation in SINQ, the Swiss spallation neutron source. The irradiation conditions were in the range: 15.8-19.8 dpa (displacement per atom) with 1370-1750 appm He at 245-300 °C. All the samples fractured in brittle mode with intergranular or cleavage fracture surfaces when tested at room temperature (RT) or 300 °C. After tensile test, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to investigate the deformation microstructures. TEM-lamella samples were extracted directly below the intergranular fracture surfaces or cleavage surfaces by using the focused ion beam technique. Deformation twinning was observed in irradiated specimens at high irradiation dose. Only twins with {112} plane were observed in all of the samples. The average thickness of twins is about 40 nm. Twins initiated at the fracture surface, became gradually thinner with distance away from the fracture surface and finally stopped in the matrix. Novel features such as twin-precipitate interactions, twin-grain boundary and/or twin-lath boundary interactions were observed. Twinning bands were seen to be arrested by grain boundaries or large precipitates, but could penetrate martensitic lath boundaries. Unlike the case of defect free channels, small defect-clusters, dislocation loops and dense small helium bubbles were observed inside twins.

  15. Creep characteristics of precipitation hardened carbon free martensitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneki, S.; Igarashi, M.; Abe, F.

    2000-01-01

    A new attempt has been demonstrated using carbon free Fe-Ni-Co martensitic alloys strengthened by Laves phase such as Fe 2 W or Fe 2 Mo to achieve homogeneous creep deformation at high temperatures under low stress levels. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be completely different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The alloys exhibit gradual change in the creep rate with strain both in the transient and acceleration creep regions, and give a larger strain for the minimum creep rate. In these alloys the creep deformation takes place very homogeneously and no heterogeneous creep deformation is enhanced even at low stress levels. The minimum creep rates of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys at 700 C are found to be much lower than that of the conventional steel, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 C in these alloys. It is thus concluded that the Fe-Ni-Co martensite strengthened by Laves phase is very useful to increase the creep resistance at elevated temperatures over 650 C. (orig.)

  16. Effect of hydrostatic pressures on thermoelastic martensitic transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beke, D.L.; Daroczi, L. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Solid State Physics; Lexcellent, C. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Solid State Physics; Besancon Univ., 25 (France). Lab. de Mecanique Appliquee Raymond Chaleat, UFR Sciences et Techniques; Mertinger, V. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Solid State Physics; Miskolc Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Physical Metallurgy

    2001-11-01

    Supposing that - according to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation - the volume change of the transformation is responsible for the pressure dependence of the equilibrium temperature T{sub o}, and that the elastic energy term, e{sub o}, corresponding to the martensite start, M{sub g}, (and austenite finish, A{sub f},) temperatures, differs from zero as well, the pressure dependence of the elastic and dissipative energy terms of the martensitic and reverse transformations can be separated. It is illustrated by the example of our experimental results for the pressure effect on the transformations in Cu-22 at%Zn-12 at%Al-1 at%Mn as well as in near equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloys. The elastic energy term, e{sub o}, showed different behaviour in the low-pressure range for samples of different pre-history, while at high pressures the pressure dependence of the elastic and dissipative terms showed a more general trend. (orig.)

  17. It was the demonstration of industrial steel production capacity ferritic-martensitic Spanish ASTURFER scale demand ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coto, R.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Artimez, J. A.; Belzunce, J.; Sedano, L.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) structural steels are considered as candidate materials with notable possibilities to be incorporated to fusion reactor ITER, nowadays under construction, and future fusion reactor DEMO, involving a notable forecasting of supply materials, with a considerable limitation due to the few number of furnishes currently on the market. The manufacture at an industrial scale of the ASTURFER steel, developed at laboratory scale by ITMA Materials Technology and the Structural Materials Division of the Technology Division of CIEMAT would be a significant business opportunity for steelwork companies.

  18. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  19. Theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongmei M.; Wang, Yu U.; Ren, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pre-martensitic phenomena, also called martensite precursor effects, have been known for decades while yet remain outstanding issues. This paper addresses pre-martensitic phenomena from new theoretical and experimental perspectives. A statistical mechanics-based Grüneisen-type phonon theory is developed. On the basis of deformation-dependent incompletely softened low-energy phonons, the theory predicts a lattice instability and pre-martensitic transition into elastic-phonon domains via 'phonon spinodal decomposition.' The phase transition lifts phonon degeneracy in cubic crystal and has a nature of phonon pseudo-Jahn-Teller lattice instability. The theory and notion of phonon domains consistently explain the ubiquitous pre-martensitic anomalies as natural consequences of incomplete phonon softening. The phonon domains are characterised by broken dynamic symmetry of lattice vibrations and deform through internal phonon relaxation in response to stress (a particular case of Le Chatelier's principle), leading to previously unexplored new domain phenomenon. Experimental evidence of phonon domains is obtained by in situ three-dimensional phonon diffuse scattering and Bragg reflection using high-energy synchrotron X-ray single-crystal diffraction, which observes exotic domain phenomenon fundamentally different from usual ferroelastic domain switching phenomenon. In light of the theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena, currently existing alternative opinions on martensitic precursor phenomena are revisited.

  20. Thermal-expansion anisotropy of orthorhombic martensite in the two-phase (α + β) titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demakov, S. L.; Stepanov, S. I.; Illarionov, A. G.; Ryzhkov, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    Anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) has been revealed along the axes of the crystal lattice of the α″ titanium martensite in the two-phase (α + β) titanium alloy of grade VT16 (Ti-3Al-5V-4.5Mo, wt %). It has been established by the method of in situ X-ray diffraction analysis that the lattice parameter b of the orthorhombic martensite obtained by quenching from different temperatures decreases upon heating. The TECs along the axes of the crystal lattice of the martensite obtained by quenching from different temperatures have been calculated. It has been shown that the uniaxial extension of bars of the VT16 alloy quenched for the metastable β phase with relative deformations of 0.7, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8% leads to the formation of the deformation-induced martensite with an axial texture along the b direction of the martensite lattice. In the course of dilatometric studies of the deformed bars, it has been established that there are two temperature intervals (from-100 to +70°C and from 150 to 300°C) with a low TEC. In the first interval, the value of the TEC varies from-2 × 10-6 to +8 × 10-6 K-1 and is determined by the volume fraction of the oriented α″ martensite. This Invar effect is one-dimensional and is manifested along the b axis of the martensite.

  1. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...

  2. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  3. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  4. Dislocation substructures developed in martensitic steels under thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Armas, I.; Armas, A. F.; Petersen, C.

    1992-09-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were carried out on a martensitic steel, DIN denomination W. Nr. 1.4914, commonly named MANET I. The tests were performed in air by allowing the sample to serve as its own heater and converting any longitudinal thermal deformation of the specimen into elastic or inelastic deformation. The low temperature was held constant and equal to 473 K and variable values, 823, 873, 923, 973 K for the high temperature were selected. The effects of different thermal cycling ranges on the mechanical behavior and the accompanying microstructural changes in the specimen were evaluated. A continous softening preceded by a stability period was observed in all thermal fatigue tests. Higher temperature changes produce an accelerated softening process. The original lath structure evolves to a mixed structure of expanded laths and subgrains or a fully subgrain structure depending on the temperature range.

  5. Nitrogen alloying of the 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Artem'eva, D. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of the nitrogen content on the structure and mechanical properties of heat and corrosion resistant 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel developed at the Central Research Institute of Structural Materials Prometey has been studied. Steel containing 0.061 wt % nitrogen possesses a high level of mechanical properties. The decrease in the nitrogen content to 0.017 wt % leads to an increase of structurally free ferrite fraction in the steel, a decrease in the density of dislocations, a decrease of structural dispersity and the absence of finely dispersed precipitates of niobium and vanadium nitrides and carbides. As a result, there is a decrease in the strength properties, especially in the heat resistance.

  6. Thermal expansion of martensitic A15 superconductors: V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, T.R.; Liu, M.; Smith, T.F.

    1995-01-01

    The martensite phase morphology of V 3 Si has been controlled by the application of appropriate stress fields to a single crystal. With this procedure, it is possible to transform the crystal to a single, tetragonal domain, enabling the thermal expansion coefficients for the tetragonal a and c axes to be measured, using high-resolution, capacitance dilatometry. Expansion anomalies were found at low temperatures, well below the superconducting critical temperature, for both the a and c axes. The tetragonality continues increasing on cooling at low temperatures, which, predicted by theory, should have been inhibited by the onset of superconductivity. In addition, anisotropy in thermal expansion is found up to 50 K, which is well above the conventional M s temperature of 21 K. (orig.)

  7. Microstructural evolution of martensitic steels during fast neutron iradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of martensitic/ferritic steels with fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) to displacement damage levels of 30--50 dpa at temperatures of 300--500 degree C produces significant changes in the as-tempered microstructure. Dislocation loops and networks can be produced, irradiation-induced precipitates can form, the lath/subgrain boundary structure and the thermal precipitates produced during tempering can become unstable, and if helium is present, bubbles and voids can form. These microstructural changes caused by irradiation can have important effects on the properties of this class of steels for both fast breeder reactor (FBR) and magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) applications. The purpose of this paper is to compare reactor-irradiated and long-term thermally aged 9Cr--1MoVNb specimens, in order to distinguish effects due to displacement damage from those caused by elevated-temperature exposure alone. 7 refs., 1 fig

  8. Influence of the welding process on martensitic high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hanus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is martensitic 22MnB5 steels, which are used in the automotive industry. The main purpose of the performed analyses is a study of strength differences in heat affected zones of the spot welding. For the needs of the strength decrease assessment, the critical layer of the heat affected area was experimentally simulated. The aim of the work is to determine the most suitable methodology for evaluating the local changes of the elastic-plastic material response. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal methods for the determination of the yield strength and to find a firming trend in these zones.

  9. Magnetic domains in Ni-Mn-Ga martensitic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, V A; Anton, R Lopez; Kohl, M; Ohtsuka, M; Orue, I; Barandiaran, J M

    2005-01-01

    A series of martensitic Ni 52 Mn 24 Ga 24 thin films deposited on alumina ceramic substrates has been prepared by using RF(radio-frequency) magnetron sputtering. The film thickness, d, varies from 0.1 to 5.0m. Magnetic domain patterns have been imaged by the MFM (magnetic force microscopy) technique. A maze domain structure is found for all studied films. MFM shows a large out-of-plane magnetization component and a rather uniform domain width for each film thickness. The domain width, δ, depends on the film thickness as δ∝√d in the whole studied range of film thickness. This dependence is the expected one for magnetic anisotropy and magnetostatic contributions in a perpendicular magnetic domain configuration. The proportionality coefficient is also consistent with the values of saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy determined in the samples

  10. Unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition – A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Ni, Yan; Gao, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the unique properties of strain glass which is different from that of normal martensite. ► We describe the importance of point defects in the formation of strain glass and related properties. ► The role of point defect can be attributed to global transition temperature effect (GTTE) and local field effect (LFE). -- Abstract: The transition behavior and unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition are investigated by computer simulations using the phase field method. The simulations are based on a physical model that assumes that point defects alter the thermodynamic stability of martensite and create local lattice distortion. The simulation results show that strain glass transition exhibits different properties from those found in normal martensitic transformations. These unique properties include diffuse scattering pattern, “smear” elastic modulus peak, disappearance of heat flow peak and non-ergodicity. These simulation predictions agree well with the experimental observations

  11. Electronic structure and phase stability during martensitic transformation in Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Feng; Shen Ping; Liu Tao; Lin Qiaoli; Jiang Qichuan

    2010-01-01

    Martensitic transformation, phase stability and electronic structure of Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics were investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations using the pseudopotentials plane wave method. The formation energy calculations indicate that the stability of the ZrCu phase increases with the increasing Al content. Al plays a decisive role in controlling the formation and microstructures of the martensite phases in Zr-Cu-Al alloys. The total energy difference between ZrCu (B2) austenite and ZrCu martensite plays an important role in the martensitic transformation. The phase stability is dependent on its electronic structure. The densities of states (DOS) of the intermetallics were discussed in detail.

  12. Structure of martensitic phase and phonon instability in Cu61Zn39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Akio; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Noda, Yukio

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the martensitic phase transformation in Cu 61 Zn 39 , neutron elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were performed at JRR-2 and JRR-3M of JAERI and HFIR or Oak Ridge National Laboratry. Measurements of phonon dispersion curve indicate that the entire TA 2 [110] phonon mode is extremely soft and shows further softening on decreasing temperature. However, no anomalies in dispersion relations found in other directions studied. The structure of the martensite phase was investigated by using a WAND spectrometer on (HHL) and (HKO) planes. Analysis of two-dimensional intensity data indicates that the structure of martensite phase in Cu 61 Zn 39 is slightly different from the 9R' structure reported by Tadaki et al. We propose a mixed phase of a distorted CsCl structure and a three-period lattice as the structure of martensite phase. (author)

  13. A Shear Strain Route Dependency of Martensite Formation in 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jang, Jinsung; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of simple shearing on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Two different shear strain routes were obtained by twisting cylindrical specimens in the forward and backward directions. The strain-induced martensite phase was effectively obtained by alteration of the routes. Formation of the martensite phase clearly resulted in significant hardening of the steel. Grain-size reduction and strain-induced martensitic transformation within the deformed structures of the strained specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy - electron back-scattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and the TEM-ASTAR (transmission electron microscopy - analytical scanning transmission atomic resolution, automatic crystal orientation/phase mapping for TEM) system. Significant numbers of twin networks were formed by alteration of the shear strain routes, and the martensite phases were nucleated at the twin interfaces.

  14. Hardness of AISI type 410 martensitic steels after high temperature irradiation via nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Owais Ahmed; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Park, Byong-Guk; Maeng, Cheol-Soo; Lee, Myoung-Goo; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2017-11-01

    The hardness of irradiated AISI type 410 martensitic steel, which is utilized in structural and magnetic components of nuclear power plants, is investigated in this study. Proton irradiation of AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples was carried out by exposing the samples to 3 MeV protons up to a 1.0 × 1017 p/cm2 fluence level at a representative nuclear reactor coolant temperature of 350 °C. The assessment of deleterious effects of irradiation on the micro-structure and mechanical behavior of the AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples via transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy and cross-sectional nano-indentation showed no significant variation in the microscopic or mechanical characteristics. These results ensure the integrity of the structural and magnetic components of nuclear reactors made of AISI type 410 martensitic steel under high-temperature irradiation damage levels up to approximately 5.2 × 10-3 dpa.

  15. Martensitic transformation during fatigue testing of an AISI 301LN steel

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo García, Antonio Manuel; Fargas Ribas, Gemma; Zapata Dederle, Ana Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The plastic deformation accumulated during fatigue testing can induce the transformation of austenite to martensite in metastable austenitic stainless steels. To analyze this issue, a metastable austenitic stainless steel grade AISI 301 LN was studied in two different conditions, i.e. annealed and cold rolled. In the first case, the steel was fully austenitic, whereas cold rolled material had almost 30% of martensite. High cycle fatigue tests at a stress ratio of 0.8 were carried out on flat ...

  16. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    temperature (DBTT) and lower upper shelf energy (USE) obtained via a Charpy impact test (austenitic steels , however, do not experience DBTT) as seen in...ALLOYING OF REFRACTORY METALS IN AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS by Alexander L. McGinnis March 2012 Thesis Advisor: Luke...Ferritic/Martensitic Steels 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Alexander L. McGinnis 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  17. Martensitic Transformation in Ultrafine-Grained Stainless Steel AISI 304L Under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Werner Höppel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of ultrafine-grained metastable austenitic steel AISI 304L, produced by severe plastic deformation, was investigated. Under monotonic loading, the martensitic phase transformation in the ultrafine-grained state is strongly favored. Under cyclic loading, the martensitic transformation behavior is similar to the coarse-grained condition, but the cyclic stress response is three times larger for the ultrafine-grained condition.

  18. Effect of martensitic transformation on springback behavior of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, H.; Mohammadian Semnani, H. R.; Emadoddin, E.; Sadeghi, B. Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The present paper studies the effect of martensitic transformation on the springback behavior of 304L austenitic stainless steel. Martensite volume fraction was determined at the bent portion under various strain rates after bending test. Martensitic transformation has a significant effect on the springback behavior of this material. The findings of this study indicated that the amount of springback was reduced under a situation of low strain rate, while a higher amount of springback was obtained with a higher strain rate. The reason for this phenomenon is that higher work hardening occurs during the forming process with the low strain rate due to the higher martensite volume fraction, therefore the formability of the sheet is enhanced and it leads to a decreased amount of springback after the bending test. Dependency of the springback on the martensite volume fraction and strain rate was expressed as formulas from the results of the experimental tests and simulation method. Bending tests were simulated using LS-DYNA software and utilizing MAT_TRIP to determine the martensite volume fraction and strain under various strain rates. Experimental result reveals good agreement with the simulation method.

  19. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the Ms temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Stumpf, Waldo; Berg, Nic van der

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M s temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M s temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  20. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the M{sub s} temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maweja, Kasonde, E-mail: mawejak@yahoo.fr [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, Materials Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Stumpf, Waldo [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, Nic van der [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2009-08-30

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M{sub s} temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M{sub s} temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  1. In-situ neutron diffraction analysis on deformation behavior of duplex high Mn steel containing austenite and ɛ-martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki Hyuk; Jeong, Jae Suk; Choi, Jong-Kyo; Koo, Yang Mo; Tomota, Yo; Kim, Nack J.

    2012-10-01

    The deformation behavior of Fe-17Mn-0.02C steel containing ɛ-martensite within austenite matrix has been investigated via in-situ neutron diffraction study at 298 K and 77 K. Based on the analyses of changes in phase fraction and lattice strain, it has been shown that the steel shows the deformation-induced phase transformation of austenite → ɛ-martensite → α'-martensite and the direct transformation of austenite → α'-martensite at both temperatures. However, the kinetics of such transformations vary with temperature, resulting in a higher and more persistent work hardening at 77 K than at 298 K.

  2. Martensitic phase transition in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni shape memory alloys studied by Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczykowski, B; Mielcarek, S; Mroz, B; Breczewski, T; No, M L; San-Juan, J

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of the martensitic phase transition on hypersonic thermally excited surface acoustic waves propagating in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni (wt%) shape memory alloy. Non-destructive and non-contact testing using Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy permitted determination of the elastic constants of austenite versus temperature. Experimental results obtained for martensite were interpreted using the proposed model of the cubic to orthorhombic martensitic phase transition based on the Landau model of a first-order phase transition. Additionally we adopted the approximation of the domain structure of martensite by a polycrystalline sample using the Voigt–Reuss–Hill procedure of averaging the elastic constants. (paper)

  3. Composite Behavior of Lath Martensite Steels Induced by Plastic Strain, a New Paradigm for the Elastic-Plastic Response of Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungár, Tamás; Harjo, Stefanus; Kawasaki, Takuro; Tomota, Yo; Ribárik, Gábor; Shi, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    Based on high-resolution neutron diffraction experiments, we will show that in lath martensite steels, the initially homogeneous dislocation structure, i.e., homogeneous on the length scale of grain size, is disrupted by plastic deformation, which, in turn, produces a composite on the length scale of martensite lath packets. The diffraction patterns of plastically strained martensitic steel reveal characteristically asymmetric peak profiles in the same way as has been observed in materials with heterogeneous dislocation structures. The quasi homogeneous lath structure, formed by quenching, is disrupted by plastic deformation producing a composite structure. Lath packets oriented favorably or unfavorably for dislocation glide become soft or hard. Two lath packet types develop by work softening or work hardening in which the dislocation densities become smaller or larger compared to the initial average dislocation density. The decomposition into soft and hard lath packets is accompanied by load redistribution and the formation of long-range internal stresses between the two lath packet types. The composite behavior of plastically deformed lath martensite opens a new way to understand the elastic-plastic response in this class of materials.

  4. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  5. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  7. Martensitic/ferritic super heat-resistant 650 C steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agamennone, R.; Blum, W. [IWW-LS1, Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Berger, C.; Granacher, J.; Scholz, A.; Wang, Y. [IfW, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Ehlers, J.; Ennis, P.J.; Quadakkers, J.W.; Singheiser, L. [IWV2, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Inden, G.; Knezevic, V.; Sauthoff, G.; Vilk, J. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    World-wide demand for higher steam parameters of ultra super critical (USC) Power Plants has led to developments of new materials with improved high-temperature properties. A new project aims at new ferritic creep-resistant steels for application at 650 C and 300 bar. The critical issues are improvement of long-term creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. The aim of the present research is to design new super heat-resistant martensitic/ferritic 9-12%Cr steels using basic principles and concepts of physical metallurgy, to test and optimise model alloys and to investigate and clarify their behaviour under long-term creep conditions with emphasis on microstructural stability and corrosion resistance. Model alloys have been designed, produced and tested with respect to deformation and corrosion. The design of model alloys has been supported by theoretical simulations and transmission electron microscopy investigations. First results for various modified 12%Cr model steels are reported, which indicate a high potential for reaching sufficient creep and corrosion resistance at 650 C. The work with further optimisation of composition and microstructure is in progress. (orig.)

  8. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  9. Static Recrystallization Behavior of Z12CN13 Martensite Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Min; Zhou, Bing; Li, Rong-bin; Xu, Chun; Guo, Yan-hui

    2017-09-01

    In order to increase the hot workability and provide proper hot forming parameters of forging Z12CN13 martensite stainless steel for the simulation and production, the static recrystallization behavior has been studied by double-pass hot compression tests. The effects of deformation temperature, strain rate and inter-pass time on the static recrystallization fraction by the 2% offset method are extensively studied. The results indicate that increasing the inter-pass time and the deformation temperature as well as strain rate appropriately can increase the fraction of static recrystallization. At the temperature of 1050-1150 °C, inter-pass time of 30-100 s and strain rate of 0.1-5 s-1, the static recrystallization behavior is obvious. In addition, the kinetics of static recrystallization behavior of Z12CN13 steel has been established and the activation energy of static recrystallization is 173.030 kJ/mol. The substructure and precipitates have been studied by TEM. The results reveal that the nucleation mode is bulging at grain boundary. Undissolved precipitates such as MoNi3 and Fe3C have a retarding effect on the recrystallization kinetics. The effect is weaker than the accelerating effect of deformation temperature.

  10. First-principles screening of structural properties of intermetallic compounds on martensitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ikeda, Yuji; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-11-01

    Martensitic transformation with good structural compatibility between parent and martensitic phases are required for shape memory alloys (SMAs) in terms of functional stability. In this study, first-principles-based materials screening is systematically performed to investigate the intermetallic compounds with the martensitic phases by focusing on energetic and dynamical stabilities as well as structural compatibility with the parent phase. The B2, D03, and L21 crystal structures are considered as the parent phases, and the 2H and 6M structures are considered as the martensitic phases. In total, 3384 binary and 3243 ternary alloys with stoichiometric composition ratios are investigated. It is found that 187 alloys survive after the screening. Some of the surviving alloys are constituted by the chemical elements already widely used in SMAs, but other various metallic elements are also found in the surviving alloys. The energetic stability of the surviving alloys is further analyzed by comparison with the data in Materials Project Database (MPD) to examine the alloys whose martensitic structures may cause further phase separation or transition to the other structures.

  11. Higher order twin modes in martensitic NiTi-The (201 Macron ) case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezaz, T., E-mail: tezaz@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sehitoglu, H., E-mail: huseyin@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Abuzaid, W. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Maier, H.J. [University of Paderborn, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde, D-33095 Paderborn (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    NiTi alloys in the martensitic phase deform by detwinning of the martensite variants succeeded by deformation twinning of the single crystal of martensite. One of the deformation twinning modes of the martensite is denoted as (201{sup Macron })[1{sup Macron }02{sup Macron }]. In this work, we establish how twinning on the (201{sup Macron }) planes develops via the combination of homogeneous shear and shuffle and establish its energy barrier via atomistic simulations. We calculate the slip barrier in addition to the twin barrier ruling out the potential for plastic flow via slip in the (201{sup Macron }) plane. The (201{sup Macron })[1{sup Macron }02{sup Macron }] mode succeeds the (001) and (100) compound twinning modes which have lower energy barriers. It plays a significant role in allowing deformation to higher strains in the martensitic phase. Therefore, the insight into the (201{sup Macron })[1{sup Macron }02{sup Macron }] twinning mode is important in extending the shape memory strains in NiTi alloys and towards better understanding of shape memory alloys in general.

  12. γ→α’ Martensitic Transformation in the Reactor Steels Under Irradiation and Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya ALONTSEVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex studies of the 12Cr18Ni10Ti and Cr15Mn14 reactor steels in the initial, deformed states, and after irradiation with the  and WC+ heavy ions were conducted. Peculiarities of the α’-martensite phase content and mechanical characteristics of the specimens, which were deformed after the irradiation were examined. It was shown that the martensite phase existed in the irradiated and deformed specimen at two scale levels. Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD revealed that the difference between the unirradiated and irradiated specimens was the formation of the α’-martensite and ε-martensite in the near surface layer of the irradiated specimen. It was determined that the fluence value has affect on the α’-magnetic phase. Thus, chrome-nickel steels of 12Cr18Ni10Ti type show better resistance to irradiation with the heavy WC+ ions in comparison with manganese steel of Cr15Mn14 type, as less martensite of irradiation forms in them.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.1904

  13. Compact tension testing of martensitic/pseudoplastic NiTi shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollerthan, S. [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: susanne.gollerthan@rub.de; Herberg, D. [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Baruj, A. [TEMADI, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Eggeler, G. [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2008-05-25

    NiTi shape memory alloys show unique properties such as pseudoelasticity and the one-way effect, both based on a martensitic phase transformation between a high temperature phase (B2) and a low temperature phase (B19'). When a martensitic, pseudoplastic alloy is subjected to a stress, favourably oriented martensite variants grow. In the present work we study how pseudoplasticity affects the mechanical behaviour of fracture mechanics compact tension (CT) specimens. For this purpose we have scaled down CT specimens of type ASTM Standard E399. We use a smaller specimen for two reasons. (1) NiTi is more expensive than, e.g. structural steel and there is a need to economise specimen material. (2) And more importantly, we need specimen thicknesses which are transparent to high-energy synchrotron radiation because we aim at characterizing microstructural and crystallographic changes in front of cracks. The present work reports mechanical results from fracture mechanics testing of a martensitic, pseudoplastic microstructure. We use approaches from linear elastic fracture mechanics to determine critical stress intensity factors and to obtain estimates on the dimensions of pseudoplastic zones in front of crack tips in martensitic NiTi.

  14. Superelasticity and shape memory at nano-scale: Size effects on the martensitic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Juan, J., E-mail: jose.sanjuan@ehu.es [Dpt. Física Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Nó, M.L. [Dpt. Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Shape memory alloys exhibit different properties at nano-scale than in bulk materials. ► An overview of the size-effects at nano-scale on the martensitic transformation is presented. ► The size-effects observed on the superelastic behavior at nano-scale are explained in terms of the microscopic mechanisms operating at this small scale. -- Abstract: In this work we overview the extrinsic size-effects on the martensitic transformation reported in the literature by nano compression tests in micro and sub-micrometer pillars, as well as by in situ superelastic tests at the transmission electron microscope. Three different size-effects are described: The increase of the critical stress for superelasticity at nano scale, the decrease of the stress for recovery during the reverse stress-induced martensitic transformation at micro and nano scale and finally the change of the selection rule for the martensitic variants promoted at micro and nano scale. New results are presented to illustrate the behavior of these size-effects and the microscopic origin of such effects is discussed. A consistent interpretation is given and explained for each one of the reported size-effects on the martensitic transformation.

  15. Martensite phase stress and the strengthening mechanism in TRIP steel by neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjo, Stefanus; Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu

    2017-11-09

    Two TRIP-aided multiphase steels with different carbon contents (0.2 and 0.4 mass%) were analyzed in situ during tensile deformation by time-of-flight neutron diffraction to clarify the deformation induced martensitic transformation behavior and its role on the strengthening mechanism. The difference in the carbon content affected mainly the difference in the phase fractions before deformation, where the higher carbon content increased the phase fraction of retained austenite (γ). However, the changes in the relative fraction of martensitic transformation with respect to the applied strain were found to be similar in both steels since the carbon concentrations in γ were similar regardless of different carbon contents. The phase stress of martensite was found much larger than that of γ or bainitic ferrite since the martensite was generated at the beginning of plastic deformation. Stress contributions to the flow stress were evaluated by multiplying the phase stresses and their phase fractions. The stress contribution from martensite was observed increasing during plastic deformation while that from bainitic ferrite hardly changing and that from γ decreasing.

  16. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Martensitic Transformation During Hot Stamping of Complex Structure Auto Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuhan; Song, Yanli; Hua, Lin; Lu, Jue

    2017-04-01

    The ultra-high strength steel auto parts manufactured by hot stamping are widely applied for weight reduction and safety improvement. During the hot stamping process, hot forming and quenching are performed in one step wherein plastic deformation and phase transformation simultaneously take place and affect each other. Thereinto, the influence of deformation on martensitic transformation is of great importance. In the present paper, the influence of plastic deformation on martensitic transformation during hot stamping of complex structure auto parts was investigated. For this purpose, a B-pillar reinforced panel in B1500HS steel was manufactured by hot stamping, and the process was simulated by finite element software based on a thermo-mechanical-metallurgical coupled model. Considering various deformation degrees, the microstructures and mechanical properties at four typical locations of the hot stamped B-pillar reinforced panel were detected. The results show that the martensitic content and the microhardness increase with the increase in the deformation amount. There are two reasons causing this phenomenon: (1) the increase in mechanical driving force and (2) the increased probability of the martensitic nucleation at crystal defects. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates the carbon enrichment in retained austenite which results from the carbon diffusion during the low-carbon martensite formation. Furthermore, the carbon content decreases with the increase in the deformation amount, because the deformation of austenite suppresses the carbon diffusion.

  17. Formation and properties of chromium nitride coatings on martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendala, B.; Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on martensitic E1961 (13H12NWMFA) steel, which is used on compressor blades in the aircraft engines, were presented. The chemical composition of E1961 was given. The PVT-550 device was used for coating. The protective chromium nitride coatings were tested. The influence of ARC-PVD method parameters for example: bias, pressure and flow rate of reactive gases on the structure and properties of the CrN coatings in corrosion tests were investigated. Technical parameters of obtained CrN coatings were given. The phase analysis of chromium nitride coatings obtained with different technical parameters were tested. The results of phase analysis are given. The pitting corrosion resistance tests in 10% FeCl 3 solution was conducted. The corrosion rate for CrN coated samples were defined. It was found that 50 V and 100 V bias, about 0.5 and 0.7 Pa pressure and 140 sccm (standard cubic centimeter) flow rate of nitride during coating favour the CrN monophase structure while increasing bias to 150 V, decreasing the pressure to about 0.5 Pa and 0.3 Pa and increasing the flow rate of nitride to 160 - 180 sccm favour the CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure. On the basis of corrosion investigations for CrN coatings obtained with different ARC-PVD parameters the best corrosion resistance in 10% FeCl 3 solution for CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure was found. (author)

  18. A Model for Converting Dilatometric Strain Measurements to the Fraction of Phase Formed during the Transformation of Austenite to Martensite in Powder Metallurgy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warke, Virendra S.; Sisson, Richard D.; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2009-03-01

    A model is developed to allow converting dilatometric strains that occur during the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) of austenite to martensite to volume fraction martensite formed in powder metallurgy steels. Unlike existing models, this model can accurately account for the observed decrease in the measured transformation strain with increased porosity. As a demonstration, the model is used to accurately calculate the volume fraction of martensite formed during the CCT of austenite to martensite in FL-4605 PM steel.

  19. The effects of martensite morphology on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and hydrogen assisted cracking in A516 grade steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, M.; Tayyaba, Q.; Manzoor, T.; ud-din, Rafi; Subhani, T.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    A low carbon A516 steel (0.2% C) having 0.9% Mn content has been annealed at 760 °C with predominantly austenite and martensite input structure. This treatment lead to a dual phase (DP) ferrite–martensite microstructures with 50% martensite volume fraction in two morphologies, i.e. bulk martensite (BM) and fibrous martensite (FM) respectively. The ferrite–martensite DP steels exhibits much higher strength (∼2 times) than ferrite–pearlite (FP) steel albeit with lower elongation (50%). The martensite morphology does not affect the uniform elongation but FM morphology exhibits higher strain to fracture. However, the corrosion rate is effected by the fraction of interfaces rather than the type of constituent phase. The BM condition with minimum interfaces has the least corrosion rate in weak acidic solution. The DP steels are more disposed to hydrogen embrittlement than FP steel. This phenomena causes a lowering of flow stress and strain fracture, the former is more progressive with rise in temperature than the latter. The crack nucleation is directly related to the corrosion rate, however despite twofold higher corrosion rate in BM condition, the extent of hydrogen embrittlement in both morphologies is similar because of the connected ferrite–martensite boundaries in BM morphology.

  20. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  1. Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys Mn2YIn (Y=Ni, Pd and Pt): Theoretical and experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hongzhi; Liu, Bohua; Xin, Yuepeng; Jia, Pengzhong; Meng, Fanbin; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation and electronic structure of Heusler alloys Mn 2 YIn (Y=Ni, Pd, Pt) have been investigated by both first-principles calculation and experimental investigation. Theoretical calculation reveals that, the energy difference ΔE between the tetragonal martensitic phase and cubic austenitic phase increases with Y varying from Ni to Pt in Mn 2 YIn. Thus a structural transition from cubic to tetragonal is most likely to happen in Heusler alloy Mn 2 PtIn. A single Heusler phase can be obtained in both Mn 2 PtIn and Mn 2 PdIn. A martensitic transformation temperature of 615 K has been identified in Mn 2 PtIn. And in Mn 2 PdIn, the austenitic phase is stable and no martensitic transformation is observed till 5 K. This indicates there may exist a positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature. Calculated results show that Mn 2 YIn are all ferrimagnets in both austenitic and martensitic phases. The magnetic properties are mainly determined by the antiparallel aligned Mn spin moments. These findings can help to develop new FSMAs with novel properties. - Highlights: • Positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature has been observed. • Heusler alloy Mn 2 PdIn has been synthesized successfully and investigated. • Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys can be predicted by first -principles calculations

  2. Sub-zero austenite to martensite transformation in a Fe-Ni-0.6wt.%C alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a model Fe-Ni-0.6wt%C alloy was investigated at sub-zero Celsius temperature. The influence of the thermal path in determining the conditions leading to the formation of martensite was studied. In the investigation, samples were austenitized and quenched, whereafter...

  3. Controlling the work hardening of martensite to increase the strength/ductility balance in quenched and partitioned steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Findley, K.O.; Hidalgo Garcia, J.; Huizenga, R.M.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of retained austenite on tensile behavior in quenched and partitioned (Q&P) steels has been studied extensively, but the deformation behavior of martensite, which comprises the majority of Q&P microstructures, has received less attention. In this investigation, martensite

  4. Insight into the Effects of Reinforcement Shape on Achieving Continuous Martensite Transformation in Phase Transforming Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Ren, Junqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Ding, Xiangdong

    2017-12-01

    A continuous martensite transformation is indispensable for achieving large linear superelasticity and low modulus in phase transforming metal-based composites. However, determining how to accurately condition the residual martensite in a shape memory alloy matrix though the reinforcement shape to achieve continuous martensite transformation has been a challenge. Here, we take the finite element method to perform a comparative study of the effects of nanoinclusion shape on the interaction and martensite phase transformation in this new composite. Two typical samples are compared: one reinforced by metallic nanowires and the other by nanoparticles. We find that the residual martensite within the shape memory alloy matrix after a pretreatment can be tailored by the reinforcement shape. In particular, our results show that the shape memory alloy matrix can retain enough residual martensite phases to achieve continuous martensite transformation in the subsequent loading when the aspect ratio of nanoreinforcement is larger than 20. In contrast, the composites reinforced with spherical or low aspect ratio reinforcement show a typical nonlinear superelasticity as a result of a low stress transfer-induced discontinuous martensite transformation within the shape memory alloy matrix.

  5. Low-temperature X-ray diffraction study of martensite lattice parameters in binary Ti-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Korotitskiy, A.V.; Gundyrev, V.M.; Zeldovich, V.I.

    2008-01-01

    Concentration and temperature dependency of the B19'-martensite lattice parameters (MLP) in binary Ti-Ni alloys as well as the effect of the structural state of a parent austenite on these parameters were studied using low-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. The existence of a concentration dependence of the MLP found for the hyper-equiatomic nickel concentration range is proved for cryogenic temperature range and extended, at least, up to 51.2 at.% of nickel. Temperature dependency of MLP is observed in the studied nickel concentration range, and they are approximately the same for different alloys in the temperature range of stable martensite. During heating in the temperature range of the martensite existence, all parameters of the B19'-martensite monoclinic cell change towards the values of corresponding parameters of the austenite tetragonal cell with which they have 'genetic' relations. The maximum transformation lattice strain calculated at the martensite-start temperature of each alloy, and, hence, the resource of the recoverable strain, are higher for pre-equiatomic and equiatomic alloys than that for alloys in hyper-equiatomic nickel concentration range. For Ti-50.7 at.% Ni alloy, the lattice parameters of martensite formed from the austenite containing a well-developed dislocation substructure deviate from the corresponding lattice parameters of the quenched martensite formed from a low-dislocated recrystallized austenite. This distinction is a general feature for the alloys undergoing B2 → B19' and B2 → R → B19' martensitic transformations

  6. Structural properties, deformation behavior and thermal stability of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenisch, Matthias

    2016-06-10

    Ti-Nb alloys are characterized by a diverse metallurgy which allows obtaining a wide palette of microstructural configurations and physical properties via careful selection of chemical composition, heat treatment and mechanical processing routes. The present work aims to expand the current state of knowledge about martensite forming Ti-Nb alloys by studying 15 binary Ti-c{sub Nb}Nb (9 wt.% ≤ c{sub Nb} ≤ 44.5 wt.%) alloy formulations in terms of their structural and mechanical properties, as well as their thermal stability. The crystal structures of the martensitic phases, α{sup '} and α'', and the influence of the Nb content on the lattice (Bain) strain and on the volume change related to the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations are analyzed on the basis of Rietveld-refinements. The magnitude of the shuffle component of the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations is quantified in relation to the chemical composition. The largest transformation lattice strains are operative in Nb-lean alloys. Depending on the composition, both a volume dilatation and contraction are encountered and the volume change may influence whether hexagonal martensite α{sup '} or orthorhombic martensite α'' forms from β upon quenching. The mechanical properties and the deformation behavior of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys are studied by complementary methods including monotonic and cyclic uniaxial compression, nanoindentation, microhardness and impulse excitation technique. The results show that the Nb content strongly influences the mechanical properties of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys. The elastic moduli, hardness and strength are minimal in the vicinity of the limiting compositions bounding the interval in which orthorhombic martensite α'' forms by quenching. Uniaxial cyclic compressive testing demonstrates that the elastic properties of strained samples are different than those of unstrained ones

  7. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstra......A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation...... transformation are totally suppressed. Graded and localized distributions of grain sizes of nitinol were compared with nitinol samples with homogeneous grain size distribution. In the materials with localized region of small grains, it was observed that the martensite rich regions form first on the border...

  8. Martensitic fcc-to-hcp transformations in solid xenon under pressure: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunja; Nicol, Malcolm; Cynn, Hyunchae; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2006-01-27

    First-principles calculations reveal that the fcc-to-hcp pressure-induced transformation in solid xenon proceeds through two mechanisms between 5 and 70 GPa. The dynamics of the phase transition involves a sluggish stacking-disorder growth at lower pressures (path I) that changes to a path involving an orthorhombic distortion at higher pressures (path II). The switchover is governed by a delicate interplay of energetics (enthalpy of the system for the structural stability) and kinetics (energy barrier for the transition). The two types of martensitic transformations involved in this pressure-induced structural transformation are a twinned martensitic transition at lower pressures and a slipped martensitic transition at higher pressures.

  9. Electron microscope study of the genesis of strain-induced martensite embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Hecker, S.S.; Murr, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Previous work of Olson and Cohen and Murr, et al., is used to describe the genesis of martensite embryos which form at the intersection of microscopic shear bands in deformed type 304 stainless steel. It is shown that the intersection volume included within intersecting shear bands contains irregular and smaller dispersed volume segments forming α' martensite (bcc). These correspond to the satisfaction of specific intersections of stacking faults or partial dislocations on approximately every second (111)/sub fcc/ plane in one direction, and every third (111)/sub fcc/ plane in the other (conjugate) direction. The requisite stacking fault or partial dislocation arrangements are produced in an irregular fashion resulting in α' martensite embryos nucleating in an incomplete and irregular fashion within the intersection volume. 9 references, 2 figures

  10. Study of ferromagnetic Co-Ni-Al alloys with thermoelastic L10 martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiullin, A.I.; Kositsin, S.V.; Kositsina, I.I.; Kataeva, N.V.; Zavalishin, V.A.

    2006-01-01

    Alloys of the 37-39 at.% Co-32-34 at.% Ni-28-30 at.% Al system, which were prepared by quick spinning-melt quenching and had a microcrystalline structure, were studied using electron microscopy, resistometry and magnetometry. It was shown that the temperature interval of the β(B2) → L1 0 martensitic transformation depended on the composition and the structural size of the alloys. When 1 at.% Co and 1 at.% Al were replaced by Ni, the temperature interval of the B2 ↔ L1 0 martensitic transformation increased by 30-60 and 100-110 K, respectively. The martensitic transformation hysteresis width was about 100 K

  11. A new quantitative approach to the thermoelastic martensitic transformation: The density of elastic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, J.; Ruiz-Larrea, I.; No, M.L.; Lopez-Echarri, A.; Juan, J. San

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic study, based on high-sensitivity adiabatic calorimetry, of the martensitic transformation undergone by Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys is presented. From the specific heat data, the thermodynamic function values, and in particular the crystal free energy, as functions of temperature, have been obtained. These results have permitted a careful estimation of the phase transformation temperatures of each β 3 ' martensite plate as a function of its stored elastic energy. Within this frame, the distribution density of the elastic energy states in the martensitic phase is directly derived from the specific heat data. It also permits a simple analysis of the nucleation processes and gives a convincing explanation of the temperature memory effects

  12. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic martensitic steels irradiated in Phenix. Introduction at the Icone irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seran, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are actually possible candidates for material of fast neutron reactors hexagonal tubes. These steels possess a swelling and a creep resistance better than of classic 316 austenitic steels and present out of irradition, mechanical characteristics suitable for the proposed application and good manufacturing properties and sodium compatibility. In ferritic steels irradiation effects came forward at low temperature that for austenitic steels. In the precedent seminary we have shown that the maximum of swelling was unknown and takes probably place at a temperature below 400 0 C. The same question sets up concerning the localization of temperature range in which the mechanical characteristics of ferritic steels are affected by irradiation. In this communication, we give the first results permitting to compare the mechanical properties in traction and in resilience observed after a 50 atom displacement irradiation on a F17 ferritic steel, a EM12 ferritic-martensitic steel and a EM 10 martensitic steel [fr

  13. Structure of tetragonal martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 cast alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Rodionov, D. P.; Kazantsev, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure of martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 alloy has been studied by metallography, X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that a massive structure built of colonies of tetragonal lamellar plates divided by a twin boundary {101}FCT is formed in the alloy under cooling below the martensite FCC → FCT transition temperature. The alloy recrystallizes after a cycle of FCT → FCC → FCT transitions with a decrease in the grain size by several times compared with the initial structure such fashion that the size of massifs and individual martensite lamella in the massif correlates with the change in the size of the alloy grain. Using thermal cycling, it has been revealed that the alloy tends to stabilize the high-temperature phase.

  14. Martensitic Transformation and Superelasticity in Fe-Mn-Al-Based Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-12-01

    Ferrous shape memory alloys showing superelasticity have recently been obtained in two alloy systems in the 2010s. One is Fe-Mn-Al-Ni, which undergoes martensitic transformation (MT) between the α (bcc) parent and γ' (fcc) martensite phases. This MT can be thermodynamically understood by considering the magnetic contribution to the Gibbs energy, and the β-NiAl (B2) nanoprecipitates play an important role in the thermoelastic MT. The temperature dependence of critical stress for the MT is very small (about 0.5 MPa/°C) due to the small entropy difference between the parent and martensite phases in the Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloy, and consequently, superelasticity can be obtained in a wide temperature range from cryogenic temperature to about 200 °C. Microstructural control is of great importance for obtaining superelasticity, and the relative grain size is among the most crucial factors.

  15. Kinetics of anomalous multi-step formation of lath martensite in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Reich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A steel containing 16wt.% Cr, 5wt.% Ni and 3wt.% Cu was transformed into martensite by applying isochronal, i.e. constant rate, cooling followed by isothermal holding. The formation of martensite was monitored with dilatometry. A series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation...... was observed during isochronal cooling for cooling rates ranging from 1.5 to 50Kmin−1. The cooling rate in the isochronal stage was observed to influence the transformation rate in the isothermal stage. Electron backscatter diffraction was applied to determine the morphology of the martensite, which...... was of lath type, and to investigate the microstructure of the material. No influence of the cooling rate on the scale of the microstructure was observed. The series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation is interpreted in terms of the combined effect of the strain and interfacial energy...

  16. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were me...

  17. Effect of ferrite-martensite interface morphology on bake hardening response of DP590 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Arnab; Adhikary, Manashi; Venugopalan, T.; Singh, Virender; Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of martensite spatial distribution and its interface morphology on the bake hardening characteristics of a dual phase steel was investigated. In one case, typical industrial continuous annealing line parameters were employed to anneal a 67% cold rolled steel to obtain a dual phase microstructure. In the other case, a modified annealing process with changed initial heating rates and peak annealing temperature was employed. The processed specimens were further tensile pre-strained within 1–5% strain range followed by a bake hardening treatment at 170 °C for 20 min. It was observed that industrial continuous annealing line processed specimen showed a peak of about 70 MPa in bake-hardening index at 2% pre-strain level. At higher pre-strain values a gradual drop in bake-hardening index was observed. On the contrary, modified annealing process showed near uniform bake-hardening response at all pre-strain levels and a decrease could be noted only above 4% pre-strain. The evolving microstructure at each stage of annealing process and after bake-hardening treatment was studied using field emission scanning electron microscope. The microstructure analysis distinctly revealed differences in martensite spatial distribution and interface morphologies between each annealing processes employed. The modified process showed predominant formation of martensite within the ferrite grains with serrated lath martensite interfaces. This nature of the martensite was considered responsible for the observed improvement in the bake-hardening response. Furthermore, along with improved bake-hardening response negligible loss in tensile ductility was also noted. This behaviour was correlated with delayed micro-crack initiation at martensite interface due to serrated nature.

  18. Quantum-mechanical analysis of effect of alloying elements on ε-martensite start temperature of steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J H; Moon, J; Ha, H-Y; Lee, T-H; Suh, D-W

    2017-12-19

    With regard to the transformation mechanism of austenitic high manganese steel, the prediction of the ε-martensite start temperature is a critical consideration in alloy design. Evaluation of the ε-martensite start temperature makes it possible to predict the microstructure and to understand the phase transformation occurring during deformation. Here we use the quantum mechanical calculation of random alloys to understand the physics for ε-martensitic transformation in steels. We could find the linear relationship between the measured ε-martensite start temperatures and the crystal structure stability for various compositions. We also could estimate the effect of several alloying elements. It is expected that the effect of decreasing the temperatures for the same amount of alloying elements addition will be larger moving farther from Group VIII. By creating a free-energy model that reflects the temperature effect, we were able to calculate the average driving force required for the ε-martensitic transformations.

  19. Mechanical Stabilization of Martensite in Cu-Ni-Al Single Crystal and Unconventional Way to Detect It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczko, O.; Vronka, M.; Veřtát, P.; Rameš, M.; Onderková, K.; Kopecký, V.; Krátká, P.; Ge, Y.

    2018-03-01

    The microstructures and transformation behaviour of self-accommodated and mechanically stabilized martensite of Cu69.4Ni3.4Al27.2 (at.%) single crystal were investigated by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetometry. XRD and TEM analyses showed the presence of both 2H and 18R phases in self-accommodated martensite. The mechanical compression of martensite (≈ 100 MPa) increased markedly the transformation temperature to austenite, i.e. resulting in significant mechanical stabilization of martensite. The 18R phase disappeared after the compression. This reveals the important role of 18R phase in transformation behaviour of Cu-Ni-Al alloy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermo-magnetic measurement is suitable method to analyse the martensitic transformation even for diamagnetic material.

  20. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, N.; Dunne, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  1. Precursors of thermoelastic Fcc-Fct martensite transformation of Fe3Pt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, R.; Takahashi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Precursor phenomena of thermoelastic martensite transformations of Fe 3 Pt have been studied by mechanical tests, X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy and neutron inelastic scattering measurements. The ordered austenite with an Ll 2 structure becomes soft markedly at temperatures below 200 K. It was also confirmed that the TA mode along [011] directions of the alloy became soft at zone boundaries of the reciprocal space with approaching to the transition temperature. The observed precursor phenomena are considered to be related to the thermoelastic fcc-fct martensite transformation. (orig.)

  2. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  3. Plastic deformation modelling of tempered martensite steel block structure by a nonlocal crystal plasticity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Boeff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plastic deformations of tempered martensite steel representative volume elements with different martensite block structures have been investigated by using a nonlocal crystal plasticity model which considers isotropic and kinematic hardening produced by plastic strain gradients. It was found that pronounced strain gradients occur in the grain boundary region even under homogeneous loading. The isotropic hardening of strain gradients strongly influences the global stress–strain diagram while the kinematic hardening of strain gradients influences the local deformation behaviour. It is found that the additional strain gradient hardening is not only dependent on the block width but also on the misorientations or the deformation incompatibilities in adjacent blocks.

  4. Effect of plastic behaviour of steels during martensitic transformation on quenching stress initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis-Judlin, Sabine

    1980-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the effects of a steel martensitic transformation on the mechanisms producing internal stresses during quench. After having reported a bibliographical study on tests of qualitative and quantitative prediction (presentation of several models) of the genesis of internal stresses during quench, the author reports the study of the alloy behaviour during cooling and presents the basis of a model of prediction of internal stresses. The next part addresses the determination of the influence of martensitic transformation on the evolution of stresses during quench. The last part reports the taking into account of the effect of stress-phase transformation interaction in the calculation of internal stresses [fr

  5. Martensitic transformation in nanostructured TiNi shape memory alloy formed via severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan)]. E-mail: tsuchiya@pse.tut.ac.jp; Inuzuka, M. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Tomus, D. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Hosokawa, A. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Nakayama, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington (United States); Morii, K. [Research and Development Laboratory, Daido Steel, Co., Ltd. (Japan); Todaka, Y. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Umemoto, M. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan)

    2006-11-25

    Martensitic transformation and mechanical behavior was investigated on TiNi shape memory alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation by cold rolling. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the sample to be a mixture of nanocrystalline and amorphous material after 40% cold rolling. Diffrential scaning calorimetry measurements and X-ray diffractometry suggested that the martensitic transformation was suppressed when the thickness reduction was over 25%. The pseudoelastic stress-strain curves of nanocrystalline/amorphous TiNi are characterized by the absence of a stress-plateau and by small hysteresis.

  6. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  7. Different microstructures of mobile twin boundaries in 10 M modulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Seiner, Hanuš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2013), 622-631 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : martensitic twin microstructure * twinning interfaces * Ni-Mn-Ga martensite * mobility of twin boundary * magnetic shape memory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.940, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135964541200732X

  8. Martensitic transformations and morphology studies of NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, M. S.; Pattabi, Manjunatha

    2017-05-01

    The forward transformation temperatures Martensite Start (Ms) and Martensite Finish (Mf) during cooling, reverse transformation temperatures Austenite Start (As) and Austenite Finish (Af) during heating are very sensitive to the thermal and mechanical history of the Shape Memory Alloy (SMA). Heat treatments, cold and hot roll, thermal and mechanical cycling have great influence on the transformation temperatures. Different characterizing techniques like Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Electrical Resistivity (ER) and Thermo Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) were employed to study the phase transformation temperatures of NiTi alloy. The microstructure of the samples was studied with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Optical Microscope (OM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM).

  9. Studies of martensitic transformation in Cu-Al alloys by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, T.; Kuribayashi, K.; Doyama, M.

    1977-01-01

    The reverse martensitic transformations in Cu-23.5 at-%Al, and Cu-25.3 at-%Al have been studied by means of positron annihilation. The coincidence counting rates of angular correlation were measured as a function of the specimen temperature. The change of counting rates in heating run was rather different from that in cooling run due to the influence of tempering of martensitic structure. The results were interpreted by the change of the formation energy of a vacancy with phase transition. Influence of heating rate is also discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of heat treatment on martensitic transformation in Fe–12⋅5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    5⋅5%Si–9%Cr–3⋅5%Ni (weight) alloy was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of cooling rate was investigated. It was observed that fast cooled sam- ple exhibited regular overlapping of stacking faults and ε martensite plates were formed parallel to each.

  11. Depth distribution analysis of Martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, E.; Gerritsen, E.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the implantation of noble gases in metals has been found to induce some exciting phenomena such as formation of inclusions containing solid gas at extremely high pressures. In stainless steels these inclusions are the origin of a stress-induced martensitic fcc → bcc phase...

  12. Structure and tensile properties of ferro-martensitic alloys hardened by chi phase precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J.; Lelong, C.; Pigoury, M.; Foucher, C.

    1985-08-01

    Transformation of ferrite into austenite and of austenite into martensite, precipitation of intermetallic phases and tensile properties of the steel Cr13-Mo1.5 are studied in function of Ti additions (from 0 to 3%) and Ni additions (from 2 to 8%) for its mechanical resistance at 400-650 0 C. 12 references are given [fr

  13. The Relevant Role of Dislocations in the Martensitic Transformations in Cu-Al-Ni Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastien, R.; Sade, M.; Lovey, F. C.

    2018-02-01

    The interaction between dislocations and martensitic transformations in Cu-Al-Ni alloys is shortly reviewed. Results from many researchers are critically analyzed towards a clear interpretation of the relevant role played by dislocations on the properties of shape memory alloys in Cu-based alloys. Both thermally and stress-induced transformations are considered and focus is paid on two types of transitions, the β→β' and the formation of a mixture of martensites: β→β' + γ'. After cycling in the range where both martensites are formed, the twinned γ' phase is inhibited and cycling evolves into the formation of only β'. A model which considers the difference in energy of each γ' twin variant due to the introduced dislocations quantitatively explains the inhibition of γ' in both thermally and stress-induced cycling. The type of dislocations which are mainly introduced, mixed with Burgers vector belonging to the basal plane of the β' martensite, enables also to explain the unmodified mechanical behavior during β→β' cycling. The reported behavior shows interesting advantages of Cu-Al-Ni single crystals if mechanical properties are comparatively considered with those in other Cu-based alloys.

  14. Interface Propagation and Microstructure Evolution in Phase Field Models of Stress-Induced Martensitic Phase Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    on martensitic or dif- fusionless transformations ( Ahluwalia et al., 2003; Artemev et al., 2001; Curnoe and Jacobs, 2001a,b; Jacobs et al., 2003; Jin...497. Ahluwalia , R., Lookman, T., Saxena, A., Bishop, A.R., 2003. Elastic deformation of polycrystals. Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 055501. Artemev, A., Jin, Y

  15. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2008-01-01

    9–12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550–650 ◦C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work...

  16. X-ray and neutron diffraction line broadening measurements in a martensitic steel for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, R.; Lukas, P.; Vrana, M.; Montanari, R.; Rustichelli, F.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction line broadening measurements have been carried out on a modified martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 for fusion technology (MANET) after quenching followed by tempering treatments at 700C. The results of the two experiments are discussed with reference to Cr redistribution phenomena in the matrix

  17. Twin boundaries and heterophase interfaces in ferroelastic martensites: Final report, July 1, 1985--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1988-09-30

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations has been started on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for understanding the relation between bulk properties and domain configurations, and the nature of transformation precursors and their role in the martensite nucleation mechanism. The theory is based on a nonlinear, nonlocal anisotropic elastic continuum model for proper FE martensites which can be used to calculate the twin boundary energy and strain profile as well as the pretransformation strain modulation from second and higher order elastic constants and from phonon dispersion data. Furthermore, we have calculated the strain energy associated with habit plane interfaces and studied the dynamical properties of twin boundaries and their effect on the specific heat and on the superconducting transition temperature. Based on our theoretical results, we have also proposed a heuristic model for martensite formation which involves the pretransformation modulation as intermediate step and would require only less potent defects for heterogeneous nucleation than according to the prevailing view. 15 refs.

  18. The role of silicon in carbon partitioning processes in martensite/austenite microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim Lee, B.N.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding carbon redistribution in steels is crucial in developing advanced high strength steels. For instance, Quenching & Partitioning (Q&P) processes rely on the partitioning of carbon from martensite into austenite, where at the end of the heat treatment the carbon-enriched

  19. Martensitic transformations in 304 stainless steel after implantation with helium, hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Grabaek, L.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1988-01-01

    Using conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and glancing angle X-ray diffraction, martensitic transformations have been studied in type 304 austenitic stainless steels implanted with 8 keV helium, hydrogen and deuterium. Furthermore, using CEMS in the energy selective mode (DCEMS), the distribution of martensite in the implantation zone has been analysed as a function of depth. Transformation of the implanted layer occurs after implantation with 10 21 m -2 He + ions while 100 times higher fluence is required for the implanted layer to transform after hydrogen or deuterium implantations. This difference is due to the ability of helium to form high pressure gas bubbles, while implanted hydrogen is continuously lost by back diffusion to the surface. The helium bubbles, which are confined under pressures as high as 60 GPa, will induce extremely high stress levels in the implanted layer, by which the martensitic transformation is directly induced. The fact that a much higher fluence of hydrogen or deuterium is required to induce the transformation, shows that radiation damage plays only a minor role. In this case, the martensitic transformation first occurs when the implanted layer resembles the state of a cathodically charged surface. (orig.)

  20. In-situ studies of the martensitic transformation in epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buschbeck, J.; Niemann, R.; Heczko, Oleg; Thomas, M.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2009), s. 2516-2526 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic shape memory alloy * martensitic phase transformation * thin films * interfaces * twinning Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.760, year: 2009

  1. Dissecting the Mechanism of Martensitic Transformation via Atomic-Scale Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) --> ɛ(hcp) --> α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ɛ/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ɛ martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  2. Modeling of the Austenite-Martensite Transformation in Stainless and TRIP Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Zhang, S.-H.; Liu, X.-H.; Gheng, M.; Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process

  3. Martensitic Transformation in a β-Type Mg-Sc Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Somekawa, Hidetoshi; Koike, Junichi

    2017-12-01

    Recently, we found that a Mg-Sc alloy with a bcc (β) phase exhibits superelasticity and a shape memory effect at low temperature. In this work, we examined the stress-induced and thermally induced martensitic transformation of the β-type Mg-Sc alloy and investigated the crystal structure of the thermally induced martensite phase based on in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The lattice constants of the martensite phase were calculated to be a = 0.3285 nm, b = 0.5544 nm, and c = 0.5223 nm when we assumed that the martensite phase has an orthorhombic structure (Cmcm). Based on the lattice correspondence between a bcc and an orthorhombic structures such as that in the case of β-Ti shape memory alloys, we estimated the transformation strain of the β Mg-Sc alloy. As a result, the transformation strains along the 001, 011, and 111 directions in the β phase were calculated to be + 5.7, + 8.8, and + 3.3%, respectively.

  4. Temperature dependence of single twin boundary motion in Ni–Mn–Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straka, L.; Hänninen, H.; Heczko, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 14 (2011), 141902/1-141902/3 ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic shape memory effect * modulated martensite * Ni-Mn-Ga * mobility of twin boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.844, year: 2011

  5. Ab Initio Simulations of Temperature Dependent Phase Stability and Martensitic Transitions in NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Thompson, Alexander E.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    For NiTi based alloys, the shape memory effect is governed by a transition from a low-temperature martensite phase to a high-temperature austenite phase. Despite considerable experimental and computational work, basic questions regarding the stability of the phases and the martensitic phase transition remain unclear even for the simple case of binary, equiatomic NiTi. We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to describe the temperature-dependent behavior of NiTi and resolve several of these outstanding issues. Structural correlation functions and finite temperature phonon spectra are evaluated to determine phase stability. In particular, we show that finite temperature, entropic effects stabilize the experimentally observed martensite (B19') and austenite (B2) phases while destabilizing the theoretically predicted (B33) phase. Free energy computations based on ab initio thermodynamic integration confirm these results and permit estimates of the transition temperature between the phases. In addition to the martensitic phase transition, we predict a new transition between the B33 and B19' phases. The role of defects in suppressing these phase transformations is discussed.

  6. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 31 (2010), 316004/1-316004/7 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * magnetic susceptibility * martensitic transition * magnetic domains Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.332, year: 2010

  7. Characterization of bainitic/martensitic structures formed in isothermal treatments below the M

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro Lopez, A.; Hidalgo Garcia, J.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Multiphase High Strength Steels are generally obtained by applying isothermal treatments around the martensite start temperature (Ms). Previous investigations have shown that bainitic ferrite can form from austenite in isothermal treatments below Ms, where its

  8. Thermoelastic martensite and shape memory effect in ductile Cu-Al-Mn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainuma, R.; Takahashi, S.; Ishida, K.

    1996-08-01

    Ductile shape memory (SM) alloys of the Cu-AI-Mn system have been developed by controlling the degree of order in the β phase. Additions of Mn to the binary Cu-Al alloy stabilize the β phase and widen the single-phase region to lower temperature and lower Al contents. It is shown that Cu-Al-Mn alloys with low Al contents have either the disordered A2 structure or the ordered L21 structure with a lower degree of order and that they exhibit excellent ductility. The disordered A2 phase martensitically transforms to the disordered Al phase with a high density of twins. The martensite phase formed from the ordered L21 phase has the 18R structure. The SM effect accompanies both the A2 → Al and L21 → 18R martensitic transformations. These alloys exhibit 15 pct strain to failure, 60 to 90 pct rolling reduction without cracking, and 80 to 90 pct recovery from bend test in the martensitic condition. Experimental results on the microstructure, crystal structure, mechanical properties, and shape memory behavior in the ductile Cu-AI-Mn alloys are presented and discussed.

  9. Propagation of an austenite-martensite interface in a thermal gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal; Sedlák, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2007), s. 218-225 ISSN 1406-0086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloy * martensitic transition * phase boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Austenite-martensite interfaces in strained foils of CuAlNi alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andrej; Paidar, Václav; Zárubová, Niva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2009), 342-344 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 149; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : martensitic transformation * CuAlNi * habit planes Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  11. Entropy change linked to the martensitic transformation inmetamagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Cesari, E.; Kustov, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, 6-7 (2012), s. 3168-3175 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : metamagnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) * martensitic phase transformation * thermodynamics * transformation entropy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.941, year: 2012

  12. Impact of Martensite Spatial Distribution on Quasi-Static and Dynamic Deformation Behavior of Dual-Phase Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Das, Anindya; Venugopalan, T.; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Walunj, Mahesh; Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi

    2018-02-01

    The effects of microstructure parameters of dual-phase steels on tensile high strain dynamic deformation characteristic were examined in this study. Cold-rolled steel sheets were annealed using three different annealing process parameters to obtain three different dual-phase microstructures of varied ferrite and martensite phase fraction. The volume fraction of martensite obtained in two of the steels was near identical ( 19 pct) with a subtle difference in its spatial distribution. In the first microstructure variant, martensite was mostly found to be situated at ferrite grain boundaries and in the second variant, in addition to at grain boundaries, in-grain martensite was also observed. The third microstructure was very different from the above two with respect to martensite volume fraction ( 67 pct) and its morphology. In this case, martensite packets were surrounded by a three-dimensional ferrite network giving an appearance of core and shell type microstructure. All the three steels were tensile deformed at strain rates ranging from 2.7 × 10-4 (quasi-static) to 650 s-1 (dynamic range). Field-emission scanning electron microscope was used to characterize the starting as well as post-tensile deformed microstructures. Dual-phase steel consisting of small martensite volume fraction ( 19 pct), irrespective of its spatial distribution, demonstrated high strain rate sensitivity and on the other hand, steel with large martensite volume fraction ( 67 pct) displayed a very little strain rate sensitivity. Interestingly, total elongation was found to increase with increasing strain rate in the dynamic regime for steel with core-shell type of microstructure containing large martensite volume fraction. The observed enhancement in plasticity in dynamic regime was attributed to adiabatic heating of specimen. To understand the evolving damage mechanism, the fracture surface and the vicinity of fracture ends were studied in all the three dual-phase steels.

  13. Strain-Induced Martensite Formation and Recrystallization Behavior in 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fadhalah, Khaled J.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of recrystallization on the evolution of microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties has been examined in an AISI 304 stainless steel, subjected to strain-induced α '-martensite transformation and subsequent annealing. Samples were processed by cold rolling and subzero rolling to induce different amounts of α '-martensite, using three reductions of 20, 40, and 60%, and later solution annealed to ensure complete recrystallization. Large transformation to α '-martensite occurred for subzero-rolled samples at low reduction (20%), while only a gradual increase of α '-martensite in cold-rolled samples took place with the increasing rolling reduction. Results from electron back-scattered diffraction indicate that annealing of cold-rolled samples produces finer recrystallized grains with increasing rolling reduction, while the predominant formation of α '-martensite in subzero-rolled microstructures is believed to have strong effect on the production of similar grain size upon annealing. Twin-related Σ3 boundaries were formed during annealing with maximum fraction of 53%. These boundaries become longer, straighter, and less incorporated into grain boundary network with the increasing rolling reduction and/or using subzero rolling, demonstrating an indirect mechanism of grain boundary engineering. Also, annealing caused scattering around the rolling texture components (Brass, Goss, S, and Copper) and the recrystallization textures become more random with the increasing rolling reduction and/or using subzero rolling. Nevertheless, recrystallization textures of samples reduced by 60% show formation of Cube and Dillamore orientations and strengthening of Brass orientation. This is thought to contribute to the enhancement of the tensile strength and microhardness of annealed samples.

  14. The influence of the martensitic transformation on the fatigue of an AISI type 316 metastable stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, D.J; Sousa e Silva, A.S. de; Monteiro, S.N.

    The influence of the martensitic transformation on the process of pulse tension fatigue of a AISI type 316 metastable stainless steel was studied at 25 0 and 196 0 c. The fatigue tests were performed on annealed and cold worked specimens in order to separate the effects of static transformation, dynamic transformation and work hardening. The fatigue limits obtained from the corresponding Wohler curves were compared for the different test conditions. The results showed that the fatigue is not affected by the dynamically induced martensite. On the other hand the static martensite, previously induced, appears to decrease the resistance to fatigue. The reasons for these effects are discussed. (Author) [pt

  15. Orientation dependence of stress-induced martensite formation during nanoindentation in NiTi shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplanche, G.; Pfetzing-Micklich, J.; Eggeler, G.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we used nanoindentation with a spherical indenter tip to study the formation of stress-induced martensite in NiTi shape memory alloys. Prior to nanoindentation, orientation imaging was performed to select austenite grains with specific crystallographic orientations, including the principal crystallographic directions [0 0 1], [1 0 1] and [1 1 1]. We studied a material where stress-induced martensite is stable at room temperature and found surface patterns with four-, two- and threefold symmetries for the [0 0 1], [1 0 1] and [1 1 1] crystallographic indentation directions, respectively. Atomic force microscopy investigations of the topography showed that the surface patterns were associated with sink-ins. The crystallographic sink-in patterns disappeared during heating, which proved their martensitic origin. Our results provide clear experimental evidence which shows that the crystallographic anisotropy of nanoindentation is governed by the crystallographic anisotropy of the stress-induced formation of martensite

  16. Influence of aging and thermomechanical cycling on the magnetostriction and magnetic shape memory effect in martensitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L’vov, Victor A; Kosogor, Anna; Barandiaran, Jose M; Chernenko, Volodymyr A

    2015-01-01

    An influence of internal stress created by the crystal defects on the magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of martensite variants in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) has been analyzed. Using the internal stress conception, a noticeable influence of the spatial reconfiguration of crystal defects on the ordinary magnetostriction of FSMA and magnetic shape memory (MSM) effect has been predicted. It has been shown that the defect reconfiguration, which stabilizes the martensitic phase during martensite aging, increases the shear elastic modulus. The increase of shear modulus reduces the magnetostriction value and in this way suppresses the MSM effect. The magneto-thermo-mechanical training of aged alloys destabilizes the martensitic phase, restores the initial magnetostriction value, and promotes the MSM effect. (paper)

  17. Effect of Annealing in Magnetic Field on Ferromagnetic Nanoparticle Formation in Cu-Al-Mn Alloy with Induced Martensite Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titenko, Anatoliy; Demchenko, Lesya

    2016-12-01

    The paper considers the influence of aging of high-temperature phase on subsequent martensitic transformation in Cu-Al-Mn alloy. The morphology of behavior of martensitic transformation as a result of alloy aging under annealing in a constant magnetic field with different sample orientation relatively to the field direction and without field was studied for direct control of the processes of martensite induction at cooling. Temperature dependences of electrical resistance, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization, as well as field dependences of magnetization, and phase composition were found. The tendency to the oriented growth of precipitated ferromagnetic phase nanoparticles in a direction of applied field and to an increase of their volume fraction under thermal magnetic treatment of material that favors a reversibility of induced martensitic transformation is observed.

  18. On the influence of heterogeneous precipitation on martensitic transformations in a Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allafi, J. K.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Schmahl, W.; Somsen, Ch.

    378 A, 1-2 (2004), s. 148-151 ISSN 0921-5093. [European Symposium on Martensitic Transformations. Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, 17.08.2003-22.08.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2041001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : shape memory alloys * martensitic transformations * precipitation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  19. Tuning avalanche criticality: acoustic emission during the martensitic transformation of a compressed Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Baró, J.; Heczko, Oleg; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.; Vives, E.; Mañosa, L.; Planes, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 21 (2012), "214101-1"-"214101-6" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : stress -induced martensitic transformation * Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory alloy * ferromagnetic martensite * acoustic emission during transformation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  20. Aging effect in parent phase and martensitic transformation in Au-47.5at.%Cd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, T.; Komachi, K.; Watanabe, K.; Nakamura, S.

    1999-01-01

    Au-Cd alloy is one of the typical alloys which shows martensitic transformation. There are two martensites close to the 1:1 composition: one is γ' 2 martensite and the other is ζ' 2 martensite. When the phonon dispersion curve was measured in the composition for Au-47.5at.%Cd which produces γ' 2 martensite, phonon softening was observed at the Brillouin zone boundary and at ζ=0.35 of the [ζζ0]TA 2 branch and a peculiar behavior was observed. One is that the M s temperature determined in this experiment was lower than the ordinary value. The other is the time dependence of the 1/3 elastic reflection, which was observed prior to the martensitic transformation. Electrical resistance measurements were performed in this alloy in order to clarify this peculiar behavior. A decrease of the M s temperature was observed after aging at 393 K, in the parent phase. The lower M s observed in neutron experiments can be explained by an aging effect in the parent phase. There are two possibilities of explaining the time-dependence of the 1/3 reflection; one is the transformation with diffusion (bainite transformation above M s ) and the other is embryo growing. (orig.)

  1. Effect of the martensite distribution on the strain hardening and ductile fracture behaviors in dual-phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyosun, E-mail: paku08@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Masato, E-mail: nishiyama11@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakada, Nobuo, E-mail: nakada@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshi@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takaki, Setsuo, E-mail: takaki@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    In order to clarify the effects of the martensite distribution on the mechanical properties of low-carbon dual-phase steel, four types of dual-phase steel with different ferrite grain sizes and martensite distributions were prepared using a thermomechanical treatment. The tensile properties of these steels were investigated; in particular, the strain hardening and the ductile fracture behaviors were discussed in terms of the strain partitioning between the ferrite and martensite and the formation and growth of micro-voids, respectively. When the martensite grains surround the ferrite grains and form a chain-like networked structure, the strain hardenability is greatly improved without a significant loss of elongation, while the necking deformability is considerably reduced. A digital-image correlation analysis revealed that the tensile strain in the martensite region in the chain-like networked dual-phase structure is markedly increased during tensile deformation, which leads to an improvement in the strain hardenability. On the other hand, the joint part of the martensite grains in the structure acts as a preferential formation site for micro-voids. The number density of the micro-voids rapidly increases with increasing tensile strain, which would cause the lower necking deformability.

  2. A new type of FCT martensite phase in single-crystalline Fe{sub 3}Pt Invar alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masataka; Sekida, Sayaka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukuda, Takashi, E-mail: fukuda@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kakeshita, Tomoyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takahashi, Kohki; Koyama, Keiichi; Nojiri, Hiroyuki [High-Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Sendai Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {center_dot} TEM observations at room temperature reveal that the specimen is a single phase of L1{sub 2}-type structure. {center_dot} The spontaneous magnetization and magnetic susceptibility curves of Fe{sub 3}Pt with S = 0.88 have bend points at 60 K. {center_dot} XRD measurements reveal that this alloy exhibits a martensitic transformation to FCT and the transformation temperature is 60 K. {center_dot} The tetragonality c/a is larger than unity in the FCT martensite. {center_dot} This tetragonality is in contrast to the tetragonality c/a < 1generally observed in the FCT martensite with S < 0.8. - Abstract: Martensitic transformation in a highly ordered Fe{sub 3}Pt has been investigated by magnetization and X-ray diffraction measurements. We confirmed that a new type of face-centered tetragonal (FCT) martensite phase appears below 60 K in Fe{sub 3}Pt with a degree of order S = 0.88. The tetragonality c/a gradually increases with decreasing temperature, and is approximately 1.005 at 10 K. This is in contrast to the tetragonality c/a < 1 generally observed in the FCT martensite with a degree of order less than 0.8. The spontaneous magnetization increases in association with the transformation.

  3. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  4. Partial-Isothermally-Treated Low Alloy Ultrahigh Strength Steel with Martensitic/Bainitic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quanshun; Kitchen, Matthew; Patel, Vinay; Filleul, Martin; Owens, Dave

    We introduce a new strengthening heat treatment of a Ni-Cr-Mo-V alloyed spring steel by partial isothermal salt-bath and subsequent air-cooling and tempering. Detailed isothermal treatments were made at temperatures below or above the Ms point (230°C). The salt bath time was controlled between 10 and 80 minutes. Through the new treatment, the candidate steel developed ultrahigh tensile strength 2,100 MPa, yield strength 1,800 MPa, elongation 8-10 %, hardness 580-710 HV, and V-notch Charpy toughness 10-12 J. Optical and electron microscopic observations and X-ray diffraction revealed multi-phase microstructures of bainitic/martensitic ferrites, fine carbide precipitates and retained austenite. Carbon partitioning during the bainitic/martensitic transformation was investigated for its remarkable influence on the strengthening mechanism.

  5. A Constitutive Description for Shape Memory Alloys with the Growth of Martensite Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experimental results and the finite element analysis, a constitutive model is proposed for two phase shape memory alloys by introducing a compensative volumetric strain into a constrained relationship between the two phases, accounting for the reduced constraint due to the growth of martensite band. The pseudoelasticity of NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tube, subjected to pure tension, is analyzed and compared with the experimental results. It can be seen that the pseudoelastic behavior, especially the phenomena of a stress drop during tension processes, can be well described with the proposed model. The proposed model separates the complicated constitutive behavior of a shape memory alloy (SMA into simple responses arising respectively from its two phases, taking into account laminar microstructure, the thickness of martensite phase and the interaction between the two phases, and provides an easy but comprehensive method for the description of the constitutive behavior of SMAs under complex thermomechanical loading.

  6. Photostress analysis of stress-induced martensite phase transformation in superelastic NiTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanchi, B.; Choupani, N.; Khalil-Allafi, J.; Baghani, M.

    2017-01-01

    Phase transformation in shape memory alloys is the most important factor in their unique behavior. In this paper, the formation of stress induced martensite phase transformation in a superelastic NiTi (50.8% Ni) shape memory alloy was investigated by using the photo-stress method. First, the material's fabrication procedure has been described and then the material was studied using the metallurgical tests such as differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction to characterize the material features and the mechanical tensile test to investigate the superelastic behavior. As a new method in observation of the phase transformation, photo-stress pictures showed the formation of stress induced martensite in a superelastic dog-bone specimen during loading and subsequently it's disappearing during unloading. Finally, finite element analysis was implemented using the constitutive equations derived based on the Boyd-Lagoudas phenomenological model.

  7. Irradiation damage of ferritic/martensitic steels: Fusion program data applied to a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-06-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels were chosen as candidates for future fusion power plants because of their superior swelling resistance and better thermal properties than austenitic stainless steels. For the same reasons, these steels are being considered for the target structure of a spallation neutron source, where the structural materials will experience even more extreme irradiation conditions than expected in a fusion power plant first wall (i.e., high-energy neutrons that produce large amounts of displacement damage and transmutation helium). Extensive studies on the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of ferritic/martensitic steels indicate that the major problem involves the effect of irradiation on fracture, as determined by a Charpy impact test. There are indications that helium can affect the impact behavior. Even more helium will be produced in a spallation neutron target material than in the first wall of a fusion power plant, making helium effects a prime concern for both applications. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, R.F.

    1994-05-10

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05--0.1 C, 8--12 Cr, 1--5 Co, 0.5--2.0 Ni, 0.41--1.0 Mo, 0.1--0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels. 2 figures.

  9. A macroscopic model to simulate the mechanically induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdahcıoğlu, E.S.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced martensitic transformation and the associated transformation plasticity phenomena in austenitic stainless steels are studied. The mechanisms responsible for the transformation are investigated and put into perspective based on experimental evidence. The stress and strain partitioning into the austenite and martensite phases are formulated using a mean-field homogenization approach. At this intermediate length-scale the average stress in the austenite phase is computed and utilized to compute the mechanical driving force resolved in the material. The amount of transformation and the transformation plasticity is derived as a function of the driving force. The mechanical response of the material is obtained by combining the homogenization and the transformation models. The model is verified by mechanical tests under biaxial loading conditions during which different transformation rates are observed. As a final verification of the model, a bending test is used which manifests the stress-state dependency of the transformation.

  10. Reduced Antivation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-07-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M{sub 2}3 C{sub 6} and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T{sub 0}3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23. In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs.

  11. Electric-field-adjustable time-dependent magnetoelectric response in martensitic FeRh alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fina, I.; Quintana, A.; Padilla-Pantoja, J.; Martí, Xavier; Macià, F.; Sánchez, F.; Foerster, M.; Aballe, L.; Fontcuberta, J.; Sort, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 18 (2017), s. 15577-15582 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetoelectric * martensitic alloy * multiferroic * piezoelectric * thin film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016

  12. Magnetic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga-Co-Cu tetragonal martensites exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rameš, Michal; Heczko, Oleg; Sozinov, A.; Ullakko, K.; Straka, Ladislav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 142, Jan (2018), s. 61-65 ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-00043S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ferromagnetic shape memory alloy * magnetic anisotropy * martensitic phase transformation * Heusler phases * twinning Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.747, year: 2016

  13. Super-strong dislocation-structured high-carbon martensite steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yong-Ning; Zhu, Yun-Tian; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Ren, Xiao-Bing

    2017-07-26

    High-carbon martensite steels (with C > 0.5 wt.%) are very hard but at the same time as brittle as glass in as-quenched or low-temperature-tempered state. Such extreme brittleness, originating from a twin microstructure, has rendered these steels almost useless in martensite state. Therefore, for more than a century it has been a common knowledge that high-carbon martensitic steels are intrinsically brittle and thus are not expected to find any application in harsh loading conditions. Here we report that these brittle steels can be transformed into super-strong ones exhibiting a combination of ultrahigh strength and significant toughness, through a simple grain-refinement treatment, which refines the grain size to ~4 μm. As a result, an ultra-high tensile strength of 2.4~2.6 GPa, a significant elongation of 4~10% and a good fracture toughness (K 1C ) of 23.5~29.6 MPa m 1/2 were obtained in high-carbon martensitic steels with 0.61-0.65 wt.% C. These properties are comparable with those of "the king of super-high-strength steels"-maraging steels, but achieved at merely 1/30~1/50 of the price. The drastic enhancement in mechanical properties is found to arise from a transition from the conventional twin microstructure to a dislocation one by grain refinement. Our finding may provide a new route to manufacturing super-strong steels in a simple and economic way.

  14. Thermal cycling of stress-induced martensite for high-performance shape memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, Riccardo; Vedani, Maurizio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to achieve an extraordinary high stress recovery shape memory effect based on thermal cycling of stress-induced martensite is proposed. An alternative thermodynamic path is considered in order to achieve outstanding functional properties of Ni-rich NiTi alloys, which are commonly used at room or body temperature as superelastic materials. Fatigue tests revealed excellent stability of the material subjected to the novel thermomechanical path, confirming its suitability for employment in high-performance shape memory actuators

  15. Dependence of the enthalpy of the direct martensitic transformation in titanium nickelide on the stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, S. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2017-02-01

    An original technique of differential thermal analysis for studying thermal properties of samples loaded with a tangential stress has been created. In a series of experiments studying the direct martensitic transformation B2 → B19' in titanium nickelide during cooling under constant stress, it has been found that the enthalpy of transformation linearly decreases with an increase in stress and, at a stress of 100 MPa, it is 30% less than that of the sample in a free state.

  16. Characterization of strain-induced martensitic transformation in a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausild, P.; Davydov, V.; Drahokoupil, J.; Landa, M.; Pilvin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Kinetics of deformation-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic steel AISI 301 was characterized by several techniques including classical light metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and electron back scattered diffraction. In situ monitoring of magnetic properties, acoustic emission and temperature increase during tensile tests at different strain rates was also performed. Results obtained by different methods are compared and discussed.

  17. On the kinetics of martensite formation in a duplex stainless steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have been made of the kinetics of martensite transformation in a duplex stainless steel of composition 21Cr-6.6Ni, 2.5M0, 1.6Cu, <.0.03C (wt.%) Solution treatment at 1050οC for 1 hr was followed by deformation at the subzero temperatures of –70 and –196οC. The kinetics of the γ → α1 transformation in the duplex ...

  18. Magnetically induced martensite transition in freestanding epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Thomas, M.; Niemann, R.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 15 (2009), 152513/1-152513/3 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : epitaxial growth * Ni-Mn-Ga alloys * magnetic epitaxial layers * magnetic transitions * martensitic transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.554, year: 2009 http://link.aip.org/link/?APPLAB/94/152513/1

  19. Boron Segregation and Creep in Ultra Fine Grained Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 7 (2005), s. 743-748 ISSN 0044-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/99/1172; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/93/0965 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ultra-fine grained materials * Tempered martensite ferritic steels * Boron segregation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2005

  20. Stability of austenitic 316L steel against martensite formation during cyclic straining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Obrtlík, Karel; Petrenec, Martin; Beran, Přemysl; Smaga, M.; Weidner, A.; Dluhoš, J.; Kruml, Tomáš; Biermann, H.; Eifler, D.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2011), s. 1279-1284 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [ICM11 -International Conference on The Mechanical Behavior of Materials /11./. Lake Como, 05.06.2011-09.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low cycle fatigue * 316L austenitic stainless steel * deformation-induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  1. IN SITU neutron diffraction studies of martensitic transformations in NiTi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Neov, Dimitar; Toebbens, D. M.; Novák, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 112, - (2003), s. 709-712 ISSN 1155-4339 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : shape memory alloys(SMA) * Ni-Ti * martensitic phase transformation * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.319, year: 2003

  2. Structure and tensile properties of ferro-martensitic alloys hardened by chi phase precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J.; Lelong, C.; Pigoury, M.; Foucher, C.

    1985-10-01

    Transformation of ferrite into austenite and of austenite into martensite, precipitation of intermetallic phases and tensile properties of the steel Cr13-Mo1.5 are studied in function of Ti additions (from 0 to 3%) and Ni additions (from 2 to 8%) for its mechanical resistance at 400-650 0 C for using it as fuel cladding of fast neutron reactors. 12 references are given [fr

  3. Magnetic anisotropy and hidden martensitic transition in V.sub.3./sub.Si

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebek, Josef; Mihalik, M.; Syshchenko, O.; Vejpravová, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2002), s. 291-294 ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /11./. Košice, 20.08.2001-23.08.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0184 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 1168 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : V 3 Si * specific heat * martensitic transition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  4. Non-classical austenite-martensite interfaces observed in single crystals of Cu-Al-Ni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 11 (2009), s. 793-807 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627; GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloy s * martensitic microstructure * non-classical interfaces * crossing twins Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.935, year: 2009 http://www.informaworld.com

  5. Sub-Zero Celsius treatment: a promising option for future martensitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    A series of samples of (in wt.%) 11.5Cr-0.67C martensiticstainless steel grade were austenitized in Argon for 1 hour attemperatures ranging from 1010°C to 1190°C. Additionally, aseries of samples of (in wt.%) 15.0Cr-5.8Ni-1.0Mo-0.03C (EN1.4418) martensitic stainless steel grade were solution nitr...

  6. Depth distribution analysis of martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Chechenin, N.G.; Grabaek, L.; Bohr, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted surface. It is found that the martensitic transformation of the surface layer occurs for fluences above 1x10 20 m -2 . The thickness of the transformed layer increases with fluence to ≅ 150 nm at 1x10 21 m -2 , which far exceeds the range plus straggling of the implanted Xe as calculated by the TRIM computer simulation code. Simulations using the MARLOWE code indicate that the thickness of the transformed layer coincides with the range of the small fraction of ions channeled under random implantation conditions. Using cross sectional TEM on the Xe implanted crystals, the depth distribution of gas inclusions and defects can be directly observed. Using X-ray diffraction on implanted single crystals, the solid epitaxial nature of the Xe inclusions, induced prior to the martensitic transformation, was established. The lattice constant obtained from the broad diffraction peak indicates that the pressure in the inclusions is ≅ 5 GPa. (orig./BHO)

  7. Orthorhombic martensite formation upon aging in a Ti-30Nb-4Sn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, Camilo A.F.; Lopes, Eder S.N. [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), School of Mechanical Engineering, 13083-860, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ospina, Carlos A. [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), Campinas, 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Caram, Rubens, E-mail: caram@fem.unicamp.br [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), School of Mechanical Engineering, 13083-860, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of orthorhombic martensite (α″) formed by step-quenching in a Ti-30Nb-4Sn (wt%) alloy have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). According to literature, α″ lattice parameters depend mainly on the composition of the parent β phase. In this study, samples subjected to step quenching heat treatment presented α″ phase formation in the proximity of α phase laths, driven by two combined factors: solute rejection and lattice strain. Our results indicate that as the aging is prolonged, α″ becomes richer in solute content, which makes it more similar to the parent β phase. An average 2.55% lattice strain along [110]β directions was found to be necessary in order to obtain α″ from the β phase after 24 h of aging at 400 °C, followed by water-quenching. The initial lattice strain along the same direction was estimated at approximately 3.60% with zero aging time. The precipitation of the α phase does not inhibit a solute rich α″ phase formation. - Highlights: • A massive α″ martensite formation was observed after 24 h of heat treatment. • Martensite formation occurs in the vicinity of α phase laths. • Incorporation of Sn in the β phase reduces the strain needed to form α″ phase.

  8. Analysis of martensitic transformation and residual tension in an 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Juciane Maria

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between plastic deformation and the strain induced phase transformation, that provides a practical route to the development of new engineering materials with excellent mechanical properties, characterize the TRIP effect 'Transformation Induced Plasticity'. Among the stainless steels, the metastable 304 L austenitic steel is susceptible to transformation of austenite-martensite phase from tensile tests at room temperature by increments of plastic deformation. It is of great technological and scientific interest the knowledge of the evolution of phase transformation and residual stress from different levels and rates of plastic deformation imposed to the material. It is also important to evaluate the interference of metallographic preparation in quantitative analyzes of this steel. The main techniques used in this study consisted of X-rays diffraction and Ferritoscopy for the quantitation phase, and XRD to residual stress analysis also. As observed, the phase transformation quantification has not suffered significant influence of the metallographic preparation and evolved from increments of plastic deformation due to different stop charges and strain rates, leading to a further strengthening of the austenite matrix. The evaluation of residual stress resulting from the martensitic transformation was susceptible to the metallographic preparation and increased its value on comparison to sample without metallographic preparation. It was also observed that the residual stress decreased with the increase of the fraction of transformed martensite. (author)

  9. Anomalous steam oxidation behavior of a creep resistant martensitic 9 wt. % Cr steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agüero, Alina, E-mail: agueroba@inta.es [Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. de Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain); González, Vanessa [Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. de Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain); Mayr, Peter [Chair of Welding Engineering, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Spiradek-Hahn, Krystina [Alloy Development Group, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    The efficiency of thermal power plants is currently limited by the long-term creep strength and the steam oxidation resistance of the commercially available ferritic/martensitic steel grades. Higher operating pressures and temperatures are essential to increase efficiency but impose important requirements on the materials, from both the mechanical and chemical stability perspective. It has been shown that in general, a Cr wt. % higher than 9 is required for acceptable oxidation rates at 650 °C, but on the other hand such high Cr content is detrimental to the creep strength. Surprisingly, preliminary studies of an experimental 9 wt. % Cr martensitic steel, exhibited very low oxidation rates under flowing steam at 650 °C for exposure times exceeding 20,000 h. A metallographic investigation at different time intervals has been carried out. Moreover, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis of a ground sample exposed to steam for 10,000 h at 650 °C revealed the formation of a complex tri-layered protective oxide comprising a top and bottom Fe and Cr rich spinel layer with a magnetite intermediate layer on top of a very fine grained zone. - Highlights: • High steam oxidation resistant 9 wt. % Cr martensitic steel at 650 °C. • Multilayer thin protective Cr–Fe oxide. • Nano-grain sub-oxide metal zone.

  10. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  11. Analysis of the strain induced martensitic transformation in austenitic steel subjected to dynamic perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.; Rusinek, A.; Pesci, R.; Zaera, R.

    2012-08-01

    An experimental and numerical analysis on the martensitic transformation in AISI 304 steel sheets subjected to perforation by conical and hemispherical projectiles is reported. Two target thicknesses are considered, 0.5 and 1.0 mm, and impact velocities range from 35 to 200 m/s. The perforation mechanisms are identified and the effect of the projectile nose-shape on the ability of the target for energy absorption is evaluated. Martensite has been detected in all the impacted samples and the role played by the projectile nose-shape on the transformation is highlighted. A 3D model implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit allowed to simulate the perforation tests. The material is defined through a constitutive description developed by the authors to describe the strain induced martensitic transformation taking place in metastable austenitic steels at high strain rates. The numerical results are compared with the experimental evidence and satisfactory matching is obtained. The numerical model succeeds in describing the perforation mechanisms associated to each projectile-target configuration analysed.

  12. Plasma assisted nitriding for micro-texturing onto martensitic stainless steels*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoh Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-texturing method has grown up to be one of the most promising procedures to form micro-lines, micro-dots and micro-grooves onto the mold-die materials and to duplicate these micro-patterns onto metallic or polymer sheets via stamping or injection molding. This related application requires for large-area, fine micro-texturing onto the martensitic stainless steel mold-die materials. A new method other than laser-machining, micro-milling or micro-EDM is awaited for further advancement of this micro-texturing. In the present paper, a new micro-texturing method is developed on the basis of the plasma assisted nitriding to transform the two-dimensionally designed micro-patterns to the three dimensional micro-textures in the martensitic stainless steels. First, original patterns are printed onto the surface of stainless steel molds by using the dispenser or the ink-jet printer. Then, the masked mold is subjected to high density plasma nitriding; the un-masked surfaces are nitrided to have higher hardness, 1400 Hv than the matrix hardness, 200 Hv of stainless steels. This nitrided mold is further treated by sand-blasting to selectively remove the soft, masked surfaces. Finally, the micro-patterned martensitic stainless steel mold is fabricated as a tool to duplicate these micro-patterns onto the plastic materials by the injection molding.

  13. Effect of Ni4Ti3 precipitation on martensitic transformation in Ti-Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, N.; Shen, C.; Wagner, M.F.-X.; Eggeler, G.; Mills, M.J.; Wang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation of Ni 4 Ti 3 plays a critical role in determining the martensitic transformation path and temperature in Ni-Ti shape memory alloys. In this study, the equilibrium shape of a coherent Ni 4 Ti 3 precipitate and the concentration and stress fields around it are determined quantitatively using the phase field method. Most recent experimental data on lattice parameters, elastic constants, precipitate-matrix orientation relationship and thermodynamic database are used as model inputs. The effects of the concentration and stress fields on subsequent martensitic transformations are analyzed through interaction energy between a nucleating martensitic particle and the existing microstructure. Results indicate that R-phase formation prior to B19' phase could be attributed to both direct elastic interaction and stress-induced spatial variation in concentration near Ni 4 Ti 3 precipitates. The preferred nucleation sites for the R-phase are close to the broad side of the lenticular-shaped Ni 4 Ti 3 precipitates, where tension normal to the habit plane is highest, and Ni concentration is lowest.

  14. Formation quality optimization of laser hot wire cladding for repairing martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Peng; Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Shiqing

    2015-01-01

    Laser cladding is an advantaged repairing technology due to its low heat input and high flexibility. With preheating wire by resistance heat, laser hot wire cladding shows better process stability and higher deposition efficiency compared to laser cold wire/powder cladding. Multi-pass layer were cladded on the surface of martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel FV520B by fiber laser with ER410NiMo wire. Wire feed rate and preheat current were optimized to obtain stable wire transfer, which guaranteed good formation quality of single pass cladding. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize processing parameters and predict formation quality of multi-pass cladding. Laser power P, scanning speed Vs, wire feed rate Vf and overlap ratio η were selected as the input variables, while flatness ratio, dilution and incomplete fusion value as the responses. Optimal clad layer with flat surface, low dilution and no incomplete fusion was obtained by appropriately reducing Vf, and increasing P, Vs and η. No defect like pore or crack was found. The tensile strength and impact toughness of the clad layer is respectively 96% and 86% of those of the substrate. The clad layer showed nonuniform microstructure and was divided into quenched areas with coarse lath martensite and tempered areas with tempered martensite due to different thermal cycles in adjacent areas. The tempered areas showed similar hardness to the substrate.

  15. Transition from many domain to single domain martensite morphology in small-scale shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the martensitic transformation during a superelastic cycle is studied by in situ scanning electron microscopy deformation experiments in microwires of Cu–Zn–Al. The diameters of the wires studied (21–136 μm) span the range in which significant size effects upon transformation hysteresis have been observed. In larger wires the transformation is accommodated by the continual nucleation of many new martensite plates that grow and eventually coalesce with their neighbors. In small wires a single martensite plate nucleates at the start of transformation and then proceeds to grow in a monolithic fashion; the wire transforms by smooth axial propagation of a single interface. The transition from many domain to single domain transformation is gradual with wire diameter, and is based upon scaling of the domain density with sample size. We attribute it to a crossover from bulk to surface obstacle control of transformation front propagation. This observation also sheds light on reported size effects in energy dissipation in shape memory alloys

  16. Analysis of the strain induced martensitic transformation in austenitic steel subjected to dynamic perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaera R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis on the martensitic transformation in AISI 304 steel sheets subjected to perforation by conical and hemispherical projectiles is reported. Two target thicknesses are considered, 0.5 and 1.0 mm, and impact velocities range from 35 to 200 m/s. The perforation mechanisms are identified and the effect of the projectile nose-shape on the ability of the target for energy absorption is evaluated. Martensite has been detected in all the impacted samples and the role played by the projectile nose-shape on the transformation is highlighted. A 3D model implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit allowed to simulate the perforation tests. The material is defined through a constitutive description developed by the authors to describe the strain induced martensitic transformation taking place in metastable austenitic steels at high strain rates. The numerical results are compared with the experimental evidence and satisfactory matching is obtained. The numerical model succeeds in describing the perforation mechanisms associated to each projectile-target configuration analysed.

  17. In-situ neutron diffraction study of martensitic variant redistribution in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga alloy under cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongbin; Zhang, Yudong; Esling, Claude; Gan, Weimin; Zou, Naifu; Zhao, Xiang; Zuo, Liang

    2014-07-01

    The influences of uniaxial compressive stress on martensitic transformation were studied on a polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga bulk alloy prepared by directional solidification. Based upon the integrated in-situ neutron diffraction measurements, direct experimental evidence was obtained on the variant redistribution of seven-layered modulated (7M) martensite, triggered by external uniaxial compression during martensitic transformation. Large anisotropic lattice strain, induced by the cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment, has led to the microstructure modification by forming martensitic variants with a strong ⟨0 1 0⟩7M preferential orientation along the loading axis. As a result, the saturation of magnetization became easier to be reached.

  18. Ultrasound-induced martensitic transition in ferromagnetic Ni2.15Mn0.81Fe0.04Ga shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchelnikov, V.; Dikshtein, I.; Grechishkin, R.; Khudoverdyan, T.; Koledov, V.; Kuzavko, Y.; Nazarkin, I.; Shavrov, V.; Takagi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental observation of direct and reverse martensitic transformation due to ultrasound processing of Ni-Mn-Ga alloy is discussed. It was found that martensite-austenite as well as austenite-martensite structural transitions can be induced by the intense ultrasound at constant temperature. During the experiments low magnetic field susceptibility measurements and optical detection of twin domains arising due to martensitic transformation were performed in situ. The non-thermal nature of the effect is confirmed making use of the pulsed ultrasound technique

  19. A coupled kinetic Monte Carlo–finite element mesoscale model for thermoelastic martensitic phase transformations in shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    A mesoscale modeling framework integrating thermodynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and finite element mechanics (FEM) is developed to simulate displacive thermoelastic transformations between austenite and martensite in shape memory alloys (SMAs). The model is based on a transition state approximation for the energy landscape of the two phases under loading or cooling, which leads to the activation energy and rate for transformation domains incorporating local stress states. The evolved stress state after each domain transformation event is calculated by FEM, and is subsequently used in the stochastic KMC algorithm to determine the next domain to transform. The model captures transformation stochasticity, and predicts internal phase and stress distributions and evolution throughout the entire incubation, nucleation and growth process. It also relates the critical transformation stresses or temperatures to internal activation energies. It therefore enables quantitative exploration of transformation dynamics and transformation–microstructure interactions. The model is used to simulate superelasticity (mechanically induced transformation) under both load control and strain control in single-crystal SMAs under uniaxial tension

  20. Results of investigations regarding the physical and mechanical properties of the martensitic 9% Cr steel EUROFER '97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirra, M.; Falkenstein, A.; Graf, P.; Heger, S.; Kempe, H.; Lindau, R.; Zimmermann, H.

    2002-04-01

    Following the history of the development activities from conventional martensitic 12% Cr steel, MANET and OPTIFER up to low-activated EUROFER (RAFM steel), the results obtained from experiments on rods of 100 mm diameter and plates of 14 mm shall be presented for a basic characterization. The physical and mechanical properties shall be compared with those of OPTIFER-1W and the F82H-mod 2% W steel. To determine the conversion behavior, a continuous cct diagram was plotted. Hardening experiments in the temperature range of 850 - 1120 C illustrated the range of maximum hardness as well as grain size development. The notch impact behavior was described for various heat treatments and sample types at test temperatures ranging from +60 to -100 C. Tensile strengths were determined for various heat treatments at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 700 C. Aging due to a long-term heat treatment was investigated by means of stabilization annealing experiments. Creep rupture strength and creeping were investigated in the temperature range of 450 - 650 C. So far, a duration of up to about 15 000 h has been covered by the experiments. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, High Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Donald H.; Cross, Steven M.; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct noniron metallic elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 °C) than for SAE 4130 steel (˜300 °C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 °C) than for carbon steels (100 °C to 200 °C and 200 °C to 350 °C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 °C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 °C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in

  2. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  3. Effect of heavy tempering on microstructure and yield strength of 28CrMo48VTiB martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Gu, Shunjie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Huibin; Wang, Qingfeng; Zhang, Fucheng

    2018-02-01

    The 28CrMo48VTiB martensitic steel for sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance oil country tubular goods (OCTG) of C110 grade was thermally processed through quenching at 890 °C and tempering at 600 °C–720 °C for 30–90 min. The microstructures of all samples were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD). Also, the tensile properties were measured. The results indicated that the yield strength (YS) decreased as both the tempering temperature and duration increased, due to the coarsening of martensitic packet/block/lath structures, the reduction of dislocation density, as well as the increase of both the volume fraction and average diameter of the precipitates. The martensitic lath width was the key microstructural parameter controlling the YS of this heavily-tempered martensitic steel, whereas the corresponding relationship was in accordance with the Langford-Cohen model. Furthermore, the martensitic structure boundary and the solid solution strengthening were the two most significant factors dominating the YS, in comparison with the dislocation and precipitation strengthening.

  4. EELS study of the inverse martensitic transformation of 2H and 18R Cu-Al-Zn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Magana, F.; Ochoa-Lara, M.T.; Lovey, F.; Flores-Zuniga, H.; Rios-Jara, D.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in 3d states occupancy associated with the inverse martensitic transformation in two samples of Cu-Al-Zn alloys with 2H and 18R martensitic structures were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The Cu L 2,3 white-lines intensities, which reflect the unoccupied density of states in 3d bands, were measured in situ, during the phase transformation in both the martensite and austenite phases. We find that the white-lines intensity decreases during the inverse transformation, when going from martensite to austenite. Even though the initial 3d occupation numbers in 2H and 18R martensitic structures are different, after the transformation, the 3d occupation numbers in the now austenitic structure have decreased in both samples, indicating that some electrons left Cu 3d bands during phase transformation. Interestingly enough, the occupation numbers in the final phases, which have the same structure, reach the same value, indicating that changes in EELS spectra are a consequence of structural changes.

  5. A comparison of dilatometry and in-situ neutron diffraction in tracking bulk phase transformations in a martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christien, F.; Telling, M.T.F.; Knight, K.S.

    2013-01-01

    Phase transformations in the 17-4PH martensitic stainless steel have been studied using different in-situ techniques, including dilatometry and high resolution neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction patterns were quantitatively processed using the Rietveld refinement method, allowing the determination of the temperature-dependence of martensite (α′, bcc) and austenite (γ, fcc) phase fractions and lattice parameters on heating to 1000 °C and then cooling to room temperature. It is demonstrated in this work that dilatometry doesn't permit an accurate determination of the end temperature (Ac3) of the α′ → γ transformation which occurs upon heating to high temperature. The analysis of neutron diffraction data has shown that the respective volumes of the two phases become very close to each other at high temperature, thus making the dilatometric technique almost insensitive in that temperature range. However, there is a very good agreement between neutron diffraction and dilatometry at lower temperature. The martensitic transformation occurring upon cooling has been analysed using the Koistinen–Marburger equation. The thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases have been determined in addition. A comparison of the results obtained in this work with data from literature is presented. - Highlights: • Martensite is still present at very high temperature (> 930 °C) upon heating. • The end of austenitisation cannot be accurately monitored by dilatometry. • The martensite and austenite volumes become similar at high temperature (> ∼ 850 °C)

  6. Effects of strain and strain-induced α'-martensite on passive films in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinlong; Luo, Hongyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of strain and heat treatment on strain-induced α'-martensite of AISI 304 stainless steel tubes were measured by X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the effects of strain and content of α'-martensite on passivated property on the surface of the material in borate buffer solution were evaluated by electrochemical technique. The results showed that the volume fraction of α'-martensite increased gradually with the increase of tensile strain for as-received and solid solution samples. However, α'-martensite in as-received sample was more than that in the solid solution sample. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that the solid solution treatment improved corrosion resistance of the steel, especially for samples with small strain. Moreover, acceptor densities were always higher than donor densities for as-received and solid solution samples. With the increase of strain, the increase tendency of acceptor density was more significant than that of donor density. We also found that the total density of the acceptor and donor almost increased linearly with the increase of α'-martensite. The present results indicated that the increased acceptor density might lead to the decreased corrosion resistance of the steel. © 2013.

  7. EELS study of the inverse martensitic transformation of 2H and 18R Cu-Al-Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Magana, F., E-mail: francisco.espinosa@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico); Ochoa-Lara, M.T. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico); Lovey, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8300 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Flores-Zuniga, H. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecaa, Av. Lopez Velarde 801, Zacatecas, Zac. 98060 (Mexico); Rios-Jara, D. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, San luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78126 (Mexico)

    2010-01-01

    Changes in 3d states occupancy associated with the inverse martensitic transformation in two samples of Cu-Al-Zn alloys with 2H and 18R martensitic structures were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The Cu L{sub 2,3} white-lines intensities, which reflect the unoccupied density of states in 3d bands, were measured in situ, during the phase transformation in both the martensite and austenite phases. We find that the white-lines intensity decreases during the inverse transformation, when going from martensite to austenite. Even though the initial 3d occupation numbers in 2H and 18R martensitic structures are different, after the transformation, the 3d occupation numbers in the now austenitic structure have decreased in both samples, indicating that some electrons left Cu 3d bands during phase transformation. Interestingly enough, the occupation numbers in the final phases, which have the same structure, reach the same value, indicating that changes in EELS spectra are a consequence of structural changes.

  8. Evolution of Intergranular Stresses in a Martensitic and an Austenitic NiTi Wire During Loading–Unloading Tensile Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Yu, C.; Daymond, M. R.; Ren, Y.

    2015-03-19

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction testing was carried out on a martensitic and an austenitic NiTi wire to study the evolution of internal stresses and the stress-induced martensite (SIM) phase transformation during room temperature tensile deformation. From the point of lattice strain evolution, it is concluded that (1) for the martensitic NiTi wire, detwinning of the [011](B19') type II twins and the {010}(B19') compound twins is responsible for internal strains formed at the early stage of deformation. (2) The measured diffraction moduli of individual martensite families show large elastic anisotropy and strong influences of texture. (3) For the austenitic NiTi wire, internal residual stresses were produced due to transformation-induced plasticity, which is more likely to occur in austenite families that have higher elastic moduli than their associated martensite families. (4) Plastic deformation was observed in the SIM at higher stresses, which largely decreased the lower plateau stresses.

  9. Effects of Annealing on the Martensitic Transformation of Ni-Based Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Heusler Alloys and Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Fichtner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effects of annealing on the martensitic phase transformation in the Ni-based Heusler system: Mn50Ni40Sn10 and Mn50Ni41Sn9 powder and Co50Ni21Ga32 nanoparticles. For the powdered Mn50Ni40Sn10 and Mn50Ni41Sn9 alloys, structural and magnetic measurements reveal that post-annealing decreases the martensitic transformation temperatures and increases the transition hysteresis. This might be associated with a release of stress in the Mn50Ni40Sn10 and Mn50Ni41Sn9 alloys during the annealing process. However, in the case of Co50Ni21Ga32 nanoparticles, a reverse phenomenon is observed. X-ray diffraction analysis results reveal that the as-prepared Co50Ni21Ga32 nanoparticles do not show a martensitic phase at room temperature. Post-annealing followed by ice quenching, however, is found to trigger the formation of the martensitic phase. The presence of the martensitic transition is attributed to annealing-induced particle growth and the stress introduced during quenching.

  10. Study of the martensitic transformation and reversion process in the PuGa 1at.% alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalire, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    The δ-stabilized PuGa 1at.% is only in a metastable state and therefore is very sensitive to the external environment (phase transformation under thermal and mechanical loading). The originality of this work consists in a quantitative In Situ characterization of the δ→α' martensitic transformation (nature and amount of existing phases, evolution of lattice parameters and induced micro-strains..) as well as a microstructural study conducted under different transformation conditions (temperature and mechanical loading). The isothermal character of the transformation kinetics in the PuGa 1at.% was confirmed. The analysis of the kinetics from the Pati and Cohen formalism gave the opportunity to investigate the mechanisms involved during the transformation (autocatalytic nucleation, interaction between the new variant formed and the matrix). Modifications induced in a stressed material (increase in temperature Ms, crystallographic orientation of transformation products) were calculated from the Patel and Cohen formalism. Microstructural numerical simulations were also performed in order to understand the effect of elastic interactions associated with transformation Eigen-strain on the martensite plate morphology and plates arrangement in regard of the observations by SEM and OM. The direct confrontation of all results highlighted the large influence of accumulated stresses in the material during the transformation. Indeed, while an autocatalytic effect controls the first steps of the kinetic, an accumulation of unfavorable mechanical interactions occurs gradually explaining the partial nature of this transformation. The study of the martensitic transformation occurring at low temperature and under stresses was complemented by the study of its reversion into the δ phase in order to grasp the different mechanisms driving this reversion. This work shows the existence of competition between direct and indirect reversion modes, the latter being closely related to

  11. Advances in martensitic transformations in Cu-based shape memory alloys achieved by in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods

    OpenAIRE

    MALARD , Benoît; Sittner , Petr; Berveiller , Sophie; Patoor , Etienne

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This article deals with the application of several X-ray and neutron diffraction methods to investigate the mechanics of a stress induced martensitic transformation in Cu-based shape memory alloy polycrystals. It puts experimental results obtained by two different research groups on different length scales into context with the mechanics of stress induced martensitic transformation in polycrystalline environment.

  12. Evolution of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel after ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herny, E.; Lafont, M.C.; Andrieu, E.; Lours, P.; Herny, E.; Lagain, P.; Cloue, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The structural hardening martensitic stainless steel 15-5PH is used in aerospace and nuclear industries for the manufacture of pieces which are thermo-mechanically highly stressed. For this reason, the steel has to have good mechanical properties in a large range of running temperatures as well as a good corrosion resistance. During long time periods between 300 and 400 C, the 15-5PH is susceptible to embrittlement due to the decomposition of the martensite into a Cr-rich area and a Fe-rich area. This embrittlement induces a drop of the impact strength and of the ductility with a strong increase of the ductile-brittle transition and of the tensile properties. Transition electron microscopy observations have revealed the appearance of a thin chromium carbides precipitation after ageing. The spinodal decomposition of the martensite has been revealed by the tomographic atomic probe. (O.M.)

  13. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  14. Effect of copper on the formation of strain-induced martensite in two austenitic stainless steels AISI 304

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilapa, Leonidas Cayo Mamani, E-mail: leonidas@ifsc.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina, Rua Pavão, 1337, Bairro Costa e Silva, Joinville, SC CEP 89220-200 (Brazil); Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Silva de, E-mail: carlos.a@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Reitor João David Ferreira Lima, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC CEP 88040-970 (Brazil); Silva, Manoel Ribeiro da, E-mail: mrsilva@unifei.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Instituto de Ciências, Itajubá (Brazil)

    2015-01-12

    The transformation of strain-induced martensite in two metastable austenitic stainless steels, AISI 304, with the same basic composition and concentrations of Cu variables was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and magnetic measurements. The deformations to induce the formation of martensite were performed using the test of conformability with Nakajima tooling at room temperature. The results obtained for the various samples showed that the steel with lower content of Cu presented higher degree of magnetization. Also it was observed that the martensite magnetic α′ and paramagnetic ε are formed at the intersection of dislocation, in the grain boundary, inside and at the edge of twinned and the stacking faults in the austenite.

  15. Superelastic NiTi memory alloy micro-tube under tension - nucleation and propagation of martensite band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.Q.; Sun, Q.P.

    2000-01-01

    The superelastic behavior of polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tube under tension is studied experimentally. The nominal stress-strain curve of the micro-tube is recorded. By using a special surface coating it is found that the deformation of the tube is via the nucleation and propagation of stress-induced martensite band. The experiments show that the martensite nucleates in the form of a spiral lens-shaped narrow band that is inclined at 61 to the axis of loading when the stress reaches the peak of stress-strain curve. The width and the length of the band grew gradually with increase of loading and finally joined and merged into a single band. The subsequent deformation of the tube is realized by the propagation of this cylindrical martensite band. (orig.)

  16. On the lattice parameters of the B19' martensite in binary Ti-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Khmelevskaya, I.Yu.; Korotitskij, A.V.; Trubitsyna, I.B.; Brailovskij, V.; Tyurenn, S.

    2003-01-01

    The concentration, temperature and deformation dependences of the B19' martensite lattice parameters (MLP) in the Ti-(47.0-50.7) at. % Ni binary alloys are studied through the X-ray diffractometry. The MLP concentration dependences exist in the behind-the-equiatomic area of the nickel concentrations. It is shown that the MLP temperature dependences are approximately similar for all the studied alloys. The martensite formation from the austenite containing the developed dislocation structure in the Ti-50.0 at. % Ni alloy and from the aged austenite in the Ti-50.7 at. % Ni alloy leads to the MLP change. The MLP change is not linked with the transition from the B2 → B19' transformation scheme to the B2 → R → B19'. The martensite deformation reorientation or its plastic deformation with compression up to 25% does not lead to the MLP change [ru

  17. Determination of dislocation density by electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray line profile analysis in ferrous lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Jenei, Péter; Csóré, András; Lábár, János; Gubicza, Jenő

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and the dislocation density in as-quenched ferrous lath martensite were studied by different methods. The blocks, packets and variants formed due to martensitic transformation were identified and their sizes were determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Concomitant transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation revealed that the laths contain subgrains with the size between 50 and 100 nm. A novel evaluation procedure of EBSD images was elaborated for the determination of the density and the space distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations from the misorientation distribution. The total dislocation density obtained by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis was in good agreement with the value determined by EBSD, indicating that the majority of dislocations formed due to martensitic transformation during quenching are geometrically necessary dislocations.

  18. Nucleation and growth of hierarchical martensite in epitaxial shape memory films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Backen, A.; Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Behler, K.; Rößler, U.K.; Seiner, Hanuš; Heczko, Oleg; Nielsch, K.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, June (2017), s. 327-334 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape memory * martensite * nucleation * Ni-Mn-Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1359645417303257

  19. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Sato, Y.S.; Sekio, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.; Ogawa, R.; Kokawa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding was applied to the wrapper tube materials, 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, designed for fast reactors and defect-free welds were successfully produced. The mechanical and microstructural properties of the friction stir welded steel were subsequently investigated. The hardness values of the stir zone were approximately 550 Hv (5.4 GPa) with minimal dependence on the rotational speed, even though they were much higher than those of the base material. However, tensile strengths and elongations of the stir zones were high at 298 K, compared to those of the base material. The excellent tensile properties are attributable to the fine grain formation during friction stir welding

  20. New Equation for Prediction of Martensite Start Temperature in High Carbon Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2018-02-01

    Since previous equations fail to predict M S temperature of high carbon ferrous alloys, we first propose an equation for prediction of M S temperature of ferrous alloys containing > 2 wt pct C. The presence of carbides (Fe3C and Cr-rich M 7C3) is thermodynamically considered to estimate the C concentration in austenite. Especially, equations individually specialized for lean and high Cr alloys very accurately reproduce experimental results. The chemical driving force for martensitic transformation is quantitatively analyzed based on the calculation of T 0 temperature.

  1. Crystal grain growth during room temperature high pressure Martensitic alpha to omega transformation in zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velisavljevic, Nenad [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chesnut, Gary N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Lewis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Systematic increase in transition pressure with increase in interstitial impurities is observed for the martensitic {alpha} {yields} {omega} structural phase transition in Zr. Significant room temperature crystal grain growth is also observed for the two highest purity samples at this transition, while in the case of the lowest purity sample interstitial impurities obstruct grain growth even as the sample is heated to 1279 K. Our results show the importance of impurities in controlling structural phase stability and other mechanical properties associated with the {alpha} {yields} {omega} structural phase transition.

  2. Lattice instability and martensitic transformation in LaAg predicted from first-principles theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitheeswaran, G.; Kanchana, V.; Zhang, X.

    2012-01-01

    , calculated using density functional perturbation theory, are in good agreement with available inelastic neutron scattering data. Under pressure, the phonon dispersions develop imaginary frequencies, starting at around 2.3 GPa, in good accordance with the martensitic instability observed above 3.4 GPa...... constants agree well with available experimental data. From the ratio between the bulk and shear moduli, LaAg is found to be ductile, which is unusual for B2 type intermetallics. The computed band structure shows a dominant contribution from La 5d states near the Fermi level. The phonon dispersion relations...

  3. Compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    in the flow stress is observed if interrupted compression tests are performed with loading and holding steps. Two work-hardening stages with work-hardening rates decreasing linearly with the flow stress are identified and interpreted in terms of the KocksMecking model. The microstructural evolution......The compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel is characterized for strain rates ranging from 10-4 s-1 to 10-1 s-1 and engineering strains up to 40%. Adiabatic heating causes a reduction in flow stress during continuous compression at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1. No reduction...

  4. One dimensional model of martensitic transformation solved by homotopy analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuan, Chen; Huo, Yongzhong [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Inst. of Mechanics and Engineering Science; Peng, Cheng [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science

    2012-05-15

    The homotopy analysis method (HAM) is applied to solve a nonlinear ordinary differential equation describing certain phase transition problem in solids. Both bifurcation conditions and analytical solutions are obtained simultaneously for the Euler-Lagrange equation of the martensitic transformation. HAM is capable of providing an analytical expression for the bifurcation condition to judge the occurrence of the phase transition, while other numerical techniques have difficulties in bifurcation analysis. The convergence of the analytical solutions on the one hand can be adjusted by the auxiliary parameter and on the other hand is always obtainable for all relevant physical parameters satisfying the bifurcation condition. (orig.)

  5. Strength properties of low-carbon martensitic steel O7Kh3GNM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehntin, R.I.; Kogan, L.I.; Odesskij, P.D.; Kle ner, L.M.; Tolmacheva, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    With the purpose of substitution of bainitic steels intended for manufacturing plate welded joints the low-carbon martensitic steel 07Kh3GNM is proposed. The 07Kh3GNM steel tempered at 650 deg C has guaranteed values σsub(0.2) >600-750 MPa and σsub(u) >= 700-850 MPa in combination with rather high for this strength level values of ductility, impact strength and fracture toughness. Steel possesses perfect weldability without preheating, in thermal strengthened state and has no tendency to cold cracking and to delayed fracture in heat treated state

  6. Nonlinear, distortive phenomena in solids: Martensitic, crack, and multiscale structures. Progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J.A.; Sethna, J.P.

    1992-08-01

    This ongoing program, from the beginning of the first three year grant 1988--1991 and now in the first year of the second phase 1991--1994, has been directed at developing both an understanding of the physics underlying structural transformations in real (alloy) materials as well as new theoretical methods which adequately describe the large (nonlinear) distortions which characterize such processes. We have had a particular interest in martensitic systems, first (1988--1991) in the equilibrium limits, and now (below) in phenomena associated with the transformation process.

  7. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures

  8. Neutron-diffraction line broadening in a tempered martensitic steel for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, R.; Lukas, P.; Mikula, P.; Vrana, M.

    1997-01-01

    The martensitic steel DIN1.4914 (MANET) belongs to the prospective materials developed for construction of future fusion reactors. The evolution of microstructure of this steel under tempering at 700 C has been investigated by neutron diffraction. The analysis of diffraction profile was used to determine some microstructural parameters, such as a mean microstrain, a mean size of coherently diffracting blocks and a dislocation density. These results are discussed in the context of different thermal treatments applied (cooling rate 150 C/min and 3600 C/min) and results of other techniques on the same set of samples. (orig.)

  9. Precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel during hot deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stress relaxation curves for three different hot deformation processes in the temperature range of 750–1000 °C were studied to develop an understanding of the precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel (Zhang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2015 [1]. This data article provides supporting data and detailed information on how to accurately analysis the stress relaxation data. The statistical analysis of the stress peak curves, including the number of peaks, the intensity of the peaks and the integral value of the pumps, was carried out. Meanwhile, the XRD energy spectrum data was also calculated in terms of lattice distortion.

  10. Precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel during hot deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Su, Qingyong; Xu, Mi; Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The stress relaxation curves for three different hot deformation processes in the temperature range of 750–1000 °C were studied to develop an understanding of the precipitation behavior in a nitride-strengthened martensitic heat resistant steel (Zhang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2015) [1]. This data article provides supporting data and detailed information on how to accurately analysis the stress relaxation data. The statistical analysis of the stress peak curves, including the number of peaks, the intensity of the peaks and the integral value of the pumps, was carried out. Meanwhile, the XRD energy spectrum data was also calculated in terms of lattice distortion. PMID:26306310

  11. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Tschiptschin, André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel) under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained i...

  12. Fatigue performance of superelastic NiTi near stress-induced martensitic transformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alarcón Tarquino, Eduardo; Heller, Luděk; Chirani, S.A.; Šittner, Petr; Kopeček, Jaromír; Saint-Sulpice, L.; Calloch, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, Feb (2017), s. 76-89 ISSN 0142-1123 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G; GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA ČR GA16-20264S; GA ČR GA14-15264S Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape-memory alloys * Nitinol * superelasticity * martensitic transformation * shape memory alloys * fatigue Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  13. Influence of quantity of non-martensite products of transformation on resistance to fracture of improving structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, A.P.; Golovanenko, Yu.S.; Zikeev, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    18KhNMFA, low-carbon, alloyed steel and 42KhMFA medium-carbon, alloyed steel have been examined. For the purpose of obtaining different structures in hardening the steel, different cooling rates, different temperatures and isothermal holding times are applied. The following has been shown: on tempering to the same hardness (HV 300), the presence of non-martensite structures in hardened state does not practically influence the standard mechanical properties of steel (sigmasub(B), sigmasub(0.2), delta, PSI). The resistance of steel to the brittle failure is enhanced by the uniform, fine-disperse distribution of the carbide phase in the structure of lower bainite (up to 80 % bainite in martensite for 42KhMF steel to be improved), as well as strongly fragmented packages of rack martensite-bainite (up to 50 % lower bainite in martensite of 18KhNMFA steel). The formation of the upper bainite in the structure of the hardened steels 18KhNMFA and 42KhMF results on tempering in the formation of coarse, non-uniform, branched carbide inclusions, and this, in its turn, leads to raising the cold-shortness threshold and to lowering the amount of work as required for propagation of a crack. The presence of ferritic-pearlitic structures in the structural steels hardened to martensite and bainite results in reducing the resistance of steel to the brittle failure; the presence of every 10 % ferritic-pearlitic component in martensite of the structural steels 18KhNMFA and 42KhMFA to be thermally improved, raises T 50 by 8 deg and 20 deg C, respectively

  14. The Investigation on Strain Strengthening Induced Martensitic Phase Transformation of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Fundamental Research for the Quality Evaluation of Strain Strengthened Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Cai Ren, Fa; Tang, Xiao Ying

    2018-03-01

    The manufacture of pressure vessels with austenitic stainless steel strain strengthening technology has become an important technical means for the light weight of cryogenic pressure vessels. In the process of increasing the strength of austenitic stainless steel, strain can induce the martensitic phase transformation in austenite phase. There is a quantitative relationship between the transformation quantity of martensitic phase and the basic mechanical properties. Then, the martensitic phase variables can be obtained by means of detection, and the mechanical properties and safety performance are evaluated and calculated. Based on this, the quantitative relationship between strain hardening and deformation induced martensite phase content is studied in this paper, and the mechanism of deformation induced martensitic transformation of austenitic stainless steel is detailed.

  15. Role of Different Kinds of Boundaries Against Cleavage Crack Propagation in Low-Temperature Embrittlement of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Mizuki; Shibata, Akinobu; Terada, Daisuke; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2017-07-01

    The present paper investigated the relationship between low-temperature embrittlement and microstructure of lath martensite in a low-carbon steel from both microstructural and crystallographic points of view. The fracture surface of the specimen after the miniaturized Charpy impact test at 98 K (-175 °C) mainly consisted of cleavage fracture facets parallel to crystallographic {001} planes of martensite. Through the crystallographic orientation analysis of micro-crack propagation, we found that the boundaries which separated different martensite variants having large misorientation angles of {001} cleavage planes could inhibit crack propagation. It was then concluded that the size of the aggregations of martensite variants belonging to the same Bain deformation group could control the low-temperature embrittlement of martensitic steels.

  16. Stress analysis of martensitic transformation in Cu-Al-Be polycrystalline and single-crystalline shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaouache, B.; Berveiller, S.; Inal, K.; Eberhardt, A.; Patoor, E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the martensitic transformation in a shape memory alloy during a superelastic loading, focusing on internal strains, stresses and phases fractions. The behavior of the austenite phase is studied by X-ray diffraction stress analysis during in situ tensile test at room temperature. Both single-crystal and polycrystal samples have been investigated. The results are discussed with the aim to correlate the microstructural variations with the local stress state evolution in the austenitic phase while variants of martensite form and develop during a superelastic loading

  17. Internal friction due to domain-wall motion in martensitically transformed A15 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Welch, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice instability in A15 materials in some cases leads to a cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformation at low temperatures. The transformed material orients in lamellae with c axes alternately aligned along the directions producing domain walls between the lamellae. An internal-friction (delta) feature below T/sub m/ is attributed to stress-induced domain-wall motion. The magnitude of the friction increases as temperature is lowered below T/sub m/ as (1-c/a) increases, and behaves as (1-c/a) 2 from T/sub m/ down to the superconducting critical temperature where the increasing tetragonality is inhibited. The effect of strain in the lattice is to decrease the domain-wall internal friction, but not affect T/sub m/. Neutron-induced disorder and the addition of some third-elements in alloying decrease both delta and T/sub m/, with some elements reducing only the former. Less than 1 at. % H is seen to completely suppress both delta and T/sub m. Martensitically transformed V 2 Zr demonstrates low-temperature internal-friction and modulus behavior consists with easy β/m wall motion relative to the easy m/m motion of the A15's. For the V 2 Zr, a peak in delta is observed, qualitatively in agreement with expected β/m wall motion

  18. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  19. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  20. Soliton twin boundaries of the cubic-tetragonal martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    Described here is one set of results from a comprehensive study of the cubic-tetragonal Martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials. The model being used is the soliton model of Barsch and Krumhansl which exhibits a first-order cubic-tetragonal martensitic phase transition. This is a nonlinear and nonlocal three-dimensional continuum model, with a two-component strain order parameter. The structure and the energy of the static (or traveling) soliton strain boundaries, associated with the minimal total free energy, is calculated at all temperatures. Insight is also gained of the corresponding type of trajectories in the order parameter space. Approaching the first-order transition temperature from below, the tetragonal-tetragonal soliton wall splits gradually into two cubic-tetragonal solitons of finite width. Their separation, however, diverges at the transition temperature. This temperature is the border point between two topologically different classes of domain walls, which apparently have also different time-dependence. Below the transition point the kink-like solutions are of traveling type, but above the transition temperature the pulse-like walls are not.

  1. Role of Elastic Compatibility and Disorder in Texture Evolution in Martensitic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, W. C.; Shenoy, S. R.; Saxena, A.; Swart, P. J.; Bishop, A. R.; Killough, M. G.

    1997-03-01

    Based on a k-space analysis of the 2D elastic compatibility condition, we derive an anisotropic long-range elastic interaction that is responsible for twinning in martensitic materials. This 2D condition is operational only for textures that have nonzero "elastic quadrupole" moment such as twins impinging on a martensite-austenite interface or tweed intersections. The long-range interaction, previously obtained (G.R. Barsch, B. Horovitz, and J.A. Krumhansl, PRL 59, 1251 (1987); PR B 43, 1021 (1991).) by integrating out the elastic fringing field energy contribution in the austenite, is thus shown as a direct consequence of elastic compatibility. Using both annealed and quenched averaging over compositional disorder, we derive an effective cross-gradient elastic energy contribution that is fourth-order in gradient and second-order in strain. The coefficient of this term is negative in a limited temperature range, indicating the presence of tweed texture and its coarsening with cooling. These results are borne out by integration of the equations of motion for rectangular and shear strains, obtained from the Ginzburg-Landau functional with the compatibility condition.

  2. Defect-induced incompatability of elastic strains: dislocations within the Landau theory of martensitic phase transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groger, Roman1 [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lockman, Turab [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saxena, Avadh [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In dislocation-free martensites the components of the elastic strain tensor are constrained by the Saint-Venant compatibility condition which guarantees continuity of the body during external loading. However, in dislocated materials the plastic part of the distortion tensor introduces a displacement mismatch that is removed by elastic relaxation. The elastic strains are then no longer compatible in the sense of the Saint-Venant law and the ensuing incompatibility tensor is shown to be proportional to the gradients of the Nye dislocation density tensor. We demonstrate that the presence of this incompatibility gives rise to an additional long-range contribution in the inhomogeneous part of the Landau energy functional and to the corresponding stress fields. Competition among the local and long-range interactions results in frustration in the evolving order parameter (elastic) texture. We show how the Peach-Koehler forces and stress fields for any distribution of dislocations in arbitrarily anisotropic media can be calculated and employed in a Fokker-Planck dynamics for the dislocation density. This approach represents a self-consistent scheme that yields the evolutions of both the order parameter field and the continuous dislocation density. We illustrate our method by studying the effects of dislocations on microstructure, particularly twinned domain walls, in an Fe-Pd alloy undergoing a martensitic transformation.

  3. Soliton twin boundaries of the cubic-tetragonal martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazor, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Described here is one set of results from a comprehensive study of the cubic-tetragonal Martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials. The model being used is the soliton model of Barsch and Krumhansl which exhibits a first-order cubic-tetragonal martensitic phase transition. This is a nonlinear and nonlocal three-dimensional continuum model, with a two-component strain order parameter. The structure and the energy of the static (or traveling) soliton strain boundaries, associated with the minimal total free energy, is calculated at all temperatures. Insight is also gained of the corresponding type of trajectories in the order parameter space. Approaching the first-order transition temperature from below, the tetragonal-tetragonal soliton wall splits gradually into two cubic-tetragonal solitons of finite width. Their separation, however, diverges at the transition temperature. This temperature is the border point between two topologically different classes of domain walls, which apparently have also different time-dependence. Below the transition point the kink-like solutions are of traveling type, but above the transition temperature the pulse-like walls are not.

  4. Internal friction due to domain-wall motion in martensitically transformed A15 compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Welch, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice instability in A15 materials in some cases leads to a cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformation at low temperatures. The transformed material orients in lamellae with c axes alternately aligned along the <100> directions producing domain walls between the lamellae. An internal-friction (delta) feature below T/sub m/ is attributed to stress-induced domain-wall motion. The magnitude of the friction increases as temperature is lowered below T/sub m/ as (1-c/a) increases, and behaves as (1-c/a)/sup 2/ from T/sub m/ down to the superconducting critical temperature where the increasing tetragonality is inhibited. The effect of strain in the lattice is to decrease the domain-wall internal friction, but not affect T/sub m/. Neutron-induced disorder and the addition of some third-elements in alloying decrease both delta and T/sub m/, with some elements reducing only the former. Less than 1 at. % H is seen to completely suppress both delta and T/sub m. Martensitically transformed V/sub 2/Zr demonstrates low-temperature internal-friction and modulus behavior consists with easy ..beta../m wall motion relative to the easy m/m motion of the A15's. For the V/sub 2/Zr, a peak in delta is observed, qualitatively in agreement with expected ..beta../m wall motion.

  5. Corrosion resistance of martensitic stainless steels in moderately sour oilfield environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barteri, M.; Cristofaro, N. De; Scoppio, L. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Roma (Italy); Cumino, G.; Pina, G.D. [Dalmine Tubi Industriali S.r.l. (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    Martensitic and duplex steels are increasingly used in the gas and oil industries when high CO{sub 2} (sweet) environments are encountered. Nevertheless, very often the field conditions make duplex too expensive and traditional 13% Cr steel insufficient due to its poor corrosion resistance. Some new martensitic stainless steel tubing for Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) with improved general and localized corrosion resistance in sweet environments, were developed. Exposure tests in autoclave were carried out in environments typical of the North Sea oil fields containing small amounts of H{sub 2}S to determine sulphide stress cracking (SSC) and localized corrosion resistance. In the tested conditions, the supermartensitic steels 15Cr and 13Cr5Ni2MoN showed no susceptibility to crevice corrosion and was immune to SCC. Supermartensitic steels proved to be an interesting alternative to the traditional CRAs for use in high chloride, high CO{sub 2} gas and oil wells containing H{sub 2}S in very low concentrations.

  6. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  7. Simulation of the Growth of Austenite from As-Quenched Martensite in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, Fei; Yan, Jia-Yi; Höglund, Lars; Ågren, John; Borgenstam, Annika

    2018-04-01

    As part of an ongoing development of third-generation advanced high-strength steels with acceptable cost, austenite reversion treatment of medium Mn steels becomes attractive because it can give rise to a microstructure of fine mixture of ferrite and austenite, leading to both high strength and large elongation. The growth of austenite during intercritical annealing is crucial for the final properties, primarily because it determines the fraction, composition, and phase stability of austenite. In the present work, the growth of austenite from as-quenched lath martensite in medium Mn steels has been simulated using the DICTRA software package. Cementite is added into the simulations based on experimental observations. Two types of systems (cells) are used, representing, respectively, (1) austenite and cementite forming apart from each other, and (2) austenite forming on the cementite/martensite interface. An interfacial dissipation energy has also been added to take into account a finite interface mobility. The simulations using the first type of setup with an addition of interfacial dissipation energy are able to reproduce the observed austenite growth in medium Mn steels reasonably well.

  8. Finite-strain micromechanical model of stress-induced martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2006-01-01

    A micromechanical model of stress-induced martensitic transformation in single crystals of shape memory alloys is developed. This model is a finite-strain counterpart to the approach presented recently in the small-strain setting [S. Stupkiewicz, H. Petryk, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 50 (2002) 2303-2331]. The stress-induced transformation is assumed to proceed by the formation and growth of parallel martensite plates within the austenite matrix. Propagation of phase transformation fronts is governed by a rate-independent thermodynamic criterion with a threshold value for the thermodynamic driving force, including in this way the intrinsic dissipation due to phase transition. This criterion selects the initial microstructure at the onset of transformation and governs the evolution of the laminated microstructure at the macroscopic level. A multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic and transformation parts is assumed, with full account for the elastic anisotropy of the phases. The pseudoelastic behavior of Cu-Zn-Al single crystal in tension and compression is studied as an application of the model

  9. Resistance to wear and microstructure of martensitic welds deposits for recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; Vedia, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    This work studied the welding metal for a martensitic steel (alloyed to Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W), deposited with a tubular metal-cored wire with gaseous protection of 82%Ar-18%Co 2 on a low carbon steel using the semi-automatic welding process. Transverse pieces were cut from the welded coupon for microstructural characterization, measurement of hardness profiles, determination of the chemical composition and wear trials. The microstructural characterization was done using optic and scanning electronic microscopes, X-rays diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Vicker microhardness (1 kg.) was measured. The wear trials (metal-metal) were performed in an Amsler machine under pure flow conditions. Different loads were used and the reference material was a SAE 1020 steel. The temperatures for each case were measured and the weight loss curves were defined as a function of the distance run and of the load. After testing the wear surfaces and the debris were measured. The microstructure of the welded deposit mostly consists of martensite and some retained austenite, with a pattern of dendritic segregation, and a hardness on the surface of 612 HVI. A lineal variation between the weight loss and the load applied was obtained as a response to the wear. The following phenomena were observed: abrasion, plastic deformation, oxidation and adhesion to the wear surfaces, as well as a tempering effect in the condition of the biggest load. The wear mechanisms acting on both surfaces were identified (CW)

  10. Work hardening induced by martensite during transformation-induced plasticity in plain carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moat, R.J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Kelleher, J.; Mark, A.F.; Mori, T.; Withers, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels are becoming increasingly exploited for industrial applications because they show high strength and high uniform elongation (ductility). Despite this interest, the relative contributions of the various strengthening and straining mechanisms are often poorly understood. In this study, neutron diffraction is employed to quantify the contribution of different mechanisms to ductility and work hardening for a 0.25 wt.% C steel. Differences in stress–strain response at different temperatures are related to the extent of the transformation of metastable austenite into martensite during deformation. At room temperature (RT) the transformation of austenite occurs gradually with straining, while at −50 °C the transformation occurs almost from the onset of loading. The associated transformation strain is reduced, comprising nearly half the total strain, lowering the apparent elastic modulus and explaining the relatively low work hardening compared to RT straining. By contrast, deformation at RT after pre-straining at −50 °C results in larger work hardening than for solely RT straining due to the higher martensite levels introduced at −50 °C. This is due to composite load transfer to the strong constituent from the soft matrix. The extent of the transformation is quantified as a function of strain at both temperatures as well as its effect on the work hardening and elongation.

  11. Effect of Al alloying on the martensitic temperature in Ti-Ta shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Alberto; Rogal, Jutta; Drautz, Ralf [Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Ti-Ta-based alloys are promising candidates as high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) for actuators and superelastic applications. The shape memory mechanism involves a martensitic transformation between the low-temperature α'' phase (orthorhombic) and the high-temperature β phase (body-centered cubic). In order to prevent the degradation of the shape memory effect, Ti-Ta needs to be alloyed with further elements. However, this often reduces the martensitic temperature M{sub s}, which is usually strongly composition dependent. The aim of this work is to analyze how the addition of a third element to Ti-Ta alloys affects M{sub s} by means of electronic structure calculations. In particular, it will be investigated how alloying Al to Ti-Ta alters the relative stability of the α'' and β phases. This understanding will help to identify new alloy compositions featuring both a stable shape memory effect and elevated transformation temperatures.

  12. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry. PMID:28150692

  13. Effect of aging on the martensitic transformation temperature in Ag-Zn-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezawa, K.; Hoshi, H.; Marukawa, K.

    2000-01-01

    The relation between atomic ordering and martensitic transformation temperature, M s , in Ag-Zn-Al alloys was examined mainly by means of electrical resistivity measurements. Disordered bcc phase was frozen-in by quenching from a temperature above the critical temperature for ordering, T c . In a Ag-22.3at%Zn-8.9at%Al alloy, the M s temperature has been found to decrease by aging in the parent phase at temperatures between 253 and 293 K. The resistivity also decreased in accord with the M s temperature. This indicates that atomic ordering proceeds by aging. The relation between the decrease in the reverse transformation temperature, A f , and the degree of long range order was obtained. In a Ag-11.0at%Zn-15.5at%Al alloy, in which the M s temperature in the as-quenched state is higher and the T c temperature is lower than that of the former alloy, aging in the martensite phase was performed. In this case, the aging brought about the increase in the A f temperature. This is in contrast to the results of aging in the parent phase. Furthermore, the effect of aging in the parent phase at temperatures higher than T c was examined. Both the transformation temperature and the resistivity were found to become higher. These changes are due to lowering in the degree of short range order. (orig.)

  14. Structural and magnetic characterization of martensitic Ni-Mn-Ga thin films deposited on Mo foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, V.A.; Anton, R. Lopez; Kohl, M.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Ohtsuka, M.; Orue, I.; Besseghini, S.

    2006-01-01

    Three martensitic Ni 51.4 Mn 28.3 Ga 20.3 thin films sputter-deposited on a Mo foil were investigated with regard to their crystal and magnetic domain structures, as well as their magnetic and magnetostrain properties. The film thicknesses, d, were 0.1, 0.4 and 1.0μm. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns revealed a tetragonal modulated martensitic phase (10M) in the films. The surface topography and micromagnetic structure were studied by scanning probe microscopy. A maze magnetic domain structure featuring a large out-of-plane magnetization component was found in all films. The domain width, δ, depends on the film thickness as δ∼d. The thickness dependencies of the saturation magnetization, saturation magnetic field and magnetic anisotropy were clarified. Beam cantilever tests on the Ni-Mn-Ga/Mo composite as a function of magnetic field showed reversible strains, which are larger than ordinary magnetostriction

  15. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  16. Softening mechanisms of the AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel under hot torsion simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Thiago Santana de; Silva, Eden Santos; Rodrigues, Samuel Filgueiras; Nascimento, Carmem Celia Francisco; Leal, Valdemar Silva; Reis, Gedeon Silva, E-mail: samuel.filgueiras@ifma.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Maranhao (PPGEM/IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    This study investigated the softening mechanisms of the AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel during torsion simulation under isothermal continuous in the temperature range of 900 to 1150 °C and strain rates of 0.1 to 5.0s{sup -1}. In the first part of the curves, before the peak, the results show that the critical (ε-c) and peak (ε-p) strains are elevated for higher strain rate and lower temperatures contributing for higher strain hardening rate (h). Moreover, this indicated that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and dynamic recovery (DRV) are not effective in this region. After the peak, the reductions in stresses are associated to the different DRX/DRV competitions. For lower temperatures and higher strain rates there is a delay in the DRX while the DRV is acting predominantly (with low Avrami exponent (n) and high t{sub 0.5}). The steady state was reached after large strains showing DRX grains, formation of retained austenite and the presence of chromium carbide (Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}) and ferrite δ at the martensitic grain boundaries. These contribute for impairing the toughness and ductility on the material. The constitutive equations at the peak strain indicated changes in the deformation mechanism, with variable strain rate sensitivity (m), which affected the final microstructure. (author)

  17. It was the demonstration of industrial steel production capacity ferritic-martensitic Spanish ASTURFER scale demand ITER; Hacia la demostracion de capacidad de produccion industrial del acero ferritico-martensitico espanol ASTURFER a escala de demanda ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coto, R.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Artimez, J. A.; Belzunce, J.; Sedano, L.

    2013-07-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) structural steels are considered as candidate materials with notable possibilities to be incorporated to fusion reactor ITER, nowadays under construction, and future fusion reactor DEMO, involving a notable forecasting of supply materials, with a considerable limitation due to the few number of furnishes currently on the market. The manufacture at an industrial scale of the ASTURFER steel, developed at laboratory scale by ITMA Materials Technology and the Structural Materials Division of the Technology Division of CIEMAT would be a significant business opportunity for steelwork companies.

  18. Effects of Hydrogen Charging on the Phase Transformation of Martensitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Yoav; Carl, Matthew; Ley, Nathan A.; Young, Marcus L.

    2017-12-01

    Ti-rich martensitic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wires of 0.5 mm diameter were tested under hydrogen-charging conditions to reveal the effects on phase transformation. Hydrogen charging was performed by immersion testing for several durations. The SMA wires were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) for the the as-received, polished, and hydrogen-charged conditions. The DSC revealed the phase-transformation behavior of the NiTi SMA wires. Single and triple heating/cooling cycles in the DSC show the relationship between hydrogen and temperature on the material. Five distinct peaks (peaks I-V) are observed during heating/cooling in the DSC. Peak I corresponds to the martensite-to-austenite (M → A) transformation. Peaks II, III, and IV are related to hydrogen charging. Peak II appears at about 210-230 °C, while peaks III and IV appear at about 350 and 440 °C, respectively. These higher temperature peaks, peaks II-IV, were observed for the first time for a martensitic NiTi SMA due to the large temperature range covered using the DSC. Only one peak (peak V) appears during cooling and corresponds to the austenite-to-martensite transformation peak. Ex situ and in situ SR-XRD revealed the phases and the crystallographic relationship to peaks I-V in the DSC.

  19. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  20. Tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners : Effects of micro-alloying on microstructure and mechanical property evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öhlund, C.E.I.C.

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims to deepen our understanding of the effect of micro-alloying on the microstructure and mechanical property evolution during tempering of martensitic steel for fasteners. The ongoing trend of engine down-sizing has led to the need for stronger and more

  1. Possible wave formation and martensitic transformation of iron particles in copper single crystals during argon ion bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thölén, Anders Ragnar; Li, Chang-Hai; Easterling, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Thin single crystal copper specimens (thickness ~250 nm) containing coherent iron particles (diameter 40–50 nm) have been bombarded with argon ions (5, 80, and 330 keV). During this process some of the iron particles transform to martensite. The transformation was observed near the exposed surface...

  2. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites: Annual progress report No. 4, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1989-03-15

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations is being carried out on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for a new theoretical basis for investigating the martensite nucleation mechanism and for establishing the conditions for nonclassical nucleation. Soliton-like solutions of a dynamic Ginzburg-Landau continuum theory for ferroelastic martensites are being studied in order to determine the strain distribution, strain energy and dynamical behavior for various geometric configurations as a function of the material parameters, temperature and boundary conditions. Model parameters of the theory consist of the second and higher order elastic constants and the harmonic strain gradient coefficients in the parent phase. X-ray measurements of the transformation strain versus temperature, and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements on biaxially stressed crystals in In/sub 1-x/Tl/sub x/ alloys for determining the second and higher order elastic constants in the single domain tetragonal state and for studying the morphology and the dynamic behavior of the martensite interfaces and transformation precursors are in progress. 6 refs.

  3. Twin boundaries and heterophase interfaces in ferroelastic martensites. Annual progress report No. 3, January 16, 1986-June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations is being carried out on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for a new theoretical basis for investigating the martensite nucleation mechanism and for establishing the conditions for nonclassical nucleation. Soliton-like solutions of a dynamic Ginzburg-Landau continuum theory for ferroelastic martensites are being studied in order to determine the strain distribution, strain energy and dynamical behavior for various geometric configurations as a function of the material parameters, temperature and boundary conditions. Model parameters of the theory consist of the second and higher order elastic constants and the harmonic strain gradient coefficients in the parent phase. X-ray measurements of the transformation strain versus temperature, and simultaneous ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements on biaxially stressed crystals in In/sub 1-x/Tl/sub x/ alloys for determining the second and higher order elastic constants in the single domain tetragonal state and for studying the morphology and the dynamic behavior of the martensite interfaces and transformation precursors have been started or are in preparation, respectively.

  4. Neutron-diffraction study of the crystalline texture in a martensitic steel for fusion-reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brokmeier, H.G.; Coppola, R.; Montanari, R.; Rustichelli, F.

    1995-01-01

    This contribution presents the results of a neutron-diffraction study on the evolution of texture in modified martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 (MANET) submitted to various quenching and tempering treatments in conditions technologically relevant to operation in future fusion reactors. The corresponding orientation-distribution functions are presented and discussed, with reference to other microstructural features of the investigated material. (orig.)

  5. In situ neutron diffraction studies of martensitic transformations in NiTi polycrystals under tension and compression stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Novák, Václav; Daymond, M. R.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 378, - (2004), s. 97-104 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : martensitic transformation * shape memory alloy * neutron diffraction * NiTi Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  6. The role of martensitic transformation on bimodal grain structure in ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-06-11

    In the present study, metastable AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to different cold rolling reductions from 70% to 93%, followed by annealing at 700 °C for 300 min to form ultrafine grained (UFG) austenite with different grain structures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation were used to characterize the martensitic transformation, in order to relate it to the bimodal distribution of the austenite grain size after subsequent annealing. The results showed that the martensite morphology changed from lath type in the 60% rolled sample to a mixture of lath and dislocation-cell types in the higher rolling reductions. Calculation of the Gibbs free energy change during the reversion treatment showed that the reversion mechanism is shear controlled at the annealing temperature and so the morphology of the reverted austenite is completely dependent on the morphology of the deformation induced martensite. It was found that the austenite had a bimodal grain size distribution in the 80% rolled and annealed state and this is related to the existence of different types of martensite. Increasing the rolling reduction to 93% followed by annealing caused changing of the grain structure to a monomodal like structure, which was mostly covered with small grains of around 300 nm. The existence of bimodal austenite grain size in the 80% rolled and annealed 304L stainless steel led to the improvement of ductility while maintaining a high tensile strength in comparison with the 93% rolled and annealed sample.

  7. Cooperative effect of monoclinic distortion and sinusoidal modulation in the martensitic structure of Ni2FeGa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.B.; Yang, H.X.; Tian, H.F.; Zeng, L.J.; Ma, C.; Feng, L.; Wu, G.H.; Li, J.Q.; Jansen, J.

    2010-01-01

    The structural features of the '5M' martensitic phase in Ni 2 FeGa alloys have been determined by electron diffraction using the multi-slice least-squares (MSLS) method. The results demonstrate that the '5M' phase contains an evident cooperative effect of monoclinic distortion and sinusoidal modulation along the [110] c direction. Theoretical simulations based on our refined data suggest that the '5M' martensitic phase observed in Ni-Fe-Ga and Ni-Mn-Ga has visible common behaviors in both stacking sequence and local structural distortion. Considering the cooperative effect of monoclinic distortion and sinusoidal modulation, we demonstrate that the '7M' martensitic phase could adopt two equivalent structural phases corresponding with the stacking sequences of (43 - ) 2 and (52 - ) 2 , respectively. - Graphical abstract: The structural model of the '5M' Ni 2 FeGa martensite viewed along the [001] c (i.e. [010] m ) zone axis, demonstrating the cooperative effect of monoclinic distortion and sinusoidal modulation along the [110] c direction.

  8. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni–Mn–Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, Peter; Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2008), 035014/1-035014/4 ISSN 0964-1726 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : NiMnGa single crystal * neutron diffraction * stress induced martensite reorientation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.743, year: 2008

  9. Stress- and Magnetic Field-Induced Martensitic Transformation at Cryogenic Temperatures in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Xu, Xiao; Miyake, Atsushi; Kimura, Yuta; Omori, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masashi; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-12-01

    Stress-induced and magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation behaviors at low temperatures were investigated for Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloys. The magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was directly observed by in situ optical microscopy. Magnetization measurements under pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T were carried out at temperatures between 4.2 and 125 K on a single-crystal sample; full magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was confirmed at all tested temperatures. Compression tests from 10 to 100 K were conducted on a single-crystal sample; full shape recovery was obtained at all tested temperatures. It was found that the temperature dependence of both the critical stress and critical magnetic field is small and that the transformation hysteresis is less sensitive to temperature even at cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of entropy change during martensitic transformation up to 100 K was then derived using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation with critical stresses and magnetic fields.

  10. The γ-ε martensitic transformation: a model for stress induced variant and its interaction with grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenin, G.

    1995-01-01

    The γ (f.c.c.) to ε (h.c.p.) martensitic transformation occurs through the Shockley a/6 left angle 211 right angle faulting every second {111} plane of the f.c.c. structure. A stress induced thin single variant corresponds to a single a/6 left angle 211 right angle faulting vector and leads to a large homogeneous shear (0.35) in amplitude. The tip of such a plate is composed of a set of identical Shockley partial dislocations with large mutual interactions. This work is a presentation of a model which describes the martensite morphology of stress induced ε martensite in shape memory Fe-Mn-Si based alloys. The model includes the formation mechanism of the plate (Seeger's like) and its growth inside a limited grain. The mutual interaction of Shockley dislocations and their interaction with the grain boundary is semi quantitatively described; it leads to a lenticular shape of ε martensite thin plates. The model is able to explain the behaviour of this kind of alloys concerning the superelastic effect and the shape memory. (orig.)

  11. Study of the order-disorder transition and martensitic transformation in a Cu-Al-Be alloy by EELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.H.; Ochoa, M.T.; Flores-Zuniga, H.; Espinosa-Magana, F.; Rios-Jara, D.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in 3d states occupancy associated with order-disorder transition and martensitic transformation in a Cu-Al-Be alloy was investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in both high energy and low energy loss regions. From the high energy loss region, the Cu L 2,3 white-line intensities, which reflect the unoccupied density of states in 3d bands, was measured for three states of the alloy: disordered austenite, ordered austenite and martensite. It was found that the white-line intensity remains the same during order-disorder transition but appears slightly smaller in martensite, indicating that some electrons left Cu 3d bands or some hybridization took place during phase transformation. From the low energy loss region, the optical joint density of states (OJDS) was obtained by Kramers-Kronig analysis. As maxima observed in the OJDS spectra are assigned to interband transitions, these spectra can be used to probe changes in the electronic band structure. The analysis shows that during the martensitic transformation, the peaks positions and relative intensities in the OJDS spectra undergoes noticeable changes, which are associated with interband transitions

  12. Tuning martensitic transformation, large magnetoresistance and strain in Ni50-xFexMn36Sn14 Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pan; Jing, Chao; Zheng, Dong; Li, Zhe; Kang, Baojuan; Deng, Dongmei; Cao, Shixun; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Jincang

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the martensitic transformation, exchange bias, magnetoresistance (MR) and strain in Ni50-xFexMn36Sn14 (x=1, 2, 3, 4) Heusler alloys. With the increase of Fe content, the austenite phase could be stabilized with L21 structure and hence the martensitic transition shifts to a lower temperature and finally disappears. This behavior can be understood by the weakening of Ni-Mn hybridization to suppress AFM interactions and enhancement of Fe-Fe ferromagnetic exchange interactions. The same reason can account for the slight decrease of exchange bias field (HEB) with the increase of the Fe content from x=1 to 2 and the disappearance of HEB for x=3. We observed MR effect for x=3, and a maximum MR value of -52% was achieved, which can be explained by the change in the electronic structure during martensitic transformation induced by the magnetic field. In addition, a large strain of 0.207% in Ni49Fe1Mn36Sn14 was observed due to the changes of lattice parameters during the martensitic transformation induced by temperature.

  13. Multi-Step Martensitic Transformations in Ni-rich NiTi Alloys - an In-situ TEM Investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Antonín; Khalil Allafi, J.; Eggeler, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 3 (2003), s. 339-363 ISSN 1478-6435 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/1172 Grant - others:DFG(DE) SFB-459 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : martensitic transformation * shape memory alloys * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Elementary martensitic transformation processes in Ni-rich NiTi single crystals with Ni4Ti3 precipitates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michutta, J.; Somsen, Ch.; Yawny, A.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 13 (2006), s. 3525-3542 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0918 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : multiple-step martensitic transformations * differential scanning calorimetry * in situ cooling transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 3.549, year: 2006

  15. Impact of the volume change on the ageing effects in Cu-Al-Ni martensite: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosogor, Anna; Xue, Dezhen; Zhou, Yumei; Ding, Xiangdong; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; L'vov, Victor A; Sun, Jun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2013-08-21

    The time evolution of the physical properties of martensite during martensite ageing is traditionally explained by the symmetry-conforming short-range order (SC-SRO) principle, which requires the spatial configuration of crystal defects to follow the symmetry change of the host lattice. In the present study, we show that the volume change of the host lattice also contributes to the ageing effects in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy besides the symmetry change. To substantiate this statement the gradual increase of the storage modulus with time at constant temperature was measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the experimental results were quantitatively described in the framework of the symmetry-conforming Landau theory of martensitic transformations in a crystal with defects. The comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirmed that the time dependence of the storage modulus is caused by two different physical mechanisms. Evaluations showing that the first mechanism is driven by the spontaneous symmetry change and the second mechanism is caused by the volume change after the martensitic transformation was carried out.

  16. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2 ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain in austenite is not hydrostatic but hkl dependent, which is ascribed to plastic deformation of this phase during martensite formation and is considered responsible for anomalous behavior of the 200 γ reflection.

  17. SEM Technique Development for Exploring Martensitic Phase Transformations in Multi-Variant Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael G.

    The purpose of this work is to validate that the martensitic transformations predicted by the model from Xian Chen and Dick James from the University of Minnesota. This model uses multiple criteria for compatibility between the austenite and martensite lattices including limitations of the middle eigenvalue of the transformation stretch matrix and what are called the "cofactor conditions." An alloy satisfying these criteria was found, (Au30Cu25Zn 45) but the traditional methods for verifying the shape and crystallographic orientation relationships of the transformation could not be used (serial sectioning and 3D Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)). The first method developed in this work uses the intensity peak of the background of EBSD patterns to extract surface topography measurements. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the deviation from specular reflection for electrons on different materials at varying voltages. The geometric setup of the EBSD camera and the sample were then used with the experimentally measured intensity peak location on the camera to calculate the surface normal vectors for each point on a sample. A proof of concept experiment was first performed on the Tin sphere calibration standard, in which the surface normal vectors were found within around 0:5ffi error near the standard EBSD sample orientation. This technique was then used to measure the surface relief caused by the martensitic transformation of the AuCuZn alloy which can be matched to predicted surface shearing values to confirm the Chen/James model. The second method developed in this thesis measures the out-of-plane grain boundary inclination angle using 2D EBSD. This utilizes the penetration depth of the electron interaction volume, and is measured by calculating the proportion of the pattern that is created from each grain. This is completed by performing dot products between an EBSD line scan across the grain boundary and reference patterns taken from the bulk

  18. Ab initio calculations of martensitic phase behavior in Ni2FeGa magnetic shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soykan, C.; Özdemir Kart, S.; Sevik, C.; Çağın, T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • L2 1 , NM and 5M phases have the energy minimum at a = 5.76 Å, c/a = 1.33 and c/a = 0.99. • Decrement in moment of Ni and increment in that of Fe reflect electrons transfer. • Differences in minority DOS over MT lead to stabilize the final structure. • C' taking small value in L2 1 leads to elastic instability in MT. - Abstract: A series of spin polarized energy calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to investigate the structural, magnetic, electronic and mechanical properties of Ni 2 FeGa magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMA’s) in the austenitic and martensitic structures. We report that L2 1 austenitic phase is metastable at a = 5.76 Å, the NM tetragonal and 5M monoclinic martensitic structures are stable at c/a = 1.33 and c/a = 0.99, respectively. That the electron removes from Ni to Fe site during phase transformation to martensite is confirmed by the increment in the magnetic moment of Ni, while decrement in that of Fe. The analysis of the partial density of states show that some distinguishable differences in the minority spin states occur upon martensitic phase transformation, such as, the replacement of the Fe states (e g and t 2g ) above Fermi level by only Fe-t 2g states during L2 1 -5M transformation and the splitting of Fe-t 2g states near Fermi level during 5M-NM transformation (through 7M). These changes lower the energy of the system, indicating that the final structure becomes stable. The soft tetragonal shear constant C′ of the austenitic phase designates the ease of the phase transition into martensitic phase. It is shown that the results calculated in this study are in good agreement with the previous calculations and the available experiments

  19. Inelastic properties evolution of alloy steels in martensitic and cold-worked states subjected to heat treatments up to 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isore, A.; Miyada, L.T.

    1975-01-01

    Two internal friction peaks were observed in a ball-bearing steel in the martensitic and cold-worked states, near 220 and 280 0 C for a frequency of about 1,3 Hz. From peaks evolution by annealing up to 600 0 C, it is possible to follow the decomposition stages of martensitic and recrystallization of cold-worked pearlite. Annealed martensite and cold worked pearlite have the same anelastic behaviour. From existing atomistic models, it is possible to interpret these peaks by dislocations-interstitial carbon and dislocations-carbides interactions

  20. Investigation on the Enhanced Oxidation of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel P92 in Pure Steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of ferritic/martensitic steel P92 was investigated in pure oxygen and in pure steam at 600–800 °C by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that the oxidation of P92 was significantly enhanced and multilayer scale with an outer iron oxides layer formed in pure steam. At 700 °C, the gas switch markedly influenced the scaling kinetics and scale microstructure. It was supposed that the higher affinity of iron to steam would be attributed to the enhanced oxidation of P92 in pure steam, and the much easier transport of hydroxyl would account for the significant difference induced by gas switch.

  1. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  2. Peculiarities of magnetoelastic coupling in Ni-Fe-Ga-Co ferromagnetic martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustov, S; Corro, M L; Cesari, E; Perez-Landazabal, J I; Recarte, V

    2010-01-01

    The reversible stress-induced magnetization (inverse magnetostriction or Villari effect) has been measured in a polycrystalline Ni-Fe-Ga-Co ferromagnetic martensite. The samples were mechanically excited using longitudinal resonant oscillations at frequencies close to 100 kHz, and experiments were performed over the temperature range 170-350 K under variable polarizing fields. It has been found that the reversible inverse magnetostriction changes its sign under low polarizing fields over a certain temperature range with its upper limit close to the Curie temperature. We argue that the variations of sign of the reversible inverse magnetostriction effect are related in the present experiments with the change in the sign of magnetostriction, as has additionally been verified in test measurements performed for pure Ni and Fe. The observed peculiarity of magnetoelastic coupling is also reflected in the temperature dependence of electrical resistance and even produces a minor effect in calorimetry scans. Possible origins of these features of magnetoelastic coupling are discussed.

  3. Modification and characterization of the AISI 410 martensitic stainless steels surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bincoleto, A.V.L.; Nascente, P.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Steam turbines are used in the generation of more than half the electric energy produced in the world nowadays. It is important the study which aims to improve the efficiency by means of the optimization of leaks and of the aerodynamic profiles, as well as to maintain the integrity of the components. The martensitic stainless steels are widely employed due to the combination of their good mechanical properties with higher corrosion resistance. However, their lower wear resistance and their poor tribological behavior limit their use, since they decrease the component life time. In order to evaluate the improvement in the performance of the AISI 410 stainless steel, several process of surface modification were employed. Five samples were produced: the first one was not treated, the second one received liquid nitriding, the third, gas nitriding, the forth, thermal aspersion of tungsten carbide, and the fifth, boronizing. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, surface microhardness, and X-ray diffractometry. (author)

  4. Small angle neutron scattering study of martensitic/ferritic ODS alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, M.H.; Perrut, M.; Zhong, S.Y.; Carlan, Y. de

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a key tool in material study at the nanoscale. This method allows characterization, in a non-destructive way, of small particles (precipitates, cavities, etc.) ranging in size between 1 and 100 nm. This technique, giving statistical data representative of the whole sample, is particularly adapted to the study of steels. We will present an overview of the SANS possibilities applied to the ODS ferritic/martensitic steels. The main objective is to study the evolution of the oxide dispersion during the different stages of the fabrication, that is, after mechanical alloying, consolidation process (extrusion or HIP) and after thermal treatments. The treatments of SANS data obtained on different ODS Fe9–14%Cr alloys are detailed by discussing the strengths and limitations of the technique. Various Fe–Cr–W–Ti experimental alloys have been characterized.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering study of martensitic/ferritic ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: mhmathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [DMSM, ONERA, 29 Avenue de la Division Leclerc, F-92322 Chatillon (France); Zhong, S.Y., E-mail: shengyi.zhong@cea.fr [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [Nuclear Materials Department, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-09-15

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a key tool in material study at the nanoscale. This method allows characterization, in a non-destructive way, of small particles (precipitates, cavities, etc.) ranging in size between 1 and 100 nm. This technique, giving statistical data representative of the whole sample, is particularly adapted to the study of steels. We will present an overview of the SANS possibilities applied to the ODS ferritic/martensitic steels. The main objective is to study the evolution of the oxide dispersion during the different stages of the fabrication, that is, after mechanical alloying, consolidation process (extrusion or HIP) and after thermal treatments. The treatments of SANS data obtained on different ODS Fe9-14%Cr alloys are detailed by discussing the strengths and limitations of the technique. Various Fe-Cr-W-Ti experimental alloys have been characterized.

  6. A 3D finite strain phenomenological constitutive model for shape memory alloys considering martensite reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghavani, J.; Auricchio, F.; Naghdabadi, R.; Reali, A.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2010-06-01

    Most devices based on shape memory alloys experience both finite deformations and non-proportional loading conditions in engineering applications. This motivates the development of constitutive models considering finite strain as well as martensite variant reorientation. To this end, in the present article, based on the principles of continuum thermodynamics with internal variables, a three-dimensional finite strain phenomenological constitutive model is proposed taking its basis from the recent model in the small strain regime proposed by Panico and Brinson (J Mech Phys Solids 55:2491-2511, 2007). In the finite strain constitutive model derivation, a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic and inelastic parts, together with an additive decomposition of the inelastic strain rate tensor into transformation and reorientation parts is adopted. Moreover, it is shown that, when linearized, the proposed model reduces exactly to the original small strain model.

  7. Design of a low-alloy high-strength and high-toughness martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-jun; Ren, Xue-ping; Yang, Wen-chao; Zang, Yue

    2013-08-01

    To develop a high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel with high strength and high toughness, a series of martensitic steels were studied through alloying with various elements and thermodynamic simulation. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the designed steel were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing and Charpy impact test. The results show that cementite exists between 500°C and 700°C, M7C3 exits below 720°C, and they are much lower than the austenitizing temperature of the designed steel. Furthermore, the Ti(C,N) precipitate exists until 1280°C, which refines the microstructure and increases the strength and toughness. The optimal alloying components are 0.19% C, 1.19% Si, 2.83% Mn, 1.24% Ni, and 0.049% Ti; the tensile strength and the V notch impact toughness of the designed steel are more than 1500 MPa and 100 J, respectively.

  8. Hierarchical characterization by EBSD and neutron diffraction on heterogeneous deformation behavior of a martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Satoshi; Tomota, Yo; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Morito, Shigekazu; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A novel combined technique of neutron diffraction and electron back scattering diffraction was applied to examine hierarchical deformation behavior of 18 mass% Ni martensitic steel. In-situ neutron diffraction experiment during tensile deformation demonstrated that intergranular stress was generated. EBSD analysis suggested that slip bands terminated not only at block boundaries, but also sub-block boundaries at a relatively small strain. In many cases, slip bands crossing sub-block boundaries were zigzagged. With increasing strain, sub-block became unclear and then block boundaries worked as a main barrier for dislocation gliding. Such kind of heterogeneous plastic flow in differently oriented hkl blocks seems to be a possible reason for the intergranular stresses. (author)

  9. Influence of Cryogenic Treatments on the Wear Behavior of AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, G.; Tuckart, W. R.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present work is to characterize the wear behavior of a cryogenically treated low-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, by means of ball-on-disk tribological tests. Wear tests were performed under a range of applied normal loads and in two different environments, namely a petrolatum bath and an argon atmosphere. Wear tracks were analyzed by both optical and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to evaluate wear volume, track geometry, surface features and the tribolayers generated after testing. This paper is an extension of the work originally reported in the VIII Iberian Conference of Tribology (Prieto and Tuckart, in: Ballest Jiménez, Rodríguez Espinosa, Serrano Saurín, Pardilla Arias, Olivares Bermúdez (eds) VIII Iberian conference of tribology, Cartagena, 2015). In this study, it has been experimentally demonstrated that cryogenically treated specimens showed a wear resistance improvement ranging from 35 to 90% compared to conventionally treated ones.

  10. Martensitic transformation on AISI 304 stainless steel produced by a coaxial plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.; Lepone, Alejandro; Marquez, Adriana

    1997-01-01

    Full text: In a previous paper, a surface treatment of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated by a Nitrogen ion beam generated in a coaxial plasma gun has been reported. The device is operated with a Titanium insert at the end of the inner electrode, producing a TiN coating on the surface of the sample. Because of the ion and plasma energy deposition, the sample surface is strongly heated during the treatment resulting in titanium diffusion. Preliminary X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have shown the presence of a martensitic transformation on AISI 304 samples, probably induced by Ti atoms. In this work, the transformation depth is studied with grazing-incidence XRD on samples subjected to several superimposed shots. For this purpose, multiple low angles of incidence are used, allowing the analysis at different depths of the substrate

  11. The effects of microstructure on crackling noise during martensitic transformation in Cu-Al-Ni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faran, E.; Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal; Shilo, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 17 (2015), 171601_1-171601_4 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15264S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : martensitic transition * crackling noise * compressive test * Cu-Al-Ni * microstructure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015 http://scitation.aip.org/deliver/fulltext/aip/journal/apl/107/17/1.4934694.pdf;jsessionid=g3qiscpfh2s3d.x-aip-live-06?itemId=/content/aip/journal/apl/107/17/10.1063/1.4934694&mimeType=pdf&containerItemId=content/aip/journal/apl

  12. Rubber effect and stabilization of martensites in noble metal based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marukawa, K.; Takezawa, K.; Hoshi, H.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous paper, it has been pointed out that the rubber effect and stabilization of the martensite phase are caused by short range reordering during aging [K. Marukawa, K. Tsuchiya, Scripta Metall. Mater. 32 (1995) 77]. This view was further examined by experimental and theoretical studies. It has been found that the change in electrical resistivity produced by aging is well correlated with magnitudes of these effects. The relation between the short range order parameters and the representative quantities of these effects was formulated on the basis of thermodynamics. Quantitative evaluation was performed by numerical calculations utilizing the Monte Carlo method. It was found that the rubber effect is prominent when the aging temperature is in the vicinity of the order-disorder transition temperature. It was also shown that in most cases disordering or lowering in the long range order causes the stabilization. (orig.)

  13. Property Optimization in As-Quenched Martensitic Steel by Molybdenum and Niobium Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Mohrbacher

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Niobium microalloying is the backbone of modern low-carbon high strength low alloy (HSLA steel metallurgy, providing a favorable combination of strength and toughness by pronounced microstructural refinement. Molybdenum alloying is established in medium-carbon quenching and tempering of steel by delivering high hardenability and good tempering resistance. Recent developments of ultra-high strength steel grades, such as fully martensitic steel, can be optimized by using beneficial metallurgical effects of niobium and molybdenum. The paper details the metallurgical principles of both elements in such steel and the achievable improvement of properties. Particularly, the underlying mechanisms of improving toughness and reducing the sensitivity towards hydrogen embrittlement by a suitable combination of molybdenum and niobium alloying will be discussed.

  14. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  15. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  16. Helium trapping in carbide precipitates in a tempered F82H ferritic–martensitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mazumder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural changes of a tempered F82H ferritic–martensitic steel following He implantation at 60 and 500 °C have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atom probe tomography (APT. After irradiation at 500 °C, numerous He bubbles were formed throughout the matrix, whereas after irradiation at 60 °C, no bubbles were seen to form in the matrix. In both irradiations, He bubbles were observed to have formed within large carbide precipitates, determined by APT compositional analysis to be M23C6. The observed preferential He bubble formation in carbides during low temperature He irradiation occurs as a result of the diffusing He being trapped in the carbide due to the strong He–C bond. As the He concentration increases in the carbide due to trapping, He bubbles are formed.

  17. Peculiarities of magnetoelastic coupling in Ni-Fe-Ga-Co ferromagnetic martensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustov, S; Corro, M L; Cesari, E [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra. Valldemossa, km 7.5, 07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Perez-Landazabal, J I; Recarte, V, E-mail: Sergey.Kustov@uib.ca [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus de ArrosadIa, 31006 Pamplona (Spain)

    2010-05-05

    The reversible stress-induced magnetization (inverse magnetostriction or Villari effect) has been measured in a polycrystalline Ni-Fe-Ga-Co ferromagnetic martensite. The samples were mechanically excited using longitudinal resonant oscillations at frequencies close to 100 kHz, and experiments were performed over the temperature range 170-350 K under variable polarizing fields. It has been found that the reversible inverse magnetostriction changes its sign under low polarizing fields over a certain temperature range with its upper limit close to the Curie temperature. We argue that the variations of sign of the reversible inverse magnetostriction effect are related in the present experiments with the change in the sign of magnetostriction, as has additionally been verified in test measurements performed for pure Ni and Fe. The observed peculiarity of magnetoelastic coupling is also reflected in the temperature dependence of electrical resistance and even produces a minor effect in calorimetry scans. Possible origins of these features of magnetoelastic coupling are discussed.

  18. Effect of Hydrogen and Strain-Induced Martensite on Mechanical Properties of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hwan Bak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plastic deformation and strain-induced martensite (SIM, α′ transformation in metastable austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated through room temperature tensile tests at strain rates ranging from 2 × 10−6 to 2 × 10−2/s. The amount of SIM was measured on the fractured tensile specimens using a feritscope and magnetic force microscope. Elongation to fracture, tensile strength, hardness, and the amount of SIM increased with decreasing the strain rate. The strain-rate dependence of RT tensile properties was observed to be related to the amount of SIM. Specifically, SIM formed during tensile tests was beneficial in increasing the elongation to fracture, hardness, and tensile strength. Hydrogen suppressed the SIM formation, leading to hydrogen softening and localized brittle fracture.

  19. Fatigue-creep of martensitic steels containing 9-12% Cr: behaviour and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, B.

    2007-09-01

    It is in the framework of the research programs on nuclear reactors (generation IV) that the martensitic steels containing 9-12% Cr are studied by the CEA. Most of the structures for which they are considered will be solicited in fatigue-creep at high temperature (550 C). The aim of this work is to understand and model the cyclic behaviour and the damage of these materials. The proposed modelling are based on detailed observations studies (SEM, TEM, EBSD...). The cyclic softening is attributed to the growth of the microstructure. A micro-mechanical model based on the physical parameters is proposed and leads to encouraging results. The damage results of interactions between fatigue, creep and oxidation. Two main types of damage are revealed. A model of anticipation of service time is proposed and gives very satisfying results. The possible extrapolations are discussed. (O.M.)

  20. Numerical Study of the Plasticity-Induced Stabilization Effect on Martensitic Transformations in Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Philipp; Hempel, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that plastic deformations in shape memory alloys stabilize the martensitic phase. Furthermore, the knowledge concerning the plastic state is crucial for a reliable sustainability analysis of construction parts. Numerical simulations serve as a tool for the realistic investigation of the complex interactions between phase transformations and plastic deformations. To account also for irreversible deformations, we expand an energy-based material model by including a non-linear isotropic hardening plasticity model. An implementation of this material model into commercial finite element programs, e.g., Abaqus, offers the opportunity to analyze entire structural components at low costs and fast computation times. Along with the theoretical derivation and expansion of the model, several simulation results for various boundary value problems are presented and interpreted for improved construction designing.

  1. Sulfide Stress Cracking Behavior of a Martensitic Steel Controlled by Tempering Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A medium-carbon Cr–Mo–V martensitic steel was thermally processed by quenching (Q at 890 °C and tempering (T at increasing temperatures from 650 °C to 720 °C and the effect of tempering temperature, Tt, on sulfide stress cracking (SSC behaviors was estimated mainly via double cantilever beam (DCB and electrochemical hydrogen permeation (EHP tests and microstructure characterization. The results indicate that the threshold stress intensity factor for SSC, KISSC, increased with increasing Tt. The overall and local H concentration around the inclusions decreased with increasing Tt, due to reductions in the amounts of solute atoms, grain boundaries and dislocations, which effectively prevented SSC initiation. Also, increasing Tt caused an increased fraction of high-angle boundaries, which evidently lowered the SSC propagation rate by more frequently diverting the propagating direction and accordingly restricted SSC propagation. The overall SSC resistance of this Q&T–treated steel was therefore significantly enhanced.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of the nanostructure of ferritic-martensitic 12%-chromium steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, S. G.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Parkhomenko, V. D.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.; Chernov, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    The nanostructure (nanoparticle distribution) of ferritic-martensitic 12%-chromium steels EK-181 (Fe-12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B) and ChS-139 (Fe-12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-Nb-Mo) subjected to different modes of mechanical and heat treatments and neutron irradiation has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. The samples have been studied in the initial state and after neutron irradiation (IVV-2M reactor) at a temperature of 80°C with fluences of 1018, 1019, and 5 × 1019 cm-2 ( E ≥ 0.1 MeV). The nanostructure of the steels is characterized by precipitations of nanoparticles with two characteristic sizes of 1.0-1.5 and 7-8 nm. The dependence of the nanostructure parameters on the composition of the steels and on the conditions of heat treatment and irradiation has been discussed.

  3. Line profile analyses of a martensitic steel during continuous and stepwise tensile deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, T.; Harjo, S.; Gong, W.; Aizawa, K.

    2016-09-01

    Dislocation characteristics in an as-quenched 22SiMn2TiB martensitic steel during tensile deformation were monitored by in-situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction combined with the Convolutional Multiple Whole Profile fitting analysis. Two loading conditions, continuous and stepwise followed by unloading, were adopted in the experiments. The diffraction patterns both in the loading (axial) and the transversal directions were measured simultaneously. The dislocation densities obtained from the experiments behaved differently in two loading conditions and in two measured directions, respectively. The different behaviour was mainly due to the increase of intergranular strains with the increase of deformation, and the profiles measured in the axial direction in the loading condition of stepwise followed by unloading gave most reliable dislocation characteristics among the profiles measured in other conditions.

  4. Dislocation characteristics of martensitic steel studied by in-situ neutron diffraction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Takuro; Harjo, Stefanus; Gong, Wu; Aizawa, Kazuya; Iwahashi, Takaaki; Shi Zengmin; Li Jian; Tomota, Yo; Ungár, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The dislocation characteristics of a martensitic steel during tensile deformation were investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction experiment using the Engineering Material Diffractometer TAKUMI at BL19 of MLF, J-PARC and the Convolutional Multiple Whole Profile fitting method. The tensile deformation was performed at different plastic strains. The dislocation densities and the dislocation arrangement parameters were successfully obtained from diffraction patterns measured in the transversal direction of deformation after unloading with the macroscopic plastic strains of 0.049, 0.098, 0.55, 1.1, 1.6, 2.2, 2.7, 3.3, and 3.9%. According to the strain increase, significant increase of the correlation between the dislocations was observed though the increasing of the dislocation density was not very much. (author)

  5. Reversibility in martensitic transformation and shape memory in high Mn ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomota, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The reversibility of austenite (γ : fcc) epsilon (ε : hcp) martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in high Mn ferrous alloys are discussed. A particular emphasis is put on the ε → γ reverse transformation behavior in two poly-crystalline alloys, Fe-24Mn and Fe-24Mn-6Si, where the latter exhibits excellent shape memory while the former shows poor memory although their forward γ → ε transformation behavior is quite similar. TEM in situ observations have revealed that the motion of Shockley partial dislocations during ε → γ reverse transformation is different from each other in these two alloys. The influence of alloying elements on the shape memory effect can be related to solid solution hardening of austenite, suggesting an important role of internal stress. The effect of training on enhancing the shape memory is explained by such an internal stress distribution associated with the formation of very thin, i.e., nano-scale ε/γ lamellae. (orig.)

  6. Elastic constants of non-modulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Bodnárová, Lucie; Heczko, Oleg; Landa, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 136, July (2017), s. 20-23 ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-00062S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic methods * elastic behavior * ferromagnetic shape memory alloys * martensitic phase transformation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.747, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1359646217301768/1-s2.0-S1359646217301768-main.pdf?_tid=9b99b306-4a83-11e7-8ec6-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1496731657_35d3b5f3132e926d5bc8c6043961bb6d

  7. Development of new ferritic / martensitic steels for fuel cladding in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratti, M.

    2009-11-01

    Many studies are directed toward the development of ferritic / martensitic ODS materials for applications in Gen IV programs. In this study, the mechanisms of formation of nano-phases (Y, Ti, O) and the influence of titanium on the precipitation refinement have been analyzed by small angle neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The obtained results allow developing new materials reinforced by nitrides (NDS which stands for Nitride Dispersion Strengthened). A first CEA patent is now being registered on these NDS materials processed by mechanical alloying. However, microstructural and mechanical characterizations are necessary to improve these new alloys. At last, a tensile and creep database has been acquired on an ODS Fe-18Cr material between room temperature and 650 C. These tests allow a qualitative description of the ODS mechanical behaviour. (author)

  8. Transformation behaviour of the ferritic-martensitic steels with 8-14 % chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirra, M.; Finkler, H.

    2002-06-01

    Comprehensive development work on martensitic steels belonging to the so-called 12% Cr-steel group have been performed at the Institute for Materials Research of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in order to meet the various requirements in nuclear and conventional energy technology. The transformation characteristics of 62 different grades of steel and heats have been determined and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams have been prepared. The diagrams are described in a chronological sequence by subjects because the change in chemical composition can be correlated only partly with the transformation behaviour in cases where several alloying elements are simultaneously subjected to changes. In the introduction the basic difference is shown between isothermal and CCT diagrams and the transformation behaviour, respectively, by the example of the Nb-free steel 1.4922 (X20CrMoV 12 1) and the Nb-containing steel 1.4914 (X18CrMoVNb 12 1). (orig.)

  9. Tube manufacturing trials by different routes in 9CrW-ODS martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, S.; Narita, T.; Alamo, A.; Parmentier, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the collaboration work between JNC and CEA-Saclay, JNC and CEA independently manufactured ODS martensitic cladding tubes by their own fabrication routes. Manufacturing started from the same hollow shape mother tubes with a composition of 9Cr-2W-0.1Ti-0.24Y 2 O 3 . The HPTR cold-rolling process was used by both JNC and CEA, but the applied fabrication routes included different cross-section reduction ratios, number of passes and intermediate heat treatments. The manufactured claddings exhibited an isotropic grain structure and equivalent tensile strength in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Even though different cross-section reduction ratios and intermediate annealing treatments were used, both cladding tubes manufactured by JNC and CEA showed similar levels of tensile and internal creep rupture strength

  10. Material properties of tungsten coated F82H ferritic/martensitic steel as plasma facing armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahiro, Y.; Mitsuhara, M.; Nakashima, H.; Yoshida, N.; Hirai, T.; Tokitani, M.; Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Two types of plasma spray tungsten coatings on ferritic/martensitic steel F82H made by vacuum plasma spray technique (VPS) and air plasma spray technique (APS) were examined in this study to evaluate the possibility as plasma-facing armor. The VPS-W/F82H showed superior properties. The porosity of the VPS-W coatings was about 1% and most of the pores were smaller than 1-2 μm and joining of W/F82H and W/W was fairly good. Thermal load tests indicated high potential of this coating as plasma-facing armor under thermal loading. In case of APS-W/F82H, however, porosity was 6% and thermal load properties were much worse than VPS-W/F82H. It is likely that surface oxidation during plasma spray process reduced joining properties. (author)

  11. Interfacial Microstructures in Martensitic Transitions: From Optical Observations to Mathematical Modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Glatz, Ondřej; Landa, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2009), s. 445-456 ISSN 1543-1649 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/09/P164; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627; GA ČR GA101/06/0768; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : martensitic transition * shape memory alloy s * X-interface * Cu-Al-Ni Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.734, year: 2009 http://dl.begellhouse.com/journals/61fd1b191cf7e96f,5d71ecb1241e6f50,6d4705726d8226cf.html09

  12. Direct observation of hierarchical nucleation of martensite and size-dependent superelasticity in shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Li, Ju; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun

    2014-02-21

    Martensitic transformation usually creates hierarchical internal structures beyond mere change of the atomic crystal structure. Multi-stage nucleation is thus required, where nucleation (level-1) of the underlying atomic crystal lattice does not have to be immediately followed by the nucleation of higher-order superstructures (level-2 and above), such as polysynthetic laths. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we directly observe the nucleation of the level-2 superstructure in a Cu-Al-Ni single crystal under compression, with critical super-nuclei size L2c around 500 nm. When the sample size D decreases below L2c, the superelasticity behavior changes from a flat stress plateau to a continuously rising stress-strain curve. Such size dependence definitely would impact the application of shape memory alloys in miniaturized MEMS/NEMS devices.

  13. Corrosion of martensitic steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Hocde, B.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion of three martensitic steels - 1.4914, HT9 and T91 - in the presence of flowing 17Li83Pb is investigated in thermal convection loops Tulip entirely made of 1.4914 steel. Two 3000-hour tests were performed at maximal temperatures of respectively 450 and 475 0 C with a δT of 60 0 C and an alloy velocity of about 0.08 m.s -1 . In both tests, corrosion is characterized by an homogeneous dissolution of the steel without formation of a corrosion layer. Corrosion rate is constant and very temperature dependent: the sound-metal loss of 1.4914 steel is 22 μm. year -1 at 450 0 C and 40 μm.year -1 at 475 0 C. Behaviours of 1.4914 and HT9 steels are very similar whereas T91 steel is about 20% less corroded

  14. Compatibility of austenitic and martensitic steels behaviour in semi-stagnant Pb17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannier, J.; Dufrenoy, T.; Flament, T.; Terlain, A.

    1991-01-01

    Compatibility tests between Pb17Li and 316L austenitic or 1.4914 martensitic steels have been performed with experimental conditions simulating the special features of the water-cooled lithium-lead blanket (low Pb17Li velocity, significant radial thermal gradient and short distances between hot and cold zones). In the 420-475 deg C temperature range, the results show that corrosion kinetics for both 316L and 1.4914 steels are quasi-linear and about 3 times lower compared to turbulent condition. From amount of recovered deposits, the mass transfer of 316L steel at 450 deg C appears to be equivalent to that of 1.1914 steel at 475 deg C. The same relationship was observed in flowing Pb17Li condition

  15. Effects of HSHPT on the martensitic transformation behaviour of an NiTi alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurau Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed high pressure torsion (HSHPT is a novel severe plastic deformation technique that is used to produce bulk ultrafine-grained nickel-titanium shape memory alloys. In this study, the effect of grain refinement on phase transformation was investigated in a near equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloy subjected to processing by this technique. Phase transformations involving different degrees of deformation and stability of thermally-induced phase transformations were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The measurements suggest that the martensitic transformation occurred even when the highest degree of deformation was applied. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM investigations bring to light that the true strain applied controls the evolution of the microstructure. The results are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  16. Evolution of metal-metal wear mechanisms in martensitic steel deposits for recharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; De Vedia, Luis A

    2008-01-01

    This work studied metal recharged by welding with a martensitic steel (Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W alloy), deposited with a metal filled tubular wire on a low carbon steel, using semi-automatic welding with a contributing heat of 2 kJ/mm and under a gaseous protection of Ar-2%CO 2 . Transverse cuts were extracted from the welded sample for microstructural characterization, hardness measurement, determination of chemical composition and wear tests. The microstructural characterization was performed using light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The wear tests (metal-metal) were carried out on an Amsler machine in natural flow condition, with 500, 1250 and 2000 N of applied charge. The reference material was SAE 1020 steel. The weight loss curves were determined as a function of the distance run up to 5000 meters for all conditions. Then the test's wear surfaces and debris were analyzed. The microstructure consisted mostly of martensite and a fraction of retained austenite. A pattern of dendritic segregation was observed. The hardness on the wear surface averaged 670 HV 1 . The wear behavior showed a lineal variation between the loss of weight and the distance run, for the different loads applied. The rates of wear for each condition were obtained. The observed wear mechanisms were abrasion and adhesion, with plastic deformation. At low charges, the predominant mechanism was mild oxidative wear and at bigger loads heavy oxidative wear with the presence of zones with adhesion. The oxides formed on the surface of the eroded plate were identified

  17. Martensitic/ferritic super heat-resistant 650 C steels - design of model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, V.; Sauthoff, G. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Tempered martensitic/ferritic 9-12%Cr steels are now recognized to be the most potential materials for 650 C ultra super critical (USC) Power Plants. The degradation of long-term creep strength, as a result of microstructural changes during long-term exposure at the elevated temperature, is the main problem for this group of steels. Therefore, to achieve sufficient creep resistance during the entire service life it is necessary to stabilize the microstructure by alloying with elements which provide enough solid solution and precipitation strengthening and slow down diffusion. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of different types of precipitates as well as alloying elements on mechanical long-term properties of new ferritic 12%Cr steels. Fine distributions of stable precipitates which block the movement of subgrain boundaries (M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, Laves phase) and dislocations (MX carbonitrides) and delay coarsening of microstructure is the key to high creep strength of such steels. Furthermore, additional Laves phase, which precipitates during service, is to strengthen the alloys when M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles become less effective. Addition of Co is to achieve an initially 100% martensitic microstructure and moreover to slow down diffusion processes and consequently coarsening of particles. The partial substitution of Co by Cu and Mn is also investigated to reduce costs. The first results of mechanical tests of the studied model alloys have shown positive effects of the addition of W as Laves phase forming element, as well as of the MX forming elements Ta and Ti. Alloying with Co has also shown beneficial effects on the creep strength of model alloys. Further optimisation of composition and microstructure is in progress. (orig.)

  18. New theory of fcc-bcc martensitic transformations in steels; Nouvelle theorie des transformations martensitiques fcc-bcc dans les aciers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayron, C. [CEA, LITEN, Plateforme de Nanocaracterisation, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)

    2011-07-01

    A 'new' theory is introduced as an alternative to the phenomenological theory of martensitic transformations. This theory is based on experimental EBSD maps treated with a new software for automatic reconstruction of parent grains. (author)

  19. Martensitic transition near room temperature and the temperature- and magnetic-field-induced multifunctional properties of Ni49CuMn34In16 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Khandelwal, A.; Roy, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    A near room-temperature martensitic transition is observed in the ferromagnetic austenite state of Ni50Mn34In16 alloy with 2% Cu substitution at the Ni site. Application of magnetic field in the martensite state induces a reverse martensitic transition in this alloy. dc magnetization, magnetoresistance and strain measurements in this alloy reveal that associated with this martensitic transition there exist a large magnetocaloric effect, a large magnetoresitance and a magnetic-field temperature-induced strain. This NiMnIn alloy system thus is an example of an emerging class of magnetic materials whose physical properties can be tuned by suitable chemical substitutions, to achieve magnetic-field and temperature-induced multifunctional properties at and around room temperature

  20. Electronic and phononic origins of martensitic behavior in nickel titanium-based binary and ternary shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Nicholas B.

    Due to the importance of NiTi as a shape memory material and the uncertainty regarding its atomisitic martensitic transformation path, a thorough investigation to understand the structural stability governing this displacive phase transformation is warranted. We investigate elastic and shear stabilities of NiTi binary and ternary (with additions of Pd and Pt) alloys using first-principles calculations with the highly-precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Ambiguities of the B2, R, B19, B19', and proposed B33 structures are resolved, and the phase stability of each structure is established by examining calculated formation energies. All single crystal elastic constants, Young's, bulk, and shear moduli, Poisson's ratio, and the Zener anisotropy of the B2, R, B19, B19', and B33 phases are calculated and presented. To investigate the susceptibility to shearing, generalized stacking fault energetics and cleavage energies are calculated for the {001}, {011}, and {111} slip planes of the B2 phase. Burgers vectors and shear resistance are established. By investigating various deformation mechanisms related to these stacking faults, we find an instability to h100i{011} slip in the B2 phase. Using this and reviewing previously proposed atomistic transformation paths, the mechanisms governing the direct martensitic transformation of NiTi between the austenite and the martensite are identified. Barrierless transformation paths from the B2 phase to the B19' phase and from the B2 phase to the B33 phase are proposed, and the ternary transformation path is investigated. Differences between binary and ternary alloys, which are known to raise transformation temperatures, are illustrated. To provide a theoretical foundation for this diffusionless structural phase transformation, we illustrate the changes in electronic structures which explain its martensitic behavior. Electronic structure evolution is illustrated throughout the proposed atomistic

  1. Finite element analysis of AISI 304 steel sheets subjected to dynamic tension: The effects of martensitic transformation and plastic strain development on flow localization

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Martínez, José Antonio; Rittel, D.; Zaera Polo, Ramón Eulalio; Osovski, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a finite element study of the dynamic necking formation and energy absorption in AISI 304 steel sheets. The analysis emphasizes the effects of strain induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) and plastic strain development on flow localization and sample ductility. The material behavior is described by a constitutive model proposed by the authors which includes the SIMT at high strain rates. The process of martensitic transformation is alternatively switched on and off in t...

  2. Tritium permeation experiments using reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel tube and erbium oxide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takumi Chikada; Masashi Shimada; Robert Pawelko; Takayuki Terai; Takeo Muroga

    2013-09-01

    Low concentration tritium permeation experiments have been performed on uncoated F82H and Er2O3-coated tubular samples in the framework of the Japan-US TITAN collaborative program. Tritium permeability of the uncoated sample with 1.2 ppm tritium showed one order of magnitude lower than that with 100% deuterium. The permeability of the sample with 40 ppm tritium was more than twice higher than that of 1.2 ppm, indicating a surface contribution at the lower tritium concentration. The Er2O3-coated sample showed two orders of magnitude lower permeability than the uncoated sample, and lower permeability than that of the coated plate sample with 100% deuterium. It was also indicated that the memory effect of ion chambers in the primary and secondary circuits was caused by absorption of tritiated water vapor that was generated by isotope exchange reactions between tritium and surface water on the coating.

  3. Corrosion and Nanomechanical Behaviors of 16.3Cr-0.22N-0.43C-1.73Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Rahul; Krishna, S. Chenna; Venugopal, A.; Narayanan, P. Ramesh; Jha, Abhay K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (ISRO), Kerala (India)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of nitrogen on the electrochemical corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of martensitic stainless steel was examined using potentiodynamic polarization and nanoindentation test methods. The results indicate that partial replacement of carbon with nitrogen effectively improved the passivation and pitting corrosion resistance of conventional high-carbon and high- chromium martensitic steels. Post-test observation of the samples after a potentiodynamic test revealed a severe pitting attacks in conventional martensitic steel compared with nitrogen- containing martensitic stainless steel. This was shown to be due to (i) microstructural refinement results in retaining a high-chromium content in the matrix, and (ii) the presence of reversed austenite formed during the tempering process. Since nitrogen addition also resulted in the formation of a Cr{sub 2}N phase as a process of secondary hardening, the hardness of the nitrogen- containing steel is slightly higher than the conventional martensitic stainless steel under tempered conditions, even though the carbon content is lowered. The added nitrogen also improved the wear resistance of the steel as the critical load (Lc2) is less, along with a lower scratch friction coefficient (SFC) when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steel such as AISI 440C.

  4. Continuous AFM observation of martensitic transformation and its reversion in training cycles of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.Z.; Kikuchi, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Shinya, N.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical treatment (so-called ''training'') cycles on stress-induced martensitic transformation and its reversion has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make clear the origin of improvement of shape memory effect (SME) due to training in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys (SMAs). It was found that training cycles make martensite plates tend to grow on the primary shear system, i.e., on the most favorable shear system for the fcc to hcp martensitic transformation. In addition, training cycles lead to a more uniform distribution of thin martensite plates in a grain. Martensitic plates with the above characteristics are easier to be reverted back to parent phase when heated, and then nearly perfect SME is obtained. AFM observation shows that the key factor to realize perfect SME in Fe-Mn-Si based SMAs is to produce the uniform distribution of thin martensite plates on the primary shear system when deformed by external stress. (orig.)

  5. In-Situ Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation Kinetics in an Austenitic Stainless Steel by Inductive Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Celada-Casero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ to martensite (α′ phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite has been found by comparing the results to the ex-situ characterization by magnetization measurements, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor has allowed for the observation of the stepwise transformation behavior, a not-well-understood phenomena that takes place in large regions of the bulk material and that so far had only been observed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  6. HREM studies on the microstructure of severely cold-rolled TiNi alloy after reverse martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.F.; Zhao, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure of Ti-49.8at.%Ni alloy, which was cold rolled to about 30% reduction in thickness in its martensitic condition and subsequently heated up to 200 C for half an hour, has been studied by high resolution electron microscopy. The interface between parent phase and martensite is not smooth and well coherent. The boundary between two subgrains of the parent phase is not straight but perfectly coherent, with partial dislocation observed at the interface. Inside some parent phase grains, thin plate-like {114} and spear-like {112} twin-related parent phase variant pairs are observed. The {114} twinning boundary is relatively straight, but with two or three atomic-height blurred layers existing near the interface. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite transformation in near-beta Ti-5553 alloy under high strain rate loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-5553 alloy is a near-beta titanium alloy with high strength and high fracture toughness. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite phase transformation of Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases were investigated. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar was employed to investigate the dynamic properties. Microstructure evolutions were characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope. The experimental results have demonstrated that Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases exhibits various strain rate hardening effects, both failure through adiabatic shear band. Ti-5553 alloy with Widmannstatten microstructure exhibit more obvious strain rate hardening effect, lower critical strain rate for ASB nucleation, compared with the alloy with Bimodal microstructures. Under dynamic compression, shock-induced beta to alpha” martensite transformation occurs.

  8. Martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in NiTi alloy covered by chitosan/silver layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryczka Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The NiTi shape memory alloy was covered with chitosan/silver layer. Coatings were deposited at room temperature using combination of processing parameters such as deposition voltage and amount of silver in colloidal suspension. Structure of layers was studied by means of X-ray diffraction. Quality of the coatings was evaluated basing on observations done in scanning electron microscopy. Transformation behaviour of coated samples was studied with use of differential scanning calorimeter. The covered sample revealed presence of the reversible martensitic transformation and ability to deformation (in bending mode up to 8%. Forward martensitic transformation, in as-received NiTi alloy and in alloy after layer deposition occurred in two steps B2-R-B19’. After deformation quality of the chitosan/silver layer remained unchanged.

  9. Time evolution in static β-phase dynamic β-martensite coexistence (Cu-Zn-Al SMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isalgue, A.; Lovey, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    The application of a SMA implies an accurate knowledge about the eventual time - behavior of the alloys. The effects of quenching and micro-heatings were studied by calorimetric and resistance measurements and the β-martensite coexistence by stress - strain - temperature - time observations. Experimental analysis was performed using copper based single crystals (Cu-Zn-Al, e/a ∼1.48 e/a with Ms below room temperature). The phenomenological behavior establishes several time constants for each evolution. A change ΔT of temperature of the parent phase near 300 K induces an asymptotic time evolution on M S near 11 per cent. The parent to martensite coexistence produces an evolution of the equilibrium temperature (near 0.5 K) linked to the existence of an interface. (orig.)

  10. Effect of W Contents on Martensitic Transformation and Shape Memory Effect in Co-Al-W Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Qian, B. N.; Peng, H. B.; Wu, B. J.; Wen, Y. H.

    2018-04-01

    To clarify the effect of W contents on the shape memory effect (SME) in the Co-Al alloys and its influencing mechanism, the SME, martensitic transformation, and deformation behavior were studied in the Co-7Al-xW ( x = 0, 4, 6, 9 wt pct) alloys. The results showed that the additions of W all deteriorated the SME in Co-7Al alloy when deformed at room temperature. However, when deformed in liquid nitrogen, the SME in Co-7Al alloy could be remarkably improved from 43 to 78 pct after the addition of 4 pct W, above which the SME decreased rapidly with the increase of W content although the yield strength of the parent phase rose due to the solution strengthening of W. The deterioration in SME induced by the excessive addition of W could be ascribed to its resulting significant drop of the start temperature of martensitic transformation.

  11. Evaluation of contribution from various hardening mechanisms to yield strength of low- and medium-carbon pearlitic and martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandomirskij, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation was made into 15Kh2NMFA, 10GN2MFA, 50KhNV, 50KhGSVF, 40Kh5V2FS, 40Kh5M2FS, 40Kh4MVF alloys after hardening and high tempering, as well as after the treatment, simulating the conditions of technological and operational heatings. Pecularities of components of yield strength of low-carbon pearlitic, medium-carbon pearlitic and medium-carbon martensitic steels after hardening and high tempering were considered. Grain-boundary and subgrain-boundary strengthening is the main factor of low-carbon pearlitic steel strengthening. Dislocation structure and carbide phase represent the main factors of medium-carbon pearlitic steel strengthening. Strengthening by uniformly distributed high-dispersion particles is the main factor of medium-carbon martensitic steel strengthening

  12. A new approach predicting the evolution of laminated nanostructures—martensite in NiTi as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersmann, M.; Antretter, T.; Waitz, T.; Fischer, F. D.

    2017-04-01

    A model for laminated nanostructures, combining classical energy minimization with full-field finite element calculations in a computationally fully automated manner, is set up and used to quantitatively analyse the interaction of grains via self-accommodation of their transformation strains. The well known Koistinenwell established B2-B19’ martensitic phase transformation in nanocrystalline NiTi is treated as an exemplary case to demonstrate our new framework. A systematic search for an optimal energy minimizing transformation path is employed within a full-field model, including crystallographic transformation strains and fully anisotropic elastic constants, by using the Python scripting language. The microstructure is updated based on previous calculation results. The underlying incremental free energy minimization criterion naturally reproduces the transformation kinetics. The sequence of grains subjected to transformation as well as the selection of martensitic variants within the grains are obtained yielding the evolution of the total interface energy as well as the strain energy, dominating our approach.

  13. Design of martensitic/ferritic heat-resistant steels for application at 650 deg. C with supporting thermodynamic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, V.; Balun, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, 40074 Duesseldorf (Germany); Sauthoff, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, 40074 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: g.sauthoff@mpie.de; Inden, G.; Schneider, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, 40074 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-03-25

    In view of developing novel heat-resisting steels for applications in conventional power plants with service temperatures of 650 deg. C, a series of martensitic/ferritic model steels with 12 wt.%Cr were studied to achieve an increased creep resistance through additional alloying with various elements for controlled precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, MX carbonitrides and intermetallic Laves phase. The alloy design relied on thermodynamic simulation calculations using Thermo-Calc and DICTRA. The mechanical testing concentrated on creep at 650 deg. C for up to 8000 h. The alloy optimization resulted in creep rupture strengths above those of the martensitic/ferritic P92 steel. The work was part of a cooperative project within the German MARCKO program.

  14. Optimization of the Fabrication Route of Ferritic/Martensitic ODS Cladding Tubes: Metallurgical Approach and Pilgering Numerical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logé, R.E.; Vanegas-Marques, E.; Mocellin, K.; Toualbi, L.; Carlan, Y. de

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Fabrication route of 9Cr-ODS (martensitic) alloys is well controlled. • Fabrication route of 14Cr-ODS (ferritic) should be further optimized. • The choice between a ferritic or a martensitic grade is not already done, it will depend also on the behaviour under irradiation, the corrosion resistance … • Part of the optimization can rely on numerical simulation of pilgering: • The constitutive behaviour is an essential ingredient for process optimization: appropriate cyclic laws must be used. • The numerical analysis can look at cracking risks, final yield stress, and even residual stress state or surface roughness. • HPTR laboratory approaches can be translated to the (industrial) VMR process provided some additional adjustments in the numerical code

  15. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of martensitic Ni2Mn1.4Sn0.6 Heusler alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, Volodymyr A.; Barandiarán, Jose M.; Rodriguez Fernández, Jesus; Rojas, Daniel P.; Gutiérrez, Jon; Lázpita, Patricia; Orue, Iñaki

    2012-01-01

    The evolutions of magnetic properties at low temperatures and the influence of magnetic field on the temperature dependence of specific heat in martensitic Ni 2 Mn 1.4 Sn 0.6 Heusler alloy are studied. The frequency-dependent blocking temperature and considerable exchange bias below it are measured in the martensitic phase. From the analysis of the specific heat curves under magnetic field, a large inverse magnetocaloric effect manifested as the magnetic field induced rise of isothermal magnetic entropy and/or magnetic field induced adiabatic temperature decrease in the vicinity of the reverse magnetostructural transformation and a significant value of the conventional magnetocaloric effect at the Curie temperature are obtained. The Debye temperature and electronic coefficient equal to Θ D =310±2 K and γ= 16.6±0.3 mJ/K 2 mol, respectively, do not depend on the magnetic field.

  16. Real-time structural analysis of quenching and partitioning (Q and P) in an experimental martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigg, Timothy D.; Edmonds, David V.; Eardley, Edwin S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We present an innovative method of studying the Q and P heat treatment process. •A specially engineered steel was used to study carbon partitioning in real-time. •Measurements were obtained using a neutron diffractometer with an in situ furnace. •Real-time evidence of partitioning was observed in the form of lattice dilatation. •Carbon ‘trapping’ is hypothesised to reduce the carbon available for partitioning. -- Abstract: Quenching and Partitioning (Q and P) is a new concept in martensitic steel heat treatment which, as well as other opportunities, offers potential for expansion of the elongation versus strength envelope available to steel users, especially the automotive industry. The Q and P steel concept shares similarities with TRIP steel in that both promote multiphase microstructures of stabilised retained austenite and a harder phase of bainite (TRIP) or martensite (Q and P), although in Q and P the two stages of martensite formation and austenite stabilisation by carbon partitioning are separated. The procedure also provides for both protection and temper strengthening of the martensite fraction. However, confirmatory study of reaction mechanisms has been frustrated by the elevated temperatures required to date to apply Q and P heat treatment to commercial steel compositions. Consequently, a model alloy has been used to separate the various stages of the Q and P heat treatment process, thus allowing diffraction experiments, particularly real-time in situ neutron diffractometry, to measure lattice parameter, lattice strain and phase fraction in order to deduce the concentration and distribution of carbon at different stages during the Q and P treatment

  17. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  18. Pressure effects on martensitic transformation under quenching process in a molecular dynamics model of NiAl alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanc, S.; Ozgen, S.; Adiguzel, O.

    2003-01-01

    The solid-solid phase transitions in NiAl alloys occur by the temperature changes and application of a pressure on the system. Both types of transitions are called martensitic transformation and have displacive and thermoelastic characters. Pressure effects on thermoelastic transformation in Ni 62.5 Al 37.5 alloy model have been studied by means of molecular dynamics method proposed by Parrinello-Rahman. Interaction forces between atoms in the model system were calculated by Lennard-Jones potential energy function. Thermodynamics and structural analysis of the martensitic transformations under hydrostatic pressure during the quenching processes have been performed. The simulation runs have been carried out in different hydrostatic pressures changing from zero to 40.65 GPa during the quenching process of the model alloy. At the zero and nonzero pressures, the system with B2-type ordered structure undergoes the product phase with L1 0 -type ordered structure by Bain distortion in the first step of martensitic transformation under the quenching process. The increase in hydrostatic pressure causes decrease in the formation time of the product phase, and twin-like lattice distortion is observed in low temperature L1 0 phase

  19. Prediction of precipitate evolution and martensite transformation in Ti-Ni-Cu shape memory alloys by computational thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povoden-Karadeniz, A.; Cirstea, D. C.; Kozeschnik, E.

    2016-04-01

    Ti-50Ni to Ti-55Ni (at.%) can be termed as the pioneer of shape memory alloys (SMA). Intermetallic precipitates play an important role for strengthening. Their influence on the start temperature of the martensitic transformation is a crucial property for the shape memory effect. Efforts for increasing the martensite start temperature include replacement of a part of Ni atoms by Cu. The influence of Cu-addition to Ti-Ni SMA on T0- temperatures and the character of the austenite-martensite transformation is evaluated using a new thermodynamic database for the Ti-Ni-system extended by Cu. Trends of precipitation of intermetallic phases are simulated by combining the assessed thermodynamics of the Ti-Ni-Cu system with assessed diffusion mobility data and kinetic models, as implemented in the solid-state transformation software MatCalc and are presented in the form of time-temperature-precipitation diagrams. Thermodynamic equilibrium considerations, complemented by predictive thermo-kinetic precipitation simulation, facilitates SMA alloy design and definition of optimized aging conditions.

  20. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.